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ANNUAL REPORT SOUTHERN UTAH UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF PERFORMING & VISUAL ARTS | 2013-2014


Table of Contents 4

DEAN’S LETTER

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PART ONE: CPVA 2013-14 HIGHLIGHTS

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PART TWO: MISSION & STRATEGIC GOALS

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PART THREE: CPVA GOALS & OUTCOMES

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PART FOUR: ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGES

CPVA ENROLLMENT SCH TRENDS GRADUATION TOTALS 3 8

PART FIVE: STUDENT HIGHLIGHTS

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PART SIX: FACULTY & STAFF

FACULTY & STAFF HIGHLIGHTS

FACULTY & STAFF LISTING

Front cover: music student Austin Clark

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Above: Joshua Leigh Hopkins and Alec TerBerg in The Fantasticks!, 2014 Photo: Karl Hugh

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The Dean’s Letter: The annual report provides opportunity for the College of Performing and Visual Arts (CPVA) to reflect on its challenges and accomplishments as we seek to align our efforts with institutional core themes and keep the arts central to the academic and cultural life of Southern Utah University and its community. CPVA is continuing its quality and currently encompasses Art and Design, Arts Administration, Dance, Music, and Theatre with oversight of the Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery (soon to be incorporated into the new Southern Utah Museum of Art). The Utah Center for Arts Administration and the Center for Shakespeare Studies are also programs within the College. This report provides a sampling of highlights for the 2013-14 academic year. A comprehensive account of all the activities and accomplishments would be an impossible task; one only needs to visit CPVA’s Press Room* online to understand the extensive listing of lecture, performances, concerts, and exhibitions created and sponsored by the college. The selected highlights demonstrate initiatives and achievements made possible by the continued support of SUU and CPVA’s extraordinary faculty, staff, students and friends. Each year it is my honor to publicly thank CPVA’s faculty and staff for their commitment to experiential learning in its truest form. Specific to this annual report, I wish to thank Michael French, CPVA’s Marketing & Public Relations Coordinator, Clarisse Lunt, CPVA’s Administrative Assistant, and graphic design student Jordan Youngberg who assisted in its creation. SHAUNA MENDINI

Dean, College of Performing and Visual Arts

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* http://www.suu.edu/pva/press.html


Above: Paquita, Journeys, Faculty Dance Concert, 2014. Photo: Karl Hugh

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Part One: CPVA 2013-14 Highlights


1st column: Rendering of Southern Utah Museum of Art 2nd Column: Students in Summer Art Camp 4th column: US Postal stamp designed by Ron Spears

March 27, 2014 marked the groundbreaking at Southern Utah University for the Beverley Taylor Sorenson Center for the Arts that will include the Southern Utah Museum of Arts (SUMA), the new Shakespeare theatre (Englestad Theatre), studio theatre (Eileen and Allen Anes Studio Theatre), and artistic and production facilities for the Utah Shakespeare Festival

The National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) Commission on Accreditation voted to award full-membership to Southern Utah University during their spring 2014 meeting

review documents and external evaluator reports. The campus Academic Program Review Committee submitted their feedback on the various self-study reports from all academic programs in the college. The external reviews for Theatre Arts Program and Arts Administration were completed by Dr. Jim Volz, California State University. The Music Program’s external report was completed by Dr. Nicholas Morrison, Utah State University along with Dr. Daniel Frezza, SUU. The self-study reports from Arts and Design (NASAD) and Dance (NASD), both of which recently completed specialized accreditation site-visits, were incorporated in the college’s overall review.

————— According to Regent’s Policy R411 and institutional program review guidelines, CPVA completed and submitted its extensive program «8»

————— The on-line Masters of Arts in Arts Administration program was initiated fall semester following the approval by the Utah State Board of Regents ————— Assistant Prof. of Art, Ron Spears, designed the U.S. Postal Service Celebratory Forever Stamp commemorating Nevada’s 150th Anniversary of Statehood

————— The National Association of Schools of Dance (NASD) Commission on Accreditation voted to award fullmembership to Southern Utah University during their fall 2013 meeting.

Among the numerous artists/scholars supported by the College, SUU’s Shakespeare Studies Center hosted Eccles Scholar Patrick Tucker a London-based director, who was formerly with the Royal Shakespeare Company and an assistant to its co-founder and Artistic Director John Barton. He provided hands-on workshops for SUU students and members of the Utah Shakespeare Festival Acting Company

————— The Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery expanded its education programs with inauguration of a Summer Art Camp for teenagers created by Arts Administration student Nathan McDonald and with a grant from the Utah Division of Arts & Museums. The camp featured three distinctive sessions including Public Art which resulted in a mural created for the Frontier Homestead Museum

PART ONE: CPVA 2013-14 HIGHLIGHTS

Assistant Prof. of Art, Deborah K. Snider saw the publication of her book The Collages of Jonathan Talbot, which features a contribution by Prof of Art Dr. Andrew Marvick and graphic design from Associate Prof. of Art Jeffrey Hanson ————— The combined efforts of the Arts Administration students, Friends of the

Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery, emcee Brad Carroll, and auctioneer Peter Sham raised the largest amount of funding ever received at the 22st Annual Art Auction with additional funds being raised due to the introduction of an online auction. This Gallery supported this effort by creating its first ever Art Auction Preview Exhibition in which all the art being offered was on display for two weeks prior to the fundraiser ————— The SUU Ballroom Dance Company, under the direction of Andrea Johnson, completed a year-end tour of Puerto Rico accompanied by Department Chair, Kay Andersen. The group performed at several prestigious venues including a national art museum, a performance for the country’s governor, and a performance to commemorate the city’s birthday celebration ————— Dr. Lynn Vartan performed Dr. Keith Bradshaw’s Canyon Concerto with the Hubei Symphony Orchestra that also included four SUU


3rd column: Ceramic students at work 4th column: Student working in print making class

percussion students. The concerto made its Chinese debut at Wuhan’s Qintai Concert Hall. With support from SUU’s grant from the U.S State Department, the group also performed at the American Studies Center of Changsha and at Peking University in conjunction with the Peking University Chinese Music Institute in a joint concert as part of the Yuanpei Festival ————— The Department of Theatre Arts and Dance with support from SUUSA, hosted the Utah Festival Opera, Pickleville Playhouse, Playmill Theatre, Lake Powell Playhouse and the Utah Shakespeare Festival in holding auditions for summer employment for SUU students ————— Through collaboration with SUU, the Department of Theatre Arts and Dance, and the Utah Shakespeare Festival, an official Student Fellowship program was initiated for SUU theatre students engaged in internships with USF ————— The Department of Theatre Arts and Dance commissioned Joan Woodbury to recreate her choreographic work, Loose Change. The recreation was directed by Theatre Arts and Dance Chair Kay Andersen as part of Journeys: Faculty Dance

Concert, to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Ririe Woodbury Dance Company ————— CPVA faculty supervised study abroad opportunities for performing and visual arts students in Taiwan (Chien-Ying Wang, Paul C. Ocampo), Italy (Keith Bradshaw), and New Zealand (Deborah Snider) The Department of Music established the first SUU Alumni Band Concert as part of SUU’s Homecoming celebration. Students from near and far participated in this event under the direction of Dr. Adam Lambert

9, 2013 curated by Dr. James Aton of the English Department. The college hosted concerts, events and workshops which centered on Jones’ time in Mexico and honored the culture and people that inspired his work and to celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month. Many of the works from private collections were being exhibited to the public for the first time.

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————— The Moon Goddess Project was initiated by the Advanced Illustration class under the direction of Ron Spears. The class published Moon Balloon a book of art on Amazon.com, curated a beautiful show in the Braithwaite Gallery in which many of the original illustrations were sold, and presented their work at Art Insights ————— Twenty-Four students and faculty traveled to Missoula, Montana to participate in the American College Dance Festival ————— The Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery presented Jim Jones: The San Blas Year Exhibit (September 12-November

performing guest artists including mime Nicholas C. Johnson, trombonist Delfeayo Marsalis, percussionists Cory Hills and Ken McGrath, Utah Festival Opera founder Michael Ballam, Latino composer Carlos Rivera and Chinese composer Ai-Ping Ding and the United States Air Force Band of the Golden West’s stunning woodwind quintet, The Golden West Winds. Most of these gifted artists also led master classes or workshops enriching the performance experience for SUU arts students

The Friends of the Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery board came together to contribute $25,000 to the Southern Museum of Art which will be built on the campus of Southern Utah University. This donation brings the Friends four-year gift total to $100,000 A new illustration studio, photography studio, painting studio, and 3D studio were created through renovation of existing facilities. The Art and Design Department obtained the 2nd Vandercook letterpress for the letterpress studio

The Department of Theatre Arts & Dance inaugurated a successful scholarship fundraiser, the BFA Musical Theatre Showcase, which featured SUU students performing classic songs from the musical theatre ————— The Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery hosted a special Art Insights Artists’ exhibition featuring the work of two presenters, sculptor Ryoichi Suzuki and graphic designer David Wolske.

————— The Department of Music host an exciting array of «9»


Part Two: Mission & Strategic Goals


Mission Statement The SUU College of Performing and Visual Arts serves as a catalyst for students to realize their creative potential by providing a personalized and rigorous learning environment, fostering experiential education and contributing to the cultural enrichment of a global society.

Right: Mural created by Summer Art Camp students. Photo: Rachelle Bonnett

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PART TWO: MISSION & STRATEGIC GOALS


Our Strategic Goals

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Cultivate in all SUU students, an appreciation for the value of the performing and visual arts

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Promote positive learning environments for our students as they seek to develop a life-long commitment to the arts

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Offer curriculum that meets or exceeds national standards which includes experiential programming giving students opportunities to develop as artists, educators, scholars and arts leaders

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Create events to enrich the quality of life on the campus, in the community, and extending to the national and international arena

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Empower and support our faculty and staff as superior educators, mentors, artists, scholars and administrators who engage student learning as part of a collaborative, academic and artistic process

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Contribute to students’ development as ethical leaders and responsible citizens in a global community

Our mission and strategic goals are focused on making the arts a vital, visible, accessible, innovative, and integral part of the intellectual and cultural life of Southern Utah University and beyond.

Learning Outcomes The College of Performing and Visual Arts has four learning goals for all students in the college that build on the University’s mission and core themes. STUDENTS WILL:

»» Communicate effectively »» Develop curiosity, critical and creative thinking skills »» Embrace global awareness, personal responsibility, and artistic integrity »» Process the history, principles, training, skills and knowledge associated with performing and visual arts to facilitate success in their chosen field

Above: Joshua Durfey (center) in Bat Boy The Musical, 2014. Photo: Asher J. Swan

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Part Three: CPVA Goals, Objectives & Outcomes


CPVA’s Alignment with SUU’s Strategic Initiatives (Selected goals and objectives are part of SUU’s Academic Roadmap) This Annual Report marks the final reporting year for Southern Utah University’s campus-wide strategic plan; the Academic Roadmap in its advancement of core themes (academic excellence, involvement and personal growth, and community and social responsibilities). The College of Performing and Visual Arts (CPVA) remains instrumental in achieving multiple goals and objectives in support of SUU’s mission to provide a transformative teaching and learning community. The summary of key accomplishments is in direct response to the Academic Roadmap. All initiatives are aligned with CPVA’s mission to serve as a catalyst for students to realize their creative potential by providing a personalized and rigorous learning environment, fostering experiential education and contributing to the cultural enrichment of a global society.

Achieve Academic Excellence and Distinctiveness 1.1 PURSUE AND SUPPORT ACCREDITATION FOR ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

2013-14 documented an accreditation milestone when the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) Commission on Accreditation voted to award fullmembership to Southern Utah University during their spring 2014 meeting and the National Association of Schools of Dance (NASD) Commission on Accreditation voted to award fullmembership to Southern Utah University during their fall 2013 meeting. For the purpose of on-going program review and enhancement,

CPVA completed cyclical program review for all its academic programs in conjunction with Utah State Board of Regents policy R411 and institutional policy. CPVA submitted its program review documents on April 7, 2014 and the external evaluator reports at the end of April to the Provost’s office. The campus Academic Program Review Committee (APRC) submitted their feedback on the various self-study reports from the Art and Design Dept., Arts Administration Program, and the Music and Theatre and Dance Department on May 5, 2014. The external reviewer for arts administration, theatre, and music visited campus in March and April. The self-study reports from Art and Design (NASAD) and Dance (NASD), both of which recently completed specialized accreditation site visits, were incorporated in the college’s overall review. The following is a summary of feedback about CPVA programs with key findings by the external reviewers:

Top: Carly Skankey and Trevor Messenger in Romeo and Juliet, 2014. Photo: Karl Hugh Photo Credit (Bottom): Photography student Asher J. Swan’s donation to Art Auction raised $950.

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PART THREE: CPVA GOALS, OBJECTIVES & OUTCOMES


Art & Design Strengths

Areas for Improvement

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS OF AND DESIGN

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS OF DESIGN (NASAD)

(NASAD) VISITING TEAM

»» A highly qualified, practicing, professional faculty. »» A dedicated and conscientious chair who has a good understanding of the issues on campus due to regular contact with members of the upper administration and support of the faculty. »» A supportive administration that is appreciative of the collective efforts of the department. »» An efficient and knowledgeable support staff. »» Facilities that are well maintained. »» Engaged students who acknowledge the professionalism and mentoring of their faculty. »» Student work that is strong in certain areas and good in most others. »» An apparent openness to curricular innovation and a willingness to assess programmatic efforts in an ongoing manner. »» Class faculty/student ratios that support good instruction in a safety-conscious environment. »» All building and grounds appeared to be extremely clean and well maintained and enhanced by the distribution of the campus art collection in many offices and public spaces. »» Quality publications that showcase the work of faculty and students.

Facilities: The university is encouraged to continue planning that brings the functions of the department under one roof in order to foster a more inclusive sense of community that leads to enhanced program retention. Other facilities recommendations for improvement include: a. Review ways to improve the current graphic design lab located in the basement of ELC that currently seems difficult to locate and offers limited flat surface work areas for student use. b. Review ways to improve IT response times to hardware and software needs in Graphic Design and Digital Imaging, areas of study wholly dependent upon working computers, current software, and ample storage for student images. c. Consider ways to create set-aside space for advanced students in Illustration. Faculty Salaries: The institution is encouraged to review salary compression issues. Newer hires fall between the 25th and 50th percentiles nationally while more senior faculty, particularly full professors, appear to be in the lowest salary range. (2011-12 HEADS Data Summary)

The Art and Design Department was granted full membership as a NASAD accredited program in June 2014.

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Arts Administration Strengths

Areas for Improvement

DR. JIM VOLZ: CONSULTANT – APRIL 2014

DR. JIM VOLZ: CONSULTANT

»» Self-study was very clear about goals and learning outcomes »» Faculty planning, curriculum development at a high level »» Student were able to articulate advanced professional competencies »» Classroom and experiential learning components of program fuse »» NAST guidelines are met through execution of projects by students »» Integration of assistantship and class work with USF, Braithwaite Gallery, and CPVA is extensive.

»» Close attention should be paid to Page 61 of the NAST Handbook (Appendix II.E.2.) related to number of faculty and staff supporting the program. »» Close attention should be paid to Page 62 of the NAST Handbook (Appendix II.E.2.) related to faculty workload. »» NOTE: Health and safety concern NA to Arts Admin program. »» SUU criteria in Self-Study had several “no data available’ responses and should be addressed. »» Advising and mentoring load on program Director should be mediated by sharing workload among adjuncts and other staff »» Strengthen the working relationship of the Arts Admin program with USF and the Theatre & Dance program »» Seek opportunities to establish the regional, national and international reputation of SUU’s MA/ MFA programs in order to expand and diversify the student population, to enhance the career opportunities of alumni and graduating students, and to further heighten the uniqueness of the program and ever-

Above: Arts Administration Rachelle Bonnett presenting at Wild Perspectives opening. Photo: Kaitlyn Jackson

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PART THREE: CPVA GOALS, OBJECTIVES & OUTCOMES


Dance Strengths

Areas for Improvement

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS OF DANCE (NASD) – VISITING TEAM – NOV 2012

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS OF DANCE (NASD) – VISITING TEAM – NOV 2012

»» The culture of the dance unit is commendable. It reflects nurture, trust and respect. It reflects values presented in all observable areas of the university structure. The mission of the dance unit is being realized. »» The global focus is critical and impressive especially to this homogenous culture. There has been an elegant transition from top to bottom in the university down through the mission of the dance unit over the last three years. The current Dean and Dance Executive were pivotal for this near seamless transition. »» New hires in the last five-year offer a diversity of thought and aesthetic that demonstrates strong leadership and vision. »» The visitors commend the institution for extensive support of the dance unit

SHORT-TERM IMPROVEMENTS:

»» Calendar planning for all college productions »» Aesthetic consideration and production language for the theatre and dance faculty development »» Communications between Dance Education, Arts Education, and the College of Education »» Alumni networking with current student body »» Area studio Dance owners sharing best practices for career planning »» Internships with best practice dance studio owners »» Arc statements/narratives for scholarship planning for dance faculty in relation to workload, service and strategic planning »» More time allocated for dance students’ development of movement invention »» choreographic input for dance majors »» Development of black box theatre »» Permission and push for artistic risk taking among faculty and students »» Closer collaboration for modeling artistic practices applied between dance teacher and accompanist within dance techniques classes »» Acknowledge instructor teaching habits and choosing approaches appropriate for realistic student preparation for real world »» Intentional and directed instruction for lifted and strengthen core PRIMARY FUTURES ISSUES

»» Enrollment growth plans for SUU – grow? If so, by how much? »» Expanding networking and internship opportunities for students as well as internships »» A college primary futures issue may be the understanding in production aesthetics and language between the theatre and dance unit. Above: Heather Childs performing One Not Involved, One Alone, One With All in Journeys, Faculty Dance Concert, 2014. Photo: Karl Hugh

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Music Strengths DR. NICHOLAS MORRISON, DR. DAN FREZZA, VISITING TEAM-OVERVIEW

The department is clearly focused on the needs of its students. Students cited the quality and caring approach of the faculty as a great strength of the institution. (See summary of student comments in the appendix.) Likewise, faculty members were energized and attentive in the classroom. From classroom visits during team’s time in the department, it is clear that teaching, for these colleagues, is a primary goal that they pursue with passion.

The Applied Music Studio classes (where all the brass players, all the wind players, etc.) meet weekly to perform and receive feedback) are particularly valuable.

Students reported that the faculty customizes lessons to the student’s particular strengths, weaknesses and learning style. They appreciate that the faculty believes in their ability to meet new challenges. The faculty finds students’ strengths and builds on them. There is no sense of students being “weeded out.”

Several students said it inspired and encouraged them to do better when they saw fellow students show great improvement as a result of the faculty’s careful instruction.

Music education majors appreciate that the Music Department has its own music education classes, since music secondary education approaches are different from approaches appropriate for other subjects like English or the sciences. The Fundamentals of Music Theory class (MUSC-1100) has been a valuable addition for those majors who came in with little experience in music basics. Likewise the earlier deadline for completing the piano proficiency requirement has been helpful.

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The students appreciate having one professor dedicated to teaching the music history classes. The small department allows students interested in playing two different instruments opportunities to do so and gain a wide range of experience.

Students feel they can approach their teachers with problems. They also can approach upperclassmen for help (for example with theory, technique questions). Students who are keen to study music but who have come to the discipline late have been made to feel welcome and reported satisfaction in how their skills have improved. Both students and faculty appreciate the favorable of student/faculty ratio. The concerts and recital schedule provides students with abundant performance opportunities

PART THREE: CPVA GOALS, OBJECTIVES & OUTCOMES


Areas for Improvement DR. NICHOLAS MORRISON, DR. DAN FREZZA

During the visit, both faculty and administrators suggested that the capacity of the music program is a topic for further discussion. The review team agrees that such a discussion is appropriate, particularly as the institution considers whether or not growth is an institutional priority. An attempt to grow the music program should proceed carefully so as not to damage the student experience. Any growth beyond the level prior to the impact of the missionary age change in 2012 will need to be accompanied by new resources to attract full and part time faculty and additional facilities and academic infrastructure. The standards of the NASM can and should guide this discussion, particularly if new programs are under consideration. The department’s ratio of music graduates to total numbers of majors appears to be slightly low. Although less than 5% away from the national average, increasing graduation rates could be a reasonable priority for the department over the next few year. The use of an off campus venue for major performances poses challenges and opportunities. It will be important for the institution to balance the interests of the community and the educational mission as it makes the decision of whether or not, and according to what time line, a music performance facility is constructed on campus.

Specific academic infrastructure needs are listed in section 2.3.C.a. of the reviewer’s report, some of which could be completed quickly at little cost to the institution. Likewise, Section 2.C.4.a of the self-study provides an excellent summary of the current state of the department’s academic infrastructure relative to NASM standards. The institution would be wise to have a plan in place that addresses many of the needs identified in the self-study by the time of the upcoming NASM reaccreditation visit. There are currently several inconsistencies in web documents that provide information on the program, such as links that do not function or go to unexpected places. The resources prepared by the department appear to be the most accurate and useful at this time. This will require close coordination between the department, the college, and the registrar’s office. The institution may wish to consider how the decennial NASM review might be used to validate this review process for music in particular, or possibly to exempt departments on campus with specialized accreditation from the timetable of this internal review. Such a course of action could result in a stronger process of peer review coupled with the possibility of a reduction of faculty and staff time in document preparation

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Theatre Strengths DR. JIM VOLZ: CONSULTANT - OVERVIEW FACULTY

STUDENTS

SUPPORT SYSTEMS

LIBRARY RESOURCES

MISSION AND GOALS

Full-time faculty experiences in wide array of theatre areas and exhibit strong commitment to students, SUU mission, and high standards.

Highly engaged students who are supportive of program and classes, and performance and production work at a high level of quality.

All administrative and personnel systems are operating at a high level.

Library holdings are sufficient to support the program.

All these statements appear to be well aligned with the College and University.

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PART THREE: CPVA GOALS, OBJECTIVES & OUTCOMES


Areas for Improvement DR. JIM VOLZ: CONSULTANT

#1, #2, #3 and #4 are related to National Association of Schools of Theatre (NAST) standards and guidelines. The subsequent recommendations are not necessarily directly related to NAST standards and guidelines.

1 Faculty and students report that there are acting classes with up to 30 students and directing classes with up to 28 students, which is well above NAST Standards. A new tenure-track position should be added to the acting/directing faculty and close attention should be paid to Page 61 of the NAST Handbook (Appendix II.E.2.) related to studentfaculty ratios.

2 Students report concerns of “faculty burnout” and intermittent inaccessibility related to hectic production schedules and the difficulty of balancing the department mission’s academic excellence mandate with the experientially-based production assignments that are essential to the overall program. Close attention should be paid to Page 62 of the NAST Handbook (Appendix II.E.2. related to faculty and staff workload.

3 The 1954-55 Auditorium Building that is used as the Department’s main production (scenery, costumes, props, make-up, lighting, storage), classroom and performance space should be replaced

at the earliest opportunity. Serious concerns were noted by the consultant relative to the following: seismic protection, asbestos, ADA codes, OSHA code standards, NFPA 101 life safety codes, and ventilation and equipment security. These issues will need to be addressed prior to seeking NAST accreditation.

4 For the formal NAST review, number the pages of the Self-Study and review the number of “No Data Available” responses in the SelfStudy and consider restructuring the Self-Study to eliminate these responses or tracking down the data if the data is deemed crucial to program review and development (i.e.: 2.A.1.c./Faculty Retention and Percentage of SCH taught by program faculty vs. faculty from other programs).

5 Administrators and faculty both noted current efforts to raise adjunct salaries and this recommendation is to continue advocacy support to continue raising adjunct salaries, especially since these invaluable resources are reportedly often used as a “quick fix” solution to academic and programmatic needs.

6 In the acting program, clarify the differences and benefits of the various degrees. Some students seemed especially confused in regards to the benefits of the BFA, (since any

theatre major can evidently take any of the classes required for the BFA) and there were concerns that the BFA often takes five years to complete.

7 In all undergraduate programs, strive to clarify, expand and solidify Southern Utah University/Utah Shakespeare Festival relationships and opportunities for undergraduate students and continue efforts to put USF leaders on SUU faculty/ staff search committees in hope of promoting joint appointments, more faculty/staff opportunities with the professional company and stronger communications and cooperation.

8 Both the SUU administration and the faculty note that the CPVA and Department of Theatre Arts and Dance made a huge sacrifice supporting the SUMA/USF complex, especially since (1) Its own needs for a performing arts complex are so immediate and wide-ranging; and, (2) The current state of the Auditorium Building is dire. It is recommended that the emphasis be taken off the idea of a “Performing Arts Complex” as a replacement for the Auditorium and instead the focus should be put on creating an “Educational Support Space” (that includes laboratories and performance spaces for theatre, dance, and music).

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The following is SUU’s institutional response summary:

COMMON THEMES THAT SURFACED IN THE CATEGORY OF AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT INCLUDED:

Overall, the external reviewers found the programs in the College of Performing and Visual Arts functioning at a high quality level. A well-qualified faculty support a comprehensive curriculum consisting of a wide range of course offerings. Much of the scholarly and creative work done by students and faculty is shared with the campus and community through well managed programming, performances, exhibitions and lectures. The college and its departments have clear missions that aligned with SUU’s mission. The outcome of the combined efforts of all these departments results in successful graduates who move into careers in the arts or who have gone on to further education. The promise of providing personalized educational experiences for students was seen as being fulfilled by all the programs. In addition to this review, the Art and Design and Dance departments recently underwent rigorous self-studies and comprehensive reviews by their respective specialized accrediting agencies. Both departments were granted continued full membership status as a result of these reviews (NASAD and NASD).

Faculty compensation and salary compression issues

growth strategies for the University and its arts programs

Faculty and staff workMore effective commuload and student faculty nication processes with ratios students majoring and minoring in the various A need for clarity about programs. the relationship of the

Enhance international partnerships and global awareness

CPVA has continued its active record in establishing and sustaining international partnerships. Our college hosted numerous international artists/scholars, participated in an international festival, supervised study abroad programs, and enhanced existing partnerships through faculty/student collaboration and exchange.

Left: The Fantasticks!, 2014 Photo: Karl Hugh Facing page: 1st column: Mime C. Nicholas Johnson leads workshop. 2nd column: Percussion students in China 3rd column: Yi Dan Guo

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PART THREE: CPVA GOALS, OBJECTIVES & OUTCOMES


The following is a summary of artistic/scholarly exchange and events: CPVA students participated in semester long study abroad programs at the National Taiwan University of Arts, and Fontys Fine and Performing Arts in Tilburg, Netherlands. ————— A study abroad summer program Exploring Dance & Culture in Taiwan, was developed and supervised by Chien-Ying Wang and Paul Ocampo at the National Taiwan University of Arts. Visual Arts students traveled for two weeks to New Zealand and participated in Art, English, & Geology in New Zealand, under the mentorship of Deborah Snider, along with Dr. Kyle Bishop and Toanui Tawa from the English Department and Dr. Johnny Maclean from Geology. The study abroad program Music in Italy, Austria, and Germany, was directed by Keith Bradshaw. Theatre in London was directed by Jeb Branin.

Bradshaw’s Canyon Concerto, at the Qintai Concert Hall. Percussion students Darin Hunsinger, Austin Julian, Marshall Miller and Tylor Williams performed the extensive orchestral percussion parts under the direction of Dr. Xun Sun.

Renowned in China for her orchestral compositions, the Department of Music hosted the guest artist AiPing Ding and presented a concert featuring her original compositions and arrangements. ————— The introduction to Art Gallery & Museum class created an exhibit of work by Korean artist Young Sil Rho at the Gerald R. Sherratt Library. Rho donated 40 of her paintings to the Southern Utah Museum of Art. The paintings are part of its permanent collection —————

With support by the U.S. Department of State, Dr. Lynn Vartan and SUU Percussion Ensemble created a joint performance at Hunan Normal University as an outreach program for the American Studies Center of Changsha. The group finalized their performances in China at Peking University in conjunction with the Peking University Chinese Music Institute in a joint concert as part of the Yuanpei Festival titled, Music and Joy for Yuanpei.

Professor Wang Jiazeng, a leading figure in contemporary Chinese arts as a printmaker and painter presented at Art Insights, as part of SUU’s faculty exchange program with the School of Arts at China’s Renmin University in Beijing. ————— SUU faculty members Ron Spears and Jessica Gerlach visited Renmin University in May 2013 presenting lectures, exhibits and demonstrations.

—————

SUU strengthened its partnership with the Hubei Opera Symphony Orchestra by collaborating in concert featuring percussion soloist Dr. Lynn Vartan performing Dr. Keith

Yi Dan Guo, faculty member from the School of Art at Renmin University in Beijing, provided a year residency in the Department of Arts & Design teaching drawing, watercolor, and Chinese painting. She also presented an exhibit of her work at SUU’s Hunter Conference Center. «25»


Secure Resources for the Academic Roadmap 2.4 IDENTIFY VIABILITY OF NEW ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND QUALITY INITIATIVES

SUU’s liberal arts and science focus at the undergraduate level is to engage students in a personalized experiential education. However, the graduate level provides opportunity to enhance education for the working professional. The following are new on-line graduate degree programs in CPVA that are aligned with graduate program objectives: Fall 2013 the Arts Administration program initiated its approved on-line Master of Arts program. The online program provides working professionals with the educa-

tion necessary to manage arts and cultural organizations. It is designed to prepare graduates for management level positions or advancement to those positions within primarily the nonprofit arts sector. The majority of the courses necessary for this degree are part of the Master of Fine Arts Program but created for the online environment. The Department of Music received approval by SUU’s Board of Trustees for a Masters of Music (MM) degree created to meet the needs of music educators currently working as professionals in their field. The program will be presented to the Board of Regents for final approval in fall 2014 and an Approval Plan will be submitted to NASM during their fall annual meeting.

Above: Fritz, Joshua & Paul, Journeys, Faculty Dance Concert, 2014. Photo: Karl Hugh Facing page: C. Nicholas Johnson, a guest artist

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PART THREE: CPVA GOALS, OBJECTIVES & OUTCOMES


Develop High Impact Educational Programs and Practices 3.2 DEVELOP INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS

Under the direction of Dr. Don Weingust with support from the Provost’s office, the ThunderBard 2013 Project brought together new SUU students in a common playreading and play-going experience. Incoming students at SUU attended The Tempest, at the Utah Shakespeare Festival’s Adams Memorial Theatre.

Increase Student Success and Engagement 4.4 CREATE A CAMPUS ATMOSPHERE NURTURING AND PROMOTING INTELLECTUAL STIMULATION

In addition to hosting the international artists outlined above, CPVA sponsored the following guest artists/performance group residencies: MUSIC

»» Pianist Masha Pisarenko returned to SUU and provided a classical program playing the music of such masters as Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, and Chopin. »» The fall 2013 Satellite Salon Series featured a concert showcasing various compositions by Carlos Rafael Rivera. The collaboration was multidisciplinary and incorporated SUU faculty and guest folkloric dancer, Monica Gomez »» The spring 2014 Satellite Salon Series featured mime artist C. Nicholas Johnson, Director of Dance/ Drama at Wichita State University and director of Alithea Creations, a company dedicated to the production of multi-discipline performances in mime theatre. »» The department sponsored, under the supervision of Dr. Virginia Stitt, a special concert featuring The United States Air Force Band of the Golden West, The Golden West Winds. »» Guest artist Delfeayo Marsalis and his quintet performed a New Orleans and Mardi Gras Celebration alongside SUU’s Jazz Ensemble under the direction of Thomas Herb.

ART & DESIGN

»» Art Insights featured a variety of gifted artists as speakers. The fall semester featured Graphic Designer/Illustrator Q. Cassetti, Theme Park Designer Todd White, Sculptor Mark Burns, Architect, Interior Designer and Zion National Park Artist in Residence Kimberly Harris, Ceramicist Kate Maury, Photographer Aline Smithson, Photographer Kerry Skarbakka, Fine and Graphic Design Arts and Zion National Park Artist in Residence Rebecca Fogg, Commercial Artist Colt Bowden, and Spiritual Artist J. Kirk Richards »» The spring semester of Art Insights showcased Photographer Paul Michael Sciacca, Photographer Rick Braveheart, and Graphic Designer David Wolske, Sculptor Ryhoichi Suzuki (also exhibited his work at the Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery), Printmaker and Writer Tersea Jordan, Gallery Owner Dries Bredenkemp, Photographer Jay Gould, and Ceramicist Andy Nasisse. THEATRE ARTS & DANCE

»» Co-artistic directors or the Utah Shakespeare Festival, Brian Vaughn and David Ivers provided a lecture on the topic: The Business of the Business »» Utah Shakespeare Festival founder Fred C. Adams along with USF’s Michael Bahr and Charles Metten appeared alongside of Theatre Arts faculty Peter Sham and Brad Carroll and our acting students in «27»


Sham and Carroll’s A Christmas Carol On The Air »» Alumnus Joan Woodbury, co-founder of the Ririe Woodbury Dance Company re-created her choreography, Loose Change Girls, on SUU dancers for the faculty dance concert »» Equity Actors, Quinn M. Matfield, Elizabeth Magavero, Lindsay Cozzens and Aaron Galligan-Stierle for the USF Acting Company presented a week of workshops for SUU students »» SUU hosted and participated in a stage reading of Christmas is Here Again, written by Brad Carrol and Jeremy Mann, to be premiered by PCPA in Dec. 2014. Guests from PCPA included Roger DeLaurier and Katie Mack »» Dancer Heather Acomb, members of the Ririe Woodbury Dance Company and members of RDT Dance Company provided dance workshops.

Support Faculty and Staff Excellence and Development 6.4 SUPPORT FACULTY SCHOLARLY, CREATIVE, AND RESEARCH GRANTS

The primary goal of the Provost’s fund for faculty scholarly support is to promote faculty efforts to develop as teachers, scholars and artists. The following are projects/travel that received funding for CPVA in 2013-13:

»» Jessica Gerlach and Ron Spears received partial travel funding to represent the Department of Art and Design with the faculty exchange program with the School of Art at Renmin University, Beijing. The faculty participated in an exhibition of their work and presented lectures, demonstrations and workshops. »» Rachel Bishop received funds to travel to the annual Association of Arts Administration Educators conference in Montreal, Quebec. She was an invited presenter of a paper titled: The Cumulative Apologia: Curriculum Integration & Program Evaluation. »» Dr. Lynn Vartan received travel support to perform as a soloist with the Hubei Symphony Orchestra at the Qintai Concert Hall in Wuhan, China. Dr. Keith Bradshaw received travel support rehearse the debut of his composition Canyon Concerto with the Hubei Symphony Orchestra and also received project funding to purchase a Hang Drum to assist in the creation of his original work. Dr. Xun Sun received travel funding to support his effort as a conductor for the Hubei Symphony Orchestra for this international project. »» Chien-Ying Wang received funding for her original choreography The Tipping Point, to be presented at the Northwest Region of the American College Dance Festival Association’s regional conference at the University of Montana

Left: Loose Change performed at Journeys, Faculty Dance Concert, 2014, originally created by alumna Joan Woodbury for Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company Photo: Karl Hugh

«28»

PART THREE: CPVA GOALS, OBJECTIVES & OUTCOMES


CONTRIBUTE TO STATE, REGIONAL, AND COMMUNITY NEEDS AS A SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CATALYST

Blalock and Partners Architectural Design Studio continued the design phase of the $35 million dollar Beverley Taylor Sorensen Center for the Arts project. The project is well under way and groundbreaking took place during a snowy afternoon during the University’s Founders Day Celebration, March 2014. This extensive construction project will provide an economic boom to the entire region. The Beverly Taylor Sorenson Center for the Arts will dramatically enrich the cultural life of Cedar City and its surrounding region. It will create a year-round destination for thousands of visitors thus enhancing SUU as a major contributor to state, regional and community need as a social and economic catalyst. HARNESS AND INTEGRATE OUR UNIQUE GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION IN THE SUU EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE

»» Brian Swanson received funding to present Current Production Practices of Rep Plat Forming and participated as a panelist for the topic Tracking Your Resources: Methods of Labor and Money at the USITT Annual Conference and Stage Expo »» Paul Ocampo received support for his dance performance Equanimity at the Cultural Center of the Philippines »» Dr. Andrew Marvick received travel support to attend the College Art Association in Chicago, Illinois and present his paper The Sisters of Atalanta: Distortions of the Classical Ideal in Fin-De-siécle Art »» Denise Purvis received travel support to present at the National Dance Education Organization’s Annual Meeting in Miami, Florida. She presented Changing the Filter: Seeing Student Disability as Pedagogic Gold Mines »» Jessica Gerlach received funding to attend the AIGA Design Educators Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota and presented Using our Hands: What hand-setting type can teach design students about typography.

The diverse landscape of southern Utah provides sustaining inspiration to both students and professional artists. The College has supported the following meaningful learning opportunities that connect to our unique region: »» The SUU Percussion Ensemble performed at Bryce Canyon National Park »» The Student Artist-in-Residence at Zion National Park was Albert (Chip) Wiggins. Ron Spears coordinated with the Zion Museum Curator to review the program and assess ways to improve the experience for the students and the Zion National Park »» CPVA continued its successful facilitation of Zion National Park Artists-in-Residence Program. Fine and Graphic Design Arts and Zion National Park Artist-inResidence Rebecca Fogg, and »» Artist, Architect, and Interior Designer and Zion National Park Artist-in-Residence Kimberly Harris were selected and also contributed to Art Insights.

Above: Ron Spears in China

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Part Four: Academic Programs


Curriculum Development and Changes Consent Changes Prerequisite Changes ART 3260 ART 4210 ART 4220 ART 4320 ART 4340 ART 4260 ART 4280 ART 4290 ART 4300 ART 4790 THEA 3533 THEA 3553 THEA 3563 THEA 3573 THEA 3733 THEA 4333

Foundation Review Foundation Review Foundation Review Foundation Review Foundation Review Foundation Review Foundation Review Foundation Review Foundation Review Foundation Review THEA 2203, THEA 2533, THEA 3223 THEA 2523, THEA 2533, THEA 3223 THEA 2523, THEA 2533, THEA 3223 THEA 2523, THEA 3223 THEA 1713 or ENGL 2400 or SST 1300 THEA 2523, THEA 3323

Other Changes AA 6210 AA 6820 AA 6980 AA 6990

Changed course description Removed Coursed Changed method of grading to pass/fail Changed course description

» » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » »

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PART FOUR: ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

Course Title Changes ART 3510 ART 4510 Dance 2090 THEA 2523 THEA 2543 AA 6900 AA 6980 AA 6990

» » » » » » » »

Visual Development Advanced Visual Development Prefix DANC 2500 Drafting for Theatre Theatrical Design I Capstone Internship Degree Defense Professional Projects

Course Prefix Changes THEA 3533 THEA 4363 THEA 3553 THEA 4353 THEA 3563 THEA 4343 THEA 3573 THEA 4373

» » » »


Degree/Program Change BFA in Studio Arts - Illustration »» Changes made to more accurately reflect the learning objectives of each class and address pedagogical redundancies present in the current curriculum BFA in Graphic Design »» Clarify the requirement for a B.F.A. Portfolio Exhibition for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design BFA in Studio Arts - Ceramics/Sculpture »» Clarify the requirement for a B.F.A. Portfolio Exhibition for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Ceramics/Sculpture BFA in Studio Arts - Illustration »» Clarify the requirement for a B.F.A. Portfolio Exhibition for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Illustration

BFA in Theatre Design & Technology »» Changes will provide increased choice within the degree Shakespeare Studies Minor »» Change in credit hours from 21 to 19. Adding variable credit. »» Moving Some required courses to electives. Arts Administration - MA »» Deleted PADM 6200- Financial Management »» Added AA 6080- Introduction to Art Gallery and Museum Studies Arts Administration - MFA »» Deleted PADM 6200- Public Sector Finance »» Deleted MKTG 6000- Foundation of Marketing & Marketing Research »» Added AA 6080- Introduction to Art Gallery and Museum Studies

BFA in Studio Arts - Painting/Drawing/Printmaking »» Clarify the requirement for a B.F.A. Portfolio Exhibition for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting/Drawing/ Printmaking

Arts Administration - MA »» Deleted MGMT 6300- HR Management & Law »» Added AA 6110- Legal Issues in the Arts

BFA in Studio Arts - Photography »» Clarify the requirement for a B.F.A. Portfolio Exhibition for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photography

Arts Administration - MFA »» Deleted MGMT 6300- HR Management & Law »» Added AA 6110- Legal Issues in the Arts

Substantive Changes New Degree Programs BFA in Studio Arts (Ceramics/Sculpture) This degree resolves an accreditation issue with more courses in the area of sculpture Master of Music Education For practicing music educators who want to expand their knowledge and professional expertise. This degree will service the needs of Southern Utah area school music teachers

New Courses THEA 3223 - Theatrical Design II THEA 3313 - Costume Construction II THEA 3353 - Period Styles SST 2300 - Shakespeare’s Plays AA 6110 - Legal Issues in the Arts Changes to Existing Courses ART 4890 - Internship »» Change credit hours to: ½ to 12 ART 4990 - Senior Seminar »» Specified Area of Study, e.g., Painting, etc. »» Change credit hours to: ½ to 4

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CPVA Undergraduate Enrollment Based on third-week reports, fall semester 2013, CPVA reached a total of 554 declared majors; a decrease of of 47 students from the previous year; however a decrease of 18 students relative to the CPVA’s five year average.

Art & Design

Music

Theatre Art & Dance

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PART FOUR: ACADEMIC PROGRAMS


Arts Admin.

Total Enrollment

Comparison

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Above: The Tipping Point, Journeys: faculty Dance Concert, 2014 Photo: Karl Hugh

«36»

PART FOUR: ACADEMIC PROGRAMS


CPVA SCH Trends Student Credit Hour (SCH) productivity for the last 7 years has increased significantly. This trend is a result of growth in majors (outside of general education) and in spite of the required higher contact hours in arts disciplines that impacts SCH generation. 7/1/2006

8/1/2007

13,404

14,611

9/1/2008 15,916

10/1/2009

11/1/2010

17,258

18,276

12/1/2011 17,779

2012-13 17,055

AVERAGE 16,234

Graduation Totals SUU’s 2013-14 Fact Book, documented the latest graduate completion year as 2012-13. CPVA graduated 74 students; the largest number of graduates was in the major of theatre arts with 19. 9/1/2008 50

10/1/2009 70

11/1/2010 73

12/1/2011 81

2012-13 74

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Part Five: Student Highlights


CPVA Undergraduate Highlights In addition to the multiple concerts, productions, exhibitions, and presentations that engage CPVA students, the following are examples of specific achievements during the 2013-14 year: ANTHONY PEARSON was recognized by the National

Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA) with his work selected for inclusion in the 2014 NCECA National Student Juried Exhibition at the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design

tography 2014. Over 16,600 photographs were received from students in the U.S., Canada and around the world. ROBERT CURL’S work was accepted into an international

juried show at the Center for Fine Art Photography in Fort Collins, Colorado entitled, “Black + White 2014.” The Juror was Jason Landry, a writer, photography collector and owner of Panopticon Gallery in Boston, MA. Additionally, Robert’s work was also showcased in an exhibition entitled “Contemporary Portraiture,” by the Kiernan Gallery in Lexington, VA. The Juror was Robin Rice, a photographer and owner of Robin Rice Gallery in New York City, NY. SARAI TRUEBLOOD’S BFA Capstone Project Heart

Strings, was accepted for publication in Creative Quarterly, fall 2014 edition. TYLER COLE and RACHEL ROSS accepted illustrator staff

position in Salt Lake City, and Minnesota respectively. Art and Design students toured Seattle, visited game studios, artist, museums and other activities providing experience in the art field. This activity was under the direction of faculty member RON SPEARS.

ALENA VANDENHAZEL’S work was accepted into Photog-

rapher’s Forum Magazine for the Emerging Professional “34th Annual College & High School Photography Contest” where she received College Honorable Mention Award. Her work will be published in the hardcover book, Best of College & High School Photography 2014. Over 16,600 photographs were received from students in the U.S., Canada and around the world. LINE UHLER’S work was accepted into Photographer’s

Forum Magazine for the Emerging Professional “34th Annual College & High School Photography Contest” as a College Finalist. Her work will be published in the hardcover book, Best of College & High School Pho-

«40»

PART FIVE: STUDENT HIGHLIGHTS

Eight graphic design students attend the AIGA Y Conference in San Diego, California and toured San Diego Studio Mires+Ball, under the direction of faculty members JEFF HANSON and JUNYUNG SON. HEIDI POWELL co-presented with faculty member DENISE PURVIS at the National Dance Education Organiza-

tion’s Annual Meeting in Miami, Florida. She presented Changing the Filter: Seeing Student Disability as Pedagogic Gold Mines. Art Students from the Ceramic Guild traveled to the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts annual conference at the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. Ten students traveled to the North Island of New Zealand for a two-week cultural emersion study-abroad under the direction of faculty member DEBORAH SNIDER


from the Art and Design Department along with Kyle Bishop and Toanui Tawa from the English Department. Five dance students participated in a study abroad summer program Exploring Dance & Culture in Taiwan, developed and supervised by CHIEN-YING WANG and PAUL OCAMPO at the National Taiwan University of Arts. Music students participated in the study abroad program Music in Italy, Austria, and Germany, directed by DR. KEITH BRADSHAW.

Twenty-four dance students participated in the American College Dance Festival, at the University of Montana in Missoula, Montana under the supervision of CHIEN-YING WANG and PAUL OCAMPO Percussion students DARIN HUNSINGER, MARSHALL MILLER, AUSTIN JULIAN, and TYLOR WILLIAMS performed with the Hubei Symphony Orchestra at the Qintai Concert Hall in Wuhan, China. They gave concerts at China Central Normal University, Hunan Normal University and performed with the Peking University Chinese Music Institute at Peking University as part of the Yuanpei Festival. The concert tour was under the direction of LYNN VARTAN, XUN SUN, KEITH BRADSHAW and SHAUNA MENDINI.

Twelve music students made a strong showing at the National Association of Teachers Singing regional competition. Taking first place in their respective divisions were Janese Shaw and Corlissa Jensen and Christina Meikle. Second place winners were Jordan Sanders, Caitlin Elmer, Annie Powell, and Lindsay Lopez. The SUU Ballroom Dance Company attended the Mustang Ball hosted by California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, California. A series of couples took first place honors in eleven categories under the direction of Andrea Johnson. Twenty-four students from SUU’s Ballroom Dance Company provided a weeklong series of performances in Puerto Rico. A performance at the University of Sagrado Corazon was attended by the Governor of Puerto Rico. The tour was under the direction of ANDREA JOHNSON and supervised by KAY ANDERSEN. KRISTAL ARMISTEAD worked for the Utah Festival Opera

and Musical Theatre, while Emily Smith worked as Walt Disney World as an entertainment technical intern. Facing page: “Platter” created by ceramics student Anthony Pearson. Above: Journeys, Faculty Dance Concert, 2014 Photo: Karl Hugh

ALANA PINCHOT and ANDIE SZEKELEY worked for New

York Stage and Film on the campus of Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York.

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CPVA Graduate Hightlights Actors TONY CARTER and TIFFANI ALLEN appeared onstage at the Pickleville Playhouse while AMANDA DAYTON, FRANK GASPARRO, NATE MARBLE and CHRISTOPHER WHITESIDE were performers at Lake Powell Playhouse.

Twenty theatre arts students worked within their field of study (acting and technical theatre) for the Utah Shakespeare Festival during the 2014 summer season, while twelve theatre arts students worked for the Neil Simon Festival.

ARTS ADMINISTRATION DAVID WICAI

During the Fall 2013 Braithwaite Gallery exhibit titled Jim Jones: The San Blas Years, the gallery staff incorporated a new element to the already successful Education Program. With funding and support from the Utah Division of Arts & Museums and the SUU Provost’s Office, the gallery was able to acquire 30 new iPads. The iPads gave the staff the opportunity to utilize a color app that allows students to create their own color palate based on what they saw in one of Jim Jones’ paintings. The goal was to create an environment of experiential learning that empowered students to learn about art on their own rather than relying on someone else to teach them about the art. The project was hugely successful, serving over 1,000 students, while also drawing the attention of several other galleries and museums across the country who wanted to learn about the process of incorporating technology into their own organizations.

RACHELLE BONNETT

In winter 2013, Cedar City Arts Council (CCAC) brainstormed ways to support the visual arts in the community and recruited new board members from the MFA program. Based on community input, it became clear that Cedar City was lacking what other arts-oriented communities offer: an art walk. The CCAC established a Public Art and Art Walks Committee, chaired by myself. After planning meetings with board members and local businesses, the CCAC announced a Call for Artists for the inaugural Cedar City Art Walk, to take place in June, July, and August. The Walk team assigned artists to local businesses based on the quality of work and the unique fit between the venue and the art’s subject matter. The first-ever Cedar City Art Walk was launched on June 27th with 16 participating businessColumn 1: Students engaged in art via iPad project Photo: Rachelle Bonnett Column 2: Opening of Jim Jones: The San Blas Years exhibition Photo: Asher J. Swan

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PART FIVE: STUDENT HIGHLIGHTS


es and galleries displaying small to large exhibits. The walk was free to all and occurred 5-8 pm. Many of the exhibiting businesses were pleased with the results. The Walks gave patrons an opportunity to interact with local artists and businesses, view technique demonstrations, and enjoy the company of others involved. The CCAC plans to make this an annual program with the intent of expanding partnerships with local businesses, thus creating more opportunities to support our local artists and nurture an environment for community members to engage with visual arts. NATHAN MCDONALD

The Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery’s vision statement puts education at the center of its purpose. As the gallery begins its transition into the Southern Utah Museum of Art it is committed to expanding educational opportunities to the region it serves. Building on the success of the gallery’s elementary school programs Nathan McDonald, MFA Arts Administration candidate, has led the first activities focusing on secondary education students. McDonald began by coordinating visits to high school art classrooms and in these visits he and an undergraduate art history major engaged over 200 students in discussions based around pivotal artists throughout history. Over the summer the gallery hosted three two-week camps designed to introduce students to art history, give them the opportunity to specialize in an artistic medium and, develop professional skills. These camps were made possible through generous support from the Cedar City Rap Tax and the Utah Division of Arts & Museum. During the first of these camps students spent two-weeks at the Frontier Homestead Museum. Students were trained in basic art techniques by local professional artists (Arlene Braithwaite, Andrew Marvick, Katharine Villard and others) and completed a mural based around the history of Cedar City. During the second camp students gained basic design skills while learning to use design tools such as the Adobe Creative Suite. In the third camp students gained basic painting and drawing skills through a rigorous series of workshops and studio time. The gallery is excited to continue and expand these important community services through the service based learning of its graduate assistants.

NATHANIEL TAGGART

The forthcoming Southern Utah Museum of Art will greatly enhance the reach of the visual arts at Southern Utah University. The number of incredible opportunities presented by this new resource can hardly be overstated; but they come with a need to expand the revenue base of the current Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery. The annual Friends of the Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery Art Auction has been the principal source of funds for the gallery’s fall exhibition and educational programs. The Friends, along with help from graduate students in arts administration and the marketing department of SUU’s College of Performing and Visual Arts, worked hard to begin to increase the profile and fundraising capacity of the Art Auction. One arm of this effort was the inaugural online art auction, which was held in conjunction with the traditional live event. The online auction allowed more of the region’s artists to take part in this important event, and connected the art auction and its generous artists to a larger audience on the World Wide Web through the auction’s portal, Biddingforgood.com. In addition to raising more than $1,600, the online auction ignited a number of important conversations between the artists and the gallery staff on how to best expand this event for benefit of all involved parties.

Above: Students in Summer Art Camp Photo: Rachelle Bonnett

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JOE NEMROW

KARI HEAPS

For part of my capstone project, I organized and managed the 2014 artsFUSION: Art, Music, and Me Kids Summer Camp. The camp itself takes place every summer in the middle of June and has two classes, around thirty students in each class. Camp was held June 16-27, Monday-Friday, from 9am-12pm. We divided the classes according to age groups (ages 8-9 and 10-12). The older class spent the first hour and twenty minutes in the visual arts class (taught by Alisa Peterson) while the younger class attended the music class (taught by Melissa Leavitt). In between the classes, the children enjoyed a snack break, then the two classes switched to their second music/art class. This year’s theme, Me, encouraged the campers’ to explore their personal creativity and individuality. In the art class, the students worked with advanced visual art mediums, such as oil pastels, clay, and mixed media with fabric. In the music class, the children learned beautiful songs with uplifting lyrics and tempos. The last day of the camp, we held a closing reception and art exhibit. The parents of the participating children were invited and enjoyed seeing their displayed artwork and proudly watched them perform the learned songs, which brought tears to their eyes. This was the 6th annual art camp. Carrie Trenholm and Sue Houston started the camp and has improved the quality and structure every year. This year, they both turned the entire responsibility of managing the camp, to me. They mentored me through the process and were so trusting of my ability to run the entire camp.

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PART FIVE: STUDENT HIGHLIGHTS

All MFA Arts Administration students participate in administrating the Utah Shakespeare Festival’s annual High School Shakespeare Competition. The MFA students manage registration, scheduling, adjudications, hospitality, catering, etc. In 2013, SUU campus and the Utah Shakespeare Festival hosted 117 junior high, high schools and academies from Utah, Nevada, Arizona, California, Colorado and Wisconsin. A recordbreaking 3,000 students participated allowing them and their teachers the opportunity to perform for peers and professionals, receive professional adjudication and training from Festival actors and directors, and to experience professional and university Shakespeare productions. THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXCERPT FROM A LETTER OF A PARTICIPATING TEACHER:

“The lead in our ensemble scene, Richard III, his father committed suicide three weeks before the competition. Because he was an only child and it was just him and his dad, this team became his safe place. He needed to be able to focus on the competition. So what we got out of the competition this year was FAR MORE than anyone will ever know. Brian Vaughn worked with this boy in a special workshop that we set up on Thursday afternoon and it was incredible to see him so focused on the craft. Brian doesn’t know what an incredible boost that was for Zach. Thank you for everything you do for ALL kids and have done for the past 39 years. Shakespeare allows these kids to think about something else and conquer something outside themselves, something so big that it says “there isn’t anything I can’t do.” - Jan Hunsaker, Salt Lake School for the Performing Arts

Above: President Scott Wyatt and wife Kathy with Deborah Snider, Assistant Professor of Art, and her husband Harold, a local potter, at 22nd Braithwaite Art Auction Photo: Asher J. Swan


«45»


Part Six: Faculty & Staff


Faculty Highlights 2013-2014 In addition to creating, directing, choreographing, designing, and performing in the multiple concerts, productions, exhibitions, and presentations that are part of CPVA’s performance and exhibition season, the following are examples the types of activities our quality faculty are engaged in: MUSIC DR. XUN SUN was a guest conductor for the Hubei Sym-

phony Orchestra’s 2014 New Year’s concert, Wuhan, China. He also conducted the Hubei Symphony for the Hubei Province’s New Year’s concert. This concert was an experimental and innovation concert because it combined with Chinese Folk Opera and Western Symphonic format with Orchestra and Folk Opera singers in presenting Aires and excerpts from Chinese traditional Opera.

Dr. Vartan performed a Satellite Salon Series with mime C. Nicolas Johnson and graphics designer JEFF HANSON (Art & Design) at the Thorley Recital Hall. DR. DOUGLAS IPSON presented Translating Alfieri’s ‘Bruto

primo’ at the SUU Festival of Excellence. DR. THOMAS HERB and ADAM LAMBERT and the SUU

Jazz Band presented an outstanding concert with renowned trombonist Delfeayo Marsalis at Cedar City’s Heritage Center Theater. DR. KEITH BRADSHAW composed Canyons Concerto for DR. LYNN VARTAN, which was premiered November 9,

2013, by the Orchestra of Southern Utah. It was performed again in May 2014 with the Hubei Symphony in Wuhan, China conducted by DR. XUN SUN. Canyon Concerto is based on four areas of Southern Utah: Bryce Canyon, Goblin Valley, Arches, and Zion’s. Dr. Bradshaw explained on the Orchestra of Southern Utah’s Website (http://osucedarcity.blogspot.com/). “Each of the four movements treat formations in these areas, such as The Gossips in Arches, and Hoodoos in Bryce, imagining each coming to life, dancing, playing, chatting, or just visiting.

DR. LYNN VARTAN recorded a solo CD, Dancing on the

Head of a Pin, in LA, February 2014. The CD, which comprises solo marimba music, is produced by Delos Records. Dr. Vartan, with RON SPEARS (Art & Design), composer Carlos Rivera, and Folklore dancer Monica Gomez, and the SUU percussion Ensemble, performed Day of the Dead at the Satellite Salon Series, Thorley Recital Hall. Dr. Vartan performed the Catch Your Breath Tour with percussionist Matthew Coley and the Co’Motion Dance Company, at Links Hall, Chicago. The performance was a combination of dance, music, and visual arts. They performed with the dancers with a projector and a program titled Isadora, integrating movements on stage with the visuals seen on the projection. Facing Page: Ron Spears and his stamp at unveiling in Las Vegas

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PART SIX: FACULTY & STAFF


ART & DESIGN JESSICA GERLACH presented at the AIGA Design Educa-

tors Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota titled: Using our Hands: What hand-setting type can teach design students about typography? She also presented this topic at the SUU Festival of Excellence. JESSICA GERLACH presented her creative work to sev-

RON SPEARS collaborated with DR. LYNN VARTAN (Music),

composer Carlos Rivera, and Folklore dancer Monica Gomez, and the SUU percussion Ensemble, performed Day of the Dead at the Satellite Salon Series. RON SPEARS received national acclaim after the US Post-

al Service released the Nevada Forever Stamp which he designed and celebrated the state’s 150th anniversary.

eral classes in the Visual Communication Department at the University of Arizona School of Art. Jessica spoke about her work using traditional letterpress methods and also presented examples of the work her students have created in letterpress.

RON SPEARS and JESSICA GERLACH traveled to Remnin

DR. ANDREW MARVICK presented The Sisters of Atalanta:

6: Contemporary Ceramic Art from Six Rocky Mountain States, for the Braithwaite Gallery.

Distortions of the Classical Ideal in Fin-de-Siècle Art, at CAA in Chicago, February 2014. DR. ANDREW MARVICK prepared 27 new medium- and

large-scale mixed-media canvases and more than 50 small works for a forthcoming exhibition of his art entitled Ancient Hues, at Cedar City’s new art gallery, galleryGALA. DEBORAH K. SNIDER presented An Unsuspecting Leader

at the SUU Festival of Excellence. June 2014, Snider’s book The Collages of Jonathan Talbot, was published by Royal Fireworks Press. The book features a contribution by SUU’s DR. ANDREW MARVICK and graphics layout by JEFFREY HANSON.

University’s School of Art, Beijing, China where they participated in an exhibition of their work and presented lectures, demonstrations and workshops. SUSAN HARRIS Curated the forthcoming exhibit, 50 from

SUSAN HARRIS was Invited to produce two artworks,

Tortoise Kylix (Night) and Tortoise Kylix (Day) for the traveling exhibition Considering the Kylix and including a printed catalog of the same title. The exhibition was produced by Peter’s Valley Craft Center in Layton, New Jersey and travels to Marywood University in Scranton, PA. She was Invited to exhibit two works in the exhibition Flora and Fauna (and printed catalog of the same title) produced by the Brinton Art Museum in Big Horn Wyoming. Susan Harris mounted a solo exhibition Susan Harris: Lidded Vessels at the Brinton Art Museum, Big Horn Wyoming. JUNGYUN SON and JEFF HANSON attended the AIGA Y

Conference in San Diego, California and coordinated eight student participants. JEFF HANSON printed and exhibited A Tiny Voice, minia-

ture letterpress artist book. ERIC BROWN exhibited in Figurative Works, International

Juried Exhibition, Foundry Art Centre, Saint Charles, MO. January 24 – March 7, 2014. ERIC BROWN wrote the Response and Progress Report

to the NASAD Commission on Accreditation (25 page document), February 2014. Result: Specialized Accreditation and Full Membership in the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. In addition he served on the NASAD Visiting Evaluation Team Chair to Indiana State University.

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RHEANA GARDNER will be presenting her work at the

RICHARD BUGG was the Artistic Director and Executive

2014 Society for Photographic Education Southeast Regional Conference, “If you build it...” in Greenville, NC.

Producter for the 12th season of the Neil Simon Festival. He also directed You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown and Driving Miss Daisy in which he also acted the role of Boolie.

THEATRE ARTS & DANCE BRIAN SWANSON presented Current Production Practices

of Rep Plat Forming and participated as a panelist for the topic Tracking Your Resources: Methods of Labor and Money at the USITT Annual Conference and Stage Expo. BRIAN SWANSON was the Technical Director for the Utah

Shakespeare Festival’s Adams Memorial Theatre’s production of Comedy of Errors, Measure for Measure, and Henry IV: Part 1.

PETER SHAM acted the role of Max Prince in Laughter

on the 23rd Floor and was director of The Star-Spangled Girl for the Neil Simon Festival. CHIEN-YING WANG presented her original choreogra-

phy The Tipping Point, at the Northwest Region of the American College Dance Festival Association’s regional conference at the University of Montana. In addition, Chien-Ying Wang presented The Tipping Point, for the SUU Festival of Excellence. PAUL OCAMPO and CHIEN-YING WANG presented the

dance performance Equanimity, at the Cultural Center of the Philippines. PETER SHAM and BRAD CARROLL’S work, Lend Me a

Tenor The Musical, is in preparation for a Broadway debut in 2014-15. BRAD CARROLL directed Utah Shakespeare Festival’s

production of The Comedy of Errors. He also wrote Christmas is Here Again, with Jeremy Mann that will premier with PCPA in December 2014.

ARTS ADMINISTRATION RACHEL BISHOP took first year MFA students to Wash-

DENISE PURVIS presented at the National Dance Educa-

tion Organization’s Annual Meeting in Miami, Florida. She presented Changing the Filter: Seeing Student Disability as Pedagogic Gold Mines DENISE PURVIS presented Engaging Interpersonal and

Intrapersonal Intelligence in the High School Dance Technique Class at the SUU Festival of Excellence. KAY ANDERSEN was a faculty member for the Interna-

tional Summer Intensive Course for the Professional Studio of Dance of Emma Pulido, Mexico City.

ington, D.C., to attend the Emerging Arts Leaders Symposium where they attended sessions by leaders in the field and had the opportunity to network with other emerging leaders RACHEL BISHOP presented at the annual Association of

Arts Administration Educators conference in Montreal, Quebec. She presented on a paper titled: The Cumulative Apologia: Curriculum Integration & Program Evaluation. RACHEL BISHOP, REECE SUMMERS (Director of SUMA),

and DEBORAH K. SNIDER (Art) presented Academic Impact: The Southern Utah Museum of Art at the SUU Festival of Excellence.

Above: Denise Purvis leads a dance lab Photo courtesy of Denise Purvis

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PART SIX: FACULTY & STAFF


BILL BYRNES presented The Utah Shakespeare Festival:

DR. DON WEINGUST has been named a member of the

An Evolving Leadership Transition, at the Hawaii International Conference on Arts & Humanities, Honolulu in January 2014.

Editorial board of Theatre Survey, the flagship journal of the American Society for Theatre Research, published by Cambridge University Press.

BILL BYRNES book, Management and the Arts, 4e, has

CPVA

been translated to Korean and was published by Random House Korea in February 2014.

CLARISSE LUNT, SHAUNA MENDINI, KAY ANDERSEN,

THE BRAITHWAITE FINE ARTS GALLERY

SHAM, and BRIAN SWANSON spearheaded an extensive

REECE SUMMERS (Braithwaite Gallery Director) received

the 2014 Engaged Staff Award from the Utah Campus Compact, April 2014.

SHAKESPEARE STUDIES DR. DON WEINGUST presented Shakespeare and Original

Practices at the biennial Blackfriars Conference, American Shakespeare Center, Staunton Virginia. The paper was given in the Blackfriars Playhouse of the American Shakespeare Center, a replica of Shakespeare’s indoor playhouse, using teleprompter software for the iPad. A version of this conference presentation will be published in Shakespeare, the Journal of the British Shakespeare Association. DR. DON WEINGUST acted as Dramaturg for the Utah

Shakespeare Festival fall production of Richard II. For a production of a history play by Shakespeare, Richard II. DR. DON WEINGUST acquired and edited several articles

for the Fall 2013 edition of The Journal of the Wooden O, as associate editor, which marked the beginning of a relationship between The Journal of the Wooden O, and the Shakespearean Performance Research Group, which he founded and continues to Co-Chair for the American Society for Theatre Research, the professional organization of scholars working in the areas of Theatre History, Theory, Criticism and Performance Studies. DR. DON WEINGUST co-chaired the annual gathering of the Shakespearean Performance Research Group, the largest ongoing group of the American Society for Theatre Research, at the society’s annual conference, held in Dallas, TX, November 2013.

RACHEL BISHOP, KEITH BRADSHAW, ERIC BROWN, PETER

year-long process of Program Review for the College of Performing and Visual Arts as part of the seven-year cycle required by the Utah State Board of Regents. SHAUNA MENDINI served as a site-evaluator for the

National Association of Schools of Dance (NASD) and provided consultative services in dance curriculum for the Hubei Province Dance Organization, Wuhan, China. MICHAEL FRENCH applied for and was awarded mon-

ies from the SUU Staff Development Fund in order to research the Couer d’Alene Art Auction as a model for evolving the Gallery’s Art Auction into a more profitable venture. On behalf of the Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery, MICHAEL FRENCH, Marketing and Public Relations Coordinator, and DONNA LAW, CPVA Advancement Officer, secured grants from the Cedar City Brian Head Tourism Bureau for two Gallery exhibitions, Jim Jones: The San Blas Years and 50 from 6: Contemporary Ceramic Art from Six Rocky Mountain States. In addition, French secured a two-year sponsorship from Cedar City’s Rainbow Sign & Banner to be used for gallery exhibitions.

Right: Michael French, Iryna Stein and Ron Spears research the Couer d’Alene Art Auction Photo: Larry Chandler

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201314 CPVA Faculty & Staff Listing DEAN’S OFFICE Shauna T. Mendini Dean Associate Professor of Dance Clarisse Lunt Assistant to the Dean Stephen Wagner CPVA Academic Advisor Michael French Marketing and Public Information Coordinator Donna Law Director of Development DEPARTMENT OF ART & DESIGN

Jeffrey Hanson Associate Professor of Graphic Design (Received Tenure and Rank Advancement 2014) Susan Harris Professor of Art Ceramics Brian Hoover Professor of Art Painting & Printmaking

Donna McIntyre Administrative Assistant Dr. Kevin Baker Assistant Professor of Music Director of Choral Activities

Peter Sham Associate Department Chair Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts Jacque Marchant Administrative Assistant

Dr. Thomas Herb Associate Professor of Music (Received Tenure with Rank Advancement 2014)

Deborah Snider Assistant Professor of Art Art Education

MUSIC EDUCATION

Richard Bugg Professor of Theatre Arts Acting/Directing

Dr. Lawrence Johnson Associate Professor of Music Voice

Brad Carroll Artist in Residence Musical Theatre

Dr. Adam Lambert Associate Professor of Music Director of Bands

Kyle Cook Scene Shop Assistant

Jung Yun Son Assistant Professor of Graphic Design Ben Sowards Artist in Residence Illustration, Painting Ron Spears Assistant Professor of Art Drawing/Entertainment Design

ARTS ADMINISTRATION

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Kay Andersen Department Chair Associate Professor of Dance

Jeremias Paul Assistant Professor of Photography

Professor of Art Art History & Drawing

Jessica Gerlach Assistant Professor of Graphic Design

Dr. Keith Bradshaw Department Chair Professor of Music Composition

Dr. Christian Bohnenstengel Assistant Professor of Music Piano

Eric A. Brown Department Chair

Rheana Gardner Assistant Professor of Photography

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE ARTS AND DANCE

Dr. Andrew Marvick Professor of Art History (Received Rank Advancement 2014)

Russell Wrankle Assistant Professor of Art 3D/Sculpture/Foundation

Rossina Felstead Administrative Assistant

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC

Rachel Bishop Assistant Professor of Arts Administration Director BRAITHWAITE FINE ARTS GALLERY Reece Summers Director & Curator

PART SIX: FACULTY & STAFF

Carol Ann Modesitt Professor of Music Voice Dr. Virginia Stitt Professor of Music Double Reed, Theory Dr. Xun Sun Associate Professor of Music Orchestra Dr. Lynn Vartan Associate Professor of Music Percussion Willem van Schalkwyk Staff Accompanist

Brian Beacom Supervisor, Scene Shop Jarrod Bray (Fall Semester) Assistant Professor Scene/Lighting Design

Dr. Christine Frezza Associate Professor of Theatre Arts Theatre History/Dramatic Criticism Katrina Dransfield (Fall Semester) / Erica Bascom (Spring Semester) Supervisor, Costume Shop Paul C. Ocampo Associate Professor of Dance Denise Purvis Assistant Professor of Dance Wendy Sanders Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts Costume Design

Brian Swanson Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts Technical Theatre Chien-Ying Wang Associate Professor of Dance (Received Tenure with Rank Advancement 2014) Dr. Don Weingust Associate Professor of Theatre Arts Director, Shakespeare Studies


Above: Journeys, Faculty Dance Concert, 2014 Photo: Karl Hugh

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CPVA Annual Report 2013-14  
CPVA Annual Report 2013-14  

Southern Utah University's CPVA Annual Report for 2013-2014