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Money Matters 2013 — 2014


Contents INTRODUCTION

1

SECTION 1 1.1 1.2 1.3

Managing your money Get organised Draw up a budget Balance your budget

2 2 2 3

SECTION 2

Budgeting tips

4

SECTION 3

Additional funding available from the University

8

SECTION 4 4.1 4.2 4.3

Additional funding from outside the University Welfare benefits and tax credits Welfare benefits/tax credits and student income Other sources of income

12 12 13 14

SECTION 5 5.1 5.2 5.3

Working Working whilst studying National Minimum Wage Income tax and national insurance

16 16 17 18

SECTION 6 Changes in circumstance 6.1 Transferring, withdrawing, taking time out and repeating

19 19

SECTION 7

Financial Difficulties and Debt

20

SECTION 8

Useful contacts

21

This booklet was produced by the University of Sussex Students’ Union Advice & Representation Centre and the University of Sussex Student Life Centre in October 2013. Whilst every effort was made to ensure that the information in this booklet was correct at the time of publication, no liability can be accepted for omissions, inaccuracies or subsequent legislative changes.


Introduction Welcome (or welcome back) to Sussex and the new 2013/14 edition of Money Matters! As you will no doubt have realised, money matters a lot when you are a student. You may just have left home and are now having to manage your own finances for the first time, or maybe you are already accustomed to managing your money but are not used to living on such a low income. Alternatively, you may have been at Sussex a while but are still struggling to get to grips with your finances and constantly juggling things around in an effort to get by. Whether you’ve just started your course or have already been here a while, managing your money whilst studying presents some unique challenges. This booklet, produced jointly by the Advice and Representation Centre (Students’ Union) and the Student Life Centre at Sussex University, aims to provide information on a whole range of moneyrelated issues including: ♦♦ Managing your money whilst living on a limited income ♦♦ Additional sources of income that you may be able to secure ♦♦ Money saving tips ♦♦ What to do if you get in financial difficulties The information given in this booklet is aimed at ALL students at Sussex whether you’re full or part-time, an undergraduate or postgraduate and whether you are a UK, EU or an international student. Whilst most of the information provided is relevant for all students some sections are aimed at specific groups – these are be clearly identified. Whilst we hope you will find the information contained in this booklet useful, remember that it is only intended as a brief guide so please contact the Advice & Representation Centre and/or the Student Life Centre if you require more detailed information. Good luck! The University of Sussex Students’ Union Advice & Representation Centre and the Student Life Centre

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1

Managing Your Money

With careful budgeting and planning it is possible to get your finances under control and manage your money effectively for the duration of your studies. This section should provide you with the basics you need to start the process.

1.1 Get Organised Before you can get on top of your finances you need to get organised, the biggest obstacle to successfully managing a budget is ‘putting your head in the sand’ at the start. Five top tips on organising yourself: 1. R  ead your bank statements, banks make mistakes but also you need to know how much money you have to spend 2. K  eep important documentation in a safe place (this includes Student Finance England letters, DWP letters, insurance documents and P60s / P45s). 3. Always keep your tenancy agreement to hand 4. H  ave everyone who lives in the house named on the bills, but make sure that one person in the house is responsible for making sure the bills are paid 5. Read your payslips and make sure you understand what any deductions are for.

1.2 Draw Up a Budget Drawing up a budget is absolutely vital if you are going to get to grips with your money as it’s the best way you can work out how much money you can afford to spend and check that you are not over-spending. See this link for a budget calculator: http://sussex. moneydoctors.info/budget/ Other budget tools online include: http://www.debtadvicefoundation.org/debt-tools/budget-planner http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/banking/Budget-planning http://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/yourmoney/interactive/

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Four top tips on creating a budget: 1. D  on’t lie, you aren’t helping yourself. If you spend £40 a week on take-aways then write it down. Just putting a different figure into the amount won’t make it true. You can always look at adjusting the figures later 2. Start by listing everything; you can organise things later 3. G  et all your expenditure into weekly amounts. For monthly payments (like rent) this means multiplying by 12 and then dividing by 52. 4. List all your income, then look at which are periodic and which are regular 5. V  isit http://www.sussex.ac.uk/studentlifecentre/funding/budgeting for money saving tips and an interactive budget planner http://sussex.moneydoctors.info/ budget/

1.3 Balance Your Budget Once you have drawn up your budget, compare your total income to your total expenditure. If your expenditure is higher than your income, you will need to take steps to balance your budget. Six top tips on balancing your budget: 1. C  heck you’re getting everything you’re entitled to and look into other ways to increase your income 2. Find ways to reduce your expenditure and avoid money drains 3. Work out your priorities and ensure that you have set aside money to cover these first 4. Organise your payments 5. Stick to your budget and spend sensibly 6. Regularly review your budget

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2

Budgeting Tips

Top 10 tips on food and shopping: ♦♦ Make a shopping list and stick to it. Never shop when you’re hungry. ♦♦ S  hop late or on Sunday afternoons when there may be bargains on offer on perishables e.g. bread and veg, however always check sell-by dates. ♦♦ M  ake a sandwich a day instead of buying a ready-made one – use your favourite ingredients and you could still save a pound or more a day – 260 weekdays = £260 a year. ♦♦ B  uying a takeout coffee everyday for a week could cost as much as £46.50 a month... Over a year that’s £558! ♦♦ Save take away containers to use for leftovers and freezing extra portions. ♦♦ Look at price per 100g to compare different prices. ♦♦ A  lways buy unpackaged fruit and veg – better for the purse and the environment. Do some research as to which fruit and veg are in season, they will be cheaper. ♦♦ Have meat-free days – good for your health and your pocket. ♦♦ B  uy value brands in the supermarket (e.g. Sainsbury’s Basic, Tesco Value, Asda Smart price) and see if you can tell the difference. Save £100s of pounds over the year! ♦♦ F  ill a water bottle, there are a lot water fountains around Uni. Buying a bottle of water every day during term-time costs £127. Top 10 lifestyle tips: ♦♦ Use the University library – they stock the books you need and many more. ♦♦ C  ustomise clothes and accessories rather than buying a new outfit (see threadbangers on youtube). ♦♦ P  urchase a second hand bike and a good quality lock. It will save money on buses, taxis and petrol. ♦♦ Challenge yourself to spend-free days. ♦♦ If you live in a shared house, keep the doors closed and only leave lights on in the room that you’re in. ♦♦ O  nce you arrive at University, join Freecycle or Freegle group. This is a mailing list where local people offer up items they no longer want, for free – as long as you agree to collect them. You can find furniture for your student house and all manner of things! You can also put out ‘wanted’ emails, requesting items that you would like to own. ♦♦ R  emember that no one can afford to party every night- so don’t feel pressured! Excessive drinking impairs judgement and can lead to spending too much money. Always plan what sort of night out you’re having and how much you’re likely to spend and try to stick to it. 4


♦♦ M  ake sure your washing machine is full every load so you save on energy bills or the cost of washes if you’re using a launderette. ♦♦ Take dated photos to accompany an inventory when you move in to a new property. ♦♦ W  hen buying train tickets, buy as far in advance as possible. Always check the cost of 2 singles compared to a return. Thinking about banking & finance ♦♦ Keep a written record of your spending. ♦♦ C  hoose your bank account wisely. Beware of the gimmicks and freebies banks will use to entice students to take out an account with them. ♦♦ C  heck your bank statements regularly or get online banking. This will help to track your spending and prevent you going over your limit which can mean bank charges. ♦♦ G  o to the cash machine once or twice a week rather than every day. If you go and withdraw £10 every weekday in term time you will be withdrawing over £1500 a year! Check your balance regularly. Don’t use your bank card to buy things. Get an agreed amount of cash out at the start of the week and don’t get any more out! ♦♦ Are you claiming all the benefits you are eligible for? Check Section 4. ♦♦ If you have an outstanding balance on a credit card, regularly check the financial market to keep up to date with the best deals on balance transfers. ♦♦ A  void store cards – there are not enough advantages to outweigh the high interest charges.

Health Matters Use the NHS – it’s free! National Health Service treatments are generally free. However there are charges for prescriptions, sight tests, glasses and dental treatment. If you are under 19, in receipt of certain qualifying benefits, are pregnant or have had a baby in the last 12 months, you will be exempt from some or all of these charges. If you are on a low income, apply for help with health costs such as prescriptions, dental treatment, sight tests and glasses – fill in form HC1 (available to collect from the Advice & Representation centre or your GP surgery), If you regularly have to pay for prescriptions consider buying a prescription prepayment certificate, ask at your GP practice. Non-UK students: If you are on a course lasting 6 months or more, you are entitled to free medical treatment from the NHS on the same basis as anyone who is ordinarily resident in the UK. If your course lasts for 6 months or less, we would advise that you take out health insurance unless you come from an EU country or a country with a reciprocal agreement for free health care in the UK.

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Top Ten Green Budgeting Tips from the Students’ Union U 1. Y  ou could save around £65 a year on your heating bill for every degree you turn your radiator thermostat down. 2. If you are in receipt of means tested benefits then you may be eligible for free insulation, worth looking into if you are likely to be staying in the same place for a few years as it can save you a lot of money. Contact the Energy Saving Trust for more info 3. By doing simple things like washing clothes at 30°C, turning off lights and chargers when not needed, and only boiling the water you need in the kettle, your house could save around £90 a year. 4. Join Sussex Roots, the new veg box scheme for Sussex Students which will be selling local seasonal fruit and veg, keeping food miles and prices down. Buying local and in season is often cheaper and much better for the environment. 5. Get your lentils, rice, pasta, etc from Scoop (Sussex Co-op society). They buy organic whole foods wholesale and sell them every week at the Tuesday market. This keeps prices cheap and as you buy by weight you can buy what you need. Having meat-free days is also good for your health, pocket and the environment. 6. The average household throws away £480 of food every year that could have been eaten Love Food Hate Waste have lots of recipe suggestions for using up food plus tips on storing food and portion sizes. 7. Walking and cycling is good for you, your purse and the environment. RE-CYCLE (Sussex Uni Bike Hire Co-op) have set up a society to rent second hand bikes at not-for-profit prices or you can purchase a second hand bike. It is worth investing in a good quality lock. 8. Travelling by public transport for long journeys is a lot greener than driving, and if you book in advance then it can often be cheaper too. As a student you can get a Young Person’s Railcard, even if you’re over 25, giving you up to a third off rail travel. If you really need to use a car then you could join a car club. 9. Getting things second hand means they have no carbon footprint and are usually a lot cheaper. Freshers Free Shop at the beginning of term is a great place to pick up free second hand stuff for your flat and the Free Shop runs all year round in Falmer House where you can pick up things like ring binders and text books. Join local Freegal and Freecycle groups for free second hand furniture and much more. Charity shops are great for clothes and books. 10. Fix what you have rather than buying new. Go to Union Computers for any computer problems and Cranks will fix your bike for free.

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Useful Links ♦♦ www.friday-ad.co.uk – for cheap second-hand stuff ♦♦ w  ww.sussex.ac.uk/students/newsandevents/smallads and www.gumtree.com for cheap second-hand stuff ♦♦ w  ww.snaffleitup.co.uk for all sorts of unwanted free things – sofas, computers, clothes etc ♦♦ www.cleaningexpert.co.uk/NaturalCleaningProducts.html for natural and environmentally friendly cleaning products ♦♦ w  ww.moneysavingexpert.com, www.vouchercodes.co.uk and www.groupon.co.uk for discounts and vouchers ♦♦ www.studentrecipes.com – 100’s of student-friendly recipes posted mainly by other students ♦♦ w  ww.tesco.com/tescopricepromise and www.mysupermarket.co.uk – compare supermarket prices ♦♦ www.energysavingtrust.org.uk for energy saving tips ♦♦ www.readitswapit.co.uk – swap your books with others ♦♦ w  ww.tvlicensing.co.uk – if you are not in University managed accommodation you will need a TV licence if you have a TV ♦♦ w  ww.gov.uk/consumer-protection-rights – keep all your receipts in case anything goes wrong. You have a whole range of consumer rights guaranteed by legislation.

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3

Additional funding available from the University of Sussex

This section (and section 4) give information about additional sources of income that you may be able to secure to supplement your main funding. For information about the main sources of funding (i.e. student loans etc.) that may be available to you please see the Student Life Centre’s money web pages, visit the Student Life Centre in Chichester 1 or email the Funding Team at hardship@sussex.ac.uk

Scholarships and Bursaries First Generation Scholars Scheme (UK students only) Home students, on the new fee regime, with a family income assessed by Student Finance England as below £42,611 may be entitled to a First-Generation Scholars Scheme award. For more information about the award visit the First-Generation web page (http://www. sussex.ac.uk/study/ug/funding/2013entry/funding/homeeu/firstgenerationscholars). PGCE students should visit the PGCE award page (http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/pg/ feesandfunding/2013entry/funding/opportunities/view/125). First-generation scholars scheme EU Student Award (EU Students only) First Year non-UK EU undergraduate students who have their income assessed by Student Finance England’s EU Bursary team as being below £25,000 are eligible for a £3,000 fee waiver in their first year only. For more information visit the web page (http://www.sussex. ac.uk/study/ug/funding/2013entry/funding/opportunities/view/227).

Loan Assistance VC Loans These are short term interest free cash loans of up to £100 from the university to offer immediate assistance to students in a financial crisis.

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Eligibility Students can apply for a VC Loan if: •

They are fully registered with the University;

They are not in debt to the University (e.g. no outstanding fees, rent, large library fines , previous VC Loans etc.);

It is more than 2 months before you graduate.

Any outstanding loans will need to be settled BEFORE a student can re-register with the University. We would advise all students who are thinking about applying for a loan to use the Student Life Centre’s Budget tool first. Students can also book a Money Advice session with a member of the Student Life team via Sussex Direct. How to apply VC Loans are administered by the Student Life Centre and the scheme is open all year round. Students who receive a loan will need to pick up the cash from Student Accounts which is open from 10am till 4pm. Late Maintenance Loans These are short term interest free loans of up to £400 from the University to offer assistance to students whose main funding has been delayed. Eligibility You can apply for a late maintenance loan if: •

You are fully registered with the University;

You are not in debt to the University (e.g. no outstanding fees, rent, large library fines etc.);

Your SFE grant / loan payment has been delayed for reasons beyond your control;

You are awaiting the payment of a PCDL.

Your sponsorship stipend has been delayed for reasons beyond your control;

We would advise all students who are thinking about applying for the loan to use the Student Life Centre’s Budget tool first. Students can also book a Money Advice session with a member of the Student Life team via Sussex Direct. When and How to Apply Application for a Late Maintenance Loan is done on-line via the Finance page of a student’s Sussex Direct account. After you apply on-line you will need to visit the Student Life Centre to supply the additional information asked for. If a loan is agreed it will be paid direct into your bank account. It can take up to 10 days for an agreed loan to reach your bank account. 9


Hardship Funding Access to Learning Fund (UK students only) What is it? The government gives all universities money each year to help students who need extra financial support because they have higher than expected costs or are facing serious financial difficulties. Who is eligible? All full time UK undergraduate and postgraduate students are eligible to apply. Eligibility for part time home students depends on the number of modules they are studying. We would advise all students who are thinking about applying to the fund to use the Student Life Centre’s Budget tool first. Students can also book a Money Advice session with a member of the Student Life team via Sussex Direct. Priority Groups All eligible students can apply to the fund, but priority is given to: •

Students with dependants (either adult or child);

Care Leavers

Students with a disability that prevents work;

Finalists;

Mature undergraduate students (over the age of 25 at the start of the course).

When and How to Apply Applications are accepted from the start of the Autumn term and the fund will run until exhausted. Applications forms and guidance notes can be downloaded from the Student Life Centre web site, or paper copies are available from the Student Life Centre and the Advice and Representation Centre. Size of Award The maximum award is £2,000. The majority of awards are less than £1,000 for the year. Summer Vacation payments from the Access to Learning Fund Non-finalist undergraduate students who have previously applied to the hardship fund are able to apply for the summer fund if they are unable to work over the summer period due to: •

Childcare commitments;

A disability that prevents work;

Exams in August and September.

The opening date for the fund will be published on the Student Life Centre’s web pages. 10


Alumni Hardship and Opportunity Fund What is it? Sussex Alumni have donated money to this fund to help current students who are experiencing financial hardship and have exhausted all other funding sources. Priority Groups The fund is open to all Sussex students however priority is given to: •

Overseas and non-UK EU finalists;

Overseas students with dependants;

Home students with disabilities;

Home student finalists who are, upon assessment, not eligible for the Access to Learning Fund;

Students from countries where there is a national crisis.

When and How to Apply Applications are accepted all year round and the fund will run until exhausted. Applications forms and guidance notes can be downloaded from the Student Life Centre web site, paper copies are available from the Student Life Centre and the International Student Support unit. We would advise all students who are thinking about applying to the fund to use the Student Life Centre’s Budget tool first. Students can also book a Money Advice session with a member of the Student Life team via Sussex Direct. Size of the Award The maximum award is £1,000, however the majority of awards are less than £500 for the year.

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4

Additional funding from outside the University

4.1 Welfare Benefits & Tax Credits Welfare benefits and tax credits are payments made by the government to certain individuals, couples and families in order to provide a level of income appropriate to their needs. Benefits and tax credits may be paid to people who are unemployed or on a low income, to people who are responsible for a child or children, to people with a disability or who are unable to work due to ill-health and to people with caring responsibilities amongst others. Please be aware that there are constant ongoing changes to welfare benefits including new rules about restricting how much benefit you can be paid in total, always check the latest details and how changes could affect you. Non-UK students: Most non-UK students do not qualify for welfare benefits or tax credits either because they do not satisfy the residence and presence conditions and/ or because they are subject to immigration control. There are some exceptions to this however – have a look at the UK Council for International Student Affairs information sheet on welfare benefits (visit www.ukcisa.org.uk and select “welfare benefits” from the A-Z index).

Tax credits Tax credits are payments from the government, designed to support families with children and households on low incomes. Depending on your circumstances, you may be eligible to apply to HM Revenue and Customs for Child Tax Credit and/or Working Tax Credit. NB - Under current government plans tax credits and benefits will gradually be replaced by one payment called Universal Credit in phases from October 2013 until 2017 – always check the latest details. Child Tax Credit If you are responsible for a child or children under 16 (or under 20 and in full- time nonadvanced education or approved training) you may be eligible for Child Tax Credit.

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Working Tax Credit You may be eligible for Working Tax Credit if you are a lone parent responsible for a child or children and are working at least 16 hours per week. OR If you are a member of a couple with children and you and your partner work at least 24 hours a week between you, with one of you working at least 16 hours a week OR if you do NOT have children but are 25 or over and work at least 30 hours per week. OR if you are 16 or over and work at least 16 hours per week and have a disability. Welfare benefits If you are a full time student, you are unlikely to be eligible for any welfare benefits until you graduate or formally withdraw from your course, unless you have children or an illness or disability. If you are currently in receipt of any means-tested benefits, these are likely to be affected by any funding you receive. Part-time students may be eligible for welfare benefits as long as you satisfy all the qualifying criteria. If you are in receipt of benefits before starting your course, you must inform the relevant office(s) when you become a student. It is always best to do this in writing and to keep a copy of your letter. Failure to inform the relevant office could lead to an overpayment being made which may be recoverable; deliberate failure to inform the relevant benefits office may be classed as fraud. Have a look at the information on the Students’ Union website (www.sussexstudent.com/ advice) for an overview of who may be eligible to claim, and some of the main issues relevant for students. The legislation surrounding entitlement to benefits and tax credits is vast and complicated and you should speak to one of the professional advisers at the Students’ Union Advice & Representation Centre for more information if you think that you may be eligible or are worried about how being a student will affect your current entitlement. Please be aware that there are constant ongoing changes to welfare benefits including new rules about restricting how much benefit you can be paid in total, always check the latest details and how it could affect you.

4.2 Welfare Benefits/Tax Credits and Student Income The way that any student income (e.g. loans and grants) is treated for benefits purposes is complicated and can be confusing. Please see the Students’ Union website (www. sussexstudent.com/advice) for an overview of how student income interacts with meanstested benefits such as Income Support and Local Housing Allowance/Housing Benefit. Non means-tested benefits (such as Child Benefit and Disability Living Allowance) are not 13


generally affected by your student income. The majority of student loan and grant income is disregarded when calculating entitlement to tax credits: only the Adult Dependants’ Grant and any part of a Professional and Career Development Loan paid for living costs will be taken into account as income. For further information about tax credits, please speak to one of the professional advisers at the Students’ Union Advice & Representation Centre or have a look at the HMRC Tax Credits website at www.hmrc.gov.uk/taxcredits

4.3 Other Sources of Income There are a number of other potential sources of income/credit for students, which you might use to support you during your studies. Pay Day Loans - Beware! These are short term cash loans easy to obtain, often online, but you are charged very high levels of interest and high charges if you don’t repay on the agreed date, and this can lead to you getting into serious debt. They are offered by lenders such as Wonga and Cash Lady. The Students’ Union and Student Life Centre DO NOT RECOMMEND that you take out these loans. Please always talk to the Student Life Centre to see what other options are available BEFORE applying for one of these loans.

Professional and Career Development Loans (PCDLs), Professional Studies Loans, and other bank loans Professional and Career Development Loans (PCDLs) are bank loans that can be used to help pay for work related learning. You can borrow between £300 and £10,000 to help support the cost of up to two years of learning (or three years if it includes one year’s relevant unpaid practical work). The Young People’s Learning Agency will pay the interest on the loan while you are learning and for one month afterwards. The loan can be used to pay course fees or other costs such as travel and living expenses. You can also use the loan to supplement other forms of support such as grants or bursaries. Because the Professional and Career Development Loan is a commercial loan product, they should only be considered as an option once all other student funding options have been investigated. For further information on financial assistance to support your learning contact National Careers Advice on 0800 100 900. The University of Sussex’s Learning Provider Registration Number is 8432. PCDLs are NOT generally available for full-time undergraduate study.

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Please note: PCDLs and Professional Studies Loans are commercial bank loans and high interest rates often apply. Strict penalties apply where the terms and conditions of the loan are not adhered to. Any bank loan should only be considered if you have no other source of funding and cannot delay starting your course. The Advice & Representation Centre does NOT recommend that you take out any bank loan. Some other high street banks offer similar delayed repayment loans called Professional Studies Loans or Professional Trainee Loans to students on certain (usually vocational) courses. You may also be able to negotiate a loan with your own bank although this is not recommended because of the usually high interest rates that apply and the serious consequences involved in failing to keep up with repayments.

Trusts and Charities There are a number of educational trusts and charities who may be able to offer additional financial help to students who are in severe financial hardship or who fit particular criteria (e.g. students with a disability/illness or who have dependent children). The eligibility criteria for these organisations is very strict and is usually very specific, and awards are usually only small. There is a lot of competition for the funding that’s available. Check http://www.turn2us.org.uk/ for a grants search.

Help with energy costs If you owe money for a water, gas or electricity bill and you are currently supplied by Southern Water, EDF Energy, E.ON or British Gas you may be eligible to apply to a trust fund set up to help customers in financial difficulties to clear their arrears. For more information, have a look at the relevant website: Southern Water Trust Fund http://www.southernwater.co.uk/DomesticCustomers/difficultyPayingYourBill/trustFund.asp EDF Energy Trust www.edfenergytrust.org.uk British Gas Energy Trust www.britishgasenergytrust.org.uk E.on Caring Energy Fund www.eonenergy.com/caringenergy The Home Heat Helpline (0800 33 66 99) advises British energy customers worried about paying their fuel bill and keeping warm during the winter. It also gives advice to low-income households in urgent need of heating help and advice. It is free to call and is open 9am-6pm Monday to Friday.  15


5

Working

5.1 Working Whilst Studying The chances are that most of you will need to find a job to supplement your income at some point during your studies. Depending on your circumstances you may decide to work throughout the year (part-time during term-time and full-time during the vacations) or you may be able to earn enough from working during the vacations that you don’t need to work during term-time. How much and when you work will also depend on your course and how many hours a week you can realistically work without unduly affecting your studies – the University recommends that you don’t work more than 15 hours per week in paid employment during term-time but for many students it’s a necessity to work more in order to afford to study. The University of Sussex has a Careers and Employability Centre located in the library. The Careers and Employability Centre has lists of job vacancies as well as offering help and advice on topics such as writing CVs and interview skills. Have a look at their website for more information about how they can help: www.sussex.ac.uk/careers Non-UK students will also need to check whether you are allowed to work, whether you need to register to work and whether any restrictions apply to the number of hours or type of work that you can undertake: European Economic Area (EEA) and Swiss nationals EEA and Swiss national students can work in the UK without having to register or seek permission. The only exception to this is for nationals of Bulgaria, Romania and Croatia, who may need to register to work in the UK. If this affects you, we’d suggest getting in touch with the University’s International & Study Abroad Office, or UCKISA (details below). International students There are various rules around how much and what types of work you can undertake as an International student in the UK, depending on what kind of immigration permission you’ve been awarded. Have a look at your passport sticker (entry clearance or residence permit) as a first step to understanding whether or not you can work in the UK. If your immigration permission does not allow you to work, this means that you must not undertake paid or unpaid employment, including work placements which are part of your course. This can 16


include voluntary work. We strongly suggest getting advice about your immigration conditions before starting work, to ensure that you don’t inadvertently break your visa/residence conditions. For further information about working in the UK contact the University’s International & Study Abroad Office (www.sussex.ac.uk/international) or visit the UK Council for International Student Affairs website at www.ukcisa.org.uk

5.2 National Minimum Wage Virtually all workers over the age of 16 are entitled to be paid at least the National Minimum Wage (NMW), which means that employers are obliged by law to pay their workers a minimum hourly wage, regardless of where they work, the size of the firm or the worker’s occupation. This includes part-time workers, workers on short-term contracts, casual workers, agency workers and people from overseas who are working in the UK, so the chances are that if you get a job you are entitled to be paid at least the NMW. The NMW is fixed at different rates for certain groups of workers, depending on your age:

Type of NMW

Hourly rate of NMW from 01.10.13

Workers aged 21 or over

£6.31

Workers aged 18-20 inclusive

£5.03

Workers aged 16 and 17

£3.72

For more information about the NMW, or for advice on what to do if your employer is not paying you at least this amount, contact the Pay and Work Rights Helpline on 0800 9172368.

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5.3 Income Tax and National Insurance Under UK law there are certain deductions employers have to make from employees’ wages. These include tax and national insurance. As a student you have to pay both income tax and national insurance in the same way as anyone else working in the UK. How much (if anything) you have to pay depends on how much you earn and your tax status e.g. whether or not you have any special allowances. Income Tax Everyone can earn or receive an amount of income in each year before paying tax. This is called the personal allowance and is currently £9,440 per year in the 2013/14 tax year for single people under 65. If your income is below your personal allowance during the tax year you will not have to pay any income tax. A tax year starts on 6 April in one year and ends on 5 April in the next. If you have paid tax throughout the year but your total income was not, or is not likely to be, as much as your personal allowance you may be able to claim a refund. Ask your local tax office for a repayment claim form (a P50) or download one from HM Revenue and Customs website (www.hmrc.gov.uk). NB: If you have more than one job at the same time, you should contact your local tax office to get a different tax code for your second job in order to avoid either over or under-paying. National Insurance Contributions (NICs) If your gross pay (i.e. your total pay before deductions) is more than a certain amount each week your employer will also deduct National Insurance contributions (NICs) from your pay. NICs are important for UK nationals because they entitle you to certain contributory benefits and count towards your pension, but all workers, including non-UK workers, must pay them depending on how much you earn. If you have more than one job, you will usually pay NICs on both jobs. All UK nationals are automatically allocated a National Insurance (NI) number at 16 (as long as Child Benefit has been in payment). If you are a non-UK student who is working in the UK there is no requirement to have a NI number before you start work - however once you have a job, you will need to apply for one. To apply, ring the National Insurance Registrations Helpline on 0845 915 7006. It will take some time for your NI number to be allocated to you but in the meantime your employer can set up a temporary NI number. For further information about income tax or National Insurance Contributions, have a look at the section of the HMRC website specifically for students (http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/students) or contact your local tax office.

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Changes in Circumstances

Sometimes your circumstances might change during your course. For example, you might move in with a partner, have a baby, start receiving some money you weren’t getting before or take time out from your course amongst many other things. Depending on your individual circumstances, any of these changes might affect your finances. If your circumstances change whilst you are at Sussex, speak to one of the professional advisers at the Students’ Union Advice & Representation Centre to see how this might affect your finances. International students: Changes to your circumstances may also have implications for your visa. If your circumstances change you should seek advice from the International and Study Abroad Office (www.sussex.ac.uk/International) or from the UK Council for International Student Affairs (www.ukcisa.org.uk) to find out what, if any, implications this might have for your visa.

6.1 Transferring, Withdrawing, Taking Time Out (Intermitting) and Repeating Some students decide to withdraw from university, transfer to another course, take time out (intermit), or have to repeat all or part of their course. The funding implications of these decisions can be serious and you should be aware of them in order to make informed choices should you need to. If you are considering transferring, withdrawing or taking time out from you course, or if you need to repeat any part of your course, have a look at the academic section of our online advice web pages (www.sussexstudent.com/advice) and come and speak to one of the professional advisers at the Students’ Union Advice & Representation Centre before making any decision. We can advise you about the implications of your decision for your student funding; your fee liability; how you will support yourself if your funding stops; whether you can apply for discretionary funding, to the Access to Learning Fund or for any other sources of support; and how to deal with any overpayments and your entitlement to future funding. We can also advise you on any other issues that may be related (e.g. your housing situation, your Council Tax liability or your benefit claims).

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Financial Difficulties and Debt

The Students’ Union Advice & Representation Centre’s professional advisers can advise you on any money-related issue including debts, benefits, and ways to increase your income while the Student Life Centre can help with budgeting skills. It is important to seek help as soon as you realise that you are likely to be in difficulty since the more time we have, the more we can usually do. Students experiencing financial difficulties who need help because of either an unexpected financial crisis or on going hardship may be able to apply for help from either the University or from external sources. In addition, there are some emergency funds potentially available to students who need cash urgently (See Sections 3 and 4).

Dealing with debt There are many reasons why people fall into debt. It might be because you have lost your job or are unable to work because of illness or disability. It could be that you have recently split up with a partner, had a baby or experienced some other change in your personal circumstances that leaves you with less money than you need. For many, especially students, it could be that you simply don’t have enough money to pay everything that you owe. Whatever the reason, being in debt is a common and often frightening and stressful experience; try not to panic, we can help! It is understandable that you may want to ignore any letters from creditors (people to whom you owe money) but your situation will get worse if you do - the sooner you seek professional help the easier it is to sort things out. Contact National Debtline for advice - http://www.nationaldebtline.co.uk/

Debts to the University If you owe money to the University (e.g. for rent arrears or tuition fees) contact the University or the Students’ Union Advice & Representation Centre as soon as possible. You should hopefully be able to reach a suitable arrangement to clear your debt, but if you do not then ultimately you may be refused entry into the next year of your course, be withdrawn on financial grounds or have your degree certificate withheld. It is legally debatable whether universities can take these academic sanctions for non-academic related debts (e.g. rent arrears, unpaid VC/bridging loans). If you are affected by this please contact the Advice & Representation Centre. 20


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Useful Contacts

University of Sussex Students’ Union Advice & Representation Centre 1st Floor, Falmer House University of Sussex Brighton, BN1 9QF Tel: 01273 877038 Fax: 01273 873501 Email: advice@sussexstudent.com www.sussexstudent.com/advice Student Life Centre Ground Floor, Chichester I Tel: 01273 876767 Email: studentlifecentre@sussex.ac.uk www.sussex.ac.uk/studentlifecentre International and Study Abroad Office Tel: +44 (0)1273 678422 Fax: +44 (0)1273 678640 Email: international@sussex.ac.uk www.sussex.ac.uk/international Careers and Employability Centre Tel: 01273 678429 Email: careers@sussex.ac.uk www.sussex.ac.uk/careers

Useful Agencies in Brighton and Hove Brighton Jobcentre Plus Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) Windsor House 30 - 35 Edward Street Brighton BN2 0LN Tel: 0845 604 3719 Text phone: 0845 608 8551 Hove Jobcentre Plus Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)

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Boundary House, Boundary Road Hove BN3 7HD Tel: 0845 604 3719 Text phone: 0845 608 8551 Brighton and Hove City Council Housing and Council Tax Benefit Office PO Box 2929, Brighton BN1 1PS Tel: 01273 292000 E-mail: housing.benefits@brighton-hove.gov.uk Brighton and Hove Council Tax Office PO Box 2929, Brighton BN1 1PS Tel: 01273 291291 Email: council.tax@brighton-hove.gov.uk

National Agencies UK Council for International Student Affairs Advice Line (open Monday-Friday 1pm-4pm): Outside the UK: +44 20 7107 9922 Inside the UK: 020 7107 9922 www.ukcisa.org.uk HM Revenue and Customs Tax Credits Helpline: 0845 300 3900 (open Monday-and Friday 8am-8pm, and Saturday 8am- 4pm) www.hmrc.gov.uk/taxcredits National Union of Students (NUS) www.nus.org.uk Energy Saving Trust Tel: 0800 123 1234 www.energysavingtrust.org.uk

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University of Sussex Student Life Centre Chichester 1 i003 University of Sussex BN1 9QJ studentlifecentre@sussex.ac.uk 01273 876767 www.sussex.ac.uk/studentlifecentre Situated at the heart of campus, the Student Life Centre is your first point of contact for information and advice about any aspect of University life. If you don’t know who to talk to or who to ask - start at the Student Life Centre. 24

The Students’ Union Advice & Representation Centre offers free, independent and confidential information, advice, and advocacy on a range of academic and non-academic issues, from housing and welfare benefits, to complaints and appeals.

Students’ Union Advice & Representation Centre Falmer House Falmer East Sussex BN1 9QF advice@sussexstudent.com 01273 877038 www.sussexstudent.com/advice


Money matters 2013 2014