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Fashion

Solution by: DyeCoo Textile Systems

Waterless CO2Dyeing of Textiles  DyeCoo offers a CO2-based dyeing technology that eliminates water and processing chemicals from the dyeing process and reduces energy consumption.

SOCIAL Water-free dyeing is a less labor-intensive process and results in no local water pollution or leftover chemicals and dyes.

THE TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE

ENVIRONMENTAL According to DyeCoo, the technology can save 15 million liters of water and 6,500 kilograms of processing chemicals annually per machine.

ECONOMIC DyeCoo’s process lowers operational costs by up to 45% compared to conventional textile dying.

This technology uses reclaimed CO2 for polyester dyeing and has already been embraced by major brands like IKEA and NIKE, the latter of which opened a dyeing facility in Taiwan. DyeCoo Textile Systems release liquid CO2 into the dye vessels of the machine, where heat and pressure transform the liquid CO2 into supercritical fluid that dyes the fabric. Subsequently, the machine lowers the heat and pressure, and the CO2 leaves the vessels as a gas. In the process, 95% of the CO2 is recovered and returned to storage as liquid ready for reuse, which makes DyeCoo an almost closed-loop technology. The result is an elimination of water and chemicals, a 50% reduction in energy consumption, and a substantial decrease in the production time of textile dyeing. WHY A SUSTAINIA100 SOLUTION? 17% to 20% of industrial water pollution is created by textile dyeing and treatment,1 and continuous to cause heavy stress on the often scarce water resources in developing countries. This CO2based dyeing technology offers a sustainable alternative to the conventional water-based dyeing process, where 30 liters of water is needed to dye just one polyester T-shirt.

Nike has opened a waterfree dyeing facility in Taiwan with DyeCoo equipment to eliminate the use of water and chemicals in the fabric dyeing process.

 DEVELOPED IN ...

THE NETHERLANDS

DEPLOYED IN ...

TAIWAN, THAILAND

1

China Water Risk. “The Environmental Cost of Clothes.” Apr 2011. Online: www.chinawaterrisk.org

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Sustainia100 2015