Page 1

A PUBLICATION OF SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY’S DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS

OUR VALUES

2012-2013 ANNUAL REPORT


inside

2-5

6-10



Campaigns

By the Numbers: Health and Wellness

11-15

Programs

16-20

By the Numbers: Discovery and Engagement

21-23

Trainings

24-30

By the Numbers: Inclusion, Community, and Citizenship

31-32

Strategic Thinking

33-36

By the Numbers: Central Services

37

Our Organization

EXECUTIVE EDITOR Jill Ouikahilo ASSISTANT EDITORS Georgia A. Popoff, Dana Ettinger ’13, Erica Belanger ’13, George Bain DESIGN Amy McVey

PHOTOGRAPHY Steve Sartori, Hyon Choi ’14, Drew Osumi ’16, and Student Affairs Offices Produced by Syracuse University Office of Publications


In the Division of Student Affairs, we continue to be guided by our mission, vision, and values that were created under the leadership of former senior vice president and dean of Student Affairs, Thomas V. Wolfe (2008-2013).

environment in which learning flourishes by aligning our core values with the array of services and programs students depend on each day. It is a great privilege and honor for us to do this work of supporting the holistic and educational development of Syracuse University students, and the

Rebecca Reed Kantrowitz Interim senior vice president and dean of student affairs

campus community.

THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

We approach our mission of cultivating an inclusive, connected, and caring

1

our values 1

A  diverse, inclusive community: We value and advocate for a diverse and inclusive community that is accessible, respectful, and responsive to the needs of an increasingly interconnected world. We acknowledge the challenges created by a history of oppression and the inequity that people from marginalized communities have had and continue to experience.

2

D  iscovery: We encourage exploration and lifelong learning through personal and professional development, individual and collective reflection and expression, and the creation of new experiences.

3

5

4

6

E ngagement: We seek to inspire a generation of global citizens and leaders in the broader national and international community to work together to create positive change on and off campus.

H  ealth and wellness: We are guided by the core belief that views optimal health and wellness as the integration of physical, emotional, relational, and spiritual well-being.

Sustainability: We encourage activities that meet the “triple bottom line� of healthy planet (environment), healthy people (mind, body, spirit, and social justice), and healthy economy (fair trade and local vendor focus).

Safety: We encourage attention to personal safety and concern for the safety of others.


2

campaigns 

THINK. DO. LIVE SU.


BE WISE

BE REAL. BE THERE. BE AWARE.

3 PILLARS OF THE CAMPAIGN 

BE Real— It is important to know your limits

BE There— Make the call if someone is in need of help

BE Aware— Know your C.U.P.S. (the signs of alcohol poisoning):

COLD SKIN

UNRESPONSIVE

THE BE WISE CAMPAIGN STRIVES TO GENERATE AWARENESS OF ALCOHOL POISONING— WHAT ITS SIGNS ARE, HOW TO AVOID IT, AND HOW TO RESPOND TO IT—THROUGH A HARM-REDUCTION APPROACH. In its first year, it grabbed public relations firm, Hill the attention of students Communications, helped ASSESSMENT OF THE and changed the tone craft the campaign’s CAMPAIGN AFTER ONE around drinking and alcohol SEMESTER OF IMPLEMENTATION messaging, marketing, poisoning through its use and promotional of colorful and playful strategies. It focused of students surveyed had heard of BE Wise graphics of the Party F. Owl the content on and professionally produced equipping students increase in student videos. Its interactive web with the knowledge to knowledge of alcohol poisoning symptoms site features a blood alcohol make safer decisions, calculator, quizzes, and a list of as opposed to telling phone numbers students can call in an students not to drink. alcohol-poisoning situation that can be Hill Communications sparked texted to the user’s cell phone from the site. engagement on campus through using The message behind the campaign is social media and #BEWiseWednesdays, simple: BE Wise about your drinking and staffing tables in the student centers and look out for each other. dining halls, and having a presence at major The S.I. Newhouse School of events. They also created and hosted the Public Communications-based student BE-BQ—the campaign’s signature event.

73% 26%

PUKING

SLOW BREATHING

Photo by Drew Osumi

THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

bewise.syr.edu

3


THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

campaigns

4

STOP BIAS AIMS TO: A  ssist students in being able to recognize acts of bias when they occur 

H  elp students in identifying University resources to report and get support if they are victims of, or witnesses to, acts of bias

G  uide students in developing an understanding of what it means to be

THE STOP BIAS CAMPAIGN EDUCATES THE CAMPUS ON BIAS-RELATED ACTS, FOSTERS

a member of an inclusive community

AND GIVES VOICE TO OUR DIVERSE COMMUNITY, AND PROVIDES RESOURCES TO HELP THOSE WHO HAVE BEEN IMPACTED BY BIAS INCIDENTS ON AND AROUND CAMPUS. On a campus that values a community of diverse scholars and is committed to creating a safe and inclusive environment, STOP Bias urges everyone to take a clear stand that biasrelated acts will not be tolerated. The web site, stopbias.syr.edu, features a reporting tool designed for campus members to report incidents of bias. The web site also includes information on how to identify bias and ways in which community members can get involved to create a safe and welcoming environment for everyone.

stopbias.syr.edu

Who Are You? Postcard Project The STOP Bias campaign launched the “Who Are You?” Postcard Project in fall 2012. This ongoing project allowed campus members to define and describe for themselves who they are. The submissions were honest, authentic, and powerful expressions of self and a beautiful representation of our global campus community. More than 160 anonymous statements from students, faculty and staff were collected and put on display during a spring reception in Panasci Lounge that also featured a slideshow of 60 of the postcards displayed in both audio and written formats. The slideshow is available on stopbias.syr.edu.


W H I T E R I B B O N C A M PA I G N

THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

No E C U S E for Abuse IN APRIL, WE SUPPORT THE VERA HOUSE WHITE RIBBON CAMPAIGN. 2012-2013 MARKED THE 19TH YEAR OF THE CAMPAIGN. The goals of the campaign on campus are to: >> R  aise awareness about domestic and sexual violence >> E ducate the SU community about domestic and sexual violence and resources >> Fund raise for programs at Vera House Wearing a white ribbon or wristband during this campaign period makes an important statement that you will not condone, support, or commit domestic or sexual violence. Students Ashlee Newman ’15 and Paul Ang ’11, G’13 co-chaired this year’s on-campus efforts. Both of them are deeply committed to the cause. “My family has had its own experience with domestic violence when my cousin,

Heather Newman, was murdered last year by her abusive husband. Following that tragedy, I was motivated to make a difference,” said Newman. “I have put a lot of effort into advocacy and legislative changes in my home state of New Jersey, but a key component to domestic violence prevention is knowledge and awareness.” “Domestic and sexual violence are a men’s issue, and men need to see other men taking an active role in the effort to end domestic and sexual violence,” said Ang. “Through this campaign we hope to make people more comfortable hearing a conversation about violence and eventually lead them to engaging in that conversation. This effort also shows that the Syracuse community is serious about preventing violence and it is an issue that the University feels is worth educating students about.”

5 VERA HOUSE FACTS AND FIGURES  Females

16

between the ages of

and

24 experience the highest

rate of domestic violence.  In

2010, Vera House sheltered

474 women, children, and men;

provided youth counseling services to

380 children; taught 446 men in the domestic violence education and accountability program; and reached

16,047 people through

their school-based, community, and professional education programs.  Vera

House continues to be the primary

resource in Onondaga County for people experiencing domestic and sexual violence. Vera House, Inc., aims to end all domestic and sexual violence; to assist families in crisis; to support those affected by domestic and sexual violence to live safe, self-sufficient lives; to empower women, and children; and to promote a culture of equality and respect in all relationships.

verahouse.org


THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS

6

by the numbers




THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

COUNSELING CENTER/OPTIONS

7

O F F I C E O F S T U D E N T A S S I S TA N C E


HEALTH AND WELLNESS

by the numbers



THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

T H E A D V O C A C Y C E N T E R : Sexual and Relationship Violence Services, Prevention and Education

8

H E A LT H S E R V I C E S


THINK. DO.. LIVE SU.

H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S P R O M O T I O N S

9


HEALTH AND WELLNESS

by the numbers



THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

R E C R E AT I O N S E R V I C E S

10


programs 11

 THINK. DO. LIVE SU.


THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

programs

12

C.A.R.E. Dialogue Circles C.A.R.E. IS A SIX-WEEK DIALOGUE CIRCLE PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND STAFF BRINGING TOGETHER SMALL GROUPS OF PEOPLE TO EXCHANGE VIEWS TO INCREASE AWARENESS ABOUT ISSUES AND EXPERIENCES ACROSS DIVERSE CULTURAL, ETHNIC, AND RACIAL GROUPS.

CAMPUS PARTICIPATION

121 students and 13 faculty/staff participated

in the program during the 2012-2013 academic year.

Participants meet once a week for two hours with two certified facilitators to share personal stories focusing on race and ethnicity. Selected readings, videos, and activities enhance students’ understanding of these issues in the broader society. It is a collaborative initiative of the Division of Student Affairs, Academic Affairs, and InterFaith Works’ Community Wide Dialogue to End Racism (CWD).

Intended goals for the program are to assist participants in becoming: >> Cognizant of racial issues on campus >> Open to seeing multiple perspectives >> A ware of social issues about race and ethnicity and adept at how to address them

multicultural.syr.edu Office of Multicultural Affairs Schine Student Center, Suite 105 oma@syr.edu 315-443-9676


Campus Participation

fullCIRCLE

Go further than you think you can because someone believes you will

Campus Participation

281

TOTAL PARTICIPANTS IN ITS FIRST YEAR

17 employer mentors

90 first-year students

74 alumni mentors

FULLCIRCLE IS A SUSTAINABLE, MULTI-LAYERED MENTORING PROGRAM DESIGNED TO ASSIST STUDENTS IN EFFECTIVELY ADJUSTING TO THE DIFFERENT

13

CHALLENGES OF COLLEGE LIFE, INCLUDING THOSE THAT ARE ACADEMIC, SOCIAL, PROFESSIONAL, AND PERSONAL IN NATURE, WITH THE GOAL OF RETENTION. The program serves first-year and upper-class students with an emphasis on African American, Asian and Pacific American, Latino, and Native students. Its mission is to support the holistic development of students of color through intentional relationships with peers, faculty, staff, alumni, and employers. fullCIRCLE promotes academic success, personal development, campus leadership, and civic engagement.

33 faculty/staff mentors

67 peer mentors

The 5 Layers of fullCIRCLE

multicultural.syr.edu Office of Multicultural Affairs Schine Student Center, Suite 105 fullCIRCLE@syr.edu 315-443-9676

This layering provides students with a broad array of support while also allowing faculty, staff, alumni, and employers an opportunity to give back.


THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

programs

R

A series of late-night programs and events on the weekends

14

ORANGE AFTER DARK (OAD) EVENTS OCCUR BETWEEN 10 P.M. AND 2 A.M. TO PROVIDE FUN, CREATIVE, AND ALTERNATIVE PROGRAMS THAT ENHANCE THE COLLEGE EXPERIENCE FOR STUDENTS. They are high-quality, affordable events that provide students with the opportunity to: >> Get off campus and explore the city >> Try news things and meet new people >> Enjoy the weekend in a different way OAD events generally occur every other weekend and sell out. Transportation is provided. Some OAD events included Cosmic Bowling, Fright Night at the Fairgrounds, Snow Tubing at Greek Peak, Midnight Movies at Destiny USA, and Stressbusters Pancake Breakfast.

oad.syr.edu

CAMPUS PARTICIPATION students 5,000 participated in OAD

programming during the 2012-2013 academic year.


STUDENT LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE To develop students who inspire others to act THE STUDENT LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE (SLI) IS A YEARLONG LEADERSHIP EXPERIENCE DESIGNED FOR RISING SOPHOMORES AND JUNIORS WHO EXEMPLIFY THE INSTITUTE’S CORE VALUES: COMMITMENT, COMMUNITY, AND CHANGE. Commitment: Speaks to our belief that our word is our bond. SLI members respect and honor their commitments. Community: Speaks to our belief that leadership is possible only in relationship with others. SLI members recognize that all we do is for the good of the Institute, the University, and the community. Change: Speaks to our belief that leadership is about positive change. SLI members strive to better themselves and the communities to which they belong. In its sixth year, SLI provides students with the opportunity to identify their personal and group leadership style, and increase their awareness of how they can impact others in the community, nationally, and globally. SLI members participate in a number of leadership and professional development opportunities throughout the year, including working collaboratively on the development and implementation of the Student Leadership Institute Conference, along with other projects. A signature event of the program is the weekend-long retreat in the Adirondacks at the Oswegatchie Educational Center.

Acceptance into SLI is a competitive process. In 2012-2013, more than 400 applications were received and 35 students were accepted into the institute, with a 90 percent retention rate, representing all the schools and colleges. 150 students attended the 2013 Student Leadership Conference, which featured more than 25 workshops and 2 keynote speakers.

SLI members have the opportunity to earn certificates in:  C  onflict resolution from the Maxwell School’s Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration 

Entrepreneurship from the Whitman School’s Falcone Center for Entrepreneurship

Health, health policy, and wellness from the Maxwell School’s Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion

Intergroup Dialogue from the School of Education

studentactivities.syr.edu Office of Student Activities 126 Schine Student Center 315-443-2718

G  rassroots and community organization from the Wellstone Action organization

15


THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

DISCOVERY AND ENGAGEMENT

16

by the numbers




THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

CAREER SERVICES

17


DISCOVERY AND ENGAGEMENT

by the numbers



THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

OFFICE OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES

18


THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

STUDENT CENTERS AND PROGRAMMING SERVICES

19


DISCOVERY AND ENGAGEMENT

by the numbers



THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

O F F I C E O F F R AT E R N I T Y A N D S O R O R I T Y A F FA I R S

20


trainings 21

 THINK. DO. LIVE SU.


trainings Jocelyn Teres ’15 and Joe Andrade ’13, MVP trainers

THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

I AM AN EMPOWERED BYSTANDER:

22

“I comfort others in their time of need.”

“I speak up for people who are too afraid to speak up for themselves.”

EMPOWERED BYSTANDERS THE ADVOCACY CENTER PROMOTES THE EMPOWERED BYSTANDER APPROACH TO

“I don’t tell or laugh at jokes that may offend others.” “I want to live with no regrets so I challenge racist statements.” “I speak up to help end sexual violence, racism, sexism, and homophobia in our community.” “I talk about issues of violence to let people know they are not alone, it’s not their fault, and there is something we can all do about it.”

The Advocacy Center 111 Waverly Avenue, Lower Level advocacycenter.syr.edu epstein@syr.edu 315-443-7273

SEXUAL AND RELATIONSHIP VIOLENCE PREVENTION THROUGH THE MENTORS IN VIOLENCE PREVENTION (MVP) PROGRAM. With this approach—rather than focusing on men as potential perpetrators of violence, or women as victims or potential targets of abuse—the focus is on men, women, and transgender individuals as empowered bystanders who intervene in abusive or harassing behavior and provide support and assistance to their peers. Through interactive dialogue, we can work toward creating a culture that recognizes and supports the role of each individual community member in reducing sexual violence, harassment, and abuse. The main goal of the MVP program is to change behaviors and prevent violent incidents before they occur through four primary aims: >> R  aise awareness of behaviors that can be defined as verbal, emotional, physical, and sexual abuse >> C  hallenge mainstream messages about gender, sex, and violence

>> C  reate a safe environment for dialogue among men, women, and transgender individuals, so that students may share their opinions and experiences >> Inspire leadership by empowering participants with options to effect change in their respective communities and in their own lives

“The goal here is to generate dialogue and not debate,” said Janet Epstein, director of The Advocacy Center. “We want to create an environment that is more caring and welcoming so that we can better deal with these types of issues. We want to have students across campus who are well-versed in how to have conversations related to sexual and relationship violence, and what they can do to promote a respectful campus.”


SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY IS ONE OF THE ONLY UNIVERSITIES TO HAVE AN ALLYSHIP PROGRAM. Allyship is a process built through relationships; it requires commitment, understanding, hope, and humility. We believe allyship also requires a dedication to continuous self-awareness and self-exploration. Recognizing and understanding the pervasiveness of

Safer People, Safer Spaces is a 3-hour training created and facilitated by the LGBT Resource Center that develops participants’ sense of allyship with the intended outcomes of: >> Being in relationship with others, in the hope of becoming a community of allies, who seek to become safer people for people with marginalized genders and sexualities (MGS)

>> G  aining a better understanding of content and language about MGS

>> H  aving an opportunity to explore perceptions (self and of peers) about MGS

>> E ngaging in conversations about strategies for noticing and interrupting problematic issues/ situations for MGS and their allies

>> Identifying learning edges and ways to engage as an ally

>> L eaving with questions to reflect on and discuss with others about what it means to develop allyship and a liberatory consciousness

privilege and oppression, both across and within identity groups, is integral to ally development. Allies are accountable for the influence and impact of their actions to the broader social world, and our goal is that allies will ultimately join in efforts to achieve liberation. 160 campus members participated in Safer People, Safer Spaces trainings during the 20122013 academic year. Marginalized Genders and Sexualities (MGS) Used to describe those who are considered non-normative/outside the mainstream, including, but not limited to, those oppressed by sexism, heterosexism, and trans* oppression. It is meant to be inclusive and encompass the complexity and fluidity of our identities.

Safer People, Safer Spaces training was developed adapting Barbara J. Love’s four elements of a liberatory consciousness, which are Awareness, Analysis, Action, and Accountability/Allyship. Excerpted and adapted from Love’s “Developing a Liberatory Consciousness” (2010, in Readings for Diversity and Social Justice, 2nd Ed, pp. 599-603)

Through the training,

it gives you information, definitions, and how to be

THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

Allyship and a Liberatory Consciousness

a better ally, but it doesn’t give you all the ‘right’ answers. No one will ever know the ‘right’ answers, but what the Safer People, Safer Spaces training teaches us is to strive toward allyship and respect for all identities.” —RAUL RAMOS ’15

LGBT Resource Center 750 Ostrom Avenue lgbt.syr.edu lgbt@syr.edu 315-443-3983

23


THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

I N C L U S I O N , C O M M U N I T Y, A N D C I T I Z E N S H I P

24

by the numbers




THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

OFFICE OF RESIDENCE LIFE

25


I N C L U S I O N , C O M M U N I T Y, A N D C I T I Z E N S H I P

by the numbers



THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

26 26

OFF-CAMPUS AND COMMUTER SERVICES


THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

OFFICE OF FIRST-YEAR AND TRANSFER PROGRAMS

27 27

OFFICE OF LEARNING COMMUNITIES


I N C L U S I O N , C O M M U N I T Y, A N D C I T I Z E N S H I P

by the numbers



THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

D I S A B I L I T Y C U LT U R A L C E N T E R

28 28

S L U T Z K E R C E N T E R F O R I N T E R N AT I O N A L S E R V I C E S


THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

LGBT RESOURCE CENTER

29 29


I N C L U S I O N , C O M M U N I T Y, A N D C I T I Z E N S H I P

by the numbers



THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

O F F I C E O F M U LT I C U LT U R A L A F FA I R S

30 30




THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

strategic thinking

31


strategic thinking

THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT’S

Council on DIVERSITY and INCLUSION The council seeks to deepen and expand our diversity and inclusion mindset to create a socially just campus and community.

32 With the charge from then senior vice president and dean of student affairs Thomas V. Wolfe to create a Council on Diversity and Inclusion (the Council) that deepens and expands our diversity and inclusion mindset, chief diversity officer (CDO) for student affairs James K. DuahAgyeman formed the Council in July 2012. Strategic planning immediately followed and resulted in a collaborative output of a vision, mission, values, goals, guiding principles, and charter document, produced in September 2012. MISSION Utilizing a social justice framework, and in alignment with the values of the Division of Student Affairs (DSA), the Council serves

as a consultative body for the senior vice president and dean of student affairs to anticipate, consider, and address issues of diversity and inclusion with respect to policies, practices, campus climate, recruitment, and retention. MEMBERSHIP Membership is by invitation from the CDO with approval from the senior vice president of student affairs, and to include a broad representation of the campus community, including staff and faculty from Student Affairs and Academic Affairs, and students. Currently there are 35 members, including 2 undergraduate students and 2 graduate students GOALS OF THE COUNCIL Create definitions of diversity and inclusion for this Council.

1

Diversity is the presence and/or representation of individual and group differences that make us unique. Diversity is not always noticeable and is quite often invisible. Inclusion is the deliberate and ongoing act of creating and incorporating systems, policies, practices, and spaces that respect individual and group differences.

Diversity and inclusion connote more than tolerance; they combine to: >> Affirm the universal oneness of our unique humanity >> Encourage healthy, respectful relationships based on an authentic desire to engage with, understand, and value other unique individuals >> Recognize the value of individual differences, with an emphasis on scholarship, citizenship, and civility >> Allow an individual to feel ‘‘expected,’’ not just ‘‘accepted’’

2

 evelop strategies for assessing the D extent to which campus populations perceive and experience diversity and inclusion. This process is ongoing.

3 4 5

Identify strategies to create a more inclusive environment for the Syracuse University community.

Inform and support inclusive recruiting, hiring, training, and retaining practices for DSA staff (professional and student).

P rovide information, support, feedback, and consultation on policies, procedures, practices, marketing strategies, and other initiatives pertaining to diversity and inclusion to the senior vice president of student affairs.


THINK. DO. LIVE SU. 33

CENTRAL SERVICES

by the numbers




CENTRAL SERVICES

by the numbers



THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

HENDRICKS CHAPEL

34 34


THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

D E PA R T M E N T O F P U B L I C S A F E T Y

35

PA R E N T S O F F I C E


CENTRAL SERVICES

by the numbers



THINK. DO. LIVE SU.

BUSINESS, FINANCE, AND TECHNICAL SERVICES

36 36


our organization OFFICE OF THE SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT • Crisis Management • Communications • Parents Office • Hendricks Chapel • Department of Public Safety

Central Services • Budget and Operations • Technical Services

The Division of Student Affairs cultivates an inclusive,

connected, and caring

environment in which learning flourishes.

LEADERSHIP Executive director of finance and operations, Kristen Jones-Kolod FUNCTION To provide infrastructure, leadership, and support for the operation and well-being of the division

Discovery and Engagement • Career Services • Student Centers and Programming Services • Office of Student Activities • Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs LEADERSHIP Associate vice president, Sylvia Langford FUNCTION To create positive learning outcomes via experiential opportunities; develop student leadership, and build self- and context awareness

Health and Wellness • Counseling Center/Options • Health Services • Office of Student Assistance • The Advocacy Center • Department of Recreation Services • Health and Wellness Promotions LEADERSHIP Associate vice president, Rebecca Dayton FUNCTION To promote the well-being of students’ʼ minds, bodies, spirits, and communities; to remove barriers to learning; and intervene on behalf of students in crisis

Inclusion, Community and Citizenship • Office of Residence Life • Office of Off-Campus and Commuter Services • Office of First-Year and Transfer Programs • Office of Learning Communities • Disability Cultural Center • LGBT Resource Center • Office of Multicultural Affairs • Slutzker Center for International Services • Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities LEADERSHIP Associate vice president, (interim senior vice president and dean) Rebecca Reed Kantrowitz FUNCTION To enable a culture of inclusion, community, and engaged citizenship; respond to student crises; and build community participation and personal responsibility


518 Crouse-Hinds Hall Syracuse, NY 13244-2130

2012 2013 annual report of the Division of Student Affairs  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you