Page 1

THE 5TH HOUSTON SUSTAINBILITY INDICATORS REPORT

OPPORTUNITY AMONG THE HOUSTON DISTRICTS

RICE UNIVERSITY

Shell Center for

Sustainability


THE 5TH HOUSTON SUSTAINBILITY INDICATORS REPORT OPPORTUNITY AMONG THE HOUSTON DISTRICTS 

by Lester King, PhD, AICP, LEED

September 2015 Shell Center for Sustainability  Rice University  Houston, TX  shellcenter.rice.edu 


THE SHELL CENTER FOR SUSTAINABILITY, RICE UNIVERSITY 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX. 77005

Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for the project. Additional copies of this report are available online at the Shell Center for Sustainability website. https://shellcenter.rice.edu.

Copyright 2015 by the Shell Center for Sustainability. All rights reserved

Page 2 of 28   


Acknowledgements

 

About the Author:  Lester O. King, PhD, AICP, LEED  Dr. King is a researcher with the Shell Center for Sustainability. He specializes in sustainable development planning and analyzing urban development performance. He  is a certified and skilled planner with experience in community development; master planning, transportation planning, and sustainability planning.    

Project Advisors:  John B. Anderson, PhD  Dr. Anderson is the Academic Director for the Shell Center for Sustainability and the Maurice Ewing Professor of Oceanography in the Department of Earth Science at  Rice University.  

Lyn Ragsdale, PhD  Dr. Ragsdale is the Dean of the School of Social Sciences, the Radoslav A. Tsanoff Chair in Public Affairs and Professor of Political Science at Rice University.    

Lilibeth André  Lilibeth Andre is the Associate Director of the Shell Center for Sustainability at Rice University since 2007. She manages the research, outreach and education activities  of the center working directly with faculty, students, and other organizations and institutions.      

Page 3 of 28   


Executive Summary

       The eleven (11) Council Districts are the administrative boundaries for elected representatives of the City of Houston. The Districts represent the  primary spatial mechanism, through which capital improvement spending is distributed annually throughout the city. On an annual basis, citizens have  the capability to identify issues or projects they would like to have funded in their discreet districts; elected officials have the capability to advocate for  projects  they  would  like  to  have  funded  in  their  discreet  districts;  and  city  staff  have  the  capability  to  identify  projects  that  require  funding  for  maintenance  and  development  of  the  city.  These  three  options  represent  the  main  avenues  to  influence  the  sustainable  development  of  the  City  of  Houston.          This study challenges a few prevailing ‘norms’ such as the ‘Within the Loop’ designation for preferred location. The study shows this should perhaps  be replaced with the more appropriate, ‘West Inner Loop’, since this is the area that is truly desirable in terms of real estate value and investment. The  East Inner Loop contains many beautiful neighborhoods and other boastful assets, however, the West Inner Loop is where the majority of investment is  targeted.           Notions of gentrification occurring in several areas, is fact checked in this report. Our research shows that gentrification is occurring in very few  places throughout the city. What is more true is that many parts of the city have become more mixed with various combinations of Black, White and  Hispanic  residents.  This  is  good  news  for  multicultural  Houston,  however  many  areas  are  still  firmly  segregated  by  single  races/  ethnicities.  In  the  Historic African‐American community of the Third Ward, for example, a frequent fear is that this area will become gentrified just like the Fourth Ward  has  become.  This  report  shows  that  between  1990‐2013,  there  has  been  no  significant  gentrification.  We  define  gentrification  as  an  area  which  was  previously more than 75% one race/ethnicity, then changes to more than 50% of a different race/ethnicity. This does not mean that the threat does not  exist. Our research shows that highways and major thoroughfares like Highway 288, US Interstate 45 and Main street (US 90), may be acting as de facto  “barriers” to significant penetration of vulnerable and worried communities like Houston’s Third Ward. In addition to the physical barriers, there is the  liability  attached  to  investing  in  perceived  “distressed”  neighborhoods  regardless  of  location.  Thirdly,  in  2013,  portions  of  the  population,  still  have  somewhat of a socio‐cultural stigma attached to moving into neighborhoods identified as minority. Research shows that minority neighborhoods that  have  become  gentrified  are  those  where  there  has  been  significant  population  loss  prior  to  the  big  gentrification  push.  The  Midtown  community  of  Houston is one such example.           We are pleased to present this report in its more thematic format for your review. We hope you will find it useful in its ability to contribute to a  better understanding of actual development patterns within the municipal boundaries of the City of Houston.    Sincerely,   

Lester O. King, PhD   

Page 4 of 28   


City of Houston,Texas E

¬249 «

59 £ ¤

290 £ ¤

§ ¦ ¨ 45

A

B

¬ «8

§ ¦ ¨ 45

290 £ ¤

90 £ ¤

B B

H A

§ ¨ ¦

§ ¨ ¦

§ ¦ ¨ 610

C

10

F

§ ¦ ¨ 610

225 ¬ «

C

§ ¦ ¨ 610

J

D

K

¬ «8

¬ «8 E

¬ «

¹

10

§ ¦ ¨

288

5

I

45

6

59 £ ¤

§ ¦ ¨

10

G

F

¬ «

§ ¦ ¨ 10

E

10

¬ «8

G

0

I

10

20 Miles Map author: Lester King, PhD.

The map above shows the outline of the City of Houston and boundaries of each council district. In the Northwest and West of the city, the tendrils represent streets and the land immediately adjacent (commercial property), that was recently annexed into the City.

Page 5 of 28   


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

Page 6 of 28   


TABLE OF CONTENTS       Acknowledgements ..................................................................................................................................... 3  Executive Summary ..................................................................................................................................... 4  SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8  Gentrification ........................................................................................................................................ 8  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 16  Affordability ........................................................................................................................................ 16  ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENT ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 22  Quality of Life ...................................................................................................................................... 22  CONCLUSION ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 26  References .................................................................................................................................................. 27     

Page 7 of 28   


SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT  Gentrification  The tremendous growth in the City of Houston is primarily the result of the large influx of Hispanic persons. Almost 700, 000 Hispanic persons moved  to the city between 1980 and 2013. During this same period, the city lost 267,982 persons from the White cohort and grew by 60,713 persons from the  African American cohort. The recent major expansions in apartment and office building in the West Inner Loop, does not seem to truly reflect either the  growing demographic in terms of income and affordability or the locational preferences of the growing ethnic groups. Many concerned residents from  the most distressed neighborhoods that lie close to or within the central urban areas, are concerned about gentrification and possible negative impacts  on their communities. These concerns may include unaffordable land value increases and unwanted land uses in close proximity to their homes. Here we  take a look at the spatial locations of gentrification and in particular the changing racial and ethnic concentrations of Houston residents over the last 23  years.   

City of Houston Race and Ethnicity 2,500,000 Population

2,000,000 Total Population

1,500,000

White

1,000,000

Hispanic

500,000

African‐American

Source: US Census Bureau

Figure 1: City of Houston Race and Ethnicity 

2013

2010

2000

1990

1980

0

Other

 The race  and  ethnicity  composition  of  the  city  is  as  follows  in  2013:   o Hispanic 44%,   o White 26%,   o Black 23%, and   o all Others 8%.    In 1980 there were at least 500,000 more Whites than Hispanics  in  the  City  of  Houston.  The  exact  counts  were  834,061  White  and  281,331  Hispanics.  The  population  counts  for  Whites  and  Hispanics  were approximately the same around 1996.  Since 1996 the Hispanic  population  has  grown  tremendously  in  Houston  as  the  White  cohort has continued to decline.   

    Page 8 of 28   


Districts ‐ Average Annual Growth Rate  1990‐2013

Population Growth 1990 ‐2013 A  ‐ 2.31 E ‐ 3.21 F ‐ 1.54 J ‐ 0.99 B ‐ 1.33 K ‐ 0.94 D ‐ 0.96 G ‐ 1.07 I ‐ ‐0.03 H ‐ 0.25 C ‐ 0.14

92,637 57,789

‐10,238 50,064 ‐34,264 57,514 ‐31,179 61,014 ‐4,821 ‐897 41,062 ‐21,537 43,488 ‐13,556 16,669 34,680 ‐22,603 27,031 454 ‐5,400 97011,609

‐60,000 ‐40,000 ‐20,000

0

20,000

40,000

4,425 White90‐13

5,244

Hisp90‐13 Black90‐13 Other90‐13

60,000

80,000 100,000 120,000

Source: US Census Bureau,  Decenial  Census (1990), ACS 5Yr  2013; Lester King,  PhD.

Figure 2: District Race/ Ethnicity Growth 

 Figure 2 shows the average annual growth rate from 1990  – 2013 for each district (Next to district label on left of figure).  It also shows the total growth for each racial/ethnic group by  district.   The  average  annual  growth  rate,  based  on  the  23  year  period, ranged from ‐0.03 (District I) to 3.21 (District E).   Most  districts  lost  considerable  population  among  the  White  cohort  between  1990  and  2013  except  for  District  E.  The largest lost was District F with 34, 264 persons.    All  Districts  gained  population  from  the  Hispanic  cohort  between 1990 and 2013.   Four  districts  lost  population  from  the  African  American  cohort  (Districts  C,  H,  I,  D  and  B).  The  largest  loss  was  in  District I with 11,251 African American persons. 

 

Page 9 of 28   


 In 1990,  40%  of  the  population  in  Houston  lived  in  areas  that  were  predominately  composed of a single ethnicity. For this analysis we used a threshold of over 75% African  American, White or Hispanic to designate those communities. It is important to note that  African  American,  Hispanic  and  White  persons  made  up  over  95%  of  the  population  in  1990 (93% in 2000 and 92% in 2013.  Therefore Houston’s claim as an international city  of  many  languages  and  cultures  must  be  placed  in  reference  to  these  big  three  combinations  of  White,  African  American  and  Hispanic,  which  make  up  92%  of  the  population today. Houston is really a majority Hispanic City and we should recognize this  fact sooner rather than later.   The White cohort was the most concentrated group in 2013 with 60% living in areas  that were predominately White. This is followed by the Black population with 38.5% of its  numbers living in areas that were predominately Black. Hispanics trailed with only 18% of  that cohort living in areas that were predominately Hispanic. This reflects the penetrating  spread of the Hispanic community across Houston.   From  as  far  back  as  1990,  we  see  evidence  that  Houston’s  Inner  Loop  was  racially  segregated East vs West, with Black and Hispanic communities to the East of Hwy288 and  US59 and the White cohort mainly to the West of that divide. The map clearly shows how  highways  (Hwy288,  US45,  US59)  have  played  a  role  in  establishing  the  boundaries  for  Houston’s  racially  concentrated  communities.  Highway  288  firmly  defines  the  western  boundary for the African American community until it meets the 610 South Loop, where  Main Street (US90) then takes over as the western border. Highway 59 forms the border  between  the  African  American  and  Hispanic  communities.  The  White  cohort  concentration is bordered by Main Street (US90) to the East.   By  2013,  both  the  White  and  the  Black  communities  have  less  persons  living  in  the  single‐race  areas.  However  from  1990  to  2013,  the  Black  population  living  in  predominately  Black  communities  has  declined  by  a  small  35,000  persons.  The  White  population  living  in  predominately  White  communities  has  declined  by  a  significant  250,000 persons. The Hispanic community, on the other  hand  has grown in size and  occupied new communities  that can now be identified as  Hispanic Communities. These communities have grown by a massive 300,000 persons. This large growth is approximately equal to the losses of both  the Black and the White communities combined. Houston is an Hispanic city and this growth trend is expected to continue.  Page 10 of 28   


Page 11 of 28     


Change in number of persons living in single‐race  neighborhoods by District 1990 ‐ 2013

Figure 3: Change in persons living in single‐race neighborhoods 1990‐2013 

E F

C

K

A

G

J

Districts

B

D

H

I

 Figure 3 shows how Districts grew in single‐race neighborhoods  by  2013.  The  Hispanic  communities  increased  by  over  55,000  Total 64,073 persons in each of Districts I and H by 2013. District J and A both had  Hispanic 66,771 White Black ‐2,237 concentrations increased by over 40,000 persons.  Total 53,631 Hispanic 58,296  Map  2  Shows  areas  that  were  gentrified  in  Houston.  For  this  White 887 Black ‐5,552 analysis we defined gentrified as any area that previously had 75% or  Total ‐2,551 Hispanic 8,094 more  of  one  ethnicity  and  changed  to  50%  or  more  of  another  White Black ‐6,338 ethnicity (See conclusion Pg.26). Between 1990 and 2013, they were  Total ‐14,137 Hispanic 25,930 very  few  areas  in  Houston  that  became  gentrified  according  to  a  White ‐15,742 Black ‐24,325 change in race or ethnicity.   Total ‐8,564 Hispanic 32,889   Community  1  –  District  A,  Spring  Branch  and  Fair  Banks  area.  White ‐41,453 Black This  area  has  a  few  spots  that  gentrified  from  majority  White  to  Total 35,055 Hispanic 40,951 majority Hispanic.   White Black Total ‐37,382  Community 2 – District C, Washington Avenue, Forth Ward. This  Hispanic 762 White ‐39,251 area  has  a  few  spots  that  gentrified  from  Black  to  White  in  the  Black 1,108 Total ‐7,599 Fourth  Ward  area  and  from  Hispanic  to  White  in  the  Washington  Hispanic 40,567 White ‐47,822 Avenue  area.  It  is  perhaps  where  the  greatest  examples  of  urban  Black Total ‐5,296 redevelopment in Houston can be found.  Hispanic 8,962 White ‐15,623  Community  3  –  District  B,  Denver  Harbor  and  Fifth  Ward.  The  Black 1,365 Total ‐45,900 Hispanic  community  has  gentrified  some  spots  of  District  B  which  Hispanic 2,370 White ‐43,921 was previously a Black community.  Black ‐4,348 Total ‐32,711 Hispanic  Community  4  –  District  K,  Central  Southwest.  This  area  is  6,265 White ‐38,976 Black gentrified from Black to a Hispanic majority.   ‐60,000 ‐40,000 ‐20,000 0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000  Community  5  –  District  D,  Central  Southwest.  This  area  gentrified from majority Black in 1990 to majority Hispanic in 2000.  Source: ACS 5Yr2013; calculation by Lester King, PhD.   By  2013  it  is  now  majority  Black  again.  Community  5  and  4  are  examples  of  Hispanic  population  growth  and  Black  community  redevelopment efforts meeting. Both of these communities are located in areas that are very low density and have a tremendous amount of vacant  and underdeveloped land to build.  Page 12 of 28 


Page 13 of 28   


Figure 4: Percentage of persons living in single‐race areas by District 

E F

C

K

A

G

J

Districts

B

D

H

I

Percentage of persons living in single‐race  neighborhoods by District 2013 Total Hispanic White Black Total Hispanic White Black Total Hispanic White Black Total Hispanic White Black Total Hispanic White Black Total Hispanic White Black Total Hispanic White Black Total Hispanic White Black Total Hispanic White Black Total Hispanic White Black Total Hispanic White Black

 The research  provides  evidence  that  the  diversity  in  Houston  can largely be explained by the tremendous growth in the Hispanic  population.   Over  50%  of  persons  living  in  Districts  I  and  H  live  in  neighborhoods that are predominately Hispanic.   In District D, 65% of the African Americans live in predominately  African  American  neighborhoods.  While  in  District  B,  46%  is  the  comparative number for African‐Americans.   Districts E and G have the largest concentration of persons from  the  White  cohort  in  those  districts  living  in  predominately  White  neighborhoods.   Map 3 Shows the distribution of building permits across the city  between 2010 and 2014.   Although  there  was  building  activity  throughout  the  city,  the  majority of high end development was located in Districts C and G.    The  High  end  development  is  almost  exclusively  occurring  in  areas that are majority White in Houston, Districts C and G. This is  also the area that can be termed the West Inner Loop.   Since most of the development intensity is occurring in Districts  C and G, which are primarily higher income and higher counts for the  White  cohort,  this  concentration  ameliorates  the  threat  of  gentrification. The concentration of wealth in areas that contain few  minorities cannot also contribute to gentrification. 

64 81 4 54 73 7 5 39 15 65 38 34 2 46 35 46 40 28 44 24 2 41 5 21 36 8 19 14 13 28 18 10 26 5 4 10 3 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

Source: ACS 5Yr2013; calculation by Lester King, PhD.

Page 14 of 28   


Page 15 of 28     


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT   Affordability  Housing affordability can be defined as relative, subjective, a product of family budget, a ratio, or residual. This would explain the gamut of definitions of  housing affordability, but spending less than 30% of income on housing (Ratio standard) has taken the fore as the definition of affordability in the US  (Stone, 2006). When comparing cities in the country with more than 250,000 people, Houston ranks 26th for affordability, with 46% of median incomes  going to housing combined with transportation costs. Philadelphia was first with 33%; New York was 4th with 37%; Chicago was 14th with 42%; and Los  Angeles  was  51st  with  52%  of  income  going  to  housing  and  transportation  cost  (Center  for  Neighborhood  Technology,  2010).  This  conflicts  with  Houston’s marketability as the affordable capital of the country.   

Percent of Housholds Spending 30% or More on Housing Costs  by District 2010, 2013 46.7

B 40.4

I

40.2

J

38.7

D

37.9

Districts

K

36.6

F

30% orMore2013

36.5

H

30% orMore2010

35.2

City

33.6

A 30.5

G

29.2

E

27.4

C 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

Source: 2010 ‐ U.S. Decennial Census; 2013 ‐ ACS13_5Yr

Figure 5: Housing Affordability 

 In 2013,  selling  prices  for  homes  in  the  Houston  Metro  region  increased  10.2%  over  2012 prices (Sarnoff, 2013).  Sales increased  by  17.4%  in  Harris  County,  which  is  higher  than  a  pre‐recession  record  set  in  2006  (Feser,  2014).  The  total  amount  of  single‐ family  home  sales  was  $20,891,392,084  in  2013  (HCAD,  2014).  This  activity  and  the  much published rhetoric regarding Houston’s  impressive growth after the recent recession  may  have  been  responsible  for  the  rise  in  housing  costs  relative  to  incomes,  when  comparing  increases  between  2013  and  2010.     The  percentage  of  housing  units  in  Houston where tenants spent more than 30%  of  their  incomes  on  housing  costs  increased  almost  50%  in  2010  from  1990  levels.  In 

2010, 30% or 104,140 housing units cost tenants more than 30 percent of their incomes.   In 2013, 35.2% of households spent more than 30% of their incomes on housing costs, which is a 5% increase over 2010 levels.  Page 16 of 28   


District B had the largest percentage of unaffordable units with 46.7% of households spending more than 30% of their incomes on housing costs.   When  Figure  6  is  used  to  show  the  median  housing  value  plotted  against  median  incomes,  we  see  that  although  District B is  the most  unaffordable district,  the reason is because of the income status  of residents, not the value of the housing. 

Median Household Income/Median Housing Value 2013  389,152

G

368,677

C 184,648

J

162,812

A

154,970

Districts

F

 Housing  values  in  Districts  G  and  C  extend  more  than  200%  above  the  next  highest District which is J.  

152,428

K

141,400

MSA Region

2013 Housing Value

137,332

E

131,400

Harris Count y Houston

123,900

D

122,676

2013 Income

 The figure  also  shows  that  the  median  housing  values,  within  the  City  of  Houston  are  below  the  median  values  for  the  surrounding  county  (Harris)  and  the  surrounding metropolitan statistical area. 

121,380

H

101,518

I

95,629

B 0

50,000

100,000

150,000

200,000

250,000

300,000

350,000

400,000

450,000

Source: ACS 5Yr 2013; District calculation by Lester King, PhD.

Figure 6: Median household income and Median housing value 2013

 The  median  household  income  in  the  City of Houston in 2013 was $45,010, which  is  an  increase  of  over  $2,500  from  2010  levels. 

The above  figure  shows  that  eight  districts  have  median  household  incomes  over  $50,000  in  the  City  of  Houston.  Districts  G  and  C  continue  to  outpace the rest of the city as the most wealthy areas.  

            Page 17 of 28   


Map 4 shows the distribution of housing affordability across the City of Houston. Much of the  city  remains  affordable  in  that  households  are  spending  less  than  30%  of  their  incomes  on  housing costs. However, the West Inner Loop where most development is concentrated is not  affordable.  Districts  G,  C,  and  E  have  large  concentrations  of  areas  where  housing  units  are  unaffordable. These areas are also Houston’s most wealthy neighborhoods.    The map also shows that the most‐wealthy neighborhoods are located along the Buffalo and  Braes Bayous. This could be a sustainability issue unless homes in these areas are enhanced to  be more resilient to flooding. Houston was initially developed at the intersection of the White  Oak and Buffalo Bayous. Today, as the map depicts, the most valuable property has extended  from the central city forming a band extending 15 miles outside of the city center and extends  about  2  miles  on  either  side  of  Buffalo  Bayou.  This  area  includes  such  well  known  places  as  River  Oaks,  Memorial,  Galleria,  Uptown  and  the  Energy  Corridor.  A  second  expansion  of  wealthy  property  exists  along  Braes  Bayou  as  well,  from  the  Medical  center  into  the  Meyerland neighborhood. Development inside the Western side of Loop 610 connects these  two Bayous and wealthy areas with other high‐end communities of Bellaire, West University,  Greenway Plaza, Upper Kirby, Museum District.     Again  that  familiar  rhetoric  heard  in  Houston  about  the  best  property  being  located  “Inside  the  Loop”,  is  challenged  by  our  research  on  actual  development  patterns,  which  shows  that  the  West  Inner  Loop  is  the  truly  sought  after  real  estate.  This  map  and  those  that  follow,  illustrate the importance of this research in highlighting the fact that from a social, economic  and  environment  perspective,  when  most  people  refer  to  “Inside  the  Loop”,  they  are  really  only  considering  the  western  half,  bordered  by  Hwy288  and  US59.  The  “Inside  the  Loop”  rhetoric should perhaps be changed to “the West Inner Loop”. 

    Page 18 of 28   


Page 19 of 28 


 When transportation  costs  are  added  to  housing  costs  as  a  percentage  of  income,  many  areas  along  the  periphery  of  the  city  also  G 60 become less affordable. M shows that the cost of  C 59 living  increases  tremendously  for  many  areas  in  A 52 E the south of  the  city, when transportation costs  51 F 48 are considered.  K 47 HousingCosts/ Income   D 45 Housing +  Transportation Costs/ Income B 44  The  average  resident  in  District  G  spends  H 43 60%  of  their  income  on  Housing  and  J 41 Transportation  costs.  District  C  closely  follows  I 41 this  lead  with  59%  of  income  being  the  average  0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 contribution.  Source: Center for Neighborhood Technology 2013       Figure 7: Housing + Transportation costs/ Income    Half  of  the  Districts  in  Houston  fall  below  the  federal  suggested  standard  of  no  more  than  46%  of  incomes  going  to  combined  Housing  and  transportation costs. Districts D, B, H, I and J can be considered the most affordable districts in Houston.   Districts

Average Housing costs as % Household Income/ Average Housing +  Transportation costs as % Income

             

Page 20 of 28   


Page 21 of 28     


ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENT  Quality of Life  Places  where  we  want  to  encourage  a  high  level  of  accessibility,  and  hence  frequency  of  use  such  as  parks  should  be  no  more  than  ¼  mile  walking  distance from residences (Ewing, 1999). Houston ranked 32nd among the 63 largest cities in the country for pedestrian activity and incentives to walking  (Walkscore, 2012).  

Percent of Population within quarter mile to Parks

Parks

Districts

 Per capita  access  to  parks  will  decline  in  Houston  since  park  acquisition  is  not  scheduled  to  increase  commensurate  with  the  50.0 population growth. Between 2010 and 2013 park access per capita  52.3 39.8 38.1 dropped by 3.6%.  39.242.6 36.4 44.0  Five districts lead the city in park access, those districts are I, C,  32.3 2013 41.6 H, J and D. District I has the largest percentage of persons within a  31.2 37.7 2010 30.2 38.0 quarter  mile  walking  distance  to  parks  with  53.2%.  However  this  30.0 35.8 percentage dropped by 5 points since 2010.  26.5 43.5 23.6 27.5  The  Bayou  Greenways  2020  project,  managed  by  the  Houston  0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Parks  Board  is  a  $212  million  initiative  to  add  80  new  miles  of  continuous trails and 1,500 acres of new parkland along most of the  Source: ACS13_5yr, City of Houston Parks Department, Lester King, PhD   Bayous  running  through  Houston.  Voters  approved  $100  million  in  bonds funding for this project in 2012.   Figure 8: Percent of population within quarter mile to parks  Our  analysis  was  conducted  on  the  42,604  acres  of  parkland  in  the  City.  Using  the  2013  population  for  Houston  as  2,134,716.24,  this  yields  approximately  50  persons  served  by  each  park  acre.  Houston’s  population is expected to reach 2,694,524 persons by 2020 and adding 1,500 acres to the park inventory will yield a total of 44, 104 acres over the  next 5 years. By 2020, there will be 61 persons served for every park acre. Although the total park performance will still decrease after the addition  of the 1,500 acres to the park inventory, the Bayou Greenways 2020 project is an excellent addition to Quality of Life in the city. Additional options  for increasing the park inventory in Houston should also be pursued by elected officials.  I C H J D City A B K G E F

53.2 58.4 51.6 57.4

Page 22 of 28   


Page 23 of 28     


Food deserts  

Districts

Percent  of population in Food Desert in Houston 62.3 60.3

B E K D A City H I J F G C

46.1 43.5 42.9 46.8 29.3

55.8 56.1

35.2

32.936.0 30.1 35.8

2013

25.7 23.7 20.7 27.3 16.2 20.6 13.8 12.2

2010

13.4 12.7

0

10

20

30

40

Source: InfoUsa, ACS5Yr2013, Lester King, PhD

Figure 9: Percent of population in Food Desert 

50

60

70

 In 2010 there were about 723,000 persons living in a food  desert  accounting  for  36%  of  the  population.  By  2013,  this  number  has  been  reduced  to  702,000,  which  is  a  3%  drop  in  percentage  to  33%  of  the  population.  The  total  population  in  Houston  increased  by  38,000  persons  city‐wide  during  this  same period.   A major contributor to the food desert decrease was the  addition  of  15  supermarkets  across  the  city  between  2011  and 2013.    The  figure  above  shows  that  five  districts  have  above  average  food  desert  sizes  in  terms  of  population  affected.  Districts B, E, K and D continue to lead the city in food desert  size. These four are now joined by District A, which has had a  6%  increase  in  the  size  of  its  food  desert  between  2010  and 

2013.  The  food  deserts  map  shows  the  1  mile  radius  around  each  supermarket  representing  good  access  in  this  study.  Between  2010  and  2013  supermarket expansion occurred at different areas throughout the city. However, The Central Third Ward area, East, and North East of the city  remain without adequate access to supermarkets.    The area in yellow on the map represents places below the median household income. Gold – Dark Brown represents about median household  incomes. From the map, we see that there are more above median income areas along the southern edge of the city in Districts C and K; and  along the North‐western stretch not currently covered with adequate access to supermarkets. District E also has a substantial concentration of  above median wage earners not covered.    Districts K and D and District E can all support more adequate supermarket access, based on increasing concentrations of income and people.   

Page 24 of 28   


Page 25 of 28   


CONCLUSION In  this  report  we  presented  actual  development  patterns  showing  concentration  of  development  investment  in  the  ‘West  Inner  Loop’.  Based  on  our  analysis, there is no factual basis for continuing to refer to the ‘Inner Loop’ of Houston as the most coveted real estate. Council Districts C and G contain  the West Inner Loop and Houston’s most coveted real estate.     Gentrification is defined by some as the displacement of lower income persons by higher income persons. Other definitions of gentrification, discretely  apply the phenomena only to the displacement of lower income minorities by higher income persons from the majority population. In our report we  defined gentrification as the displacement of any one race/ethnicity by another race/ethnicity. This approach was preferred for two reasons. (1) Houston  is a Majority‐Minority city. While the white cohort only constitutes 26% of the population, most of the city leadership is from this cohort. Therefore the  white  minority  have  the  economic  capability  to  displace  the  Hispanic  majority,  which  complicates  the  intended  definition  of  gentrification  being  the  displacement of minorities. (2)  Many Houstonians from the traditional minority classes (Hispanic, Black) continue to voluntarily live in neighborhoods  segregated by their own race/ethnicity. Therefore race may be a stronger indicator than income to identify places where Hispanic and Black persons  have  been  displaced.  Districts  D  and  B  maintain  a  majority  Black  populace.  The  Third  Ward  community  in  District  D  shows  no  significant  signs  of  gentrification. Districts I and H have become majority Hispanic.     Houston has  recently been termed one of the biggest examples of a multicultural city. Our research shows clearly that  Houston  is in fact  a  majority  ‘Hispanic  city’.  The  Hispanic  community  should  perhaps  be  integrated  more  into  the  fabric  of  Houston’s  leadership.  This  would  increase  the  level  of  social capital coming from this large group. Hispanics constitute 44% of the population in Houston, which is almost twice as many people as any other  group. All other ethnicities and cultural groups (Asian, African, etc.) only constitute 7% of the population.    Recent increases in home values by the county government conflict with Houston’s marketability as an affordable destination. The county government’s  increase in assessment value is based in part on the market value of comparable sales. The market value is in turn based on speculative demand, which  is driven by expected increases in population growth. The prevailing rhetoric of Houston gaining 3.5 million people by 2035 is both incorrect and may be  a contributing factor to damage wealth retention among the middle class in Houston. This is because the 3.5 million people are not forecasted for the  City of Houston municipal boundaries (665 sqml), but for the region, which consists of 8 counties and covers a massive (7,978 sqml). The City of Houston  is  only  projected  to  grow  by  896,000  by  2035.  The  majority  of  the  3.5  million  people  forecasted  to  move  to  our  region  are  expected  to  live  in  the  suburban communities outside of the City of Houston. Therefore while it may seem strategically attractive to market the city as a major growth hub  expecting 3.5 million people, the City may be indirectly eroding its affordability and middle class wealth base, since land values are increasing to meet  the needs of 3.5 million people, who are in fact not moving here at all.    We need to find more ways to add more park land to our inventory. The Bayou Greenways 2020 project is an excellent program. It however needs to  be supplemented with other ways to add badly needed parkland for Houstonians. On the good side, the grocery industry and city leaders are working  diligently on bringing more supermarkets to the city, which decreases the size of the food desert. More needs to be done in Districts K, D and E since  these are communities plagued by under development.     Page 26 of 28   


References

U.S. Census Bureau. (2011, December). American FactFinder. Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov  Center for Neighborhood Technology. (2010). H+T Affordability Index. Retrieved November 2012, from Center for Neighborhood Technology:  htaindex.cnt.org  Cervero, R., & Duncan, M. (2006). Which Reduces Vehicle Travel More: Jobs‐Housing Balance or Retail‐Housing Mixing? Journal of the American Planning  Association, 475‐490.  Ewing, R. (1999). Best Development Practices: A Primer for Smart Growth. Washington: Smart Growth Network.  Feser, K. (2014, Januray). 2013 Home sales reflect boom. Houston Chronicle.  Harris County Flood Control District. (2004). Flood Insurance Rate Maps. Retrieved November 2012, from www.hcfcd.org/firms.html  HCAD. (2014). 2014 Market trends and Reappraisal. Houston, TX: Harris County Appraisal District.  King, L. (2012). Houston Sustainability Indicators: A Comprehensive Development Review for Citizens, Analysts and Decision Makers. Houston: Shell  Center for Sustainability, Rice University.  Sarnoff, N. (2013, August). Asking prices up over last year. Houston Chronicle.  Schwab, J., & Topping, K. (2008). Hazard mitigation: An essential role for planners. In P. A. Service, & J. Schwab (Ed.), Hazard mitigation: Integrating best  practices into planning (Vol. 560, pp. 1‐11). Washington, D.C.: American Planning Association.  Stone, M. E. (2006). What is Housing Affordability? The Case for the Residual Income Approach. Housing Policy Debate, 151‐184.  TEA. (2013). School and District with Site Address. Austin, TX: Texas Education Agency.  The Economist. (2013, May 4). The Economic Performance of Cities. The Economist.  U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2011). The Affordable Care Act and Health Centers. Retrieved May 2013, from Primary Care: The Health  Center Program: http://bphc.hrsa.gov/about/index.html  Walkscore. (2012). Walkscore Professional. Retrieved November 15, 2012, from Walkscore: http://www.walkscore.com  White, I. (2008). The absorbent city: urban form and flood risk management. Urban Design and Planning. 161, pp. 151 ‐ 161. London, UK: Institution of  Civil Engineers.     

Page 27 of 28   


THE 5TH HOUSTON SUSTAINBILITY INDICATORS REPORT OPPORTUNITY AMONG THE HOUSTON DISTRICTS      A publication of the Shell Center for Sustainability  Rice University  School of Social Sciences  6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005   

www.HoustonCommunitySustainability.org https://www.facebook.com/hsi.project  Lok1@rice.edu          Page 28 of 28   


THE 5TH HOUSTON SUSTAINBILITY INDICATORS REPORT

OPPORTUNITY AMONG THE HOUSTON DISTRICTS A publication of the Shell Center for Sustainability Rice University - School of Social Sciences MS-27 - 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 shellcenter.rice.edu

Houston Sustainability Indicators: Opportunity Among The Houston Districts  

This study analyzes Affordability, Gentrification and Quality of Life in the City of Houston. We compare trends in the City's 11 council dis...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you