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2011 SADC Summit Brochure

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2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Contents Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Introduction Mandate of the FANR Directorate The Regional Food Security Situation during the 2010/11 Marketing Year Latest Major Developments and Areas of Intervention Way Forward Shd and Sp Activity Report Education and Skills Development Employment and Labour Health and Pharmaceuticals HIV and AIDS Special Programme: Orphans, Vulnerable Children and Youth (OVCY) Science, Technology and Innovation ICT Gender and Development Infrastructure and Services Communication and ICTs Meteorology Transport Water

4 4 4 4 8 19 24 24 25 25 26 26 27 27 27 30 32 32 33 35

Directorate of Human Resources and Administration Human Resources Unit Administration Unit Procurement Records Management Project

46 46 46 48 48

Directorate of Trade, Industry, Finance and Investment (Tifi) Goods and Services Market Integration Finance and Investment Macro-economic Convergence Enhancing Productive Competitiveness Conclusion

54 54 55 57 57 58

The 2011 Sadc Media Awards Winning Article Launching of the 2012 competition in member states

60 61

Sadc Contact Addresses SADC Anthem Acknowledgements

64 72 73

Photo pages 2010 Summit 2010 Chairman’s Visit Official Opening of the SADC Headquarters

20 21 59

63

Contact Details

THE TEAM

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2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Highlights for the 2011 Summit Report 1.0 Introduction

agricultural policies and the promotion of gender sensitive development strategies and programmes; Ensuring sustainable food security policies and programmes; Development, promotion and harmonisation of the biodiversity, phytosanitary, sanitary, crop and animal husbandry policies; Development of measures to increase agricultural output and the development of agro-based industries; Development, promotion and harmonisation of policies and programmes aimed at effective and sustainable utilisation of natural resources such as plants, wildlife, fisheries, forestry, et al.; Ensuring effective protection and equitable and sustainable utilisation of the environment; and Promotion of trade in agricultural products.

Agriculture is a major social and economic sector in the SADC region, contributing between 4% to 27% of the GDP and about 13% of the total export earnings. It is estimated that 70% of the region’s population depend on agriculture for food, income and employment; hence, the performance of this sector has a strong influence on food security, economic growth and social and economic stability. Although much has been achieved since the founding of SADC, some challenges remain which need to be addressed. These challenges include under production, low productivity, land degradation and unsustainable use of the region’s natural resources. At the regional level, these challenges are being addressed by the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resource’s Directorate (FANR).

2.0 Mandate of the FANR Directorate

3.0 The Regional Food Security Situation during the 2010/11 Marketing Year

The strategic objectives of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Directorate (FANR) are: to develop, promote, co-ordinate and facilitate the harmonisation of policies and programmes for increasing agricultural production and productivity; to promote the utilisation of sustainable natural resources; to enhance equitable and sustainable management of the environment; and promote trade. These objectives are within the overall goal of improving food security and fostering economic development. 2.1 Specific Functions • Development, promotion and harmonisation of

4

• • •

• •

The SADC Secretariat, through the FANR Directorate, continued to monitor regional food security in conjunction with the Member States. The food security situation for the 2010/11 marketing year, which ended in March 2011, was generally satisfactory as a result of good cereal harvest in 2010. Total cereal availability for the year was estimated at 39.38 million tonnes, made up of 34.64 million tonnes of production and 4.73 million tonnes of carryover stocks, while total demand was estimated at 38.64 million tonnes, leading to an overall cereal surplus of 730,000 metric tonnes.


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Zimbabwe

Swaziland

South Africa

78

85

70

189

5

406

25

3203

9

301

356

4

4732

Formal/SGR

71

65

63

131

5

278

25

3203

9

90

353

4

4297

On Farm

7

19

7

31

-

128

-

-

-

211

3

-

406

Other

-

1

-

28

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

29

A.2 Gross Harvest

1178

55

137 3572

2 2641

155 15122

75 7095 3078 1534 34643

B

Gross Domestic Requirements

2202

334

357 2608

308 3522

319 14936

150 7041 2063 2269 36109

C

Desired SGR Carryover Stocks

24

85

D

Domestic Shortfall/Surplus

-970

-280

E

Commodity Cross Substitution

-

-

-

F

Imports

-

312

F.1

Received

Commercial Food Aid

F.2

G

84 7396 3433 1538 39375

30

10

150

49

1756

8

-163 1123

-311

-625

-187

1633

-73

-

-

67

-

-

-

986

230

-

-

830

173

2136

78

173

13

-

-

-

19

2136

-

173

13

-

-

-

19

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

139

217

-

-

Commercial

-

139

217

-

Food Aid

-

-

-

-

4

Committments Shipped

-

Committments Not Yet Shipped

Expected

Exports

12

181 18325

Zambia

Malawi

Angola

A.1 Opening Stocks

7 3047

SADC

207 3761

Domestic Availability

Tanzania

139

A

Namibia

Lesotho

1256

Thousands of metric tonnes

Mauritius

Botswana

Mozambique

Table 1: SADC Cereal Balance Sheet for 2010/11 Marketing Year

150

200

60

2534

205 1170

-790

732

-

-

1053

73

-

-

3832

-

73

-

-

2414

2136

-

61

-

-

2402

-

-

-

12

-

-

12

830

154

-

78

-

-

-

1418

-

830

154

-

74

-

-

-

1414

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

160

-

2374

-

-

80

-

2619

-

-

-

-

-

-

2374

-

-

-

-

2375

-

4

-

-

-

160

-

-

-

-

80

-

244

-970

-

-

-

-311

-

-14

-

-

-

-

-791

-

12 1414 1290

-

5532

H

Import Gap

I

Forecasted Closing Stock

-

113

79 1154

-

262

35

3150

J

Current Stock

-

162

57

-

-

-

-

4601

1

90

-

-

4910

K

Self-Sufficiency Ratio

57

42

58

144

2

87

57

123

56

105

166

68

109

L

Inversed Import Gap

970

-

-

-

311

-

14

-

-

-

-

791

-

M

Import Needs (000’s)

970

280

163

-

311

558

187

-

73

-

-

790

-

N

Current Stocks (months)

-

5.8

1.9

-

-

-

-

3.7

0.1

0.2

-

-

1.6

5


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

graph 1: trend in sadc cereal production

graph 2: cereal deficits by crop since 2003/ marketing year

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2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Maize production was estimated at 28.94 million tonnes, while wheat, rice and sorghum/millet were estimated at 1.76 million tonnes, 1.49 million tonnes and 2.46 million tonnes respectively. The overall surplus was wholly due to maize which indicated increased surplus of 4.81 million tonnes compared to 2.81 million tonnes in 2009/10. The region had deficits of 2.97 million tonnes, 0.67 million tonnes and 0.44 million tonnes for wheat, rice and sorghum/millet respectively during the year. Individual country analysis of the food security situation during the 2010/11 indicated that Malawi (1.12 million tonnes), South Africa (1.63 million tonnes), Tanzania (0.21 million tonnes) and Zambia (1.17 million tonnes) had overall maize/cereal surpluses while the rest had deficits ranging from 0.73 million tonnes in Swaziland to 0.97 million tonnes in Angola as indicated in Table 1. 3.1 Regional Trend in Cereal Production Cereal production analysis for the past 10 years indicates an increasing trend in the region. However, as indicated in Graph 1, this is entirely due to increase in production of maize, with production of the other cereals (wheat, rice and sorghum/millet) remaining stagnant. As a result of this situation, the region has had maize surplus for seven of the last eight years (since the 2003/04 marketing year) while relying on imports to cover the demand for the other cereals as indicated in Graph 2. Table 1 and Graph 1 indicate that while the region has made great strides in increasing maize production, production of the other main cereals consumed in the region have not changed much, resulting in increasing import bills especially for wheat and rice. The worldwide high food prices in 2007/8 affected the region mostly through these imports, while maize prices were stable during the period.

3.2 Livestock Production With regard to livestock production, FANR facilitated the implementation of two major programmes in the Member States, namely the SADC Foot and Mouth Diseases Project (SADC FMD) – funded by European Union; and the African Development Bank-funded project Strengthening Institutions for Risk Management of Transboundary Animal Diseases (TADs). FMD was implemented in all SADC Member States with particular focus on Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. The objective of the intervention was to contain the spread of FMD in the above three countries and to prevent the diseases from spreading to other countries in the region. The specific interventions of the project included: provision of vaccines and equipment for mass vaccinations; surveillances; and the control of animal movement to limit interaction between livestock and wildlife. The TADs project (2007-2012) operational in Angola, Malawi, Mozambique, United Republic of Tanzania and Zambia , has the overall objective of enhancing livestock as a tradable and safe commodity through assured animal health, more specifically, through improved capacity for detection, identification, monitoring and surveillance of TADs in the SADC region. The expected outputs are: rehabilitation of veterinary services in the five Member States; improved capacity for diagnosis and surveillance of TADs; and harmonisation of animal disease surveillance systems. The TADs project has introduced the new Digital Pen technology; established National Virtual Centres; rehabilitated veterinary services and laboratories; training of 50 laboratory technicians and over 100 veterinary field staff; and analysed buffalo samples for FMD to assist in the longterm control of the disease. The above interventions combined with Member States’ and other stakeholders’ interventions and support have

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2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Table 2: Production of livestock Products

Livestock Product

2006 Million tonnes

2007 Million tonnes

2008 Million tonnes

2009 Million tonnes

% increase/decrease (2008 vs 2009)

Beef

1.25

1.28

1.33

1.39

4.5

Mutton

0.14

0.15

0.15

0.16

6.7

Goat meat

0.14

0.15

0.15

0.16

6.7

Pork

1.32

1.35

1.40

1.41

0.7

Poultry

1.83

1.88

1.95

2.04

4.6

Milk

4.44

4.55

4.65

4.75

2.2

Eggs

0.56

0.57

0.59

0.61

3.4

Wool*

2,400

2,460

2,525

2,600

3.0

Mohair*

400

410

420

430

2.4

Game meat**

700

720

750

750

0.0

Meat consumption includes beef, mutton, goat meat, pork and poultry. * Production from the Kingdom of Lesotho (tonnes) ** Deer meat production from Mauritius (tonnes) Source: Comprehensive Agriculture Development Programme (NEPAD) and FANR, 2009 ¥Data is only available from countries with NVACs.

some significant impact on the overall livestock production and take off in the region over the past five years (Table 2). As shown in the table, estimates from 2009 indicate average increases of 4.5%, 6.7%, 6.7%, 4.6%, 0.7%, 2.2% and 3.4% in the production of beef, goat meat, mutton, poultry, pork, eggs and milk respectively compared to 2008. Production of meat increased from 4.98 million tonnes to 5.16 million tonnes, while those of eggs and milk increased from 0.59 million tonnes and 4.65 million tonnes to 0.61 million tonnes and 4.75 million tonnes respectively. Due to recent increases in medium to large-scale commercial poultry meat and egg production farms, poultry meat accounted for about 40% of total meat production in the region during 2009. Despite the increased meat and milk production, the region continues to be a net importer of these commodities. For example, the estimated demand for meat in 2009 was 7.5 million tonnes against a production of 5.16 million tonnes. 3.3 Household Food Security Access to food at household level – especially to vulnerable people such as the sick, orphaned, elderly and labour constrained – continues to remain a problem in all Member States. This situation is usually exacerbated by natural disasters such as drought, flood and tropical cyclones which frequently affect parts of the region, leading to poor

8

harvests and ultimately hunger. Compared with the past few years however, the region is making progress in reducing household food insecurity. As indicated in Table 3 below the number of people who are food insecure, including those requiring humanitarian assistance, has in most cases continued to decline since the 2002/03 marketing year when some 14.41 million people were assessed as requiring such assistance. 4.0 Latest Major Developments and Areas of Intervention As part of SADC’s Regional Indicative Strategic Development Plan (RISDP), the Directorate focuses its priorities in six intervention areas as follows: 4.1 Ensure Food Availability Availability of food at all times can be achieved through improving production and trade. The majority of farmers in the region are small-scale landholders who depend on their own production for food. The FANR Directorate therefore highly prioritises the development and promotion of policies and programmes which will result in overall improvements in the food production, protection, the processing, storage and utilisation of all crops and livestock. In order to facilitate the harmonisation of policies, the


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Table 3: Population of Food Insecure Households in SADC

Country

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

2006/07

2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Lesotho

270,000

948,300

541,000

245,700

553,000

353,000

450,000

200,000

Malawi

400,000

1,340,000

5,055,000

833,000

63,200

673,498

147,492

508,089

Mozambique

659,000

659,000

801,655

240,000

520,000

302,700

281,300

350,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

224,795

106,297

Swaziland

217,000

600,400

634,400

465,900

345,000

238,600

262,000

160,989

Tanzania*

844,333

686,356

848,019

995,433

581,974

780,416

717,684

432,530

60,000

39,300

1,232,700

380,537

440,866

444,624

110,000

53,629

Zimbabwe

5,422,600

2,300,000

2,884,800

1,392,500

4,100,000

5,100,000

1,400,000

1,287,937

Total

7,872,933

6,573,356

11,997,574

4,553,070

6,604,040

7,892,838

3,593,271

3,099,471

Namibia

Zambia

Source: SADC FANR Directorate – Member States’ Vulnerability Assessment Committees (NVACs). ¥Data is only available from countries with NVACs.

FANR Directorate is developing an agricultural policy framework to facilitate and guide Member States to achieve harmonisation in key agriculture policies. Other activities include: • Development of the Agricultural Water Management for Food Security; • Surveillance, control and eradication of Agriculture Pests and Diseases; • Developing a framework for monitoring availability, access and utilisation of agriculture inputs; • Increasing production and use of fertiliser; • Best practices in access to agricultural land; and • Dissemination of Regional Research Outputs and Technologies. Meanwhile, the Secretariat has been developing a harmonised system of labelling fertiliser in the region. The system is expected to facilitate trade in fertiliser among Member States. The Secretariat is also facilitating the establishment of a SADC Seed Centre which will implement the already established Harmonised Seed Regulatory System. It is expected that this will increase availability and accessibility of improved seeds to farmers in the SADC region. In November 2010, the Directorate published a field handbook on ‘Pests and Diseases of Phytosanitary and Economic Importance in the SADC Region’. The book will contribute to the safe trade of agricultural products by assisting in the correct identification of pests on agricultural

consignments moving between countries. During the period under review, the Directorate also initiated a project proposal on the control of the Asian Fruit Fly, a serious pest of horticultural crops which has been detected in the majority of SADC Member States. Main Intervention Areas: • Food production information and best practices available and shared regionally; • Information and best practices on technology to enhance productivity made available; • Regional irrigation and water management programme developed and financed; • Policies and programmes on transboundary /shared natural resources management facilitated; • Surveillance, control and eradication measures harmonised; • Framework for regional agricultural input market developed; • Information on best practices (on access to agricultural land) is shared; • Regional research output and technologies disseminated.

4.2 Ensure Access to Food Regional food security cannot be achieved unless people have sufficient access to food produced (quantity of production) or purchased (affordability). It is recognised that the region will remain food insecure if, some of its population have limited access to food, either through their own production or purchases. Thus, the level of household

9


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

income and the surety of stable food prices are important determinants on the fiscal capacity of households to purchase food and thus become food secure. The FANR Directorate’s focus in this area is mostly at country level, which includes monitoring of national policies and programmes. However, at the regional level, the Directorate is very active and is supporting a number of measures aimed at increasing intra and inter regional trade as a means for improving household access to food. This also includes on going initiatives within the Secretariat to eliminate agricultural trade barriers and the promotion of agriculture products. Main Intervention Areas: • Elimination of agricultural trade barriers within SADC facilitated; • Programmes that promote commercial agriculture production facilitated; • Policies and programmes to promote value addition to agricultural products facilitated.

4.3 Ensure Improved Safety and Nutritional Value of Food Improved food security includes all aspects of safe and nutritious food which are essential for a healthy population. 4.3.1 Food Safety: In view of the impact of food-borne diseases on the health of SADC citizens, and the difficulties faced by SADC exporters in complying with Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) requirements (including MRLs) for trade in food products, the SADC Secretariat was tasked by the Member States with developing an intervention that would harmonise food safety control guidelines and procedures through the

10

strengthening of relevant institutions in the SADC region. In accordance with the SPS Annex to the SADC Protocol on Trade, twelve (12) National SPS Co-ordinating Committees have been set up to manage SPS matters at Member State level, as well as the Regional Food Safety Expert Working Group. Regional Guidelines on the Management of SPS matters have been developed, together with separate Regional Guidelines on the Regulation of Food Safety, Crop Protection Products and Veterinary Drugs. In addition, food-testing reference laboratories have been strengthened across the region through technical staff training in analytical skills and accreditation process, and provision of analytical equipment in order to extend the number of parameters to be tested that include pathogens, pesticides and veterinary drugs residues, heavy metals aflatoxins. Main Intervention Areas: • Regional food quality standards developed and monitored; • Sharing of information on best practice facilitated.

4.3.2 Bio-safety: As most Member States are signatories to the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Cartagena Protocol on Bio-safety, the Directorate continues to monitor the development of national legislations on Biotechnology and Bio-safety. Ongoing monitoring includes the implementation Biosafety frameworks whose key components include national policies on biotechnology, risk assessment strategies, public participation, and monitoring and enforcement mechanisms. To date, South Africa, Malawi, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe have passed regulatory legislations.


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

warning system which includes the Agricultural Information Management System Programme at the regional level and National Early Warning Units in Member States. Food Security updates at the regional level are now produced on a quarterly basis rather than monthly. Information on household level food security and vulnerability is being collected, analysed and disseminated by the Regional Vulnerability Assessment and Analysis (RVAA) Programme. Within an overarching aim of improving food security, the RVAA Programme seeks to strengthen national and regional vulnerability analysis systems in order to inform policy formulation, development programmes and emergency interventions that will lead to a reduction of vulnerability in the SADC region. The Directorate has also been a key player in facilitating the establishment of a Regional Food/Financial Reserve Facility. The objective of this facility is to provide SADC with a mechanism for preventing, better anticipating, and preparing for future adverse impacts and shocks to food security. Most of the Member States seem to be in favour of the Regional Financial Reserve Facility.

In addition, the Directorate is collaboratively supporting a number of crop diversification initiatives, most notably; research is being undertaken on improving the nutritional value of cassava. Research of this nature takes into consideration increasing consumption patterns of noncereals food crops such as cassava and plantain. Cassava forms a significant part of food in countries like Angola, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, the United Republic of Tanzania and Zambia, while plantain is an important food crop for the Democratic Republic of Congo and the United Republic of Tanzania.

4.5 Ensure: Strengthened Institutional Frameworks and Enhanced Capacity

During the past year, the Directorate continued to monitor the development of national legislations by Member States. The Directorate collaborated with RAEIN Africa to provide capacity building in Bio-safety. The Directorate also organised regional high level dialogue scheduled for November 2011 to sensitise policy makers on issues of Bio-safety

FANR is continuously involved in strengthening institutional frameworks and capacity within the Directorate, itself, as well as facilitating similar developments in other stakeholder institutions at national level. A main area of focus for the region is the development of relevant legal frameworks, promoting the development of effective networks and promoting dialogue among stakeholders in the region.

4.4 Ensure: Disaster Preparedness for Food Security

The Directorate continues to monitor and evaluate the implementation of the Dar-es-Salaam Declaration and Action Plan on Agriculture and Food Security. Reports generally indicate that Member States are implementing a number of planned activities in the areas of agriculture and food security.

Chronic vulnerability and food insecurity remains persistently high in the SADC. Since the beginning of millennium, recurrent food security crises and economic shocks have continued to erode the ability of households to access sufficient food and income throughout the year. Humanitarian interventions in response to the unfavourable conditions are a common feature in the region. In order to support improved humanitarian and policy development responses, the Directorate continues to strengthen relevant national and regional early warning and vulnerability assessment and analysis information systems. Regional Food Security Bulletin and Agro-meteorological Updates continued to be produced as part of the early

Main Intervention Areas: • Mechanism for establishing and managing a regional food reserve facility developed; • Monitoring, evaluation and dissemination of regional food supply and demand conducted; • Disaster management plans operationally implemented.

Main Intervention Areas: • Instruments for co-operation facilitated; • Effective networks and dialogue established and strengthened in SADC.

4.5.1 Regional Agricultural Policy One of the strategic interventions recommended in the SADC RISDP towards addressing the many agriculture-

11


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

related challenges facing the region is the development of a binding legal instrument on food security and agricultural development. This strategic direction gave rise to the need to formulate a common agricultural policy for the region, the SADC Regional Agricultural Policy (RAP). It is envisaged the RAP would be a formal policy arrangement comprising a legally binding instrument with (i) governance based on the principle of subsidiarity and (ii) with budgetary provisions linked to Member States’ own planning and budget frameworks. An established and effectively implemented RAP should lead to better policy coordination, public action and budget support with regards to agriculture and food security in Southern Africa. The RAP’s overall objective is therefore to stimulate sustainable agricultural development and food security in the region by guiding and promoting actions at regional and national levels in the agricultural sector that contribute to deeper regional integration. The RAP’s specific objectives are to: • Promote and support production, productivity and competitiveness of the agricultural sector; • Promote regional self-sufficiency in basic commodities by exploiting regional potential; • Promote and support growth in incomes for agricultural communities in particular small-scale farmers, fishers and foresters; • Promote the development of trade and markets; • Promote food safety; and • Promote sustainable utilisation and management of natural resources and the environment. The Directorate is at advanced stages in the formulation of the SADC RAP and it expects to have completed work towards the RAP Policy Statement by end of 2011. The RAP Policy Statement is expected to outline the policy vision; purpose / scope of the policy in terms of setting objectives, principles and expected outcomes; interventions and measures that the policy will focus on; and an overview of RAP implementation processes. 4.5.2 SADC Plant and Genetic Resources Centre The Directorate has been instrumental in establishing a network for the conservation and sustainable use of plant genetic resources (PGRs) with focus on indigenous and endangered species. The network comprises of National Plant Genetic Resources Centres (NPGRCs) in all Member States and a regional centre – the SADC Plant Genetic Resources Centre (SPGRC) located in Lusaka in Zambia. Complementary to the ex-situ conservation, the network implements on-farm conservation of traditional crop diversity throughout the region. Other useful wild plant and crop wild relatives are maintained in-situ in protected areas, some of which have been collected and preserved

12

in gene banks. In order to enhance utilisation, information on all collections and kept materials both at NPGRCs and SPGRC is captured in the SPGRC Documentation and Information System (SDIS) which is undergoing conversion from standalone to web-based version to facilitate real-time access and updating. SPGRC has facilitated construction of Local Area Networks and connected to Internet most NPGRCs in readiness for the web-based SDIS. The NPGRCs have collected and are conserving about 45,000 accessions, of which more than a third (15,534) accessions have been duplicated for long-term conservation at the regional centre. Over 1,600 mixed crop germ plasmas have been collected and conserved in respective countries and some of the samples have already been duplicated to SPGRC. Of these, 1,345 accessions have been characterised. 4.5.3 Strengthening Capacity for Agriculture Research and Development (SCARDA) and Implementation and Co-ordination of Agricultural Research and Training (ICART) During the past year the Directorate implemented a number of projects aimed at strengthening co-ordination and capacity of the regional research institutions. In particular, FANR has been supporting the implementation of a Programme to strengthen Capacity for Agricultural Research and Development in Africa, (SCARDA) funded by DFID. The SCARDA closed on the 30th June 2010 as per the Grant Agreement between the Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA) that led the project at continental level and the Department for International Development (DFID) of the United Kingdom that funded the project. SCARDA was implemented as a pilot project by Focal Institutions of three SADC countries, namely Botswana, Lesotho and Zambia.


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

The objectives of the project had been to: • Strengthen the institutional and human capacity of African agricultural research and development systems to conduct quality agricultural research; and • Identify, generate and deliver research outputs that meet the needs of poor people involved in agriculture and other related agricultural industry sectors. At the closure of the project in June 2010, SADC through additional financial support from DFID supported the focal institutions over a six month period to complete initiated and uncompleted activities and to package lessons learnt for sharing with other SADC Member States that did not participate in the pilot phase of the project. Achievements from the project include the following: Achievements from the project include the following: • Priority needs for capacity strengthening the focal institutions of SCARDA followed a participatory institutional analysis process. This led to the development and change of management action plans for transforming the institutes in order to deliver expected research outputs. • 17 MSc were trained in various fields of Agriculture and 126 scientists received short term training to enhance technical skills of professional staff in order to conduct research that is demand driven. • Demand Studies were conducted in the three countries to assess the competencies of graduates from tertiary agricultural education systems. The studies revealed high weaknesses in the graduates being produced, indicating that there are serious gaps in the training programmes. The issues were revolving around the need to improve linkages with stakeholders, carrying out regular curricula review, incorporating experiential learning and improving the entrepreneurship components of the training programmes.

• The project introduced an innovation systems approach as a new paradigm that takes into account both the demand and supply needs for research. This approach has a higher potential to develop agriculture and promote public/private partnership among industry sectors involved in agricultural research and development. SADC will again receive further support from DFID for a bridging phase towards development of a second phase. This will be to allow completion of some initiatives in the focal countries that were developed through as support from SCARDA. The focus of this phase will be on establishment of innovation platforms and the adoption of the innovation systems approach to adapt the tools and methodologies for multi-stakeholder participation based on the value chain. This bridging phase of institutional capacity strengthening will cover the period from the 1st April to 31st December 2011. 4.5.4 Co-ordination of Agricultural Research and Training (ICART) The Implementation and co-ordination of Agricultural Research and Training in (ICART) project closed in December 2010. The project had been supported by the EU to the tune of 15 million Euros. The project goal was to contribute to regional economic growth and poverty alleviation in SADC through innovative research and training activities for the improvement of smallholders’ livelihoods. The purpose was to enable National Agricultural Research Systems (NARS) in the SADC Member States to enhance their capacity to address common regional researchable constraints and opportunities in Agriculture through regional initiatives. There were six expected results of the project namely: • SADC gains regional capacity to co-ordinate Agricultural Research and Training;

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• Research Networks are established in accordance with the research priorities for SADC Region; • The competitive fund system improves performance of the regional agricultural research and training programme; • Competitive funded project provides results and outputs to meet rural development; • A regional information system is operational; • The scholarship fund strengthens the regional training capacity. Achievements from the projects include the following: Seven agricultural research projects we refunded through a competitive grant system. The projects were implemented by a consortium of regional research institutes in 10 Member States. Several technologies were developed and packaged in the form of scientific publications, technical briefs and extension manuals. Grants were also awarded to four regional universities on a competitive basis to develop MSc programmes and award scholarships. The following MSc programmes were developed and taught: Collaborative MSC for broad-based Agricultural Training (UFS); Land and Water Management Programme (SUA); Plant Breeding and Seed Systems (UNZA); and MSC short courses in Dairy Science and Technology (University of Zimbabwe). Fifty scholarships were awarded for MSc to follow those courses. The project also funded networking activities by the following regional networks in 12 Member States: Land and Water Management; African Conservation Tillage (ACT); Regional Universities Forum for Capacity Strengthening (ROFORUM); Animal Traction Network of Eastern and Southern Africa (ATNESA); Information Core for the Southern African Migrant Pests (ICOSAMP) Network;

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Association for African Medicinal plants Standards (AAMPS); Banana Research Network for Eastern and Southern Africa (BARNESA); and the SADC Network of Agricultural Information Managers. Regarding communication and information training, the project produced: (i) a Directory of Agricultural Research and Development Institutions in the SADC region; (ii) a situation Analysis of agricultural Research and Training in the SADC region; (iii) report on lessons learnt on the establishment of the Competitive Grant Scheme; (iv) provided training on the use of an Agricultural Information Management System portal; (v) publications from the network support activities in the form of books, manuals and workshop proceedings. The project also provided institutional support to FANR to hold technical meetings for the Director of research and Deans of Agriculture. It also supported the establishment of CCARDESA and the FANR Monitoring and Evaluation. 4.5.5 Centre for Co-ordination of Agricultural Research and Development in Southern Africa (CCARDESA) SADC Multi Country Agricultural Productivity Programme (SADC MAPP) is aimed at promoting agricultural development in the SADC region through support to agricultural research and technology generation, dissemination and adoption – taking into account regional priorities and strategies. Under the SADC MAPP programme, one of the core activities has been the establishment of a Sub-regional Organisation for coordination of agricultural Research (SRO). During the past year most activities were focused on preparations towards the establishment and launching of the sub-regional organisation.


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

The Board of Directors shall be responsible for the following: • Provide oversight and direction to CCARDESA Secretariat; • Appoint, renew or terminate the services of the Executive Director of CCARDESA Secretariat; • Establish Committees of the Board of Directors to guide and supervise the work of the CCARDESA Secretariat and to review and approve administrative and financial management systems; • Approve overall operational policies and strategic plans of CCARDESA (Strategic Plan, annual work plans, budget and financing plans); • Select new members of the Board based using established guidelines. The Charter for establishment of CCARDESA came into force on 5 May 2011. The institution is expected to be launched on 14 July 2011 by FANR Ministers. CCARDESA will provide a platform for regional coordination of Agricultural research and development and scale up access to and adoption of technologies as well as facilitating the region in increasing agricultural production and productivity. The SRO will co-ordinate the implementation of the SADC MAPP which is intended to translate Pillar 4 of the Comprehensive Africa Agricultural Development Programme (CAADP) into research and development activities. Through implementation of the SADC MAPP programme, CCARDESA will accelerate smallholder productivity. It will focus on increased rate of growth of the agricultural sector in SADC and improved livelihoods of the rural population. It will also aim at increased productivity of smallholder crop and livestock enterprises in SADC, thereby contributing to reducing the proportion of poor households in the rural population. CCARDESA will co-ordinate implementation of the following specific themes of SADC MAPP: • Farmer empowerment and market access; • Research and technology generation; • Farmer led advisory services and innovation systems; • Education, training and learning systems; • Knowledge, information and communication; CCARDESA, will be located in Gaborone, Botswana and has been established as a subsidiary organisation of SADC. Functionally, it will be linked to the SADC Secretariat through a Memorandum of Understanding. The SADC Secretariat shall provide overall strategic policy guidance and leadership to CCARDESA in order to ensure that the regional R&D agenda and priorities are consistent with the SADC mandate on agriculture and food security. CCARDESA is a semi autonomous institution with a Board that will be fully responsible for its governance.

4.5.6 Capacity Building on Bio-safety and the Implementation of the ‘Convention on Biological Diversity and the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety’ As most Member States are signatories to the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Cartagena Protocol on Bio-safety, the Directorate continues to monitor the development of national legislations on Biotechnology and Bio-safety. Ongoing monitoring includes the implementation Bio-safety frameworks whose key components include national policies on biotechnology, risk assessment strategies, public participation, and monitoring and enforcement mechanisms. To date most Member states have made significant progress but are at different stages of development of national legislations. A major constraint is capacity to implement the required Bio-safety protocol. In this regard, the SADC FANR Directorate has partnered with regional and international institutions to strengthen Member States’ capacity in Bio-safety in the following areas: • Public Awareness and Public Participation in Biotechnology and Bio-safety to enhance the capacity of stakeholders to communicate biotechnology and Bio-safety issues in line with Article 23 of the Cartagena Protocol on Bio-safety; • Negotiation Skills and Techniques training which is necessary for negotiations of Multilateral Environmental Agreements; • Training in Risk Assessment and Risk Management of imported or transit GMOs aimed at enhancing the capacity of stakeholders to effectively implement and comply with the Cartagena Protocol on Bio-safety; • Training of SADC stakeholders on GMO testing to enhance the capacity of stakeholders to detect GMOs which is an important requirement for monitoring and surveillance as well as for ensuring compliance;

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• Establishment and support of the Southern African Network of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) detection Laboratories (SANGL). The SADC–FANR Directorate has co-organised in partnership with RAEIN-Africa a Regional High Level Dialogue on Biotechnology and Bio-safety in November 2011. The High Level Dialogue was aimed at facilitating a shared understanding on Bio-safety issues amongst stakeholders and to further facilitate identification of areas for regional co-operation and collaboration in Bio-safety. 4.5.7 The Comprehensive Africa Agricultural Development Programme The Comprehensive Africa Agricultural Development Programme (CAADP) is an initiative of African countries aimed at stimulating agricultural-led growth in African economies, thereby reducing hunger and poverty in line with MDG1. In support of this continental initiative, the FANR Directorate collaborated with the African Union, NEPAD and the World Bank to establish a ‘Child Trust Fund’ (CTF) under the CAADP Multi-donor Trust Fund. The overall objective of the CTF is to mainstream CAADP principles in FANR activities and accelerate implementation of CAADP in SADC Member States. 4.6 Ensuring Effective Protection and Sustainable Utilisation of the Environment and Natural Resources FANR’s efforts in ensuring protection and sustainable utilisation of the environment and natural resources focuses on harmonisation of policies, mainstreaming environment, monitoring and reporting on environmental conditions as well as co-ordinating negotiations of multilateral environmental agreements. Main activities in this area include:

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4.6.1 Development of a Protocol on Environment The RISDP calls upon the SADC Secretariat to facilitate harmonisation of policies that will promote regional integration. In response, Secretariat has developed a number of policies and protocols for this purpose. A draft SADC Protocol on Environment has just been finalised. The objective of this Protocol is to promote sustainable utilisation of the Environment and management of transboundary resources of interest to SADC Member States. This draft will need to undergo national regional consultations to ensure ownership and buy-in by Member States. Financial resources will be required facilitate consultations at both national level and regional level. Once the Protocol has been approved financial resources will be required to facilitate its implementation. 4.6.2 Development of the SADC common Regional Positions The RISDP mandates the Secretariat to facilitate preparation of SADC regional Common positions for priority multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs) to the region. The integrated Committee of Ministers set a number of MEA as priority for the region. These include the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Convention to Combat Desertification, the Basel Convention on Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and Other Wastes, the Stockholm Convention and the Rotterdam Convention, the Convention on Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) and the Principles of Sustainable Development under the Commission for Sustainable Development. Conferences of these International conventions take place annually or biannually. Financial resources will be required


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Specific objectives include to: • promote policy harmonisation for climate adaptation and mitigation; • promote generation of data and information for decision support; • Facilitate exchange of information and lessons learnt; • Facilitate co-ordination of regional activities such as; • Facilitate Member States access to climate funding; • build capacity to enable the region improve the resilience of its communities to the impacts of climate change. Once the draft is finalised, the Secretariat will require financial resources to facilitate national and regional consultations to finalise the programme document. Financial resources will also be required to facilitate implementation of the regional programme. 4.6.4 Implementation of the Biodiversity Convention to facilitate development of regional common positions for these convention conferences including participation of the Secretariat at such meetings. Main Intervention Areas: • Legal and regulatory frameworks to promote regional co-operation in environment created; • Environmental and sustainable development issues integrated into sectoral, national and sub-national socio-economic planning; • Regular assessments, monitoring and reporting on environmental conditions and trends in the SADC region facilitated; • Regional positions in the negotiations and implementation of Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs) and other agreements are harmonised.

4.6.3 Implementation of International Conventions The SADC Extra-Ordinary Consultative Conference on Poverty Eradication and Sustainable Development which took place in Mauritius in April 2008 set Climate Change as one of the priorities among cross-cutting issues for the SADC Region. This call was reiterated by the Integrated Committee of Ministers (ICM) which directed SADC Secretariat to facilitate the development of a programme on Climate Change. The Secretariat is in the process of developing a regional programme document on climate change. The objective of the programme is to assist SADC Member States implement activities that will enable them adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change. The programme will also facilitate Member States access to support mechanisms of capacity building, technology transfer and financing for adaptation and mitigation.

In order to facilitate implementation of the biodiversity convention, the SADC region developed the Regional Biodiversity Strategy which was approved in 2007. In order to facilitate its implementation, a Regional Biodiversity Action plan is being developed. The objective of the Action Plan is to harmonise efforts in the region and facilitate implementation of the National Biodiversity Action Plans (NBSAPs) of the various Member States. The Action Plan is at the draft stage. A number of activities still remain that will require financial resources. These include national and regional consultations, consultancy fees for finalisation of the Plan and resources to facilitate Implementation of the action plan. 4.6.5 The SADC Sub regional Environmental Action Plan (SREAP) The SADC sub regional Environmental Action Plan (SREAP) was approved by SADC Ministers responsible for Environment and Sustainable development at their meeting of November 2009. The SREAP facilitates the implementation of Environment Programmes in Member States as well at regional level. Since its approval, the Action plan is implemented on piece meal basis. There is need for financial resources to facilitate the full implementation of the Action Plan both at regional and Member States levels. 4.6.6 Development of the Environment Mainstreaming Manual Sustainable environmental management is crucial for the SADC region’s sustainable socio-economic development. In order to facilitate sustainable development in the region, the Secretariat initiated the development of a manual. The objective of the manual is to help Member States mainstream environment in their planning and implementation of development projects and programmes. The development of the manual is still underway. Financial

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resources will be required to facilitate national and regional consultations as well as to facilitate its implementation once it has been approved. 4.6.7 Implementation of the Rio Declaration beyond 2012 In 1992, more than 100 heads of states met in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil for the first international Earth Summit which was convened to address urgent problems of environmental protection and socio-economic development. The assembled leaders signed the Convention on Climate Change and the Convention on Biological Diversity, endorsed the Rio Declaration and the Forest Principles and adopted Agenda 21, a plan for achieving sustainable development in the 21st century. The year 2012 marks 20 years since the Agenda 21. In order to commemorate the year but also to review progress, the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD) is organising a follow-up conference. It will take place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from 4th to 6th June 2012. The Conference is intended to secure renewed political commitment for sustainable development, assess the progress to date and the remaining gaps in the implementation of the outcomes of the major summits on sustainable development, and address new and emerging challenges. The Conference will focus on two emerging themes: (a) a green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication; and (b) the institutional framework for sustainable development. The SADC Secretariat will co-ordinate a number of activities that will require financial resources prior to and after the conference.

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These activities will include: • Co-ordination of the development of a SADC common position for the conference; • Facilitation of the development of a regional review report in preparation for the conference; • Preparation of a strategic plan for implementation of the outcomes of the conference; • Implementation of the strategic plan. This area of the FANR addresses environment issues which are cross-cutting, transboundary and have global dimension. 4.7 Natural Resource Management (NRM) Natural resource management encompasses Fisheries, Forestry, Wildlife and Trans-frontier Conservation Areas which are all implemented through their respective SADC Protocols. These natural resources are detrimental to livelihoods and economic development in the region. Their transboundary nature also fosters deepening regional integration and promotes peace. 4.7.1 Fisheries The focus has been on implementing the SADC Protocol on Fisheries. In so doing, the SADC Secretariat in collaboration with Member States has elaborated programmes and action plans based on the priorities set in the Implementation Strategy for the Protocol on Fisheries. These programmes and action plans will enhance capacity to safeguard its fisheries resources from external invasion, promote aquaculture production, improve access of fish and fish products in the region, and improve management of fisheries resources within the region.


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

The following are the main output and achievements for the 2010/2011 financial year: • The Action Plan to facilitate the implementation of the SADC Statement of Commitment to combat Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing; • The project to facilitate the establishment of the Regional Monitoring Control and Surveillance Centre; • The programme for aquaculture development; and • The Co-Management Programme for the Shared Fisheries Resources of the Zambezi Basin has also been elaborated. 4.7.2 Wildlife The SADC region continues to record an increase in game populations and related benefits to local communities. Also critical to wildlife is their sustained contribution to tourism in SADC. Transfrontier conservation areas are also making a significant contribution to tourism and the conservation of biodiversity. There are currently about 20 Transfrontier Conservation Areas in SADC, which are at different levels of development. The main challenge for Transfrontier Conservation Areas is limited financial resources, lack of legal framework and immigration laws that limit free movement of tourists and law enforcement officers across international boundaries. Poaching of rhinoceros also remains a challenge in the region. The SADC Secretariat in collaboration with Member States has developed a programme to address challenges faced by Transfrontier Conservation Areas. Member States are encouraged to fully implement the SADC Protocol on Wildlife Conservation and Law Enforcement in order to address the poaching of rhinoceros among others.

4.7.3 Forestry Through the implementation of the SADC Protocol on Forestry, the Secretariat in collaboration with Member States has developed two programmes: i) Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) and ii) on Fire Management. These programmes are based on priorities set in the Implementation Strategy for the Protocol on Forestry. The REDD+ programme aims to assist the region to benefit from the carbon market through capacity building and adoption of an ecosystem approach to the implementation of REDD+ mechanisms. The Fire Management programme on the other hand, aims to assist the region to effectively manage forest fires and to collaborate in this effort. The programme also entails employing early warning and enhancing capacity at community, national and regional levels. Efforts are also underway to develop a programme on forest law enforcement, governance and trade in order to facilitate exports of forest products to international markets. Also critical in this regard is to promote value addition to forest produce and natural resources at large for employment creation and poverty alleviation. 5.0 Way Forward The FANR Directorate will continue to co-ordinate and facilitate the harmonisation of policies and programmes: to increase agricultural production and productivity; promote sustainable natural resource utilisation; enhance the equitable and sustainable management of the environment; and promote trade – all within the overall goal of improving food security and fostering economic development in the region. To achieve this, the Directorate will need the support of Member States in facilitating some joint programmes including technical committee meetings and the monitoring of the Dar-es-Salaam Declaration.

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2010 Summit

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1. H.E Kabila handing over the Chairperson’s badge to H.E Pohamba 2. President Pohamba and Dr Salomao posing for a picture with the 2010 recipients of the Sir Seretse Khama Medals, Former President of Republic of Zambia, H.E Kaunda, Former President of Republic of Nigeria, H.E Nujoma and Mr Hashim Mbita. 3. President Pohamba handing out award certificates to SADC Secondary School Essay Winners 4. SADC Heads of State and Government and invited dignitaries posing for a group picture during the 2010 Summit 5. Members of the SADC Secretariat Management team at the 2010 Summit

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2010 Chairman’s Visit

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6 Executive Secretary Dr T.A. Salomao welcomes the H.E Pohamba during his official Chaiperson’s visit to the SADC Secretariat 7 Deputy Executive Secretary – Finance and Administration Ms E. Moshubekwa presenting a bouquet of flowers to the chairperson 8 SADC Secretariat Staff during the Chairperson ‘s visit 9 Director TIFF, Ms Gofhamodimo presenting a token of appreciation on behalf of the SADC family to President Pohamba 10 SADC Chairperson of Council Hon. Dr. Hage Geingob 11 Dr Pherudi Mokete , Head of the SADC Early Warning System greeting the Chairperson 12 Ms. Maria Tali, SADC Librarian briefing the Chairperson on the operations of the SADC Library 13 SADC Staff listening to the proceedings 14 SADC Staff posing for a picture with the Chairperson and his delegation

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2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Shd and Sp Activity Report for the Sadc Executive Secretary 2011 Report In the area of social and human development, the region continued to implement initiatives guided by the Regional Indicative Strategic Development Plan (RISDP), relevant Protocols and Declarations as well as the 2010/11 Business Plan of the Directorate. Major developments and trends in the Directorate’s focus areas included the following: Education and Skills Development Progress has been made in the harmonisation of policies and implementation of common measures for increased access to quality education and for improving skills development approaches. These were undertaken within the context of key regional, continental and global commitments, in particular the Protocol on Education and Training, the African Union Second Decade Plan of Action, Education for All (EFA) and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In line with the RISDP, priorities for the education and skills development sector focused on policy development and harmonisation, capacity building, monitoring and evaluation and mainstreaming of gender and HIV and AIDS. Regional frameworks that have been developed in the year under review include the Draft Strategic Framework for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) aimed at strengthening TVET systems in order to produce relevant and required skills for the labour market and address unemployment especially among the youth. A draft Regional Open and Distance Learning (ODL) Policy Framework and Guidelines for mainstreaming gender in ODL have also been developed. To this end, four Member

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States were supported in the development of national ODL policies. Furthermore, research on cost barriers to quality higher education is currently underway to address impediments to student mobility in the region. The region has developed mechanisms and tools for monitoring progress in the implementation of regional, continental and global commitments. These include the Regional ODL Monitoring Framework and national reporting templates; indicators for monitoring the education sector’s response to HIV and AIDS; and assessment framework for monitoring the implementation of the SADC Education Management Information Systems (EMIS) Norms and Standards. With respect to capacity building and strengthening of institutional capacities, the ODL Centres of Specialisations in Secondary Education and Teacher Education based in Malawi and United Republic of Tanzania respectively, were equipped and provided with additional capacity in the form of Technical Advisors. Two regional institutions were selected to offer long-term training in ODL studies, starting in the later part of 2011. In addition, about 70 ODL practitioners were able to participate in study tours in the region to attend regional and continental ODL conferences and to facilitate benchmarking. Despite the above mentioned progress, the region continues to face a number of challenges in the implementation of regional, continental and global commitments. These include low knowledge levels of learners in primary school on HIV and AIDS issues; barriers


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Information System has been completed and is under consideration. Implementation structures in the sector have been enhanced through the establishment and implementation of Tripartite Technical Sub-committees on Social Protection; and Employment and Labour. These committees which involve workers, employers and government representatives, are now fully operational and spearheading implementation of employment and labour sector programmes in the region. Health and Pharmaceuticals

to access to education especially in higher education and Technical and Vocational Education and Training and; inability to reach consensus on hosting of Pan African University Institute on Space Science. Employment and Labour The region continued to place emphasis on adopting common policy approaches towards improving the conditions of employment and labour for poverty reduction and for enhancing social justice. Relevant tools and policy instruments were developed to enable Member States to monitor and evaluate progress in the implementation of policies and programmes. The main purpose of these instruments is to facilitate collection and analysis of data regarding the implementation of the provisions of the SADC Policy instruments in the following priority areas: • Social Security, • Child Labour, • Occupational Safety and Health and • HIV and AIDS and employment. Three policy/legal documents to facilitate productivity improvement in the region have been developed. These are; • the Charter establishing the SADC Productivity Organisation (RPO); • Memorandum of Understanding between SADC RPO and SADC Secretariat; and • a Host agreement for the RPO. In this context, the issue of productivity is being approached through the principle of subsidiarity. Steady progress is being made towards the establishment of labour market information systems in the region: a draft document presenting a Prototype Labour Market

In the SADC region significant progress has been made in the area of policy development and harmonisation, particularly in disease control, Reproductive Health; Information, Education and Communication and Health Systems Development. The region has also developed mechanisms for monitoring progress in the implementation of the SADC Protocol on Health in line with regional, continental and global tools to demonstrate the sharing of Best Practices among Member States. These include the development of Regional Strategic Frameworks, with core indicators and analytical annual reports, for Disease Control targeting both communicable and non-communicable diseases. In the area of Communicable Diseases, Tuberculosis particularly the Multi-Drug Resistant and Extensively Drug Resistant TB) and HIV/TB, co-infection has become a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The drug resistance is fuelled by many factors that include high default rate among migrants, limited capacity to diagnose and general failure to adhere to international standards for management of TB patients. Malaria on the other hand, has been under control and this is attributed to a number of regional SADC initiatives such as the trans-Zambezi Cross Border Initiative and the Lubombo Malaria control programme involving Mozambique, Swaziland and South Africa, which successfully managed to reduce and sustain cases by 70%. To address non-communicable diseases which are increasingly causing premature deaths, the region has agreed to commemorate SADC Healthy Lifestyles Day during the last week of February every year. Despite progress made, the region still faces many challenges which could be met successfully through appropriate regional frameworks and minimum standards in the following areas: mainstreaming gender in regional public health policies and programmes; supporting migrant population in the region to access health services; facilitating the mobility and prudent use of scarce health professionals; pooled procurement and production of essential medicines and supplies; combating the trading of counterfeit and sub-standard medicines; enforcing compliance to agreed protocols and minimum standards; and coordinating regional responses for health emergencies and emerging and re-emerging epidemics. In its current plan addressing Public Health, the SADC Secretariat in

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2011 SADC Summit Brochure

collaboration with relevant stakeholder is developing Strategic Frameworks and Plans addressing areas of Food and Nutrition; Non-Communicable Diseases; African Traditional Medicine; Pooled Procurement of Essential Medicines; and Regional Production of Generic Medicines. HIV and AIDS In line with the Maseru Declaration on combating HIV and AIDS, the region continued to facilitate the harmonisation of policies and approaches relating to HIV and AIDS. To this end, a Regional Framework for the Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) was developed and approved by the Ministers of Health and Ministers responsible of HIV and AIDS in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo, in November 2010.The Framework will, among others, facilitate the reintegration of STI management with HIV and AIDS control. With regard to capacity building on and mainstreaming of HIV and AIDS, a review of the education sector response to HIV was carried out and the report was disseminated in all Member States. The report identified priority areas for regional intervention to strengthen the education sector’s response. This was a collaborative effort between the Secretariat, UNESCO, UNICEF and MIET Africa. In terms of tracking progress on agreed commitments on HIV and AIDS, the Epidemic Update Report of 2010 reveals that there is continued improvement in making antiretroviral drugs accessible to people with AIDS and keeping them alive and productive. The HIV infection rates remain very high particularly among young people aged 15-24 years, and additional efforts were made to accelerate the delivery of HIV and AIDS, TB and Malaria treatment, care and support services among children and young people in the region. However, more needs to be done as most Member

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States remain far from attaining the MDG targets pertaining to HIV and AIDS. As for resource mobilisation, the main focus was to followup on the implementation of the SADC HIV Regional Fund as well as the SADC HIV Cross-Boarder Initiative supported by the Global Fund. A sum of US$15 million has been received from the Global Fund to implement Phase 1 of the Initiative. These efforts are complementing those supported by Member States at national level, and ICPs to provide prevention and treatments services along regional migration routes and across national borders, and will improve access to HIV and AIDS services in the region. Notwithstanding the above positive developments, the region remains overly reliant on external donor funding, which is significantly reducing as a result of the global economic and financial crisis. In order to address some of these challenges, the Secretariat has put in place mechanisms to support Member States in scaling up the empowerment and participation of children and youth as agents of change in the HIV prevention. Special Programme: Orphans, Vulnerable Children and Youth (OVCY) Special focus has been directed to address the needs of orphans, other vulnerable children and youth in the region. Following the Council directive of August 2010, a joint meeting of SADC Ministers was convened for the first time in Windhoek, Namibia from 1-3 June 2011. The Ministers discussed and developed a clear road map for addressing child and youth vulnerability in the region. The road map prioritises the establishment and strengthening of structures for empowering children and youth; it promotes voluntarism and emphasises the imparting of leadership capabilities as well as the creation of employment and entrepreneurial opportunities to improve their lives.


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

ICT A new Cisco-based internet protocol telephony system has been recently implemented at the Secretariat. This system brings about unified communication with the seamless delivery of data, voice and video services over the same infrastructure to users. Tele-conferencing, videoconferencing and secure wireless access are some of the new features that are now available. This system puts the Secretariat at par with any modern and comparable institution as far as the latest ICT infrastructure is concerned. Moreover, it is bedrock for the deployment of future value added services such as videoconferencing between the Secretariat and Member States and the hosting of regional applications such as the regional customs database and the tax information system. GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Key regional guidelines were developed, which seek to harmonise a minimum package of basic services for OVCY across the region, to ensure that they can survive and grow up to become responsible and productive citizens. The guidelines – which place emphasis on the co-ordination of efforts between sectors, the establishment of referral systems and collaboration to ensure that comprehensive services are holistically delivered – are of particular importance to the functions of government and service delivery systems in Member States. The region worked closely with the African Union Commission (AUC) and the Pan African Youth Union (PAYU) to prepare recommendations that were considered by Heads of States and Government during the July 2010 African Union Summit whose theme was “Youth Empowerment and Sustainable Development”. Science, Technology and Innovation Progress has been made on the ratification of the Protocol on Science Technology and Innovation by Member States. Mainstreaming of gender in science, technology and innovation in line with the Protocol is ongoing. The region is progressing in establishing an association for Women in Science, Engineering and Technology which should be instrumental in taking the agenda further. Meanwhile the region is coordinating the African Union Kwame Nkrumah regional scientific awards for women. This programme, which has been running for the past two years, identifies and rewards the best women scientists in the SADC region. A project focusing on policy development and capacity building is being undertaken in collaboration with UNESCO. It will provide policy training for senior officials in October 2011.

Mandate of the unit The overall objective of the Gender Unit is to facilitate the achievement of substantive equality between women and men in the SADC region through mainstreaming gender into all national and regional policies, programmes and activities, and the adoption of positive measures to accelerate progress in that regard. The mandate of the SADC Gender Unit is to facilitate, co-ordinate, monitor and evaluate the implementation of the SADC Protocol on Gender and Development, SADC Declaration on Gender and Development, the Addendum on the Prevention and Eradication of Violence Against Women and Children, the RISDP as well as various other regional and global gender instruments to which SADC Member States are a party to. The SADC Gender Programme spearheads regional initiatives to ensure that a gender perspective permeates the entire SADC Programme of Action and Community Building Initiative. Latest major development Status of ratification of the SADC protocol on gender and development: At the Annual Meeting of Ministers Responsible for Gender/ Women’s Affairs, ministers reviewed progress made in the ratification of the SADC Protocol on Gender and Development and approved a Roadmap towards the ratification of the SADC Protocol on Gender and Development for implementation at Member State level; further urging Member States to comply with the Roadmap and implement it immediately. This has facilitated and intensified the ratification processes by the Member States. The Status of ratification of the SADC Protocol on Gender and Development currently reflects eight Member States namely Angola, DRC, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, United Republic of Tanzania and Zimbabwe.

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South Africa and Zambia have committed to ratifying the protocol in the near future. Secretariat is spearheading the campaign of popularising the SADC Protocol on Gender and Development. IEC materials and simplified versions of the SADC Protocol on Gender and Development in different vernacular languages in SADC Member States have been produced and distributed. Gender mainstreaming: Training of Gender Trainers (Tot) Regional Workshop was held on the 6-10 December 2010 with a total of 45 participants (Gender Trainers) from fourteen SADC Member States, representing Government Ministries of Gender/ Women, other line ministries, as well as individual gender training experts and civil society gender activists. The aim of the training was to roll out the usage of the Resource Kit at national level. In this way the training had a ‘multiplier effect’ in that there would be a pool of trainers, who in turn would undertake training at the national level using the Resource Kit. During the workshop, National Action Plans for rolling out the Gender Mainstreaming Programme were developed and with funding mobilised from ICPs, the identified activities in the National action Plans will be carried out. SADC Gender, Peace And Security Seminar: The SADC Secretariat’s Gender Unit in collaboration with the Directorate of the Organ on Politics Defence and Security (OPDS) held a three-day regional policy seminar on Gender Peace and Security on the 15-17 March 2011 in Johannesburg South Africa. The goal of the Seminar was to develop a framework for engagement and implementation by SADC Member States in dealing with sexual violence, particularly in conflict and post conflict zones and to facilitate gender mainstreaming in SADC’s conflict resolution, re-construction and rehabilitation processes and projects in line with the UN Resolution 1325 and Article (28) of the SADC Protocol on Gender and Development.

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The Objectives of the Seminar were to: • Unpack the situation (status and magnitude) of violence against women in conflict and post conflict zones in the SADC Region; • Deliberate on possible measures to deal with sexual violence in post conflict and conflict situations; • Propose gender mainstreaming initiatives in peace keeping, prevention, re-construction, peace negotiations, and rehabilitation processes and projects in line with the UN Resolution 1325 and Article (28) of the SADC Protocol on Gender and Development. The seminar was attended by 72 participants, three representatives of each of the SADC Member States, representatives of the SADC Gender Unit and the Directorate of the Organ on Politics Defence and Security, representatives of international organisations and of civil society. Participants were provided with thought provoking interventions on the status of implementation of UNSCR 1325, UNSCR 1820 and the SADC Protocol on Gender and Development, the effectiveness and challenges of existing national and regional legal frameworks, mechanisms and responses to sexual violence, an overview of the SADC Organ and its guiding framework and the current status of gender mainstreaming in SADC’s peace and security architecture. The meeting developed two strategic documents which are: SADC Strategy for addressing Gender Based Violence in conflict and post conflict areas; and the Framework for Mainstreaming Gender into SADC’s Peace and Security Architecture and SIPO. Women’s Economic Empowerment Study on the gendered impacts of trade policies in sadc Gender Unit, with financial support from the UNECA, conducted a study to assess the gender impacts of


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

SADC High Level Advocacy Workshop for Women Informal Cross Border Traders. A High Level Advocacy Policy Meeting was held from the 1-3 November 2010 in Harare, Zimbabwe. The workshop was attended by representatives from fourteen SADC Member States with a total of 60 participants drawn from Government Ministries of Gender/Women Affairs and Trade, Business Women’s Associations, the private sector, and the development partners.

the SADC Trade Protocol by taking stock of how its implementation have affected men and women and organisations involved directly/indirectly with intra regional trade within the region. The study assessed the measures as an attempt to gain an understanding on the gendered impacts, gaps, and weaknesses, entry points for promoting gender equality, equity and women empowerment using four SADC Member States namely Mauritius; Mozambique; Namibia and Zambia as case studies. The study found out that there were no clear directives, targets and time frames for Member States to integrate a gender perspective in the SADC Trade Protocol during its implementation. Overall, there was no gender disaggregated data and information on actions taken to implement STP strategies as well as gendered outcomes. The study assessed a variety of issues necessary for establishing the gender impacts of the SADC trade protocol at macro and micro levels using information mostly from qualitative sources. These includes presence of an enabling environment for the integration of gender in the implementation of the trade protocol; gender sensitivity of specific actions taken to implement the protocol by different actors as well as types of effects and or impacts/outcome to men and women. Further, the study identified main problems and challenges that limited the effective integration of gender in the implementation of the Protocol which amongst others include limited skills and knowledge on gender analysis; limited advocacy on the protocol itself at member state level; lack of clear monitoring and evaluation / follow up plan; inadequate gender disaggregate statistics and limited participation of key actors in a consistent and coherent manner. The results of the study will be used to programme appropriately from mainstreaming gender in trade in SADC.

The objectives of the High Level Advocacy Policy Workshop were to: • Disseminate the research findings, particularly the recommendations of the study on Informal Cross Border Trade in Southern Africa to policy makers; • Advocate and raise awareness on the importance of integrating Informal Cross-Border Trade issues in national development programmes, policies, laws, budgets and protocols; • Sensitise and solicit support from Government Ministries to enforce implementation of the recommendations emerging from the study at the national level; and • Develop a Regional Advocacy Strategy and Action Plan for ICBTs which l include clear policy and legislative action areas at both national and regional levels necessary to create an enabling environment for ICBT. The Regional Advocacy Strategy for ICBT was developed which emphasised on the urgent need for the formalisation of Women In Business Associations at both the national and Regional levels. Women in politics and decision making positions: SADC Member States have made some strides and progress in ensuring that women occupy positions of leadership. The current status of women in representation in political and decision making positions is as follows: • Presidents and Vice Presidents: none of the SADC Member States has a woman President. Malawi, Mauritius and Zimbabwe are the only Member States with women Vice Presidents; • Prime Minister and Deputy Prime Ministers: Zimbabwe is the only Member State which has a woman Deputy-Prime Minister; • Speakers and Deputy Speakers of Parliament: Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique and Tanzania have women Speakers of Parliament. Zimbabwe has a female President of the Senate; Angola, Malawi, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe have women Deputy Speakers of Parliament while Namibia has a Deputy Chairperson of the National Council (Upper House); • Cabinet Ministers: South Africa has the highest representation at 42%, followed by Angola and Lesotho both at 32%. Seychelles and Mozambique at 28% and

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28.5% respectively. Malawi is at 27% while Tanzania has 27.5%, Namibia 23%, and Swaziland 23.8%. Zimbabwe reflects 20%, Zambia 19%, Madagascar 14% and Botswana 13.3%. DRC and Mauritius have 11.1% and 10% respectively; Deputy Cabinet Ministers: Lesotho leads with 60%, followed by South Africa at 39%. Malawi has 30%, Namibia and Botswana 25%, Tanzania 14.3%, Angola 22%, Mozambique 20%, Zambia 13.6%, Mauritius 12.5%, DRC 9.2%, Zimbabwe 9% and Madagascar 5%; Parliamentarians: South Africa has the highest representation of women with 45%, followed by Mozambique at 39.2%. Angola has 38.6%, Tanzania 36%, Namibia and Lesotho 25%, Madagascar, Seychelles and Zimbabwe 24%, Malawi 21.8%, Swaziland 21%, Mauritius 18.8%, Zambia 15%, Botswana 10.3 % and DRC 8.4%; Rural Provincial/Councillors: Lesotho records the highest with 58% followed by South Africa at 37%. Tanzania 35.5%, Zimbabwe 19%, Botswana 18%, Swaziland and Namibia 16%, DRC 7%, Zambia 6%, Mauritius 5.8%, and Angola 3.5%; Urban Provincial/ Councillors: South Africa and Namibia both score highest with 40%, Tanzania has 35%, Botswana 23%, Swaziland 20%, Zimbabwe 18%, Mauritius 12.7%, Angola 11%, DRC 10.9%, and Zambia 7%. Other Member States who do not appear above do not have the relevant structures to report on this area; Permanent Secretaries: Lesotho has the highest at 44%, followed by Botswana at 33.3 %, Mauritius 31.5%, South Africa 30%, Tanzania 26.7%, Zimbabwe 26%, Mozambique and Swaziland are both at 24%, Namibia 23%, Malawi 20%, Zambia 18.6% and DRC 12.7%; Deputy Permanent Secretaries: Botswana is highest with 32.2%, followed by Mauritius at 31.5%, Lesotho 31%, South Africa 30%, Tanzania and Swaziland has 24% and Malawi 12%; Directors: Lesotho has the highest representation of 48%, followed by Botswana with 44.8%. Swaziland has 36.5%, Zimbabwe 33%, Namibia 32%, Mauritius 31.5%, South Africa 30%, Tanzania 26%, Mozambique 24%, Zambia 23% and Malawi 10%; Judiciary: Zambia has a woman Deputy-Chief Justice. For Court Presidents, Mauritius records 67% and South Africa reports 40%. On Judges, Mauritius has the highest with 45%, Lesotho 36%, Mozambique 30.5%, Zambia 30.2%, Zimbabwe 29%, Angola and Namibia 20%, Malawi 18%, South Africa 15.4%, and Tanzania 35%. On Magistrate Courts, Botswana is highest with 57% followed by Mauritius with 50%, Namibia 43%, Lesotho 42%, Zimbabwe 41%, South Africa 35%, Mozambique 29.3%, Zambia 23%, Swaziland 22%, Tanzania 38%, and Angola 17%. Regarding the Registrars of Courts, Namibia has a woman Registrar of the courts.

• Attorneys General: Botswana is the only Member State with a woman Attorney General; and • Ambassadors: Lesotho has the highest with 33% followed by Zimbabwe with 30%. South Africa has 28%, Botswana 25%, Namibia 22%, Malawi 18%, Mozambique 17% and Mauritius 15%. Reports on this level were not received from Angola, DRC, Swaziland, Tanzania and Zambia. Despite the above highlighted success, SADC generally falls short of the commitment made to increase the number of women represented in positions of power and decision making; hence there is need for: • Member States to create a conducive electoral policy environment and framework by reviewing their electoral laws and adopt gender friendly electoral systems i.e. Proportional Representation as opposed to First-PastThe Post system; • Adoption and implementation of legislated quotas in the constitutions and electoral laws as well as to implement affirmative action provisions; including at political party levels; • Member States to introduce policies that will encourage all the political parties to implement legislated quotas that can increase the possibility of achieving gender equality in all political positions; • Integrating affirmative action provisions in the Member States recruitment policies to address the imbalances of the past and bring in more women in decision-making and management positions in both the public and private sector. Infrastructure and Services The importance of sound infrastructure for sustained economic growth and development is well recognised all over world. Regional cross-border infrastructure, in particular in the areas of transport, energy, information and


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

communication technologies, Meteorology, and water, has the potential to facilitate intra-regional trade and investment, unlock national and regional comparative advantages, and address the special needs of landlocked countries to access the rest of the world. Infrastructure constitutes the key stimulus to economic development, regional integration and poverty reduction. The vision of SADC’s Infrastructure and Services Directorate is to be a World Class facilitator of regional integration and sustainable development through provision of universal access to infrastructure and services in the region. To achieve this, the Directorate facilitates through strategic expertise, the provision of adequate, integrated and cost efficient infrastructure related services to support regional integration and poverty reduction. It covers the Energy, Information and Communication Technologies, Meteorology, Transport, Tourism and Water sectors. Energy The goal of the energy infrastructure intervention is the provision of reliable and sustainable energy at the lowest cost for economic and social development as a major contributor to the eradication of poverty. The RISDP further emphasises the challenge facing SADC in the energy sector: to help eradicate poverty by providing affordable energy services to rural communities as a basic right through increased access to modern energy technologies, including renewable energy sources and more efficient use of traditional fuels. The main sub-sectors of the initiative are in electricity; coal, petroleum and natural gas; and cross cutting issues which include traditional and renewable sources of energy. The cross cutting issues are particularly important for the poor because they focus on improving access to affordable energy services to rural communities through rural electrification and the development of new and renewable energy sources.

The Secretariat continues to co-ordinate and implement the Power Sector Development Roadmap which is aimed at addressing electricity shortfalls facing the region. The Power Situation The SADC region currently has an installed capacity of 55,996 MW of which 49,777 MW is available. The difference of 6,219 MW is due to the fact that some machines are under rehabilitation including 197 MW in Angola, 1,200 MW in DRC, 3,100 MW in South Africa, 228 MW in Tanzania, 597 MW in Zambia and 725 MW in Zimbabwe. The peak demand for the region in 2010 stood at 45,721 MW, which requires generation capacity amounting to 50,385 MW taking into account the need to meet the 10.2% minimum reserve capacity requirements. With the available capacity at 49,777 MW this gives a deficit of 608 MW. A total capacity equivalent to 1,100 MW was commissioned in 2010 as follows: in Angola (60MW), Botswana (70 MW), DRC (160 MW), South Africa (640MW) and Zimbabwe (180 MW) from rehabilitation and new projects against an annual target of 2,000 MW. The target could not be met as some projects did not secure financing on time. Demand in the region is increasing at an average of 3% per annum. If all the projects are completed according to plan the region is expected to achieve a power surplus capacity by 2014. Demand Side Management Program Demand Side management remains the most realistic short term tool to conserve power and minimise load shedding. The region is therefore implementing a number of demand side management programmes which include the replacement of incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent lamps, installation of solar water heaters,

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improvement of commercial lighting and hot water load control. In the year 2010 the region saved 750 MW from the compact fluorescent lamps programme. Generation Projects As part of the short term measures, a number of rehabilitation and generation projects are being undertaken to address the generation supply gap. Up to 16,932 MW is planned between 2011 and 2015. This year (2011) the region plans to install 1,248 MW most of which will be in South Africa and Zimbabwe. In 2012 the region plans to install 1,592 MW with the bulk of it in Botswana and DRC while in 2013, 2014 and 2015 the region intends to install 4,087 MW; 3,906 MW and 6,129 MW with the bulk of it installed in Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Tanzania. Transmission Projects The Secretariat continues to facilitate the implementation of cross border transmission projects to enable non connected members of the Southern African Power Pool to be connected, to facilitate trade among member countries and also to relieve transmission congestion that hampers trade within the region. These include the Caprivi Link which was commissioned in October 2010. Other ongoing projects are: the Gove-Huambo 80 km 220kV line; the Lucala-Uige 212 km 220kV line; the Uige-Maquela do Zombo 191 km 220kV line; and the Gabela-Kileva 242km 220kV interconnector – all of them in Angola. Based on ongoing projects, the region looks set to attaining self sufficiency in power by 2014, provided adequate funding is resourced for all planned projects to be implemented. Communication and ICTs The overall objective for the Communications and ICT Sector is to ‘establish communications systems that are fully integrated, efficient and cost effective to meet the region’s requirements and to ensure connectivity to SADC citizens that will ensure regional integration and Poverty alleviation. A fully integrated communications infrastructure/ network will serve the ideals of a single Economic space in the SADC region with free movement of goods, services and capital. The SADC Secretariat has continued to embark on a number of priority initiatives with a view to coming up with best practices for the region in terms of ensuring universal service access to the SADC citizens through policy and regulatory harmonisation. The SADC Region Information Infrastructure (SRII) Project was divided into three stages of short-, medium- and long-term and is progressing very well with short-term

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(digitalisation of transmission links) and medium-term (expansion of the digitalised transmission links) now compete. The long-term implementation which includes all fibre regional transmission broadband highways is nearing completion. Under Policy and Regulatory front, SADC is moving towards embracing the issue of convergence. Two implementing Agencies that are responsible for Policy and Regulation in issues of Communications and Postal namely, Communications Regulatory Association of Southern Africa (CRASA) and the Southern African Postal Regulators Association (SAPRA), have been merged and a converged Regulatory Authority formed. The framework for the development of the SADC Home and Away Roaming among SADC Member States has realised considerable progress. Regulatory Impact Assessment Study has been completed. The expectation is that before the end of 2011 the region should enjoy reduced mobile roaming rates on both Pre-paid and Post-paid. Publication of roaming rates will be undertaken so as to give the SADC citizens a choice. Meteorology The objective for the Meteorological Sector is to establish systems and infrastructure that are fully integrated, efficient and cost effective to meet the requirements of the users, and to minimise adverse effects associated with the severe weather and climate phenomena. The SADC Climate Services Centre (CSC), formerly Drought Monitoring Centre, has continued to provide services and timely outreach products in weather and climate monitoring and prediction for the benefit of the SADC Member States and regional and international institutions. In particular those organisations dealing in Early Warning for Food Security,


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Disaster Preparedness, Health and Water Management Sectors. For instance, the Southern Africa Regional Climate Outlook Forum (SARCOF) products and subsequent updates from CSC enable better planning for climate-driven disasters. CSC has also maintained partnerships with research scientists, universities, national, regional and international climate centres worldwide and representative usercommunity institutions. These partnerships have also made it possible for the CSC to carry out programme activities. In particular, the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) has continued to play a central role in the success of CSC since its inception. CSC has improved and made a uniform approach to seasonal forecasting for this region. This process has increased the capacities of professional and technical staff in the SADC NMHSs and Early Warning Systems (EWS) for disaster risk reduction, malaria control, to monitor and forecast extreme weather events such as drought, floods, et al.

Transport Corridors SADC has identified eighteen (18) regional transport and development corridors. A strategy has been developed to scale up the infrastructure development for these corridors. The strategy focuses on development of governance instruments, management institutions and infrastructure. The corridor strategy is implemented jointly with COMESA and EAC, to avoid duplication because of integrated transport networks and trade flows among the three Regional Economic Communities. Instruments The region has followed variable routes in developing and signing legal instruments to govern and manage transport corridors. These vary from Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), Articles of Association to a Constitution. Whichever form of instrument may be used, it is an agreement among the parties that sets out the objectives, principles, institutions and mechanisms for jointly managing and developing the operations of transport projects, systems, policies and regulations in a corridor.

Transport The overall objective of the transport sector is to establish a multi-modal transport system which provides efficient, cost effective and fully integrated transport infrastructure and operations, that best meet the needs of customers and promote economic and inclusive social development while being environmentally and economically sustainable. The region has embarked on initiatives aimed at addressing challenges arising from the lack of availability and access to sound, cost effective, efficient transport infrastructure necessary to strengthen intra-SADC trade. Major focus remains on the development of SADC Corridors, recognising the need for an integrated transport policy framework to achieve regional integration.

So far the following corridors; Maputo , Beira , Nacala, Mtwara, Dar es Salaam, Central, Trans-Kalahari and Walvis Bay-Ndola-Lubumbashi corridors have signed instruments. An MoU is being discussed and developed for the North South Corridor. In the Eastern Corridors, MoUs were recently reviewed by the Ministers and two (Beira and Nacala) require revision. Instruments still need to be developed for Lobito (Benguela), Malange, Namibe, Trans Orange, Maseru-Durban corridors. Institutions Corridor institutions are necessary to ensure joint and coordinated development, management and operations of its

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infrastructure. The SADC region has adopted Corridor Management Committees (CMC) as the basic model institution. Joint regional CMC are also established at Ministerial, Technical and Secretariat levels. CMCs have been established for Trans Kalahari, Maputo, Beira, Mtwara, Dar es Salaam and Central Transport Corridors. Corridor management Institutions are fully functional on Trans Kalahari, Maputo, Dar es Salaam, and Central Transport Corridor. Interim or transitional institutional arrangements are in place on the WB-N-L corridors. There are plans to resuscitate and implement operation of corridor institutions on the Limpopo, Beira, Nacala and Mtwara corridors. Infrastructure The region has embraced the “One Stop Border Post” (OSBP) concept to enhance border management efficiency improvement that entails joint control and management of border crossing transactions and activities by agents of the adjoining countries, using shared facilities, systems and streamlined procedures. OSBP development projects are under implementation at the following border crossings: Beitbridge (South Africa/ Zimbabwe); Kazungula (Botswana/Zambia); Kasumbalesa (DR Congo/Zambia); Nakonde/Tunduma (Zambia/Tanzania); Transkalahari/Mamuno (Namibia/Botswana); Lebombo/ Ressano Garcia (South Africa/Mozambique); Mandimba/ Chiponde (Mozambique/Malawi); and Mwami/Mchinji (Zambia/Malawi). These projects include the following: legal, policy, regulatory, process and system harmonisation, integration, and infrastructure development. The projects are at varying stages of development with one OSBP (Chirundu) operational.

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SADC Secretariat is in the process of documenting and disseminating the model applied and lessons drawn from Chirundu OSBP, for the benefit of other Member States working on similar projects. The Kazungula Bridge Project The Study on the Economic Feasibility and Detailed Engineering Design of the Kazungula Bridge has been completed. All reports have been adopted by the Governments of Botswana and Zambia. The Study also delivered a Sponsors Agreement which will provide a comprehensive foundation for joint execution of the project by the two parties; and a structure of the Shareholding Company (Kazungula Bridge Authority) which will supervise the construction and management. The Project will be moving to the next phase of implementation in 2012. A roadmap was finalised towards construction reflecting about 24 months’ preparation for construction. However, the Governments of Botswana and Zambia are committed to redouble their bilateral commitment to see the Project through within the shortest time. Ponta Techobanine Project: The Development of Onshore Deep Sea Port and Heavy Haul Railway Line Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Botswana have agreed to build a new deepwater port in southern Mozambique and a rail system linking the three countries. The countries have signed a Memorandum of Understanding for a Ponta Techobanine – port and rail project which is expected to cost USD 7 billion. Air Transport Liberalisation of Air Transport Markets: The Tripartite Summit held in Kampala, Uganda, in 0ctober


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Contracting State by providing training to their available national inspectors. The project is planned as a fore-runner of a permanent SADC Aviation Safety Organisation (SASO) to be manned by Regional Flight Safety Inspectors, having the mandate to continue the certification, surveillance, airline audit and training function. A Model Civil Aviation Act and Generic Regulations and Procedures have been developed and shall be used by Member States as a basis for harmonisation of primary aviation legislation and regulations in SADC. A draft Annex to the Protocol on Transport, Communications and Meteorology has been developed and covers essential elements including SASO governing body; organisational structure; SASO staff service conditions; their duties and delegated responsibilities for providing certification, surveillance, audit and quality control functions; immunities; and other relevant administrative and legal provisions. 2008 launched the Joint Competition Authority (JCA) and approved the nomination of the JCA members (two from each REC and the current chair from COMESA) The JCA is being established as a joint Committee operating on the authority of the three REC Councils with a Secretariat to support its technical work and administrative processes. As a step towards operational implementation of the JCA, a consultant will be engaged to develop a framework for operationally implementing the JCA taking into account the institutional and legal structure; the organisational structure; a sustainable funding mechanism; and a Multilateral Air Services Agreement (MASA) template. Joint Competition Regulations and Guidelines, Provisions and Procedures for the Implementation of the Regulations for Competition in Air Transport Services were adopted by the COMESA/EAC/SADC Council meetings and adopted in 2006. Enhancing flight safety In line with the provisions of Article 9.4 of the Protocol on Transport, Communications and Meteorology which encourages Member States’ recognition of each other’s licences, certificates of airworthiness, SADC has embarked on the implementation of the Co-operative Development of Operational Safety and Continuing Airworthiness Programme (COSCAP). COSCAP is aimed at enhancing the safety of air transport operations in the region. The project seeks to address deficiencies in the aviation legislation and regulations relating to the issues of personnel licensing, airworthiness, and certification of aircraft maintenance organisations, surveillance and harmonisation of regulations. A regional pool of flight safety inspectors will be established for the purpose of carrying out the whole range of certification on behalf of Member States lacking such skills. In addition, the project will enhance the individual oversight capability of each participating

Upper Airspace Control Centre Since 1999, the various organs of SADC, including SADC Ministers meeting (COMI) have taken certain decisions to facilitate the implementation of the Protocol on Transport, Communications and Meteorology in respect of the provision of air traffic services and infrastructure and regarding the implementation of the Communications, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) concept in the region, including the concept of an Upper Airspace Control Centre (UACC). The SADC UACC project is pursued consistently with Member States’ plan to have one common Area Control Centre for air traffic in the Sub-region. Progress has been made in the development of the Annex to the Protocol on Transport, Communications and Meteorology (PTCM), addressing essential elements including UACC governing body; organisational structure; UACC staff service conditions; their duties and delegated responsibilities for providing certification, surveillance, audit and quality control functions; immunities; and other relevant administrative and legal provisions. A strategy to intensify collaboration between civil aviation authorities and security organisations in the implementation of the UACC has been developed. Water The Water sector works towards the provision of a sustainable enabling environment, leadership and coordination in water resources strategic planning, use and infrastructure development through application of integrated water resources management at Member State, Regional, River Basin and Community level.

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The 2010/2011 financial year marked the end of the second phase of the five-year Regional Strategic Action Plan on Integrated Water Resources (IWRM) (RSAP 2) and the beginning of RSAP 3 which is set to run till 2015. Although some projects have been completed, a considerable number are ongoing owing to the nature of the projects. The conceptual framework of RSAP 3 was tabled before the Water Resources Technical Committee and the newly established RSAP focal points in all the SADC Member States in October 2010. The RSAP 3 document will be presented to the Ministers responsible for Water in September 2011 at their meeting in Maseru, Lesotho where they will give their final approval to the plan. Projects that have been completed from RSAP include the SADC Hydro geological Map and Atlas and the Economic Accounting for Water Use project, both of which fall under the Water Management pillar of the second Regional Strategic Action Plan. SADC Hydro Geological Map and Atlas By April 2010, the Water Division had completed and uploaded the SADC Hydro geological Map and Atlas on the World Wide Web. The map and atlas provide and overview of the groundwater resources in the region. The two instruments are expected to assist in improving the understanding of groundwater occurrence within SADC. By providing information on the extent of the region’s aquifers, the map and atlas will assist planners to manage our groundwater resources in a more efficient and effective manner in addition to promoting co-operation and better understanding of water resource planning and management. The resource is expected to work as a base map for hydrogeologists and water resource planners whilst not

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being too technical for non specialists to understand. It is available online as an interactive tool on www.sadc-hgm. com. Economic Accounting for Water Use Project The SADC Economic Accounting for Water use project was successfully completed in September 2010. The project managed to develop standardised methodologies for compilation of economic accounting of water that can be used by Member States. These methodologies were piloted in Malawi, Mauritius, Namibia and Zambia and on the Maputo and Orange-Senqu river basins. To access these and other documents visit www.sadcwateraccounting.org. Member States were also trained on how to use these standard set of methodologies in order to increase their capacity to use them at a national level. This also was an exercise to increase the capacity in this area in the region as one of the major challenges identified during the implementation of the project was capacity. A roll out of the project is planned for in the RSAP 3, which will expand the project scope to cover those countries and river basin that were not covered in the first phase of the project. Regional Water Infrastructure Programme A crucial part of SADC’s Regional Water Infrastructure programme is the implementation of pilot projects. The projects as implemented in order to demonstrate key aspects of water infrastructure development and to share lessons learnt with Member States. The Kunene Transboundary Water Supply Project between the governments of Namibia and Angola is the first of such projects under the infrastructure programme.


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

To assist Member States in mobilising resources for the implementation of regional infrastructure projects, the Water Division will be hosting a Strategic Water Infrastructure Investor/Donor Conference during the last week of September in Maseru, Lesotho. The conference is aimed at bringing potential investors, development partners and SADC Member States in one place in order to explore investment opportunities the region has to offer as they relate to Water Infrastructure. A pre- conference where Member States were preparing for the main conference was held in Mbabane Swaziland on the 27th of June 2011.

ZAMCOM and LIMCOM Agreements At River Basin level, although both the Zambezi River Basin Commission and the Limpopo River Basin commission agreements have not yet achieved full ratification, a lot of progress has been made. Both river basins now have fully fledged interim Secretariats based in Maputo, Mozambique and Gaborone, Botswana respectively. These interim Secretariats that have been set up will assist with the facilitation of the ratification process of the agreements for both river basins and also begin to implement projects at River basin level.

Raising Awareness on Integrated Water Resources Management In effort to encourage journalists to report on water issues SADC runs the SADC Water Media Awards. These were given for the third year running during the 30th anniversary Heads of State and Government Summit that was held in Windhoek, Namibia in August last year. Ms. Veronique Anna Ahwane from Seychelles and Mr. Lozaro Alfredo Mueche from Mozambique were awarded the prize of US$ 2000.00 each as overall winners in the Radio and Photography categories. The annual SADC Multi Stakeholder Water Dialogue was held in October 2010 in Maun under theme “Watering Development in SADC: Toward Climate Resilience through Benefit Sharing.” The Dialogue is an awareness raising activity where the water sector engages with other sectors in order to ensure that the region’s water resources are managed in an integrated manner. In 2011 it was held in Swaziland at the end of June under the theme “Watering Development in SADC: Financing Water for Climate Resilience to Ensure Regional Security.” The outcomes will be shared at a side event during the COP 17 negotiation processes that are scheduled to take place in Durban, South Africa at the end of 2011.

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region. It is familiar with the strengths and weaknesses of the respective courier companies operating in the region and is geared to provide clients with a service that most meets their requirements at the lowest possible cost. The Fast + Furious International – Global Village Logistics – team boasts many years of hands on experience in logistics services, customer service and management. With clients being the company’s most valuable asset, emphasis is placed on treating them with respect, dignity and confidentiality regardless of the size and nature of the project. Fast + Furious International – Global Village Logistics – people will work very closely with the client to better understand the client’s specific needs. Highly trained and experienced Fast + Furious International – Global Village Logistics – professionals maximise strategic partnerships and alliances to guarantee the provision of the best worldwide express and logistics solutions in Botswana. Fast + Furious International – Global Village Logistics – strength lies in its ability to provide effective solutions that equip clients with the best service at the best cost. Tel: +267 393 4893 Fax: +267 393 4897 www.globalvillagelogistics.co

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COMPUTERS / SERVERS / SOFTWARE In addition to the office automation offerings, Outsource Digital completes the total business solutions package by offering a range of award

winning Desktops, Laptops and related hardware as in servers and data storage services assisting you in securing the most effective and affordable software. Print Audit 5 is the world’s most comprehensive suite of print tracking products. Its three components Analysis, Reduction and Recovery can be purchased individually or as a suite.

SURVEILLANCE AND SECURITY SOLUTIONS CCTV: In today’s world Surveillance and Security products are key factors for protecting your family, staff, and assets, ensuring their safety and security 24/7. The products are easy to install and maintain and provide peace of mind for the business and home owner. There are various options available to consumers depending on their needs and budget parameters. Analogue CCTV is more cost effective to install, easier to operate and maintain. The ideal security option is digital CCTV since digital is far more flexible, offers recording in a higher definition of multiple tracks. There are additional factors available such as storage capacity, definition (mega pixels) and the frame rate. Access Control: Gone are the days of your employees clocking in and out of their workplace or wondering who accessed your premises when and for how long. Simply install a T50 Fingerprint Access control device or a Terminal Biometric Nitgen Fingerkey and your employees can move swiftly through the process and you always have the data at your fingertips.


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Destination Southern Africa

The Regional Tourism Industry of Southern Africa (RETOSA) is a concept that brings together the 15 captivating and diverse countries of the Southern part of Africa, through the promotion and marketing of tourism in the region. This ensures that a concrete destination identity is created. RETOSA offers a unique opportunity to discover the natural wonders and splendours of the region – the infinite contrasts of scenery, climate, colour, traditions and culture: the African Dream.

RETOSA aims to ensure that the tourism industry becomes the 21st century’s economic driver for SADC through the effective development and promotion of the sector – and they are well on their way to achieving this. They successfully hosted the Festival of Africa as Africa’s signature event during the 2010 FIFA World Cup, ensuring all eyes were on Africa and its endless possibilities, by focusing on encouraging international investment. Another project that RETOSA is driving is the UNIVISA, which is essentially the SADC equivalent of the Schengen visa and will allow tourists to travel across Southern Africa with ease. This ideal mirrors the aim of SADC countries working together for the benefit of one another in breaking down borders and thus creating accessibility. The Executive Director, Mr Francis Mfune has said “in collaboration with Member States organisations, private sector and the media, RETOSA has engaged in several projects that aim to promote tourism opportunities in the region”. Separate puzzle pieces are thus joined together in a broad web that stretches from the West Coast of Southern Africa to the East. This is just the start: the Director of Marketing and Communication, Kwakye Donkor, has said that the face of RETOSA is about to change. The RETOSA board seems to be taking the organisation to a whole new level. Their enthusiasm for the task ahead is echoed in the sentiments on the region: “we believe

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that you will be enchanted not only by our friendly people but also by the unmistakable diverse culture, heritage and landscape”. RETOSA has taken advantage of the endless offerings of the SADC countries in creating a unified brand. Travelling in Southern Africa is an unforgettable experience. It is a region of extremes and natural beauty – a world in 15 countries. The wonder of snow-capped mountains, rugged coastlines and tropical islands compete with sweeping carpets of vibrant flowers and vast areas of unspoilt wilderness. The mist enshrouding the Victoria Falls, the deep silence among the ochre dunes of the Namib, the first glimpse of a mountain gorilla in its natural habitat – all these things affect the soul in ways unfelt in other regions. These images need little embellishment – they speak for themselves. RETOSA therefore doesn’t need to rely on stereotypical perceptions. They are aided by the rich histories and cultures of Southern Africa’s hospitable people – who are hard to be forgotten. The African Dream can be experienced in the 15 incomparable countries that are Southern Africa:

BOTSWANA

ANGOLA

Neighbouring countries: DRC, Zambia, Namibia and Republic of Congo Major activities: Beaches and water sports in Luanda; game viewing, bird watching and river cruises in the Kissama National Park; climbing the Tunda-Vala volcanic fissure; driving the Leba Pass; photographing the dunes in the Iona National Park.

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Neighbouring countries: South Africa, Zimbabwe, Namibia and Zambia Major activities: Water safaris, walking and elephant-back safaris, and game-viewing by aircraft/helicopter in the Okavango Delta; 4x4 wilderness travelling in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO (DRC) Neighbouring countries: Central African Republic, Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Zambia, Angola, Republic of Congo and Tanzania

Major activities: Cruising on the Congo River; sight-seeing in Kinshasa; visiting Lake Kivu and the volcanoes of the Virunga mountain range; boating, rafting or hiking through the rainforest; visiting the mountain gorillas. LESOTHO


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

MAURITIUS

Surrounded by the Indian Ocean Major activities: Snorkelling, scuba diving and ‘undersea strolls’; water sports such as kayaking, jet skiing, parasailing and windsurfing; hiking in the Black River Gorges National Park; visiting Le Morne Brabant. MOZAMBIQUE

Neighbouring countries: Surrounded by South Africa Major activities: Climbing Thaba Bosiu; shopping in Maseru; game viewing, bird watching and pony trekking in the Sehlabathebe National Park; enjoying water sports at the Katse Dam; skiing in the Maloti Mountains.

MALAWI

NAMIBIA

MADAGASCAR

Surrounded by the Indian Ocean Major activities: Snorkelling and diving at Ifaty; visiting the lemurs and the Ankarana Reserve; sight-seeing in Antananarivo.

Neighbouring countries: South Africa, Swaziland, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Tanzania and Malawi Major activities: Kayaking, sailing, dhow trips and snorkelling; visiting the Bazaruto Marine Park and the historical Ilha de Mozambique; game viewing and bird watching in the Gorongosa National Park.

Neighbouring countries: Zambia, Tanzania and Mozambique Major activities: Kayaking, snorkelling and scuba-diving off the pristine beaches of Lake Malawi; horseback safaris in Nyika National Park; exploring the Chongoni rock art; climbing Mount Mulanje.

Neighbouring countries: South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Angola Major activities: Taking a balloon ride over the dunes of Sossusvlei; hiking in the Fish River Canyon; flying over the the Skeleton Coast; taking a safari in the Etosha National Park.

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2011 SADC Summit Brochure

SEYCHELLES

to the top of Table Mountain; game viewing, safaris and bird watching in the Kruger National Park; meandering along the Garden Route; wine-tasting in the wine region; water sports and golfing at the coastal resorts. SWAZILAND

Neighbouring countries: Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, the DRC, Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique Major activities: Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro; visiting Zanzibar; game viewing and bird watching in the Serengeti; visiting the Ngorogoro Crater; taking a boat trip on Lake Victoria. ZAMBIA

Surrounded by the Indian Ocean Major activities: Glass-bottom boating; water sports such as snorkelling, sailing or surfing; island-hopping; visiting natural reserves and marine parks; horse-riding; guided nature tours. SOUTH AFRICA

Neighbouring countries: South Africa and Mozambique Major activities: Visiting the Swazi Cultural Village and the King Sobhuza II Memorial Park; horse-back safaris and guided walks in the Hlane Royal National Park; hiking in the The Malolotja Nature Reserve. TANZANIA

Neighbouring countries: Namibia, Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Mozambique Major activities: Taking a cable car

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Neighbouring countries: Tanzania, the DRC, Malawi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Namibia and Angola Major activities: Scenic flights over the Victoria Falls; swimming in the Devil’s Pool above the falls; white-water rafting and other water sports; river cruises; elephant-back rides; walking with lions, game drives in the Mosi-oaTunya National Park; walking safaris in the South Luangwa National Park.


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

ZIMBABWE

Neighbouring countries: South Africa, Botswana, Zambia and Mozambique Major activities: Flights over the Victoria Falls; sunset cruises on the Zambezi river; bungee jumping off the Victoria Falls Bridge; river rafting and other water sports; swinging through the gorge; elephant-back rides; walking with lions; visiting the Great Zimbabwe National Monument.

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2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Directorate of Human Resources and Administration Highlights of Mandate in the 2011 Summit Brochure HUMAN RESOURCES UNIT In this report we will look at the status of recruitment as directed by Council in Cape Town in 2009. The Secretariat intensively conducted regional and local recruitment from May 2009. The recruitment of the Deputy Executive Secretary –FA was concluded in August 2010 and the Deputy Executive Secretary assumed duty in October 2010. The rest of the vacant positions are still being filled. So far the 56 vacant positions we had in 2009, 85% has been already filled and 15% are to be recruited within the financial year 2012/2013.

The SADC Secretariat implemented the Performance Management System in 2009/2010 and the first review took place in April, 2010. All staff members signed the Performance Agreements and currently the PMS is on course. The only challenge we are facing is the rewards to be given to high performers. In the PMS there is a mention of bonus which is not currently paid and if this is not addressed, then the PMS will be weakened. ADMINISTRATION UNIT Austerity Measures under Travel Management Policy Background

A major area in recruitment continues to be the administration of the quota system and the cost involved in the recruitment of staff under the current SADC Administrative Rules and Procedures. Further to that, regional recruitment is time consuming as the turn around exceeds eight months contrary to three months directed by the Council.

The SADC Secretariat has recently introduced some austerity measures aimed at improving policies and efficiency in travel and holding of technical meetings in Gaborone, Botswana and adopting the utilisation of modern information and communication technologies such as video conferencing facilities.

However we are pleased to report that the Council in 2010 approved that in case where we fail to get suitable candidates in Member States with quota points, we can extend the recruitment to Member States without quota points and recruit one person per country. This will assist the SADC Secretariat to recruit suitable candidates in Member States without quota points. The challenges reported in 2010/2011 still stand.

Up to now, the existing SADC Secretariat Travel Policy still reflects the role of the Secretariat prior to the major re-structuring of 2001. There has been no single comprehensive Travel Policy. There was therefore a need for the Secretariat to have in place an adequate planning, management and control over official travel, with a view to achieving a cost-reduction and enhancing effectiveness of travel.

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cumulatively; • Reduced number of eligibility for per diem per mission from 10 to 14 days; and • Removal of payment of per diem and other travel costs on attendance of third party events; • All travel services shall be acquired in accordance with SADC Secretariat Procurement Rules and Procedures, with a particular focus made on securing services of a specialised Travel Management Agent. • Operating functions or individuals are no longer permitted to make their own travel arrangements; and • Travel budgets consolidated to enable the organisation to benefit from economies of scale in acquisition of travel. Other austerity measures

The Secretariat has, in the process of reviewing its operational policies examined the practices of other organisations, such as the African Union and emerging best-practices, amongst others. The review of the Travel Policy also subscribes to the following principles: • Relevance: that only travels that are in accordance with the implementation of the prioritised RISDP and SIPO programmes and supporting actions, properly authorised by the relevant person in the organisation and are proven essential for the employee’s capacity to perform the duties, and are expected to bring benefits to the Institution shall be considered; • Safety: that all travel arrangements shall put the life and integrity of the employee and his/her accompaniment above all other considerations; • Value for money: that only the most economic advantageous travel arrangements, on the most direct and time efficient routes and modes for travelling and only the essential travel expenses shall be authorised; • Reality of occurrence: that to enhance accountability only travel that can be proved with appropriate supporting documents shall be accepted; and • Effective management: that the management of travel shall be user friendly, easy enforceable and controlled, and require minimum costs for the implementation by the Institution. In light of the review, the following changes are being introduced: Austerity These measures include: • Introduction of an annual limit on official travel of 45 days per fiscal year, i.e. 20% of available working days in a year, excluding participation at statutory meetings; • Staff members not being allowed to be on consecutive official missions for more than 10 working days,

The following austerity measures were approved by Council in August, 2010, and are presently implemented: • Policy meetings: Besides the statutory meetings of Summit, Organ Summit, Council and Ministerial Committee of the Organ, the other ministerial structures should reduce their meetings as follows: • Peace and Security: one ordinary meeting a year, unless there is an emergency which may call for extra-ordinary meeting; • Economic integration: two ordinary meetings a year; and • Special programmes of regional dimension: human, socio-economic development, as per the outcome of Lusaka re-prioritisation workshop of August 2007, one ordinary meeting every two or three years; • Technical meetings: significant reduction of these meetings; • Peace and Security; limited to one ordinary technical meeting a year; • Economic integration; limited to three ordinary technical meetings a year; and • Special programmes of regional dimension; human, socio-economic development, as per the outcome of Lusaka re-prioritisation meeting of August 2007, limited to one ordinary technical meeting a year. Management of travel SADC Secretariat currently does not have an overall defined travel management framework. Currently, the control is budget oriented only. Proposed improvements involve setting out clear framework for the management of travel, which include: • Definition of eligible travel and costs; • Role and responsibilities of management; and • System of monitoring and reporting of travel under the control of the Director of Human Resources and Administration. The expected benefits from these measures include the following: • improved utilisation of human resources;

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• • • •

enhanced relevance of travel; increased impact of the Secretariat; better focus of the Secretariat; and availed tools to management to better control travel.

Holding of technical meetings in Gaborone, Botswana and adopting the utilisation of modern information and communication technologies such as video conferencing facilities. Proposed Improvements include the following: • Entering into framework contracts with local and regional service providers, such as Hotels, Airlines, Transport Operators and conference service providers (Translation, Interpretation, Catering, Conference equipment and venue); • Using the SADC Headquarters as a venue for smaller technical meetings; • Improved co-ordination and planning of meetings through a central platform. In this regard, a calendar if events will be prepared at the beginning of each year in order to secure meeting venues in good time; and • Circulation of documentation using the extra-net and use of video conferencing facilities for engagements not requiring meetings. SADC NCPs / NCs to be sensitised on these e-facilities. • Using Johannesburg as a venue for some meetings in order to reduce costs for delegates from Member States and the Secretariat. This will eliminate the need for connecting flights to Gaborone and ensure early return of delegates to their capitals because there are frequent flights out of Johannesburg. Impact of the proposed improvements The policy is presently undergoing further review to introduce additional austerity measures as directed by council at its February 2011 meeting. The overall impact of these measures is that they will improve efficiency and overall effectiveness of the SADC Secretariat. PROCUREMENT The Secretariat now has a new Procurement Policy Framework which will be rolled out in the financial year 2012/2013. This new procurement framework’s rules and procedures apply standards which offer guarantees equivalent to internationally accepted practice. The assumption by the Secretariat of the lead role in the implementation of the Regional Indicative Strategy Development Plan (RISDP) has placed a heavy burden on the capacity of the Secretariat. In the area of procurement, this burden resulted in the procurement function being very fragmented, with the active involvement of technical directorates in handling procurement initiatives. This fragmentation has, thus far, been necessary for the Secretariat to manage the situation as a highly centralised

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procurement system was not feasible due to capacity constraints. This burden is anticipated to continue for some time into the future and the success of regional integration efforts will be dependent on the extent to which the capacity at all levels can be developed to match the requirements. The Procurement Policy framework has proposed an optimum structure to meet this demand. The framework has created a dedicated procurement function responsible for handling all procurement initiatives for the Secretariat. It has aligned the level of procurement competence among the various positions within the Procurement Function to be consistent with their procurement responsibilities. RECORDS MANAGEMENT PROJECT A consultancy on Records management undertaken by the International Records Management Trust of United Kingdom in conjunction with the University of Botswana school of Library and Information Studies is underway in the Secretariat. The consultancy is reviewing and aligning the Secretariat’s records management processes, in order to enhance, easy access of records and information. An Electronic Records and Document Management system (ERDMS) will be installed which will allow centralisation of all records into the Secretariat and will introduce automated work processes. The revitalisation and modernisation of these processes and procedures should result in timely availability of records and information for effective and informed decision making throughout SADC Secretariat and will serve better the information needs of Member States. This project will also lead to the preservation of SADC’s documentary heritage.


SOUTHERN AFRICA (SADC) MAGAZINE Sharing knowledge, future vision and inspiration in the pursuit of best practice in governance and leadership

D E H C N U LA

1 1 0 2 Y A M


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

WORLD TRADE CENTER

Building an African network of World Trade Centers Africa Open for Trade – A Plethora of Business Opportunities Just as a wave gains huge momentum and power before crashing onto the shores of Africa’s dramatic coastline – so trade and growth are gaining huge momentum on this incredibly diverse continent. Africa – as an emerging Market will continue to serve as a major growth engine of the global economy. However to achieve success and advance the African economies in a highly developed and competitive market, the individual African developing economies must pool their resources together and work alongside each other. The World Trade Centers Association is on the forefront of this burgeoning trade. It is on the cusp of a wave that is constantly gathering more energy. As ports and harbours are Africa’s gateway to the World; the World Trade Centers are the gateway to Africa. Hence, the rationale for World Trade Centers springing up in numerous cities across sub-Saharan Africa. The goal is thus simple: to increase trade with Africa through each of the regional World Trade Centers in this vast continent. With a worldwide network of businesses in more than 100 countries and 330 cities, the World Trade Centers Association has successfully

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increased trade all over the world. Now, their sights are set on Africa and the wealth of opportunities it has to offer. World Trade Centers are powerhouses that amalgamate all the facilities and services necessary to transact international business and give companies (regardless of size) the expeditious access to international markets and a universal language to communicate with. The Mochron Office for International Trade, that provides services to the World Trade Center Johannesburg and Cape Town, has as its primary objective to increase trade with Africa and hence to achieve this objective applied to the WTCA (World Trade Centers Association) for 12 additional WTC licenses in sub-Saharan Africa and more specifically the SADC region (over and above the existing two South African licenses – WTC Cape Town and Johannesburg). These options were granted by the WTCA in New York to establish future WTC cities and are as follows: Angola (Luanda), Botswana (WTC Gaborone), DRC (WTC Kinshasa), Kenya (WTC Nairobi), Mozambique (WTC Maputo), Madagascar (WTC Antananarivo), Namibia (WTC Windhoek), Republic of Djibouti (WTC Djibouti), Rwanda (WTC Kigali), Tanzania (WTC Dar es Salaam), Uganda (WTC Kampala), Zambia (WTC Lusaka) and Zimbabwe (WTC Harare). The export of African natural resources, coupled with Value Add Processing on the continent, will in return stimulate the import of capital equipment and other foreign direct investment, as well as the engineering and manufacturing sectors. African business people have a deep-rooted pride and desire to use their own skills, creating direct wealth on the continent.

and operate as a unified global business force. Services offered by The Mochron Office for International Trade: • Trade Promotion • Transactional Trade Services and Trade Education • Import/Export Management • Financial and Risk Management Solutions Pertaining to Importing & Exporting • WTC Executive Club Offering exclusive business services including: around the clock Private Banking, Executive Travel, Personalised & Individualised Executive global introductions, reciprocal office facilities in more than 300 cities, fast track access to all World Trade Center services, and multiple first mover opportunities. A crucial unprecedented service offering extended by the Strategic Business Unit – Trade facilitation – is an essential dimension in economic development in today’s globalised world, especially from a developing country’s perspective. Trade facilitation reduces the transaction cost and complexity of International Trade and improves the trading and investment environment in a country, while at the same time enhancing government control. As a consequence, trade facilitation results in mutual benefits for both the public and private sector and thus, in the end, transforms into increased welfare for the individual citizens. In layman terms, this is where the action occurs; WTC trade deals are executed at this stage, which includes freight forwarding, shipping, shipping insurance, clearance, couriering, trade financing, trade project financing, legal/regulatory requirements, bonded warehousing, trade settlement, and full Import/Export management.

Services The Mochron Office for International Trade leverages the capabilities of 43 Sub-Sahara African countries to function

Together we can make a difference and achieve our individual growth objectives as well as achieve an increase of one percent of Global Trade with Africa which will earn

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the African continent approximately US$70-billion in annual revenue (which equates to more than three times the current foreign aid donations it receives and 16 percent more than Africa requires to alleviate poverty on the continent.) Business Opportunities Forty-three World Trade Center real-estate opportunities and spin-off business opportunities across African countries have been created. Real-estate value for developers using the World Trade Center brand is significant both in occupancy rate and rental returns, while the spin-off business opportunities leverage the business network of every businessperson for sustained and regular deal flow. The business opportunity with the Office for International Trade is therefore threefold: I. Real Estate Development: World Trade Centers are some of the most iconic buildings, which serve as landmarks in the respective cities where they operate. These buildings command rental rates at an average of 18 percent higher than similar buildings less than a street block away. Vacancy rates are in most cases 11 percent less than the market average. Countries like China are developing more than 120 WTCs because of the macro-economic impact this has on their country. The World Trade Center brand together with highimage/impact events and large volumes of people who visit WTCs provide implicit value to tenants. WTC buildings consolidate international trade agencies and private sector firms involved in global trade and commerce, providing a single point of access – it is a visible location of mostly intangible services. The Office for International Trade provides the services and management for the WTC projects it undertakes in Africa. The opportunity is for Real Estate Developers to capitalise on this opportunity without the need to run the operations of the WTC in Africa.

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II. Export and Import: Companies across sub-Saharan Africa are invited to participate and grow their business globally, through the development of import and export trade both on the continent and off the continent. These companies will enjoy exposure through the region’s local WTC office to more than one million potential business partners at other WTCs globally. As the power of the World Trade Center network extends across countries and nations, each participating business is able to grow globally through The Mochron Office for International Trade and each regional WTC. The opportunities within a World Trade Center are not exclusive to big business. Each World Trade Center is required to engage local business to participate in every aspect of it is global success. As a professional person active in one of 150 selected regions, you are invited to apply for accreditation from The Mochron Office for International Trade. A successful accreditation will ensure your regional agency license. The agency represents The Mochron Office for International Trade and is the local partner that exclusively generates business between that region and The Mochron Office for International Trade. Agency revenue will be generated through every transaction with The Mochron Office for International Trade. These range from Trade Missions, Trade Exhibitions, International Trade Deals, Trade Finance, World Trade Center Real Estate and much more. To be qualified to carry this international accreditation and secure an agency license, applicants need to be mature businesspersons, who have held senior executive positions in business over a number of years. In most cases only experienced senior directors and managing directors can receive this accreditation – alternatively individuals with similar experience can apply. Applicants are required to attend training and assessments during a three week Regional Business School Training Seminar at the World Trade Center,


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

followed by an interview with a panel of fully accredited businesspersons. During this assessment period, The Mochron Office for International Trade ensures that its regional agents are experienced enough to talk business, to its international clients. A regional agent is part of the global team for The Mochron Office for International Trade and they are the contributors to the Africa one percent goal. To assist in ensuring the agency success, accredited agents are introduced to the CEOs of strategic business partners in their regions and to the CEOs of other World Trade Centers. They are also automatically members of the World Trade Center Executive Club, receive sponsored international business travel, VIP conference passes, have access to World Trade Center technology platforms and office infrastructure. Only a select number of professional persons can be invited to secure an opportunity to grow their personal wealth and experience the challenges and excitement of international business. III. Strategic Partnerships: Strategic Partners in each economic region of Africa are required to make trade as seamlessly as possible. It is efficiency that generates the profit which grows the value of local business and economies. We therefore invite companies that provide business services related to: freight forwarding, shipping, customs brokers, business brokers, business consultants, accounting, legal, business development, international trade, import/export, global sourcing, procurement, commodity traders, professional conference organising, international marketing and publishing, trade and credit risk insurance and trade finance to come forth. Strategic partnerships will be formed with a select number of these companies in each economic region. In addition, the Office for International Trade is also seeking partnerships with port authorities, customs offices, warehousing and banking partners across Africa. It takes drive, ambition and superb business acumen to reach the highest echelons of the corporate world. Invest in your future – invest in your continent – World Trade Center, your investment partner. Julius Steyn, CEO World Trade Center Cape Town and CEO Mochron Investments World Trade Center Crystal Towers, Century City Cape Town, South Africa Email: info@wtc.co.za Telephone: +27 87 944 4072 www.wtc.co.za

WORLD TRADE CENTER SOUTH AFRICA (WTC CAPE TOWN & JOHANNESBURG) AFRICA HEAD QUARTERS BOTSWANA (WTC GABARONE) | KENYA (WTC NAIROBI) | MOZAMBIQUE (WTC MAPUTO) NAMIBIA (WTC WINDHOEK) | RWANDA (WTC KIGALI) | TANZANIA (WTC DAR ES SALAAM) UGANDA (WTC KAMPALA) | ZAMBIA (WTC LUSAKA) AN AFRICAN INITIATIVE

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Directorate of Trade, Industry, Finance and Investment (Tifi) The mandate of the TIFI Directorate is to co-ordinate regional trade and financial liberalisation; to facilitate competitive, diversified industrial development; to promote increased investment into the SADC region and to promote the integration of the SADC economy into the global economy. Finally, TIFI is mandated to foster regional integration through assisting in the implementation of the SADC Free Trade Area, the creation of the Customs Union, Common Market and the Monetary Union. TIFI has the following major intervention areas, whose impacts on growth and development are intrinsically interrelated: (i) Goods and services market integration; (ii) Financial and capital markets development and strengthening; (iii) Attainment of deeper monetary co-operation; (iv) Attainment of macro-economic convergence; (v) Increasing levels of intra-SADC investment and foreign direct investment. (FDI); (vi) Enhancing productive competitiveness; and (vii) Effective participation in and compliance with international agreements. The above major intervention areas are critical in the stimulation of growth and development of the SADC economies both individually and collectively. Such interventions are also catalytic to deeper regional economic integration, a key objective of the Regional Indicative Strategic Development Plan (RISDP).

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Goods and Services Market Integration In pursuit of its mandate to spearhead market integration in SADC through the establishment of the SADC Free Trade Area (FTA) and subsequently the SADC Customs Union, 2010-11 plans for trade focused on consolidating the FTA. This was primarily through drawing up of a more systematic plan for following up on activities arising from the implementation of SADC FTA such as facilitating accession and joining of the FTA by Angola, DRC and Seychelles; implementation of tariff reduction commitments; addressing Non-Tariff Barriers to trade (NTBs); and reviewing rules of origin applicable under the FTA. Plans also focused on simplification and harmonisation of trade documentation and procedures; promotion and facilitation of trade; enhancement of Customs-to-Customs co-operation and Customs-to-Business partnerships; and effective capacity building for the SADC Customs Administrations. Tariff reduction and removal of NTBs The majority of SADC countries are on course in meeting their tariff reduction commitments under the Protocol on Trade. It is envisaged that most Member States will complete their tariff reductions at the beginning of 2012. Regarding NTBs, significant progress has been made in establishing a credible mechanism for the elimination of NTBs within SADC and between SADC, COMESA and the EAC under the tripartite process. The mechanism allows for reporting, monitoring and elimination of non-tariff barriers.


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Its usage has been greatly enhanced through its online application. During 2010/11, over 60% of reported NTBs have been resolved. Establishment of a SADC Customs Union The SADC RISDP had envisaged that a Customs Union would be established by 2010. However the Ministerial Task Force on Regional Economic Integration noted that the date was unattainable and established a High Level Expert Group tasked with reaching a common understanding on key elements of the Customs Union, and to report to the Task Force before the end of 2011. Trade in services A draft Protocol on Trade in Services was developed, in line with Article 23 of the SADC Protocol on Trade. It was approved by Ministers of Trade in July 2009. The Protocol will be presented for signature to the Heads of State and Government during the August 2011 Summit meeting. The draft Protocol on Trade in Services constitutes a framework agreement that provides a basic set of rules for services trade in the SADC region, but does not per se provide for the substantive liberalisation of SADC Member States services markets. This liberalisation will be carried out through the negotiation of commitments by all the SADC Member States to be undertaken once the Protocol has been signed, ratified and is in force. In preparation for the substantive negotiations, Negotiating and Scheduling Guidelines for the first round of SADC Trade in Services Negotiations were developed and adopted by the Ministers of Trade. These negotiations will focus on liberalisation of six priority services sectors, namely: communication, construction, energy-related services, financial, tourism and transport services. Competition policy Under the area of Competition Policy, the focus was on development of capacity in those Members still in the process of setting up competition authorities. This process will continue in 2011-12 and has been enhanced by the securing of Trade.Com support for a capacity building project to run for the duration of the 2011/2012 year. Trade facilitation and customs modernisation Co-ordinated Border Management is a key factor in the success of cross-border facilitation initiatives, which require commitment and co-operation among all the border agencies. In this regard a draft guideline on Co-ordinated Border Management has been developed and awaits approval. In addition, the legal instruments of the SADC Transit Management System (STMS) comprising common law and documentation have been developed and adopted. A pilot of the One Stop Border Post (OSBP) was

undertaken at the Chirundu Border Post between Zambia and Zimbabwe. This pilot has been effective in enhancing co-operation amongst border agencies and in facilitating trade. It has also provided lessons to build upon as the concept is rolled out to other border posts in the region. Efforts are underway to implement the same concept at other border posts. The establishment of a wide area network (WAN) linking Customs administrations to enable sharing and exchange of information was not met as targeted. However, the SADC Organ on Peace and Security has commenced a project to connect contact points in SADC Member States through a VSAT system (Via Satellite) which could also provide a backbone for creating a WAN that will link Member States Customs administrations. Consultation between the SADC IT Unit, Customs Unit and the SADC Organ has taken place with a view to ensuring how this can be implemented. Preparations for a Tripartite FTA At Tripartite level, notable progress has been achieved in fulfilling the objective of establishing a broader Free Trade Area amongst Member States of COMESA, EAC and SADC with negotiations for the FTA launched during the 2nd meeting of the Tripartite Summit held in June 2011 in Johannesburg, South Africa. EPA Negotiations In the area of Economic Partnership Agreements (EPA) focus was on the conclusion of an all-inclusive EPA and the development of a framework on Services and Investment. However, negotiations for an all-inclusive EPA on goods was not concluded by end of 2010 as agreed on account of lack of agreement on the scope of coverage for the negotiations with the EC proposing that trade related issues, including Geographical Indications, Intellectual Property Rights, Sustainable Development and Taxation be part of the negotiation agenda. Nonetheless, progress was made in the following areas: finalisation of a draft text on Investment, which was shared with the EC; the finalisation of the draft text on services and joint modalities, which are subject to national consultations; and a draft joint working text on cumulating. Progress was also made on developing new textual proposals on some of the provisions of the Interim Agreement which some of the Members of the SADC EPA group considered contentious and needed to be resolved. Furthermore, it was agreed that the texts agreed at Swakopmund in March 2009 on some of the unresolved issues be part of the final EPA. Finance and Investment Finance and Investment focuses on four intervention areas, namely: financial and capital markets development; attainment of deeper monetary co-operation; tax coordination and related matters; and increasing levels of

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intra-SADC investment and foreign direct investment (FDI). To this end, the objectives for the year under review included facilitating the harmonisation of policy and legal frameworks in the areas of banking, payment systems, and non-banks; facilitating the development of policy options for the harmonisation of the investment regimes, including a model framework for Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) and addressing barriers to FDI; and facilitating closer co-operation with regard to taxation and related matters in the SADC region, including a common approach to tax agreements, tax incentives indirect taxes and tax database. FIP Implementation During the year under review several visits to Member States were undertaken in order to assess the status of implementation of the Protocol on Finance and Investment (FIP) within the respective Member States as well as the level and nature of support that Member States require to strengthen and advance implementation of the FIP. The main findings of the visits include: limited awareness of the FIP and its implications for the countries concerned; limited national co-ordination and absence of national FIP policies; and capacity deficiencies in the technical areas required for implementation of the FIP. Capacity building emerged as the most pressing need at the national level. Following the assessment it was recommended that a pro-forma road map for regional implementation of the FIP be developed and made available to Member States to guide them in the development of their own national implementation strategies. An assessment of implementation of FIP in Member States is underway and this will inform the development of the FIP implementation roadmap. Investment In the area of investment, an investment promotion programme under the theme ‘1 Team, 15 Nations for Sustainable Investment’ (SADC 2010) was implemented to take advantage of the 2010 Africa Cup of Nations hosted by Angola and the 2010 World Cup hosted by South Africa. This encompassed the development of an online media centre, interviews with the media; and production of a SADC 2010 film. As a follow up to the 2010 Investment Programme, a Public Private Partnership (PPP) Network was launched, which is seen as a build up to the SADC Public Private Dialogue (PPD) series scheduled for the following year. The launch of the network will ensure that there is a common communication and co-operation policy, which will govern the interaction between the SADC Secretariat and the Private Sector. A concept Note for Private Sector Participation in SADC has been developed and discussed at a meeting between SADC and cooperating partners. An assessment of the SADC Investment Regimes was undertaken to establish the current status of investment laws and policies in all Member States and whether they are aligned with the obligations of the FIP; to compare existing

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laws and policies with international best practice; and to recommend options for the harmonisation of such laws and policies at the SADC regional level. An investment portal (a web based database) has also been developed with the assistance of Mauritius; and the report of the Investment Regimes will form a basis for the portal. Collaboration with the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) to develop a Model SADC BIT Framework SADC has resulted in Members States reaching a consensus to develop guidelines for a Model SADC BIT. This work was based on an assessment analysing a selection of BITs signed by SADC Member States, the COMESA Investment Agreement and the FIP with respect to the constraints these agreements may place on SADC Member States’ ability to regulate foreign investment to serve their development interests in a sustainable manner. Banking, Capital Markets and Development Finance Work is in progress regarding the modalities of the establishment of a SADC Central Bank and Single Currency. The Central Bank Officials are in discussion regarding the theoretical and empirical issues relating to the establishment of a regional Central Bank as well as the key legal instruments used in the operational implementation of the Regional Central Bank; and expected challenges. A strategic plan for the Committee of Insurance, Securities and Non-Banking Authorities (CISNA) was developed setting priorities, action plans and anticipated results for the next five years. This plan will also be an operational/ management tool for the mobilisation of resources to support and execute the CISNA mandate and will also be used as a guide to co-ordination, monitoring and evaluation. The operational implementation of the SADC Project Preparation and Development Facility (PPDF) was facilitated.


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Economic performance for the SADC region for 2010 remained positive. Average real GDP rebounded to just above the 2008 level. Inflation remained supportive with most of the region recording single digit inflation rates by end-December 2010. Fiscal positions of most SADC states improved with satisfactory performance in fiscal balances and public debts to GDP.

The PPDF Trust was registered in South Africa in October 2010 and governance documents such as operational guidelines, procurement manual and financial management framework have been put in place. Tax Co-ordination In the area of tax, work on the development of the SADC Tax Database continued through finalisation of the registration and password process and a second Database update workshop to train two further delegates from Member States in remote real time updating. A SADC Model Double Taxation Avoidance Agreement (DTAA) and Commentary were developed and finalised in 2010. Training in interpretation of tax agreements and practical negotiation to improve the uptake also delivered to all Member States. A VAT cross border MOU for information exchange was also developed but this was superseded by the development of the SADC Agreement for Assistance in Tax Matters (AATM) that is multilateral for all Member States. This was approved by Ministers of Finance in 2009 and is expected to be signed at the 2011 Summit. Macro-economic Convergence Member States committed themselves to converge on stability-oriented economic policies in order to achieve and maintain macro-economic stability within the region. The convergence areas are: restricting inflation to low and stable levels; maintaining a prudent fiscal stance, based on the avoidance of large budget deficits, monetisation of deficits and high or rising ratios of public and publicly guaranteed debt to GDP; avoiding large financial imbalances in the economy of a Member State; and minimising market distortions.

With regard to the Macro-economic Convergence indicators, a total of five Member States (Lesotho, Mauritius, South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe) met the 2012 Macroeconomic Convergence Programme (MEC) inflation target of less than 5 per cent in 2010. Angola, Botswana, DRC, Malawi and Zimbabwe met the 2012 MEC fiscal deficit target of less than 3 per cent of GDP in 2010 while all Member States except for DRC, Mauritius and Zimbabwe met the 2012 MEC public debt target of 60 per cent of GDP in 2010. A total of six Member States recorded real GDP growth above the regional target of 7 per cent. These are Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Enhancing Productive Competitiveness During the year under review, activities under enhancing productive competitiveness focused on the development of the SADC Industrial Development Policy and Strategies; implementation of the Industrial Upgrading and Modernisation Programme (IUMP) at regional and national levels; implementation of the plan for the Harmonisation of Mining Policy, Standards, Legislative and Regulatory Framework; and development of an infrastructure for Standards, Quality Assurance, Accreditation and Metrology (SQAM). Industry Consultations on the development of the SADC Industrial Development Policy continued with visits to Angola, Botswana, DRC, Lesotho, Malawi, Namibia, Swaziland and Tanzania. Consultations pointed out to the need to identify interventions that can be undertaken at regional level and the extent of regional co-operation towards industrial development in SADC. A Memorandum of Understanding between the SADC Secretariat and UNIDO was signed in August 2010 to formalise and strengthen the relationship between the two parties and enhance collaboration on matters pertaining to industrial development. Mining Following the approval of the Implementation Plan for the Harmonisation of Mining Policies, Standards, Legislative and Regulatory Frameworks (HIP) in SADC in 2009, the Geological Survey Committee (GSC) was re-established.

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harmonisation programmes; growth in awareness of SQAM as evidenced by more private sector participants in regional standards technical committees; launch of the SADC Annual Quality Award competition; establishment of a functional regional accreditation operation (SADCAS); a programme of technical regulations harmonisation started; growth of organisations participating in Proficiency Testing (PT) and inter-comparison schemes; and increased use of International Organisation of Legal Metrology (OIML) documents in Member States thus achieving harmonisation in this area. Conclusion

This committee used to exist under the now defunct SADCC Mining Sector Coordinating Unit (MCU), which was based in Zambia. The Embassy of Japan through the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC) in co-operation with the Department of Geological Survey (DGS) of the Government of the Republic of Botswana has established a remote sensing centre for conducting remote sensing analysis and transferring of its basic and applied technologies into the SADC region. The project includes conducting training courses for the region at the centre using Japanese techniques such as ASTER. A draft Security Framework for the major minerals produced in the SADC region was developed. The framework entails a comprehensive minerals tracking and certification system to ensure that illegitimately acquired mineral products do not enter legitimate value chains both in countries where actual mining takes place and in those through which the minerals transit for export. Standards, Quality Assurance, Accreditation and Metrology Most of the activities under the SQAM programme in 201011 were project-related and aimed at capacity building in the following areas of SQAM: standardisation, technical regulations, metrology (industrial and legal), accreditation and conformity assessment. The EU supported project ended in November 2010 and to carry on with future activities a three year agreement was entered into with the German Government. By the end of the 2010/11 financial year the SQAM programme had realised the following: an increase in the number of trained experts in all areas of SQAM and thus availability of more technicians to spearhead standards

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During the year under review, a number of achievements were realised under TIFI. Major achievements include efforts to facilitate accession and joining of the FTA by Angola, DRC and Seychelles; adoption of negotiating guidelines for the liberalisation of trade in services; assessment of customs administrations to ensure that their legislation and procedures conform to international best practices; and development of guidelines on co-ordinated border management. Further TIFI implemented an investment promotion programme within the context of the 2010 World Cup; an Investment Portal was developed; and the PPDF was put into operation. In the area of productive competitiveness, consultations on the development of SADC Industrial Development Policy continued; a draft Security Framework for major minerals was developed; and a number of capacity building efforts under SQAM were carried out. Despite progress in a number of areas, little progress was realised in relation to preparations for the SADC Customs Union. Further, negotiations for an all-inclusive EPA on goods was not concluded by end-2010 as agreed on account of lack of agreement on scope of coverage for the negotiations.


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Official Opening of the SADC Headquarters

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15 SADC Heads of State and Governments listening to the citation by Mr Nyambe Nyambe, Senior Officer, Natural Resources and Wildlife 16 President of the Democratic Republic of Congo H.E Joseph Kabila Kabange planting a tree 17 Rt Honourable Morgan Tsvangirai, Prime Minister of the Republic of Zimbabwe with Hon Pandu Skelemani, Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Relations Botswana, RT Honurable Prof Arthur Mutambara, Deputy Prime Minister, Republic of Zimbabwe and and Hon Matambo, Ministers of Finance and Development Planning – Botswana 18 President of the Republic of Zimbabwe H.E Robert G. Mugabe planting a tree 19 SADC Secretariat staff during the official opening 20 SADC Executive Management, Dr Salomao, Ms Emilie A. Mushobekwa and Eng. Caholo admiring the marimba band during the official opening ceremony 21 Members of the SADC Management Team during the official opening 22 SADC Chairperson H.E Pohamba unveiling the SADC Headquarters plaque. Looking on is Dr Salomao, His Excellency President Robert Mugabe, His Excellency President Joseph Kabila Kabange and His Excellency President Jacob Zuma

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The 2011 Sadc Media Awards The 2011 SADC Media Awards recorded an unprecedented turn-over of entries, highlighting an increase in the coverage of SADC in Member States. A record thirty-four SADC Media Awards entries were received and adjudicated on by the SADC Regional Adjudication Committee (RAC) at its meeting in Harare, Zimbabwe from June 27 to July 1 2011. The quality of the entries heightened competition in all the four categories of Photo Journalism, Print, Radio and Television. The winning margins showed that the competition was very intense, especially in the Print, Radio and Television categories. Adjudicators were overwhelmed by the quality of the entries. Picking one winner in each category was not an easy task. Notwithstanding the intensity of the competition, the best entries emerged and were awarded. Mr. Alfredo Lazaro Mueche from the Republic of Mozambique won the Photo Journalism award with his pictorial story “Na Grande Festa”. The Television category was won by Mr. Steven Yarukeekuro Ndorokaze from the Republic of Namibia, whose documentary on “The TransKalahari Highway” is worth archiving. Mr. Jose Lopes Canhina from the Republic of Angola scooped the Radio category award for his documentary “O papel do camihno de ferro de Benguela no processo de integracao regional da SADC”, which brings to the fore the benefits of rehabilitating the Benguela Railway Line within the SADC regional integration agenda. Mr. Justin Mahlahla from the Republic of Zimbabwe won the Print category with his feature on

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“SADC at 30”, detailing SADC achievements and challenges in the last 30 years. (See below). These winners will be awarded their prizes of two thousand US dollars each during the official opening of the SADC Heads of State and Government Summit in Luanda, Republic of Angola in August 2011. The SADC Media Awards competition takes place every year in the print, photojournalism, radio and television categories. The competition is open to all journalists who are SADC nationals. Below is the full version of the winning article in the print category by Mr. Justin Mahlahla as it was published on the ZBC News Website:


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

SADC AT 30 Justin Mahlahla On April 1, 1980 African leaders who included Julius Nyerere of Tanzania, Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia, Seretse Khama of Botswana, Samora Machel of Mozambique and Agostinho Neto of Angola met in Lusaka, Zambia and formed the Southern African Development Co-ordination Conference (SADCC) transformed in 1992 into the Southern African Development Community. The organisation was formed under the theme ‘Towards Economic Liberation.’ It has 15 member countries: Angola, Botswana, DR Congo, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The founding fathers, imbued with the principles of brotherhood and common destiny joined synergies, strategies and resources, under the umbrella of the movement of Frontline states to face the challenges that bedevilled the continent. So much has been realised during the 30 years that SADC has been in existence. On August 17 2010 SADC celebrated 30 years since its formation and the region has benefited from a number of socio-economic and political achievements in that period, including democracy in Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe. On the economic front, the accomplishments include the SADC Free Trade Area launched in 2008, creating a regional market worth over US$430 billion with a combined population of more than 260 million. This market growth has put the region in a stronger position to respond effectively to global economic competition. To ensure that this economic integration is maintained and deepened, SADC aims to transform the FTA into a Customs Union by 2011, a Common Market by 2015 and a Monetary Union in 2018. By attaining the status of FTA in 2008, producers and consumers in the SADC region benefit from tariff-free trade for an estimated 85% of all goods originating within the region. The remaining 15% tariff line is expected to be phased out by 2012. The scrapping of tariffs and some non-tariffs barriers should see a significant increase in domestic production as Member States seek to meet increased demand. Consumers in the region should be the greatest beneficiaries of a free market as they can expect to get better products at lower prices due to increased production. All SADC Member States are members of the FTA, with the exception of Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The two countries are expected to join the FTA

soon, after requesting time to rebuild their economies following decades of armed conflict. A recent report by the Ministerial Task Force on Regional Economic Integration says significant progress is being made by Member States in implementation of the FTA. A further goal is the creation of greater FTA encompassing members of the Common Market for East and Southern Africa (Comesa), the East African Community (EAC) and SADC, numbering 26 countries, half of Africa. The 2009 launch of the One Stop Border Post at Chirundu between Zambia and Zimbabwe is another milestone for the region in its quest to deepen integration and promote the movement of goods, services and people across the region. Identified by SADC and Comesa as a pilot project of the one-stop border initiative, Chirundu provides a model to encourage continental integration as envisaged by the African Union. The One Stop Border Post, a first on the African continent, allows travellers to be cleared just once for passage into another country in contrast with the prevailing situation in which travellers have to be sanctioned on both sides of the border, often generating lengthy delays. Another major investment achievement recorded by SADC is the transformation of transport corridors into broader Spatial Development Corridors, and establishment of the North-South Corridor between Durban and Dar es Salaam, as a development priority. Maputo and Walvis Bay are some examples as they respectively provide an alternative gateway to the Indian Ocean in the east and the Atlantic Ocean in the west. On energy co-operation, the creation of the Southern African Power Pool (SAPP) by 12 national utilities stands out as a major achievement by SADC in its plans to co-ordinate efforts to exploit the numerous energy resources in the region. Since the formation of SAPP in 1995, all power utilities in mainland SADC with the exception of Angola, Malawi and the United Republic of Tanzania are interconnected, allowing them to sell electricity to one another through bilateral arrangements as well as a competitive market. SAPP has identified a number of priority energy projects for commissioning over the next few years to address the energy situation in the region, although most of these are yet to be fully implemented. Between 2009 and 2013, SAPP expects member utilities to commission projects that would add about 8,800 Megawatts (MW) of electricity to the regional grid, allowing the region to balance supply and demand. With respect to tourism and investment, SADC can count it’s achievements as the development of several Trans Frontier Conversation Areas (TFCA) such as, among others, the Greater Limpopo (which straddles Mozambique, South

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Africa and Zimbabwe), and several river basin commissions to guide the development of the 15 shared river basins in the region. Despite these achievements, the tourism industry remains challenged by the slow pace of implementation of programmes such as the Univisa, now being piloted by five countries. A Univisa will enable tourists to move between and across associated countries with ease without having to apply for travel documents each time they enter a different country. SADC is one of the Regional Economic Communities (RECs) envisaged by the African Union as the building blocks of an African Economic Community, approved in 1991. SADC is working towards the promotion of gender equality and empowerment of women in all sectors, and implementation of 50-50 representation by 2015 in line with the African Union. SADC Heads of State and Governments signed the SADC Protocol on Gender and Development in 2008, which is now in the process of ratification and domestication. The Protocol has so far been ratified by Namibia and Zimbabwe, and needs ratification by 10 Member States before it enters into force.

SADC also brokered talks in Zimbabwe that resulted in the formation of an inclusive government led by President Robert Mugabe, after almost 10 years of political rivalry that has impacted on the country’s economy. In Lesotho and Madagascar, the SADC Organ Troika is still searching for a solution working with all major stakeholders to ensure that constitutional normalcy is restored to those countries. SADC has established a Regional Peace Training Centre and a standby force – the SADC Brigade – to participate in peace missions at the request of Member States, to maintain stability and prevent conflicts from spreading into other neighbouring areas or countries. To promote common political values and systems, the region adopted the SADC Principles and Guidelines Governing Democratic Elections in 2004. Member States have since successfully implemented the guidelines to consolidate political stability. When SADC leaders meet at their annual Summit scheduled for 16-17 August in Windhoek, Namibia to celebrate and take stock of these achievements and challenges over the last 30 years, they will review progress on implementations of current regional projects and programmes. However, the bloc still faces a myriad of challenges. In his address during the opening ceremony of the 30th Summit of Heads of State and Government in Windhoek, Namibia, President Hifikepunye Pohamba, whose country takes over the rotating SADC presidency from DR Congo, noted that 30 years ago Zimbabwe had just won independence from Britain while South Africa and Namibia were still ruled by the apartheid regime. Since then, he said, ‘Our region has established a strong democratic culture, in which a political transition is regularly achieved through the ballot box.’ ‘We have a historic opportunity to realise the dream of SADC citizens,’ he said, listing poverty eradication, food security, job creation, gender issues and tackling the HIV/ AIDS pandemic among the bloc’s chief priorities. Heads of State and Government admit that there still are many challenges faced by SADC, namely the HIV-AIDS prevalence and the high poverty rates, food security and illegal immigration.

With regard to political stability, SADC has succeeded in consolidating peace and security in the region albeit with a few challenges. In 1998, SADC-led troops helped the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) defend its sovereignty when some neighbouring countries tried to invade it. The region continues to support DRC’s road to recovery following many decades of armed conflict.

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Conflicts arising from the transition and consolidation of the democratic processes have been cited as being the sources of some tensions. While SADC still faces these seemingly insurmountable challenges, the efforts that the regional bloc has put in solving wars and bringing member-states together should propel it to face the future with vigour and enthusiasm. Nothing is impossible for as long as the region works together.


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LAUNCHING OF THE 2012 COMPETITION IN MEMBER STATES The 2012 SADC Media Awards competition will be launched during the official opening of the Heads of State and Government Summit in Luanda in August 2011. As usual, the competition in the four categories of print, photojournalism, radio and television categories will be open to all journalists who are SADC nationals. There will be no theme for the 2012 SADC Media Awards competition. All entries on regional integration will be accepted. Entries are invited from work published and or broadcast in a recognised media house or agency between January and December 2011. Entries are to be submitted to the National Adjudication Committee (NAC) in each Member State. The NACs will select the best entries from each category and forward them to the Regional Adjudication Committee (RAC) through the SADC Secretariat for final adjudication. The SADC Regional Adjudication Committee (RAC) on the Media Awards encourages all journalists from all over Southern Africa to participate in the competition, showcase their work and stand a chance to win and receive an award at the 2012 SADC Heads of State and Government Summit.

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Sadc Contact Addresses CHAIRPERSONSHIP Chairperson of SADC H.E. Hifikepunye Pohamba President of the Republic of Namibia Incoming Chairperson of SADC José Eduardo dos Santos President of the Republic of Angola Chairperson of the Organ H.E. Rupiah Bwezani Banda President of the Republic of Zambia Deputy Chairperson of the Organ H.E Jacob Zuma President of the Republic of South Africa Chairperson of the Council of Ministers Hon. Dr Hage Geingbob Minister of Trade and Industry Democratic Republic of Namibia Deputy Chairperson of the Council of Ministers Hon. Dr. Ana Dias Lourenço Minister of Planning Republic of Angola SECRETARIAT MANAGEMENT Executive Secretary Dr. Tomáz Augusto Salomão Deputy Executive Secretary: Regional Integration Eng. João Samuel Caholo Deputy Executive Secretary: Finance & Administration Ms Emilie Ayaza Mushobekwa SADC Headquarters Plot 54385 Central Business District (CBD) Private Bag 0095 Gaborone, Botswana Tel: +267 395 1863 Fax: +267 397 2848; +267 318 1070 Email: registry@sadc.int Website: www.sadc.int

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SADC NATIONAL CONTACT POINTS REPUBLIC OF ANGOLA Dr. Beatriz Morais SADC National Contact Point Ministry of Planning Rua Conego Manuel das Neves, 9˚ Andar Bairro Valodia (Predio da EDEL) Luanda, Angola Tel: +244 22 243 1261; +244 22 243 1244; +244 22 243 1260 Fax: +244 22 243 1244/1260 Email: bmorais-@hotmail.com CC: learao13@yahoo.com REPUBLIC OF BOTSWANA Dr. Taufila Nyamadzabo SADC National Contact Point Secretary for Economic and Financial Policy Ministry of Finance and Development Planning Private Bag 008 Gaborone, Botswana Tel: +267 395 0372; +267 395 9851 Fax: +267 395 6086; +267 390 4525 Email: tnyamadzabo@gov.bw CC: amadikwe@gov.bw; kmoichubedi@gov.bw DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO H E Mr. Bene L M’Poko SADC National Contact Point Ambassador Embassy of the Democratic Republic of Congo PO Box 28795 Sunnyside 0132 Pretoria, South Africa Tel: +2712 343 2455 Fax: +2712 344 4054 Email: rdcongo@lantic.net CC: Mr Guillaume Manjolo Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo Cell: +243 81212 9975 Email: Manjologuillaume@yahoo.fr


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

KINGDOM OF LESOTHO Mr Mosito Khethisa SADC National Contact Point Principal Secretary Ministry of Finance and Development Planning Kingsway Road Cnr Old High Court Road PO Box 395 Maseru 100, Lesotho Tel: +266 2232 3703 Fax: +266 2231 0157 Email: mkhethisa@finance.gov.ls CC: SADC National Coordinator Mrs Motena Tsolo Ministry of Finance and Development Planning PO Box 395 MASERU, Lesotho Tel: +266 2232 1015 Fax: +266 2231 0281 Email: mtsolo@finance.gov.ls CC: mmoeketsi@finance.gov.ls REPUBLIC OF MADAGASCAR Ms Nirina Angela Rabozakandraina SADC National Contact Point Ministry of Foreign Affairs Andriamfidy Road ANOSY ANTANANARIVO BP 836 MADAGASCAR Tel: +261 33 730 1540 Fax: +261 20 223 4484 Email: angelanirina@yahoo.com REPUBLIC OF MALAWI Mr. Ted Sitimawina SADC National Contact Point Secretary for Development Planning & Co-operation Ministry of Development Planning & Co-operation PO Box 30316 Lilongwe 3, Malawi Tel: +265 178 8888 Fax: +265 178 8247; +265 178 8131 Email: tedsitima@yahoo.com; ted.sitimawina@mepd.gov.mw CC: Mr. Maxwell Mkumba +265 999 84 0222; +265 888 86 0222 (Mobile) +265 178 84 71 (Direct Line) maxmkumba@yahoo.co.uk CC: estherchiumia@yahoo.com; zembeleadwell@yahoo.com (Adwell Zembele)

REPUBLIC OF MAURITIUS Mr Anund Priyay Neewoor, G.O.S.K SADC National Contact Point Secretary for Foreign Affairs Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Regional Integration & International Trade 9th Floor, Newton Tower Port Louis, Mauritius Tel: +230 405 2517 Fax: +230 212 3220 Email: aneewoor@mail.gov.mu CC: mofarc@intnet.mu REPUBLIC OF MOZAMBIQUE Mr Domingos Fernandes SADC National Contact Point Directorate for SADC Affairs Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Co-operation Avenida 10 de Novembro nr. 620 Maputo, Mozambique Tel: +258 2132 7000/7; Ext 155 Fax: +258 2132 7029 Email: fernandes@consadc.co.mz CC: domingos.fernandes@minec.gov.mz REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA Dr Malan Lindeque SADC National Contact Point Permanent Secretary Ministry of Trade and Industry Cnr Uhland and Goethe Street, Block B Brendan Simbwaye Square, 4th Floor Private Bag 13340 Windhoek, Namibia Tel: +264 61 283 7111/7332 Fax: +264 61 220227 Email: sadc@mti.gov.na CC: kamalanga@mti.gov.na REPUBLIC OF SEYCHELLES Mr. Maurice Loustau-Lalanne SADC National Contact Point Principal Secretary Ministry of Foreign Affairs Maison Queau de Quinssy Mont Fleuri PO Box 656 Victoria, Mahe, Seychelles Tel: +243 28 36 05 Fax: +248 22 48 45 Email: mloustaulalanne@mfa.gov.sc

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CC: tromain@mfa.gov.sc CC: Mr Joseph Nourrice High Commissioner Seychelles High Commission Global House, 296 Glenwood Road Lynnwood Park, Pretoria Republic of South Africa Tel: +27 12 348 0270/720 Fax: +27 12 348 0069 Email: jnourrice@seychelleshc.co.zaa REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA Ambassador AK Bramdeo SADC National Contact Point Chief Director: Africa Multilateral Department of International Relations and Co-operation OR Tambo Building 460 Soutpansberg Road Rietondale, PRETORIA 0084 Tel: +27 12 351 0186 Fax: +27 12 329 2269 Cell: +27 78 803 1917 Email: bramdeoa@dirco.gov.za Website: www.dirco.gov.za KINGDOM OF SWAZILAND Ambassador Clifford S. Mamba SADC National Contact Point Principal Secretary Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Co-operation PO Box 518 Mbabane, Swaziland Tel: +268 404 2661/4; +268 404 0922 Fax: +268 404 2669 Email: pilimamba@hotmail.com; CC: Ms Chazile M. Magongo Director – SADC Unit SADC NCP Ministry of Foreign Affairs & International Co-operation PO Box 518 Mbabane, Swaziland Tel: +268 404 2661/4; +268 404 2783 Fax: +268 404 2669 Email: cm.nyandza@yahoo.com; magongoch@gov.sz UNITED REPUBLIC OF TANZANIA Ms. Grace Mujuma SADC National Contact Point Acting Director, Directorate of Regional Co-operation,

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Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Co-operation, PO Box 9000, Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania Tel: +255 22 212 0532 Fax: +255 22 212 0529 Mobile: +255 789 88 3038; +255 719 52 5262 Email: drc@foreign.go.tz REPUBLIC OF ZAMBIA L. M. Mungoma (Ambassador) SADC National Contact Point Permanent Secretary Ministry of Foreign Affairs Charter House Independence Avenue PO Box 50069 Lusaka, Zambia Tel: +260 211 25 3508 Fax: +260 211 25 0080/0240/2883 Email: foreignlsk@zamtel.zm REPUBLIC OF ZIMBABWE Mr. Albert Ranganayi Chimbindi SADC National Contact Point Director for Multilateral Affairs Ministry of Foreign Affairs Samora Machel Avenue Monomotapa Building PO Box 4240 Causeway Harare, Zimbabwe Tel: +263 4 79 2797 Fax: +263 4 70 6293/5470 Email: archimbindi@yahoo.com; sadczim@yahoo.com


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

SADC INSTITUTIONS (SADC TREATY ARTICLE 9 (1)) (a) The Summit of Heads of State or Government (b) The Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation (c) The Council of Ministers (d) The Sectoral and Custer Ministerial Committees (e) The Standing Committee of Officials (f) The Secretariat (g) SADC National Committee (h) Sub-Committees of the SADC National Committees (i) The Registrar SADC Tribunal PO Box 40624, Ausspannplatz Windhoek, Namibia Tel: +264 61 38 3600 Fax: +264 61 38 3616 SADC Parliamentary Forum (SADC Treaty Article 9 (2) SADC Forum House, Parliament Gardens Love Street Private Bag 13361 Windhoek, Namibia Tel: +264 61 28 7000 Fax: +264 61 25 4642 | +264 61 24 7569 Email: info@sadcpf.org Web: www.sadcpf.org SADC SUBSIDIARITY ORGANISATIONS (SADC Agencies) Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa (RETOSA) Executive Director Lone Creek, C40, Corner Mac Mac and Howick Close Waterfall Park PO Box 7381, Half Way House1685 South Africa Tel: +27 11 315 2420 Fax: +27 11 315 2422 Email: retosa@iafrica.com Web: www.retosa.co.za SADC Plant Genetic Resources Centre (SPGRC) Senior Programme Manager Private Bag CH6, LUSAKA, Zambia Tel: +260 161 11147 | +260 162 33391/2 Fax: +260 261 1031 Email: Spgrc@zamnet.zm Regional Peacekeeping Training Centre (RPTC) The Director Private Bag 7735, Causeway Harare, Zimbabwe Tel: +263 470 3964 Fax: +263 473 7330

Southern African Power Pool (SAPP) Co-ordination Centre PO Box GT 897, Harare, Zimbabwe Tel: +263 425 0563/4 Fax: +263 425 0565/6 SADC SUBSIDIARY ORGANISATIONS (INDEPENDENT) SADC Development Finance Resource Centre (SADC-DFRC) The Co-ordinator Private Bag 0034, Gaborone Tel: +267 319 1146 Fax: +267 319 1147 Southern African Development Community Accreditation System Mr Ron Josias Regional Co-ordinator Tel: +27 12 394 3764 Fax: +27 12 394 4892 Email: ronj@sanas.co.za STAKEHOLDERS (ARTICLE 23) SADC Electoral Commissions Forum C/O IEC – Botswana 7th Floor-Block 8. Government Enclave Private Bag 00285, Gaborone, Botswana Tel: +267 318 0012 | +267 361 2400 Fax: +267 318 0016 | +267 390 5205 SADC Council of NGOs C/O BOCONGO Private Bag 00418, Gaborone, Botswana Tel: +267 391 1319 Fax: +267 391 2935 Email: bocongo@info.bw or bocongo@bocongo.bw Southern African Trade Union Co-ordination Council Plot 5071 Kabelo Way, Extension 10 PO Box 601557, Gaborone, Botswana Tel: +267 390 1449; +267 316 0401 Fax: +267 318 4453 Email: Info@Satucc.Org REPUBLIC OF ANGOLA DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS IN THE SADC REGION BOTSWANA H.E. Mr. José Agostinho Neto Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Khama Crescent Plot 13233 Tel: +267 3900204 Fax: +267 3975089 | +267 3181876 Email: angolaemb@inf.bw

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2011 SADC Summit Brochure

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO H.E. Mr. Emílio Guerra Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola BD. 30 Juin Nº 441, Gombe, Kinshasa Tel: +243 1233003 | +243 8842801 | +243 8803576 Fax: +243 1398971 | +243 812610268 +243 815563442 Email: mjb@raga.net

ZIMBABWE H.E. Mr Hendrik Vaal Neto Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola 26 Speke Av. Doncaster, Harare Home PO Box 3950 Tel: +263 4770070/5/6 | +263 744354 Fax: +263 4770077 | 263 011235002 Email: Ambassador@africaonline.Co.zw

MAURITIUS Tel: +23020 12985 | +23020 113377 | 23020 11593 Fax: +23020 113377

REPUBLIC OF ANGOLA DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS IN AFRICA

MOZAMBIQUE H.E. Mr Isaias Vilinga Ambassador Av. Kenneth Kaunda nº 770, Maputo Tel: +2582 1493691/493139 | +2582 1493271 Fax: +2582 1493930 | +2582 1499086 +2582 1493928 NAMIBIA H.E. Mr. Alexandre Rodrigues Duarte “Kito” Ambassador Tel: +26461227535 | +26461221339 Fax: +26461221498 | +26461229979 SOUTH AFRICA H.E. Mrs. Josefina Pitra Diakité Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola 1030 Schoeman Street, Hardfield, Pretoria 0083 PO Box 8685 Pretoria 0001 Tel: +27 12 3420049/50 | +27 12 3423671/96 Fax: +27 12 3427039 Email: Embaixada@angola.org.za fernando@angolaembassy.co.za TANZANIA H.E. Mr.Ambrósio Lukoki Ambassador Embassy of Republic of Angola Malik-Magore Road 149, Dar-Es-Salaam PO Box 20793 Dar-Es-Salaam Tel: +255222602684 | +255222132349 +255222602683 Fax: +255222601855 | +255222601035 +255222601855 ZAMBIA H.E. Mrs Balbina da Silva Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Serval Road 15b, Kabulonga, Lusaka Tel: +2601263697 | +2601260402 Fax: +2601260143 | +2601292163

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ALGERIA Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Rue Mohamed Khoudi Vila12-E1 Bihar; Algiers Tel: +21321925987 | +21321925337 Fax: +21321920418 Email: ngolamd@wissal.dz CAPE VERDE H.E. Mrs. Josefina da Cruz Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Avenida da OUA, Meio da Achada de Santo António Praia, Cabo Verde, C.P. 78-A Tel: +2382623235/6 | +2382623437 Fax: +2382623234 | +2382621503 Email: embang.gmc@cvtelecom.cv REPUBLIC OF CONGO – BRAZZAVILLE H.E. Mr. Fernando Mavunza Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Brazzaville Tel: +24222 5063402 | +24222 814721 Fax: +24222 2815172 | +24222 34294897 Email: midangolacg@yahoo.fr CÔTE D´IVOIRE H.E. Mr. Gilberto Buta Lutukuta Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola II Plateaux´Cocody Rue de la Canabiere Impasse 2, Chemin les Filaos, Lot 222-272 Tel: +22522 444591 | +22522 444300 Fax: +22522 444652 | +22522 416368 Email: ambangolaci@yahoo.fr ARAB REPUBLIC OF EGYPT H.E. Mr António da Costa Fernandes Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola 12 Midan Fouad.Mody EL-Dine, Mohandisseen, Cairo


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Tel: +20 2 3377602 | +20 2 7498259 Fax: +20 2 33378683 Email: angola@access.com.eg ETHIOPIA H.E. Mr Arcanjo do Nascimento Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Bole Kifle Ketema Region, Kebele 05, House Nr. 114, PO Box 2962, Addis Ababa Tel: +25111180771 | +251180767 | +251911255550 Fax: +251116182386 | +251116182389 Email: angola.embassy@telecom.net.et GHANA H.E. Mrs Ana Maria Teles Carreira Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Liberation Road/Patrice Lumumba Road, Airport Tel: +23321 766477 | +23321 778369 Fax: +23321 775791 | +23321 763431 GUINEA BISSAU H.E. Mr. Feliciano dos Santos Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Tel: +2453 207376 | +2453 207412/3 Fax: +2453 207413/480 Email: embangolabissau@eguitel.com GUINEA CONACRY H.E. Mr. Manuel Ruas EQUATORIAL GUINEA H.E. Mr. Armando Mateus Cadete Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Tel: +2453 207376/207413/207372/207412 Fax: +2453 207413/207480/207412/207379 Email: embangolabissau@eguitel.com NIGERIA Dr. Osvaldino Contreiras Chargé d´Affaires, a.i. Embassy of the Republic of Angola Plop-9, Pope John Paul II, off Ghana Str; Maitamu, Abuja Tel: +2349 4135121 Fax: +2349 4611635 Email: gabembnig@linkserve.com angola.embassy@yahoo.com.br KINGDOM OF MOROCCO H.E. Mr. Manuel Aragão Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Tel: +212-5 37 659239 Fax: +212-5 37 659238 | +212-5 37 653703

REPUBLIC OF SÃO TOMÉ AND PRINCIPE Chergé d´Affairs, a.i. Embassy of the Republic of Angola Tel: +239-22 224166/7/8/9 | +239 224855/250/22376 Fax: +239-22 221362 | +239903484 www.embangola.st AFRICAN UNION (AU) H.E. Mr.Arcanjo do Nascimento Ambassador REPUBLIC OF ANGOLA DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS IN EUROPE, ASIA, THE UNITED NATIONS AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONS AUSTRIA H.E. Mrs. Maria dos Reis Ferreira Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Seilerstaitte 15, 1 Stock, Tur 10 A-1010 Wien Vienna Tel: +43-7187488/7187487 Fax: +43-7187486/7148866 Email: Embangola.viena@embangola.at BELGIUM H.E. Mrs. Maria Elizabeth Simão Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Rue Franz Merjay 182 B-1050 Brussells Tel: +3223461872/80 | 3468748 Fax. +3223440894 | 3792809 Email: embassy.belgium@sky.net.be GERMANY H.E. Mr Alberto Neto Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Wallstr 58-59 10179 Berlin Deutschland Tel: +49 30 240897 | 0240897 | 12240897 Fax: +49 30 240897 | 24089712 Email: Botschaft@botschaftangola.de GREECE H.E. Mrs. Isabel da Silva Feijó KINGDOM OF SPAIN H.E. Mr.Victor Manuel Rita da Fonseca Lima Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola C-Serrano, 64-3, 28001, Madrid Tel: +34 91 4356166/430 | +34 91 914352308 Fax: +34 91 5779010 | +34 91 5767598

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2011 SADC Summit Brochure

FRANCE H.E. Mr. Miguel da Costa Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola 16, Avenida Foch 7501, 6 Paris Tel: +33 1 45015820 | 45019496 Fax: +33 1 45003371 | 45000497 GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND H.E. Mr. Miguel Fernandes Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola 2 Dorset Street London Wlu 6Qy Tel: +44 2072999850 Fax: +44 2072999888 | 74869397 Email: embassy@angola.org.uk HUNGARY H.E. Ms Lisete Pena Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola 1123, Budapest, Alkotas, U,50 Tel: +36 1 4877680 | 4877680/85 Fax: +36 1 4877699 Email: anemba@angolaembassy.hu INDIA 86 Paschimi Marg Vasant, Vihar New Delhi – 110-057 Tel: +91 11 27146197 | 261 46195 Fax: +91 11 26146184 | 26146190 Email: xietuang@d12.vsnl.net.in ISRAEL H.E. Mr. José João Manuel Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Rua Alemby-14, Smitat Beit Hashoeva Tel Aviv -65814 Tel: +972 3 6912093 | 6094282 Fax: +972 3 6912094 | 6912102 Email: ambassador@angolaembassy.org.il secretary@embassy.org.il ITALY H.E. Mr Florêncio de Almeida Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Via Druso, 39-00184, Roma Tel: +39 06 39366902/941 | 7726951 Fax: +3906 77073634 | 77254294 | 77251017 Email: embrargola@hotmail.com JAPAN H.E. Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola

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2-10-24,Daizawa, Setagayaku 155-0032 Tokyo Tel: +81 3 54307879/2/3/4 Fax: +81 3 57127481 | 57127482 Email: embassy@angola.or.jp angolamd@s3.ocv.ne.jp MEXIQUE H.E. Mr Leovigildo da Costa e Silva Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Gaspar de Zuniga 276 Lomas Virreyes C.P. 1000, Mexique DF Tel: +525 5 55201090 | 52034832 Fax: +525 55 5209924 Email: luanda@data.net.mx | luanda2@prodigv.net.mx POLAND H.E. Mr Domingos Culolo Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola UI.KRASICKIEGO Tel: +48 22 8440994 | 8440983 Fax: +48 22 8440985 Email: embaixada@emb-angola.pl PORTUGAL H.E. Mr. José Marcos Barrica Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Av. Da República N.68 C.P.N. 1069, 213- Lisboa Tel: +351217067041/43 | 7961830 Fax: +351217951778 | 7971238 RUSSIA H.E. Mr. Joaquim Augusto de Lemos Ambassador Tel: +7495-7499 499 1436324 | 9399518 Fax: +7495 9561880 | 2325563 Email: angomosc@cl.ru SERVIA H.E. Mr. Toko Diakanga Serão Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Vase Pelagica 32, 11 000 Belgrade Fax: +38111 2653424 | +38111 3690065 Email: Ambassada.angole@sbb.co.rs SOUTH KOREA H.E. Mr.Mr. Albino Malungo Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola SWEDEN H.E. Mr. Brito Sozinho Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola


2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Skeppsbron 8,11133 Stockholm Box 3199, 103 64, Stockholm Tel: +468242890 | 7662350 | 56849825 Fax: +468343127 | 202315 Email: info@angolaem.se | www.angolaemb.se UNESCO H.E. Mr. Diekupuna Sita José Ambassador 1, Rue Miollis – 75015 Paris Cedex 15 Tel: +33 1 45682975/76 Fax: +33 1 45675748 | 45682962 SINGAPORE H.E. Mr. Fidelino de Jesus Figueiredo Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola 9 Temasek-Boulevard Suntec Tower Two 44-03 Singapore 038989 Tel: +6563419360 Fax: +6563419367 | 68844304 Email: embangola@pacific.net.sg SWITZERLAND H.E Mr. Apólinario Jorge Correia Ambassador Angola Office of the United Nations and International Organizations 45-47 Rue de Lausanne 1201 Tel: +41 22 7323060 | 7323063 | 795631707 Email: Ambmission.angola@word.com SWIRTZERLAND H.E. Mr. Osvaldo Varela Ambassador Ensingerstrasse 48-CH 3006 Berne Tel: +41 31 3518585 Fax: +41 31 3518586 THE VATICAN H.E. Mr. Armindo do Espírito Santo Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Palazzo Odescaichi-Plazza 55, Apostoli, 87 – Roma Tel: +39 06 69190650/697 Email: embafvat@interfree.i REPUBLIC OF ANGOLA DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS ABROAD UNITED STATES OF AMERICA H.E. Mr. Alberto Bento Ribeiro Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola 2100-2108 16th Street N.W., Washington DC 20009

Tel: Fax:

+1 2027851156/301 3651153 | 1 2023320145 +1 202 4134932 +1 202 8229049 | 7851258

UNITED NATIONS H.E. Mr. Ismael Gaspar Martins Ambassador N.York, 820 Second Avenue, 12th Floor – New York, NY 10017 USA Tel: +1 212 8615656 | 8615787/89 Fax: +1 212 8619295 | 9490313 | 8619438 Email: themission@angolaun.org UNESCO H.E. Mr. Diakumpuna Sita Nsadisi José Ambassador 1, Rue Miollis – 75015 Paris; Cedex 15 Tel: +33-1 45682975/76 Fax: +33-1 45675748 | +33-1 45682962 ARGENTINA H.E. Mr Hermínio Escórcio Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Ancoreta 1314 esq. Charcas, C.P. 1425 Tel: +541145548877 | +54115548383 Fax: +541148213233 | +54115548998 Email: Embra-stc-arg@hotmail.com BRAZIL H.E. Mr. Neslson Cosme Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola SHIS- QL6- Conjunto 5 – casal 1 CEP 71620 – 055 – Brasilia – DF Tel: +55+61 32484489 | 32482999 | 3365562 Fax: +55+61 32481567 CHINA H.E. Mr. João Garcia Bires Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola Tayuan Diplomatic office Building, 1-8-1-2 100600, Beijing – China Tel: +86-1065326968/839 | 65327143 Fax: +65326969 | 65326990 Email: angolaembassy@a-1.net.cn CUBA H.E. Mr José César Augusto Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Angola 5ª Av. Nrs 1012 e 1008 e- 10 y 12 Miramar-Playa C.P.85- Hotel Neptuno Tel: +537 2042474 | +537 2044391/92 Fax: +537 2040487 | +537 2044390 Email: embangol@ceniai.inf.cu

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2011 SADC Summit Brochure

SADC Anthem ENGLISH Sadc, Sadc dawn of our certainty Sadc, Sadc dawn of a better future And hope for regional and universal integration Towards our peoples unity and harmony Cradle of humanity Cradle of our ancestors Let us praise with joy, the realisation of our hopes And raise the banner of solidarity Sadc, Sadc, Sadc, Sadc dawn of our certainty french Sadc Sadc aube de nos certitudes Sadc Sadc aube d’un avenir meilleur Espoir d’integration regionale et universelle Pour l’unite et l’harmonie entre nos peuples Berceau de l’humanite Berceau de nos ancetres Celebrons avec joie la realisation de nos espoirs Levons haut le drapeau de la solidarite Sadc Sadc Sadc Sadc aube de nos certitudes portuguese Sadc, Sadc aurora da nossa certeza Sadc, Sadc de um futuro melhor E de esperança de integração regional e universal Rumo à harmonia e unidade dos povos Berço da humanidade Berço dos nossos antepassados Juntos cantemos alegres, a concretização da nossa esperança Erguendo a bandeira da solidariedade Sadc, Sadc, Sadc, Sadc aurora da nossa certeza

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2011 SADC Summit Brochure

Acknowledgements Project Co-ordinator: Balepeng Montwedi Advertising: Red Pepper Editorial Advisors: Leefa P. Martin Charles Mubita Segolame Evans

SADC Secretariat Plot 54385 CBD Private Bag 0095 Gaborone, Botswana Tel: + 267 395 1863 (Op) Fax: + 267 397848/3181070 Email: registry@sadc.int Website: www.sadc.int Photography: SADC Secretariat Eagle Photographers – Mr E C Phale Office of the President – Namibia Jean-Paul Baziaka – NCP Office – DRC

Contributors:

SADC National Contact Point – Angola SADC directorates & units • Trade, Industry, Finance and Investment (TIFI) • Infrastructure and Services (I & S) • Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources (FANR) • Social and Human Development and Special Programmes (SHD & SP) • Human Resources & Administration (HR & Admin) • Gender Unit (GU) • Public Relations Unit (PRU) • SADC National Contact Point – Angola

Special Thanks to: Red Pepper Global Village Partnerships All advertisers

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SADC Summit Brochure 2011