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AD TIME FOR THE TRADE SHOW! FRLA HALL OF FAME 2016 WINNERS SMART BUSINESS OVERTIME EXEMPTION, TIP CREDIT AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT

DINE OUT FOR #ORLANDOUNITED FALL 2016

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Proud of the company we keep

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DEPARTMENTS

4 Food for Thought A Heart for Hospitality From the Chairman’s Desk We Are Hospitality 4  Great Florida Events Don’t Miss Out on the Fun 8  10  Dine Out Florida's Hospitality Industry Unites for the OneOrlando Fund 14  Hospitality Awards FRLA’s 2016 Hall of Fame Recipients 14  Chefs that Sizzle Todd Stolpe, Captain's Table 16  Path to Power Jason Emmett, Duffy’s Sports Grill 22  Hospitality Happenings Glance at the Happenings Around the State 45  A La Carte Industry Information You Need to Know 46 Emeril's Florida Season Four Schedule 48  ENGAGE Continued Momentum 48  Movers and Shakers 49  Marketing Tips Ulele Case Study 50  Energy Choice So What Is Energy Choice, Anyway? 55  Prostart High School Teachers Go Back to School During Summer Vacation 56  ADA Compliance Now What? 58  FRLA’s Corporate Calendar What Is Happening with FRLA and the Industry

SPECIAL FEATURES 15 27

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VISIT FLORIDA — FRLA’s Tourism Partner

Get Familiar with VISITFLORIDA.org

FRLA’s Food Safety Edition

Find Out What Is Happening in This Segment of Your Business Secrets of Success — One Ocean Resort & Spa

Elevating Customer Service to the Next Level

40  Tip Credit

Don’t Let Your Business Tip Out of Control

42  Business Matters

Don’t Put Sexual Harassment on Your Menu

Cheers & Tears 43 

Florida Restaurant Show 52 

The Final Rule on Overtime Exemptions Makes Its Debut

New Ideas, New Products and New Solutions at the 2016 Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show

ON THE COVER: Florida's hospitality industry united to raise more than $800,000 for the OneOrlando Fund.

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FROM THE CHAIRMANS DESK

A Heart for Hospitality By CAROL B. DOVER

I

want to personally thank those of you who recently participated in Dine Out for Orlando United. It is people like you, with a heart for hospitality, who help make the Sunshine State a wonderful place to live, work and play. I am humbled by your willingness to give back and proud of the difference your contribution will make in the lives of family, friends and colleagues in Orlando. Collectively, our industry donated more than $800,000 to the OneOrlando Fund. This edition of Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine, spotlights a small fraction of your efforts. Please, take a moment to read about the steadfast support of our community on page 10. There, you’ll also see the incredible leadership from Governor Rick Scott and Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer who dined with us during the event. While we were proud to take part in Orlando’s healing we are still continuing to pray for the victims and their families. I am glad to again be back in the City Beautiful for our 2016 Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show. We are thrilled to watch the continued growth of this event, cultivated by

our wonderful partners at Urban Expositions. In addition to the fantastic line up at the show, we are excited to present our annual Stars of the Industry. The event, held on Sept. 28, at the Hyatt Regency Orlando, is THE Florida hospitality gathering of the year. That night, we will recognize the accomplishments of outstanding hospitality employees and celebrate their service in the industry. Plus, we will honor the first responders who work diligently to protect us. While we hope you pick up many new techniques and trends at the FR&L Show, we encourage you to pay extra special attention to the portion of this magazine dedicated to food safety. The section, which starts on page 27, underscores the basics in proper handling and identifies the latest concerns that could directly impact your business. It is critical to the health of your guests and employees that you ensure you’re meeting the highest of standards. Splashed across the rest of the magazine, you’ll see the many wonderful events and initiatives we’ve taken part in over the past few months. On page 8, check out the Great Florida Events we’ve hosted in the Panhandle, along the First Coast and down

south. You’ll also see a beautiful spread of our Summer Board Meeting and Marketing + Operations Summit, where we spotlighted innovative ideas on pages 18 and 19. Not to mention, the countless chapter events in our Hospitality Happenings section on page 22, which always bring together the best and brightest in the industry. It is with your support that our association is able to continue to thrive, making an impact in our industry and the great state of Florida. As always, thank you for your hard work, passion for the business and especially for your care for our community. Cheers!

Carol B. Dover FRLA President & CEO

We Are Hospitality By LINO MALDONADO

H

ere in the state of Florida, we know how to do hospitality. It’s our livelihood, the backbone of the economy and really, it’s in our blood. We welcome guests and customers through our doors with smiling faces, we would move mountains to ensure every one of them has the best possible experience, and we band together to do good in the face of tragedy by helping our friends and neighbors in need. I was reminded of our strength as an industry and giving nature of our people on June 30, 2016, when hundreds of restaurants and restaurant associates across the state of Florida joined forces to benefit those in need. More than $800,000 was donated to the One Orlando fund as a result of this initiative, which was driven by the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association and VISIT FLORIDA to support our families, friends and neighbors following the tragedy in Orlando. I’d like to

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send a heartfelt thank you to every individual and business that supported this initiative. As we look ahead to what’s now the second half of 2016, I can’t help but be enthusiastic about what’s in store for FRLA members. The Marketing and Operations Summit — an event that combines key initiatives for two of the most critical components of any business — kicked off the events season in late July, followed by the always entertaining and educational Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show in September, and many other Great Florida Events to follow, closing out 2016 with a bang. Cheers!

Lino Maldonado 2016 Chairman of the Board

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Susie R. McKinley EMAIL: EDITOR@FRLA.ORG PUBLISHED BY

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MAGAZINE Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by email. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

Printer’s Address 13487 S. Preston Hwy. Lebanon Junction, KY 40150

Ad rates and submission Guidelines at www.FRLA.org Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 1044-03640) is published bi-monthly. FRLA Members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Publisher’s Press, Inc., Lebanon Junction, KY. Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, 230 South Adams St., Tallahassee, FL 32301 or via email to susana@frla.org. Send subscription address changes to susana@frla.org.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Check frla.org/great-florida-events for more information about our upcoming events! Don't miss any of our Great Florida Events coming up later this summer and in the fall!

Visitors enjoyed Stuart's Coastal Living Happiest Seaside Town event.

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Great Florida Events sponsored Chris Janson and LoCash in Okaloosa County.

The Jacksonville Jaguars sponsored the Tallahassee Takeover event this summer to expose Northwest Florida football fans to the Jags and to some of the team’s former Seminoles.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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DINE OUT

Florida’s Hospitality Industry Raises More than $800,000 for Victims of Orlando Tragedy Proceeds from “Dine Out for Orlando United” Donated to OneOrlando Fund

T

he Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association (FRLA) is honored to announce that the hospitality industry raised more than $800,000 to support the victims of the recent tragedy in Orlando. The funds were collected during Dine Out for Orlando United, a fundraising event led by the FRLA in partnership with VISIT FLORIDA, that took place on June 30, 2016. Nearly 1,500 restaurant locations across the state participated, and their contributions were submitted directly to the OneOrlando Fund. During the event, guests dined at participating restaurants and made direct donations. Restaurateurs donated a percentage of their

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daily receipts, from 10 percent to 100 percent, to the fund. Employees worked a shift, volunteered their time or donated a portion of their tips. Businesses raised awareness by promoting, organizing or donating directly to the OneOrlando Fund. Local establishments reported lines out the door throughout the day, specifically for the Dine Out for Orlando United effort. “I am in awe of our friends, family and colleagues in hospitality, who offered their help and hearts to ensure our Sunshine State remains strong,” said Carol Dover, President and CEO of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. “Thank you to Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer and Florida Governor Rick Scott for dining with us on Thursday, and their steadfast support of Dine Out for Orlando United. We are incredibly proud to take part in Orlando's healing, grateful for those who contributed to this effort and are continuing to pray for the victims, their families and our community.” As a number of restaurants continue to report their contributions in the coming weeks, the final donation amount is expected to grow. The OneOrlando Fund is a project of

Strengthen Orlando, Inc., a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation created for the purpose of supporting and starting projects to strengthen the Orlando community. Funds received into the OneOrlando Fund are directly distributed to victims’ families and survivors in an open, transparent and fair manner. Please visit frla.org for links to access photos, a recap video and a list of participating restaurants.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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We specialize in: - Restaurant booths: Mega offers many different styles, shapes and features of booths in a wide range of materials, colors and sizes. - Commercial reupholstery: Our experienced craftsman can make cost-effective repairs to your existing booths, bar stools or furniture. - Hotel furniture: Create one-of-a-kind chairs, sofas, ottomans, tables and custom seating solutions for your front lobby, bedrooms or restaurant. - Cushions: Custom outdoor cushions made to survive Florida weather using quick dry foam and fade resistant fabric.

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H A L L O F FA M E AWA R D S

Congratulations to FRLA’s 2016

HALL OF FAME RECIPIENTS! RESTAURATEUR MANUEL A. ‘MANNY’ GARCIA III Manny Garcia has been a major player in the food and restaurant industry since 1969. At one time Garcia, a Burger King franchisee, had 60 units across Florida. Manny introduced a number of new dining concepts to Central Florida including Pebbles Restaurants, Harvey’s Bistro and Manuel’s on the 28th Restaurant and more recently in The Villages, City Fire American Oven & Bar and a tavern called Honest John's Whiskey and Provisions. Garcia has once again broken new ground with the opening of Wahlburgers, a casual burger restaurant founded by brothers Mark, Donnie and Paul Wahlberg. Wahlburgers is managed by Garcia and his daughter Gina Buell and her husband Mike. They are looking to open Wahlburgers throughout the area.

HOTELIER JULIAN MACQUEEN – INNISFREE RESORTS, PENSACOLA BEACH It was the summer of 1966, and a 15-year-old boy from Birmingham didn’t want to leave the beach. His parents told him to get a job. So Julian MacQueen hitchhiked the shores of Destin until at last he arrived at the Jack Tar Beach House. His Southern manners scored points with the chef, who hired him on the spot. By the time he finished college at the University of South Alabama, he had eight years of hotel experience and a degree in psychology. He never left the hotel business. Today, his company boasts 1,000 employees and twice as many rooms, including hotels, RV resorts and the state-of-the-art Innisfree Jet Center located at Pensacola International Airport. But MacQueen himself does not boast. He just wants to export the natural beauty and Southern charm of our piece of Florida to the rest of the world — one visitor at a time.

SUPPLIER ISLAND OASIS Island Oasis has been a loyal FRLA allied member, exhibitor and sponsor for more than 15 years. They have graciously served their beverage products at the FRLA/NRA Golf Tournament since the tournament’s inception more than 15 years ago. Island Oasis also sponsors and participates at several chapter golf tournaments and events around the state. Tim Burks, Regional Sales Manager/ Central U.S. serves on the Allied Member Council. 12  FA L L

2016 Call Island Oasis 1-800-999-5674 or visit our website at www.islandoasis.com or DaVinci Gourmet 1-800-640-6779 or visit DaVinciGourmet.com

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Save the Date... March 14, 2017 is Florida’s Tourism Day in Tallahassee Plan to attend this important industry event. Details will be available soon.

WE PUT BUTTS IN SEATS. Find out how when Tim Holcomb, Restaurant Branding Expert, speaks at this year’s Florida Restaurant and Lodging Show.

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Todd Stolpe EXECUTIVE CHEF, CAPTAIN’S TABLE Chef Todd Stolpe grew up in the restaurant business at his mom’s eatery the Saw Mill Inn. From there he received a degree in Culinary Arts and Related Services. Chef Todd was Executive Chef for Centerplate serving at VIP events across the country such as the Superbowl. In addition, he has prepared food for the President of the United States and the Prince of Monaco. Describe your restaurant concept. Our concept is the Captain’s Table, long considered

the premier place for fine dining around Charlotte Harbor. A top tier of Fishermen’s Village, Captain’s Table is the flagship of Smuggler’s Enterprises, family-owned restaurant network known throughout Southwest Florida for excellent food and service in a variety of settings, in a managing partnership of Executive Chef Todd Stolpe and General Manager Nate McKelvy.

What inspires your menu? We are striving for a dynamic menu, one that’s bold and authentic. The new Captain’s Table menu has been a team effort that began with water-driven inspiration that progressed to exploratory, kitchen-tasting sessions among the staff and then to final recipe and presentation. The items are a testament to our patrons’ interest in having exciting selections to choose from. The appetizers, main courses, and side items showcase Caribbean, Asian and Old World Spanish influences on South Florida’s fresh seafood and locally grown, seasonal fruits and vegetables to create exciting food where the flavors have depth and balance. Other innovations include a “Wild Game and Whiskey” dinner that marries full-course, table d’hôte specials — such as bison, boar, or rabbit — with specialty bourbons, whiskey and brandies, topped with a hand-rolled cigar on the sunset deck. Upcoming events include the “Hemingway Old Caribbean” dinner which will explore Caribbean food and old, aged rum. Describe one of your most popular menu items. One of

our most popular items for dinner service is our Chilean Sea Bass which is also known as “Patagonian tooth fish,” that has been coconut milk fed (marinated) pan seared with light seasoning, oven finished with our coconut sriracha broth, complimented by wasabi mashed potatoes and grilled asparagus.

What is your “sizzle?” Farm to table, Gulf to table, seed to table,

local, organic, fresh and fun. That’s what our sizzle is! We are inspired by Caribbean and Asian flavors. We work directly with established farms and ranches such as 3 Suns Ranch

HotChef? Are You Considered Among Florida’s Hottest Chefs? 14  FA L L

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in Charlotte County, who provide wild hog, grass-fed beef and grass-fed bison. The hog, for example, is wild caught locally, penned and taken to the ranch, where it is fed organic material such as the spent hops and barley from a local brewery, and orange pellets from the local juice plants and groves. This grooms a mild and bursting-with-flavor wild hog. For lunch service, we receive it and marinate it in coconut milk, wine, fresh herbs and then it is seared with our espresso rub andslow braised for hours, until you have the greatest flavor you can imagine. The final product is used on our Punta Gorda Pig sandwich, which is a grilled cheese with aged cheddar, sour dough bread and fat point marinated onion slivers that have been flashfried with house made BBQ sauce. UNREAL! For dinner service, we use their wild hog for Frenched chops which are Jamaican jerked marinated with onions, leeks, habanero peppers, soy, juice and more. Then after 24 hours in the “marinade” it is char-grilled to temperature and finished with a Caribbean dark rum BBQ reduction. There are just some examples of what direction we are taking our sizzle. Describe your most memorable moment as a chef.

A few career highlights include creating private events for President Obama and Former President Clinton. I also catered a private dinner for Prince Albert of Monaco and was awarded a medal for culinary excellence from President Obama in 2012. I was on a select team of chefs from all over the USA that planned, produced and coordinated menus and meals at such major sporting events that included three Superbowls and five Orange Bowls with each requiring several thousand platings for executives and celebrity diners, and finally as culinary coordinator for the 2013 BCS College Football Championship.

Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about them in a bi-monthly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to editor@frla.org. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. Be sure to include restaurant and contact information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine as Chefs That Sizzle! F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Get Familiar with VISITFLORIDA.org

A One-Stop Resource for Marketing and Industry Education VISITFLORIDA.org, unlike VISITFLORIDA.com, is a website designed exclusively for the Florida tourism industry. The site was created to provide marketing guidance and education for VISIT FLORIDA Partners and easily showcases ways tourism businesses can enhance their exposure to visitors. A key feature of the site is the Online Marketing Planner, which serves as a resource for the industry to participate in VISIT FLORIDA officially sanctioned co-op programs, including advertising, sales, public relations, promotions, welcome centers and industry education. Since its inception in 2009, the Marketing Planner has proven to be a vital tool for the Florida tourism industry to promote their businesses and take full advantage of all available cost saving opportunities. With more than 200 programs listed, the Planner makes it easy to create your own customized marketing plan. As new co-op programs become available, the information is added to the Planner program list, which can be sorted by program type, audience, market and media channel. The Planner also has a “My Plan” button with shopping cart functionality that allows you to view, save and print a customized plan. Many of the items on the Planner offer a discount for VISIT FLORIDA Marketing Partners. To learn more, go to VISITFLORIDA.org/planner. VISITFLORIDA.org also offers helpful information on a host of other topics, such as: Crisis Preparation – Includes FAQs and other information about w w w.FRL A .org

preparing for or responding to specific potential crisis situations that could impact Florida tourism entities. Order FREE Maps and Magazines – Complimentary bulk orders of Official Florida Vacation Guides and Florida Transportation Maps. Research – Includes FAQs about visitation, the Florida Visitor Study, the Power of Florida Tourism infographic and a Florida Tourism by the Numbers PowerPoint presentation that the industry is welcome to use. Education – Participate in FREE Online Hospitality Training and listen to recorded webinars in the Learning Library. About Us – Includes digital versions of VISIT FLORIDA’s Strategic Plan, Marketing Plan and interactive Annual Reports. Additional resources available on the site are exclusive to Marketing Partners, such as image and VISIT FLORIDA logo downloads, the ability to submit images for posts on VISIT FLORIDA consumer-facing social media channels, and the opportunity to share Partner-to-Partner specials. For more information about becoming a Marketing Partner, go to VISITFLORIDA.org/join. To enroll today, call the VISIT FLORIDA industry hotline at 877-435-2872 or email partner@VISITFLORIDA.org.

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PAT H T O P O W E R

Jason Emmett CEO, DUFFY’S SPORTS GRILL

How did you get started in the hospitality industry?

My dad owned a restaurant in New York City in the early 1980s, which was my first introduction to the industry. I still have fond memories of playing with the soda gun or following my dad around the dining room. My first job in the industry came after I graduated college. I worked as an assistant manager for the food service operation of the United Nations.

Early in your career what was the most valuable lesson you learned? My dad gave me a lot of great advice throughout

my career, even before I graduated from college. From a first job perspective, he once told me the easiest way to make sure your new boss liked you was simply to show up early and leave late. It sounds like common sense, but it was an amazingly easy way to show my early employers that I was willing to work hard.

Do you have any mentors who were instrumental in helping you achieve your goals? Again, my father was the best mentor I could have asked for. I am so grateful that I had the chance to work side by side with him for over seven years, until he passed away last year, and the lessons I have learned from him have shaped my life, both at work and at home. Both from how to manage and lead effectively, to prioritizing what is most important and proactive planning, the business concepts my dad taught me help me shape every day of my life. I’ve also learned from him to never take things too seriously, and to remember to laugh at myself once in a while. Most of all, my dad used to tell me to wake up every day and remember how lucky I am, and that every day is a gift, and to treat it as such. Now that he is gone, I really try to take that last piece of advice to heart.

How has participation in the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association positively affected your business? The FRLA has been hugely helpful to us as an orga-

nization and to me personally. We have relied up the Regulatory Compliance alcohol and food service training for all of our employees for many years now. The legislative work they do for our industry is extremely important as well, as we do not lobby, and have no interest in lobbying. It is nice to know there is someone

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advocating for our industry in Tallahassee and looking out for our best interests. Personally, I have learned a great deal from the many executives of other concepts in our industry, and truly value the advice I’ve received and the friendships I’ve made.

How have your philanthropies and giving back to the community affected your business decisions?

Charitable giving and community involvement have always been core to our corporate beliefs. We always want to be seen as an active participant in our communities, and give back where ever we can. While we have always been active this way at each location, this year we decided to formalize our charitable efforts under one umbrella, and formed our own foundation, named the Duffy’s Foundation. This has allowed us to better organize our charitable outreach, and make more of an impact in the communities we operate in. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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Grande Growth: Getting Bigger by Acting Smaller, John Moore – Branding and Marketing Expert from Starbucks and Whole Foods

Left to right: Patrick McClellan, Brittany Houghton, Shannon Harvey all with Flora-Bama Management and David Case with Streb’s Restaurant

Greg Delks, Vice President - Franchise Development, Firehouse Subs, accepting an award from our FRLA Chairman of the Board, Lino Maldonado

What Makes Teams Great: Don Yaeger – Business Leadership Coach

The Heartland Team (left to right): Carlos Torres, Randy Pumputis, Katy Cleary, Mike Hervis, Jud Vanderlaag, Rich Shamas

Tracy Cehovin and Michael Maluda, of Rogue Pub, accepting their award from our FRLA Chairman of the Board, Lino Maldonado

Left to right: Fred Lefranc – Chaos Strategist Results Thru Strategy; and Bennie Arbour – CEO/President, Goldco, LLC (Burger King Franchisee)

Destinations at the Center of Discovery: Kelly Frailey Covato – Client Partner-Global Marketing Solutions, Facebook

unMarketing: Scott Stratten – Marketing, Branding & Social Media Expert

Strategies To Up Your Cocktail Game Panel (right to left): Moderated by Joseph Natale, Vice President of Food & Beverage, Menin Hospitality; Presented by: Jessica Kamay, Beverage Director Oceans234; Matthew Swig, Bar Chef, Max’s Harvest; Armando Rosario, Director of Mixology, Florida & National Accounts, Southern Wine & Spirits of Florida; and Renee Korbel Quinn, Founder, Spirited South Florida

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Building A Global Destination Hotel Panel (left to right): Moderated by Bruce Craul, COO, Legendary Hospitality; Presented by Dev Motwani, President, Merrimac Ventures; John Tolbert, President, Boca Raton Resort & Club; Steve Keup, Regional Director of Operations, Hersha Hospitality; Sheldon Suga, VP Managing Director, Hawks Cay Resort

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INDEPENDENT OPERATORS WORKSHOP September 27, 2016 | 8:30am - 12:30pm @ Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Orange County Convention Center | Orlando, FL

INDEPENDENT OPERATORS ATTEND TO... Find solutions IMMEDIATELY applicable for business growth. SHARE BEST PRACTICES and learn relevant new management skills. Leave with PRACTICAL, REAL-LIFE TIPS & TECHNIQUES to accelerate your business.

Join us for a Chairman’s Breakfast followed by these featured presentations:

KEYNOTES Jim Knight

Kathleen Wood

Jim is a training & development veteran for 30+ years, and oversaw all training initiatives for Hard Rock International for 21+ years. With his experience and creativity, he has consistently developed cutting-edge training concepts and speaks ondeveloping world-class service, organizational culture, employee branding and leadership skills.

Kathleen is a nationally recognized growth strategist and specializes in shifting leaders and businesses to new levels of success. She is the co-founder of her own self-serve yogurt, gelato and sorbet shop, Suzy’s Swirl, and was previously the President & COO of Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers.

SPECIAL INDEPENDENT OPERATORS PANEL Best Practices from Successful Independents - Leading independent restaurant operators from Central Florida share and discuss

LEIGH DOYLE,Vice President, Ellie Lou’s Brews & BBQ

CHUCK PRATHER, Owner, The Birchwood Hotel

MARY BETH HANSON, President,Paradise Grill

BRAD COWHERD, Owner,Infusion Tea/Soda Fountain/The Dog House

KATHLEEN WOOD, Moderator

PLUS: Access to the hottest menu trends, state of the art design and décor, the best in business education and 450 of the leading vendors and purveyors dedicated to serving the restaurant and foodservice community -- all under one roof as part of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show.

JOIN US FOR THIS CELEBRATION OF INDEPENDENT OPERATORS! THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS! Presenting

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Bronze


After a full day of education, networking and sourcing new products...

Join us for the NEW Opening Night Party! We invite you to join us for our NEW Opening Night Party @ Lafayette’s! Tuesday, September, 27 5:30pm-7:30pm Lafayette’s at Pointe Orlando 9101 International Dr, Suite 2220

GET YOUR TICKETS AT $28 ticket includes: 2 drink tickets Appetizers: Tomato Basil Bruschetta, Buffalo Chicken Sliders, Mac n Cheese, Pulled Pork Sliders, Fried Green Tomatoes Entertainment from the LIVE band, Pointe Collective


H O S P I TA L I T Y H A P P E N I N G S

We are proud to highlight the latest happenings in hospitality. This section is designed to serve as an update on our industry

and provide a snapshot of what

we’re accomplishing together. If you would like to share something significant that’s happening in your area, feel

free to submit your story to editor@frla.org.

Great Florida Events sponsored Chris Janson and LoCash in Okaloosa County.

First Coast Chapter members hear from the U.S. Department of Labor on overtime and exemption changes to FLSA.

Chef Emeril Lagasse, Ralph Lewis and Curtis Lewis take a few minutes in between shooting Emeril’s Florida Season 5. 22  FA L L

2016

South Broward High School’s FRLA Chapter interns did a great job while earning internship hours toward their HTMP certificates.

Behind the scenes at the Emeril’s Florida filming for Season 5 at White Horse Fashion Cuisine in Wellington. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Exclusive health care pricing and solutions for Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association members Together, the National Restaurant Association (NRA), Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA) and UnitedHealthcare offer special advantages for your FRLA member business: } Health care reform guidance and solutions around the Affordable Care Act

Save with rate discounts up to*

on Medical 5% 5 Plans Specialty 5% on Benefits *Some restrictions apply.

} Exclusive savings on group medical plans and specialty benefits for NRA/FRLA members } Wellness programs and services } Bilingual resources for Hispanic/Latino owners, operators and employees

Find out what the FRLA and UnitedHealthcare can do for your business. Visit uhctogether.com/frla. For more information, contact your broker or Kimberlee Vandervoorn at (301) 865-7058 or kvandervoorn@uhg.com.

Š2016 United HealthCare Services, Inc. Insurance coverage provided by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or its affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. Health Plan coverage provided by or through a UnitedHealthcare company. M55718 7/16


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F LO R I DA R E S TA U R A N T A N D LO D G I N G A S S O C I AT I O N

Hospitality Stars of the Industry AT T H E 2 0 1 6 T R A D E S H O W

SEPTEMBER 28, 2016 B E N E F I T I N G T H E F R L A E D U C AT I O N A L F O U N DAT I O N : I N S P I R I N G T O M O R R O W ’ S H O S P I TA L I T Y L E A D E R S Ticket Price: $150 6:00 PM Welcome Reception 7:00 PM Celebration of the Industry 8:00 PM After Party

Sponsorships available, please contact mstone@frla.org or 850-224-2250 ext. 226 Visit http://www.frla.org/event/fall-board or scan the code for event details.

Cocktail Attire Hyatt Regency Orlando

JOIN US AS WE HONOR THE FIRST RESPONDERS W H O H U M B LY S E R V E O U R C O M M U N I T Y w w w.FRL A .org

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Regulatory Compliance Services protects your business by making sure you are compliant with the Florida Responsible Vendor Act (Florida Statute 561.701-706)

For less than the price of one drink per day, you can protect your alcoholic beverage license from suspension or revocation.

CONTACT US TODAY FOR A FREE ON-SITE CONSULTATION.

800-537-9863

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


FOOD SAFETY Welcome to the Food Safety Issue of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine.

Food safety is critical to the health of your guests and employees. In addition, a foodborne illness outbreak can be the end of a successful operation. Be mindful of the risk factors that contribute to foodborne illness such as poor employee health and hygiene, cross-contamination, cooking food to incorrect temperatures, and improper cooling and thawing techniques. Be certain that you are aware of the source of your food supply and ensure that it has been inspected and licensed as needed. Read this section to be aware of current trends in the world of food safety.

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M I S R E P R E S E N TAT I O N

Truth in Menu By Cathy Tucker, Chief of Sanitation and Safety Inspections, Division of Hotels and Restaurants, DBPR

C

onsumers are embracing the concept of eating foods marketed as “local,” “organic” or “farm to table.” Recent published studies have highlighted how the misrepresentation of food or the describing of food in a way that misleads or misinforms consumers can be a public health risk and financial fraud. Florida law prohibits the misrepresentation of food. This includes the false or misleading description of food, serving or selling food under the name of another food or misleading, misinforming and misrepresenting the appearance, color or quality of food to the consumer. Instances of these prohibited activities have risen along with the increased consumer demand for “local,” “organic” and “farm-to-table” food. Menus or any other manner used to promote or advertise items for sale must be accurate and truthful. Particular attention should be focused on food descriptions placed on menus, blackboards or specials flyers, including specific ingredients and where ingredients are originally sourced. Establishments that serve these types of foods are especially vulnerable to violations due to the seasonal availability of many of these items or availability of items from

particular sources. It is important for operators to inform customers if the establishment is unable to provide or offer an item ordered by the customer and what, if any, food item is substituted. Failure to accurately and truthfully identify food items for sale, such as substituting tomatoes grown out of the country as tomatoes grown in Florida, is a violation of Florida law. Department of Business and Professional Regulation Sanitation and Safety Inspectors actively enforce the following provisions of Florida law:

Chapter 509.292, F.S. — Misrepresenting food or food product; penalty, 1. An operator may not knowingly and willfully misrepresent the identity of any food or food product to any of the patrons of such establishment. The identity of food or a food product is misrepresented if: (a) The description of the food or food product is false or misleading in any particular; (b) The food or food product is served, sold or distributed under the name of another food or food product; or (c) The food or food product purports to be or is represented as a food or food product that does not conform to a definition of identity and standard of quality if such definition of identity and standard of quality has been established by custom and usage. Section 3-601.12, Food Code (2009) — Honestly Presented A. Food shall be offered for human consumption in a way that does not mislead or misinform the consumer. B. Food or color additives, colored over wraps or lights may not be used to misrepresent the true appearance, color, or quality of a food. The Division of Hotels and Restaurants’ mission is to protect the public health, safety and welfare through educating and promoting cooperation with our licensed establishments. Please visit the Division’s website for more information on updates, signs and publications at: myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/hr.

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B E P R E PA R E D

Ask Your Inspector Q: I recently changed seafood vendors for my restaurant. Upon opening a new box of raw oysters, I noticed the tag stated “Cooking Only” in large letters. This is the first time I have seen a tag stating this. Am I able to serve these oysters in my raw bar? A: Oyster tags bearing a “Cooking Only” label may have a greater likelihood of containing harmful levels of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) bacterium requiring the oysters to be cooked in order to make them safe to eat.

The National Shellfish Sanitation Program requires oyster dealers to use this “Cooking Only” label if harvesting conditions do not meet specific criteria for reduced risk of contamination. Oysters that bear the “Cooking Only” label must be fully cooked before sale or service to the customer. In addition, special precautions should be made to prevent cross contamination of other foods (including oysters that are served raw) and surfaces. Don’t forget, your local H & R inspectors are here to help! Simply look at your most recent inspection report for contact information.

Florida law requires mandatory foodhandler training. FRLA’s online training is easy, self-guided, and this interactive online training program will teach you the basics of safe food handling and preventing foodborne illness.

w w w.FRL A .org

Official DBPR Contracted Provider

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SAFER DINING

Food Allergies: A Food Safety Hazard

F

ood safety month has arrived and with it comes new laws that may directly impact your business. Whether you are a restaurateur, hotelier, manufacturer or distributor, the new FSMA laws and FDA Food Code regarding food allergies affect you! Are you aware of how and when? The new FSMA laws consider food allergens a food safety hazard (undeclared food allergens are now considered adulterants) and apply to manufacturers and distributors. As a food service establishment, it is extremely important vendors are adhering to these laws, ensuring your guests’ safety. More importantly, claiming an “allergen-free” product on your menu makes you liable for the product and protocols. Make certain you are obtaining product specification sheets from your supplier on a regular basis, including substitution policies! As a restaurateur and hotelier, following the guidance of the 2009 FDA Food Code is essential

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regarding training staff on food allergy awareness. Staff not being properly trained or best practices having not been developed creates liability. Eight foods (eggs, fish, milk, peanuts, shellfish (crustacean), soy, tree nuts and wheat) are responsible for 90% of all food allergic reactions. Although we’ve heard much about these eight foods, handling them in your respective place of business may be challenging. Time and time again we hear about an exposure occurring from a food allergen. Remember, accidents happen. However, an incident may be prevented! Dining out with food allergies is a luxury! However, when food allergies are involved, knowing a food service establishment has been trained in handling food allergy requests makes all the difference. Since it only takes a minute amount of a food allergen to be present to invoke a reaction, it is imperative proper protocols are in place to ensure a safer dining experience. Safer Dining, LLC is the exclusive food allergy training provider for Regulatory Compliance Services. They are a Food Allergy Consulting and Education

firm located in St. Petersburg, Florida. They cater to all genres of the hospitality industry. Safer Dining offers Online Training (in English and Spanish) and In-House Training Workshops. Please visit SaferDining.com/Education or call 727-313-4055 for more information. Jordan H. Maeson is the President and Founder of Safer Dining, a food allergy consulting and education firm located in St. Petersburg, Florida. A culmination of her medical experience, her familial background within the restaurant and hotel industry, and her adult onset of deadly food allergies created a trifecta for Safer Dining. Dr. Maeson is a leading subject matter expert in her field.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SOCIAL MEDIA

Social Media & Food Safety Can it destroy your business?

R

ecently a very popular national eatery was dealt a blow to its operation and to its stock prices. This was because one influential author described the foodborne illness experience that his editor was undergoing and speculated the restaurant where she had recently dined made her sick. Six tweets, no more than 840 characters, sent stock prices tumbling and besmirched a corporation’s best efforts to maintain its corporate image of serving food safely. If you don’t realize that social media is not only here to stay, but that it is also a negative as well as a positive for the reputation of your establishment, you better get on top of things pretty quickly. Folks out there on social media are paying attention. Did you realize that @USDAFoodSafety has more than 784,300 followers? Or that FoodSafety.gov has more than 186,291 followers on Facebook? How about @FDArecalls with more than 618,500 followers? Food Safety News has 32,000 followers on Twitter. These are real numbers. It’s important to understand that the old way of reaching out to customers via press releases, web page postings and the like are not going to “get it” for today’s customer. Essentially, to maintain your reputation and “street cred” with today’s younger restaurant guests, you may want to consider not only having some social media outlets pumping out your message; you should also probably be responding in real time to questions, concerns and comments made about your operation, particularly in the “Twittersphere.” If you choose to put your head in

By Susie McKinley

the sand and not pay attention to what is brewing out there on social media, you may find your restaurant isn’t the hot spot that it once was. Who are these people? Social media now crosses all ages, life statuses and occupations. You may find your mild-mannered grandma ranting about #foodsafetyissues alongside a millennial who is taking photos of his awesome-looking dinner or his unbelievable experience at your resort. From new parents to college students, the media and haters, social media enthusiasts come from all walks of life. Social media is a positive force when there is a food recall or an emergency situation. It spreads the news quickly to various friends or followers. It can also be of real benefit to your operation if your staff is preparing food that is interesting or delicious to look at. There is nothing like “checking in” to your favorite restaurant or resort. Social media can also be a beast that is difficult to tame if you aren’t well versed in how to handle a food safety crisis, or a bedbug infestation or simply an irate or misinformed customer. Consider putting up your best defense. Get to know how social media can help or hurt your operation. Hey, if you spend a little time engaging in one of the many outlets, you might end up catching up with a long-lost friend. Susie McKinley is an avid social media user and is the editor of FR&L Magazine. She is a former director of the Division of Hotels and Restaurants.

Mandatory Food Handler Training – RCS Can Help! FRLA’s Regulatory Compliance Services (RCS) provides mandatory food handler training

S

ince 1997, Florida law requires that all food handlers (employees whose job involves the occasional or routine handling of food or beverage or the contact surfaces involved in the production, storage or service of food or beverage products) be provided a course of study utilizing a state-approved basic food safety curriculum. The training must be conducted by a certified food manager, and records of the training must be kept on file. Companies trained by RCS can find their training records in the DBPR online database. The FRLA SafeStaff® Foodhandler Training Program is the contracted program of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) and contains the following six mandated key food safety principles:

1. Ensuring proper personal hygiene 2. Preventing cross-contamination 3. Controlling time and temperature when handling food 4. Proper cleaning and sanitizing 5. The causes and effects of major foodborne illnesses 6. Ensuring proper vermin control FRLA offers food handler training via an online system or via onsite training by FRLA’s Regulatory Compliance Services’ training team. During onsite training, one of our professional training staff comes to your establishment and provides a live employee food handler training for you. In addition, the trainers assist you in assuring you have the necessary documentation to avoid problems during an inspection.

To schedule your SafeStaff® food handler training, call 800-537-9863 or log on to regcomplianceusa.com . w w w.FRL A .org

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KITCHEN MAN AGER CERTIFICATION

An Important Way To Improve Restaurant Food Safety CDC identified the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) 2013 Food Code provision on certified kitchen managers as a key provision states can adopt to better prevent foodborne illnesses in restaurants.

Research shows that restaurants with managers certified in food safety are less likely to have foodborne illness outbreaks

This provision states that restaurants should have at least one employee with management responsibility who is certified in food safety. Twenty-six states and Washington, D.C., currently require kitchen manager certification for restaurants.

have better food safety practices have better ratings and fewer critical violations on their inspections

Why restaurant food safety is important Restaurant outbreaks are often caused by unsafe practices in the restaurant.

About 6 in 10 outbreaks are linked with sick employees. Example: A sick employee prepares food and contaminates it. About 1 in 3 outbreaks are linked with unsafe food preparation practices. Example: An employee does not cook hamburgers long enough to kill the germs in the beef.

What is kitchen manager certification? Certified kitchen managers are restaurant employees with management responsibility who have passed a test to show knowledge of food safety. Typically, they do this by:

CS265843B

taking a food safety course

p passing a test administered by one of the four accredited certification programs provided by the National Registry of Food Safety Professionals, National Restaurant Association-ServSafe, Prometric Inc., and 360training.com

each year:

48 million

people in the U.S. get sick

128,000

are hospitalized

3,000

die from foodborne illnesses

800

outbreaks of foodborne illness occur and most of these are associated with restaurants


How much does certification cost? Online certification costs approximately $257 per person

Outbreaks can lead to: Outbreaks can cost many times more than that

loss of customers, sales, and reputation

lawsuits and legal fees

negative media coverage

higher insurance premiums

What can you do if your state does not require kitchen manager certification? •

States can adopt the certified kitchen manager provision from the 2013 FDA Food Code.

Restaurant industry management can require kitchen manager certification in restaurants.

Kitchen managers can get certified through an accredited certification program.

Consumers can ask to see proof of kitchen manager certification (for example, a certificate) when going out to eat.

For more information: •

CDC’s 2016 Prevention Status Report: www.cdc.gov/nceh/ehs/news/features/2016/food-safety-psr.html

2013 FDA Food Code: www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/GuidanceRegulation/RetailFoodProtection/FoodCode/ UCM374510.pdf

CDC food safety resources: www.cdc.gov/nceh/ehs/activities/food.html

About the FDA Food Code Local, state, tribal, and federal regulators use the FDA Food Code as a model for their own food safety rules. It contains science-based guidance to improve food safety in restaurants. CDC strongly encourages adoption of the 2013 FDA Food Code. In its 2016 Prevention Status Report, CDC identified four key 2013 FDA Food Code provisions as especially important in reducing illnesses and outbreaks in restaurants: •

Excluding sick food service employees from working until at least 24 hours after symptoms of vomiting and diarrhea have ended

Prohibiting bare hand contact with ready-to-eat food

Requiring at least one employee with management responsibility to be certified in food safety

Requiring food service employees to wash their hands May 2016 CS265843B


S A F E S TA F F

CITY

LOCATION

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS

13

4

8

6

Ramada Inn

BOCA RATON

15

20

17

15

Hilton Garden Inn

BRANDON

7

5

9

7

Embassy Suites

DAYTONA BEACH

21

12

16

14

Best Western Plus International Speedway Hotel

FT LAUDERDALE

13

11

15

13

Embassy Suites

FT MYERS

1

6

3

1

Hilton Garden Inn

FT PIERCE

1

6

3

1

UF Indian River Research

FT WALTON

13

4

1

6

Wyndham Garden

GAINESVILLE

-

-

-

-

Hilton Garden Inn

GAINESVILLE

12

4

1

4

Best Western Gateway Grand

ISLAMORADA

20

16

22

13

Islander Resort

JACKSONVILLE

12

9

13

11

Lexington Jacksonville Riverwalk

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

14

11

15

6

Four Points by Sheraton

KEY WEST

6

4

7

6

DoubleTree Grand Key Resort

KISSIMMEE

-

-

-

-

Seralago Hotel & Suites Maingate East

LAKELAND

9

7

10

9

Courtyard by Marriott

MELBOURNE

8

13

10

8

Holiday Inn Hotel & Conference Center

MIAMI

22

20

22

1

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami - Blue Lagoon

MIAMI SPANISH

13

11

15

13

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami - Blue Lagoon

NAPLES

16

28

10

15

DoubleTree Suites

OCALA

20

18

15

13

Homewood Suites by Hilton Ocala at Heath Brook

ORLANDO ENGLISH

-

3

7

7

Rosen Inn International

ORLANDO ENGLISH FRLA SHOW

27

-

-

-

Orange Country Convention Center

ORLANDO SPANISH

-

-

-

-

Rosen Inn International

ORANGE PARK

13

4

1

5

Hilton Garden Inn

PANAMA CITY

13

11

8

13

Gulf Coast State College Student Union East Gibson Lecture Hall

PENSACOLA

20

25

15

13

Hilton Garden Inn Airport

PORT RICHEY

28

19

30

14

Days Inn & Suites

SARASOTA

1

6

3

1

Holiday Inn Lakewood Ranch

ST AUGUSTINE

19

17

14

19

Holiday Inn Express & Suites

ST PETERSBURG

Holiday Inn Express

30

21

28

16

TALLAHASSEE

-

-

-

-

TAMPA - ENGLISH

-

24

2

12

Hilton Garden Inn

TAMPA - SPANISH

-

-

-

-

Hilton Garden Inn

VENICE

12

10

7

5

Ramada

WEST PALM BEACH

26

24

21

19

Holiday Inn West Palm Beach Airport

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Hilton Garden Inn Central

Dates subject to change without notice. Please see SafeStaff.org for current schedule.

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule To register, call toll-free 1-866-372-SAFE (7233) or visit www.safestaff.org. DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION: Register for training at least 3 business days prior to exam date, or 10 Business Days prior for Test With Confidence Packages.

ServSafe® Goes Hi-Tech! All ServSafe Food Protection Managers Exam results are being upgraded to complimentary ServSafe® eCertificates. No more waiting for certificates in the mail. Log in and download your certificate as soon as your exam is graded! You can even share it electronically with your company via an email share link. Find out more: ServSafe.com.

* Dates are tentative

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fatfreeinc.com Southwest Florida · Central Florida · Eastern Florida

954-999-3913

Kitchen Exhaust Vent System Cleaning

Rooftop Grease Containment & Servicing

Exhaust Fan Repair

Kitchen Air Diagnostics & Balancing

Fan Maintenance & Service

Equipment Cleaning & Reconditioning

Filter Rental Exchange Program FRLA Members: Fat Free, Inc. is offering FRLA members a FREE inspection and a 10% discount on hood cleaning services. Contact John Zaza, Director of Corporate Development, at 954-999-3913 or john@fatfreeinc.com. Learn more at fatfreeinc.com.

FAT FREE SYSTEMS ARE THE STATE OF FLORIDA’S LEADING KITCHEN EXHAUST CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE PROVIDER Tampa | Fort Meyers | Fort Lauderdale Fat Free Inc. has become the leader in restaurant exhaust hood maintenance in the state of Florida with operations/ offices in Fort Myers, Tampa and Fort Lauderdale. Our motto is to service to a higher standard. Rest assured, that with over 30 years of experience, IKECA certifications and pictures to prove your entire completed job will meet NFPA 96 and IKECA C-10 standards, you will not have a kitchen exhaust fire to deal with. We are proud members of the FRLA (Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association).

Why Choose Fat Free Systems? • Heavily involved with the NFPA (National Fire Prevention Agency) the nations agency that write all the fire codes • Certified by IKECA (International Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning Association), the nation’s governing and certification body for the commercial kitchen industry • $3M liability insurance • Photographic verification of service • Live person available 24/7 • Fully equipped service trucks • Computerized tracking and scheduling

• •

• •

Over 30 years of experience meeting customer needs Member of International Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning Association (IKECA) Proud member of FRLA (Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association) Proud members of the Fort Lauderdale Chamber of Commerce Work very close with the state of Florida’s Hospitality Insurance Industry as well as the state of Florida’s Fire Inspectors and are available to provide educational awareness seminars


FOOD SAFETY

Flies are a Food Safety Hazard By Mark Wagner

F

lies, also known as “filth flies,” are pests. To a restaurant owner or management, flies represent a serious risk to food safety. Flies contaminate food with filth on their legs and other body parts contributing to the spread of disease. Flies are a risk you should not take lightly. Filth flies are recognized as carriers of easily communicable diseases. Flies collect pathogens on their legs and mouths from decomposing organic matter found in your garbage dumpster and around the dumpster corral. Using thin garbage liners and directly dumping trash into the dumpster makes a great home and breeding ground for these pests. Mature filth flies also use saliva to liquefy solid food before feeding on it. During this process, they transfer pathogens by landing on food or the prep surfaces in your restaurant. How gross is that ... right? In addition, flies can further contaminate food or food prep areas by defecating on it while they have a free lunch in your restaurant.

Flies are not just a nuisance to your guests, but to your bottom line, profits, and possibly your bank account. Risks are everywhere in your business.” Flies have been shown to carry more than 100 pathogens that cause human diseases by the military and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. Diseases carried by flies include typhoid, cholera, dysentery, salmonellosis, shigellosis, and can cause E. coli infections and tuberculosis. Flies have also been known to transmit the eggs of parasitic worms and deposit them on the food we eat. These flies are not just a nuisance to your guests but to your bottom line, profits, and possibly your bank account. Risks are everywhere

in your business, and you should avoid them, but how? The best way to address the reduction of flies in your operation is by changing the way you process your waste. By incorporating or partnering with a team that eliminates flies, you could have the situation handled. A Pack-A-Drum manually operated compactor system with heavy-duty bags helps to keep dumpsters and the dumpster corral free from flies. Containing the materials that flies feed and breed on is how you win the battle and avoid “risks” associated with flies. The benefits of using Pack-A-Drum are huge as your system is completely paid for out of waste-cost savings. PackA-Drum produces results for your team on a guaranteed basis and has been in business for over 15 years. Pack-ADrum staff are so confident that they can curb your fly control problem that they will loan equipment to a potential client and will split the savings with your team. Find out more about Pack-ADrum by visiting pack-a-drum.com. Mark Wagner is the Vice President of Marketing and Sales and Garbage Guru at Pack-A-Drum, Inc.

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SECRETS OF SUCCESS

One Ocean Resort & Spa ne Ocean Resort & Spa is located in Atlantic Beach, Florida, just outside of Jacksonville. It is an ocean front resort uniquely located in Atlantic Beach’s charming Town Center. It is home to the beautiful Azurea Restaurant that sits with an unequalled view of the Atlantic Ocean. The beautiful natural setting and the gorgeous interior design to the specialized attention that each guest receives separates One Ocean from other hotels in this region. WHAT MAKES YOUR HOTEL UNIQUE?

The pillars of our resort experience are built on elegant design and atmosphere, intuitively trained associates and authentic services. Our team is educated and trained in how to bring these One Ocean Resort cornerstones to life in every task they do, ultimately enabling guests to feel always in your element. CAN YOU TELL READERS ABOUT YOUR SIGNATURE AMENITIES?

We are dedicated to anticipating the needs of a guest prior to their arrival. Guests receive personalized care as they are greeted by name from the valet service, who escort them to their guest room without stopping at the front desk, providing a seamless check-in. A dedicated 38  SU FA LMLM2016 ER 2016

docent helps acquaint guests with the property and acts as an instinctive hosts throughout the guests’ stay. Docents assist with things like packing and unpacking items, steaming garments and shining shoes. Our docents are empowered to assist guests with their every need, personal or business. They are highly trained in all areas of the hotel, food and beverage, spa and housekeeping, so they can deliver what the guest is expecting. To better serve patrons’ needs, a guest historian keeps a record of each traveler’s personal preferences while staying at the hotel. The historian contacts guests prior to their stay, tailoring their vacation with customized amenities like snacks, beverages, morning coffee and a favorite newspaper delivered to the room. The guest historian also makes arrangements for special occasions, such as birthdays, anniversaries and weddings. Historians are tasked to ensure that we exceed expectations; for example, flowers in the room to acknowledge a special day. Our guests tell us that it delights them to find surprises in their rooms. It makes a lasting impression. The elevated service atmosphere extends to the spa, where visitors can sip champagne while overlooking the sea before retiring to a treatment room for one of the resort’s bespoke therapies such as the Botanical Facial, Healing Sea Cocoon or signature Seashell Massage. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY ONE OCEAN RESORT & SPA

O

By SUSIE MCKINLEY WITH DAVID MARIOTI, GENERAL MANAGER OF ONE OCEAN RESORT & SPA


guest recovery is needed that we extend the best customized solution. WHAT CRITICAL OR PRIORITY AREAS DO YOU EMPHASIZE IN TRAINING YOUR STAFF, AND HOW DO YOU MANAGE EMPLOYEE TURNOVER?

ONE OCEAN HAS BEEN NAMED BY MANY MEDIA OUTLETS, SUCH AS FORBES AND SOUTHERN LIVING, AS A GREAT HOTEL. IT HAS ALSO BEEN RECOGNIZED AS A AAA FOUR-DIAMOND RESORT. CAN YOU SHARE WITH READERS HOW THE RESORT RECEIVES SUCH IMPORTANT ACCOLADES?

One Ocean has established it as a priority to maintain strong relationships with travel industry influencers. We realize that the valuable feedback provided by discerning readers of these publications not only makes us a better resort, but also elevates our training initiatives. It also establishes our company among the best of the best in our luxury segment. w w w.FRL A .org

WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING YOU EMPHASIZE WITH STAFF ABOUT YOUR CUSTOMERS?

We emphasize with our associates how integral the many opportunities for personalized service are over the duration of a guest’s stay and how to keep those touch points consistent. From the moment of arrival to the fond farewell, we aim to keep a positive halo over the heads of our guests as they move about the resort. Every associate is empowered to enhance a guest stay with these special touches and ensure if a

Our motto for guest service is that everyone staying with us, whether for leisure or business, are “Always in your Element.” Every associate is trained through our property orientation that anticipating the guest’s every needs is a priority. Additionally, our associates are unified by three common core values shared in our overall approach to service: authentic, intuitive and elegant. WHAT ARE ONE OCEAN’S SECRETS OF SUCCESS?

It all starts with the associates’ attitudes and consistency in training from day one. We hire for a high IQ in personality and train on the technical components of our operation. Ultimately our associates need to feel valued by leadership and our guests in their daily work. High levels of satisfaction on these levels are what inspires all of us at One Ocean Resort & Spa. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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Don’t Let Your Business Tip Out of Control Avoid Frequent Mistakes Invalidating the Tip Credit Bya LAURA PRATHER1, MANAGING SHAREHOLDER-TAMPA, JACKSON LEWIS

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s new legislation and agency regulations continue to alter the American workplace, the hospitality industry is no exception. Such is particularly true in Florida, a leading state for wage and hour lawsuits. Litigation focused on tip credit violations and novel interpretations of the wage and hour regulations are on the rise. This article discusses these prevalent legal challenges to the hospitality industry, while providing some practical steps to minimize exposure. For decades, the hospitality industry has been utilizing a tip credit to offset the minimum wage paid to servers, bartenders and other staff directly involved in serving the customer. In essence, a tip credit allows Florida businesses to apply $3.02 toward the minimum wage of qualifying employees because their tips would bring them to the statutory minimum. However, in order to use the tip credit, employers need to carefully follow the rules. I. THE 80/20 RULE A recent trend in lawsuits challenging a business’s use of the tip credit is the phantom 80/20 Rule. Under the 80/20 Rule, employees are challenging employers’ use of the tip credit by claiming more than 20 percent of the employee’s time was spent on nontipped side work. This “side work” is inherent to tipped roles (i.e. waiters, bartenders), and includes such duties as setting tables, rolling silverware, restocking supplies, etc. In theory, violating the 80/20 Rule would force employers to pay the full minimum wage instead of the reduced tipped rate for hours spent on side work and subject them to costly attorneys’ fees. The good news for employers is the 80/20 Rule is not official law. Rather, it simply 1

originated from a Department of Labor (“DOL”) handbook, which explicitly warns against its use “as a device for establishing interpretative policy.” Moreover, the 80/20 Rule was even denounced in 2009, continuing the DOL’s contradiction and confusion pertaining to the tip credit. Florida courts have agreed with this interpretation of the 80/20 Rule, identifying it as “unworkable,” “inappropriate” and “infeasible.” Prevailing over the 80/20 Rule, the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) allows employers to take a tip credit for any employee receiving at least $30 a month in tips “customarily and regularly.” The FLSA makes absolutely no mention of time limits a tipped employee may spend on side work or any particular task. With the absence of any restrictions, the

The author gratefully acknowledges the contribution of Michael Bohling, a third year student at the

law school at Notre Dame for his assistance and research for this article. 40  FA L L

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A. Inform Workers They Are “Tipped” Employees It may seem intuitive that a bartender or waiter realizes they are a tipped employee when hired. However, the law does not accept implicit notice. Rather, employers are required to tell these workers they are tipped employees and how this status impacts them. Specifically, employers should provide the following information:

• Uniforms: Employers can charge for uniforms so long as it does not result in employees making less than minimum wage. However, since tipped workers are already paid below minimum wage, charging them would invalidate the tip credit. Employers cannot ask employees to use their tips either. Remember an employee must retain all of their tips.

1. The base cash wage the employer is paying the employee;

• “Dine and Dash” & Breakage: Employers are prohibited from charging tipped employees when customers leave without paying, commonly called walk outs. Similarly, employees should not be charged for dishware or equipment that may break on the job. The law mandates the employer to absorb these losses, not the employee. Instead, document the incident in the employee file.

2. The amount of the tip credit claimed by the employer (the difference between the employee’s base wage and minimum wage); 3. That the tip credit cannot exceed the amount of tips received by the employee; 4. The employee retains all of their tips; plain text of the FLSA is the prevailing authority regarding tipped employees. While the merits of the 80/20 Rule are contested, the key takeaway is that it has been used to drag employers into court. Fortunately, employers can take precautions against the 80/20 Rule. As a rule of thumb, employers should always consider whether a tipped employee’s side work is related to their job function. Fortunately, the DOL has provided guidance as to the core duties of servers and bartenders.2 This source is particularly useful since plaintiffs commonly raise these listed duties in lawsuits. Special attention to DOL guidelines and employee activities can go a long way in protecting against erroneous 80/20 claims. II. FREQUENT MISTAKES INVALIDATING THE TIP CREDIT The tip credit may have been around for decades, but employers must dot their I’s and cross their T’s if they want to use it. An employer taking an invalid tip credit against the minimum wage results in a tipped employee being owed standard minimum wage plus an additional amount for liquidated damages. Invalidation occurs when employers fail to carefully follow the FLSA requirements for taking the tip credit. Although it is difficult to stay on top of these requirements in the high demand, rapid-paced service industry, here are some quick tips to ensure your business is compliant. 2

5. That the tip credit will not apply unless employees are informed of these provisions. Such notice can be oral or written but must also be provided in mandatory DOL postings. While providing this information is easy, it is a common mishap resulting in lawsuits. Requiring employees to sign an acknowledgement that they were provided this information at the time of hire is a simple way to avoid an employee claiming they were never told. This also avoids the necessity of trying to locate the hiring manager when the lawsuit is filed years after the employee was hired. B. Their Tips Are Their Tips The title from MC Hammer’s hit single, “U Can’t Touch This,” says it all. Employers cannot prevent employees from receiving all of their tips. Management should avoid any and all interference; including delegating tips to non-service staff. Common mistakes occur when employers operate tip pools with nontipped employee participants such as management or dishwashers. These systems violate the law and can invalidate the tip credit. Employers should insure that only employees that have direct customer interaction participate in a tip pool. C. Be Careful Charging Tipped Employees Another troubling concept is passing business expenses on to tipped employees. Some examples are:

See Details Report for: Waiters and Waitresses, O*NET ONLINE (2015), http://www.onetonline.org/

link/details/35-3031.00. w w w.FRL A .org

While these costs are burdensome to employers, they are minuscule in comparison to the costs for defending a lawsuit or the reimbursement of wages following a lost tip credit. D. Properly Accounting for Credit Card Fees Finally, deducting credit card fees from a tipped employee’s wages can be problematic. Employers are permitted to deduct the actual credit card fees from an employee’s tip, but that is all. For example, if a customer leaves a $5 tip on a credit card sale, and the credit card applies a 2% fee, the employer can only deduct $0.10 from the employee’s gratuity ($5.00 x 2% = $0.10). Employers need to be careful not to apply an incorrect fee since different credit cards charge different processing fees. Further, the employer must still pay the employee on time, regardless of any payment delays from the credit card company. While accounting for credit card fees can be useful for employers, it must be done correctly to avoid legal issues. CONCLUSION The wage and hour issues mentioned here are the tip of the iceberg with the expanding litigation facing the hospitality industry. It is imperative that businesses have proper hiring procedures, diligently oversee their implementation and continually train managers to avoid the costly mistakes that can cause a business to lose its balance and allow employees to gain control. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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Don’t Put Sexual Harassment on Your Menu By CHRISTY CRUMP

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hen you think about sexual harassment, do you assume your establishment is doing just fine? In fact, the restaurant and lodging industries have a big problem with sexual harassment. While one in three women have been sexually harassed at work, in the restaurant industry that number skyrockets to nine in 10! While the total number of cases has decreased over the years, thanks to increased sexual harassment prevention training, there are still 11,000 reported cases of sexual harassment every year. This can be a huge problem for your business. Lack of attention to harassment in your workplace can hurt your business through 42  FA L L

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increased absenteeism and turnover, low productivity and even litigation expenses. That’s why it is crucial for you to have a plan in place to stop harassment before it starts. Education is the best defense against harassing behavior that could tarnish your business’s reputation and put you in legal hot water. Your sexual harassment prevention training should include helping employees understand what is and isn’t harassment, what a hostile work environment looks like, how to report sexual harassment violations, showing your management the importance and legal ramifications of a well-run grievance process, and how to maintain the necessary paperwork in a safe and secure way. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

These elements, and more, need to be part of a comprehensive sexual harassment prevention program that all employees attend. In addition to helping you meet state mandates regarding food and alcohol service, Regulatory Compliance Services (RCS) helps your business create a mandatory sexual harassment/hostile workplace prevention program, which includes ongoing training for all employees. You might think it can’t happen to you, but it’s important to be proactive in protecting your business, your livelihood and the livelihood of your employees. Give us a call today to schedule a meeting with an RCS representative to learn the benefits of implementing RCS’s affordable sexual harassment prevention program. Christy Crump is the Director of Operations for FRLA’s Regulatory Compliance Services. Regulatory Compliance Services www.regcomplianceusa.com 800-537-9863


B U S I N E S S M AT T E R S

Cheers & Tears The Final Rule On Overtime Exemptions Makes Its Debut By LAURA PRATHER, MANAGING SHAREHOLDER-TAMPA, JACKSON LEWIS

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raditionally, December is a busy month filled with shopping, parties and holiday celebrations. It is a time to reflect on a year that is nearly complete and to anticipate the possibilities in the year ahead. December 2016 brings an overhaul to certain overtime exemptions that may bring cheers to employees and tears to employers. The long-awaited Final Rule from the U.S. Department of Labor governing overtime exemptions for executive, administrative and professional employees becomes effective on Dec. 1, 2016. It should come as no surprise that this overtime twist has arrived. On March 13, 2014, President Obama directed the Department of Labor to streamline and modernize the overtime standards for executive, administrative and professional employees, also known as the “white collar exemptions.” The Executive Office believed that the current system allowed too many employees to be exempt from overtime. The Department of Labor estimates that when the new rule goes into effect, more than 4 million workers will be eligible for overtime, and wages will increase by more than 1 billion per year. In some ways, the white-collar exemption has not changed. In order for a white-collar employee to qualify as exempt from overtime, a threepart analysis takes place. First, is the employee paid a “predetermined and fixed salary” (salary basis test)? Second, is the salary sufficient to meet a minimum threshold (salary level test)? Finally, do the job duties satisfy federal regulations (duties test)? The employee is not entitled

w w w.FRL A .org

to or is exempt from receiving overtime if all three tests are met. The Final Rule contains four main changes. It increases the salary threshold for white collar exemptions. It allows employers to pay 10% of the increased salary by utilizing nondiscretionary bonuses, commissions and incentive pay. It increases the salary threshold for the highly compensated employee exemption. For the first time ever, it provides for automatic increases in the salary level. The salary level will increase from $23,660 ($455 per week) to $47,476 ($913 per week) beginning December 1, 2016. The new salary level is more than two times the existing salary threshold. It is based on national data regarding the salary levels for all salaried workers in the 40th percentile. The Department of Labor set the rate based on the salary for workers in the lowest income Census region (the South) instead of the nationwide salary levels. However, this new salary is greater than the current salary level for exempt employees in both New York ($35,100) and California ($41,600), states with a significantly higher cost of living. Employers did gain a few benefits. Non-discretionary bonuses, commissions and incentive pay can now be used to satisfy up to 10 percent of the white collar salary threshold. If employers rely on this non-discretionary income to satisfy the salary level, it must be paid to the employees at least quarterly. The Final Rule also allows employers to make a “catch up” payment if an employee’s non-discretionary

bonuses, commissions and incentive pay are insufficient to satisfy the salary threshold. The “catch up” payment must be paid in the next pay period following the quarter. Highly compensated employees will have lots to celebrate as 2016 comes to an end. The salary level for highly compensated employees will increase from $100,000 per year to $134,004. Once again, the Department of Labor used nationwide salary data for full-time workers, but used the 90th percentile rather than the 40th percentile. Additionally, the salary level for highly compensated employees is not based on the lowest Census region (currently the South) like the standard salary level evaluation. Employers also cannot use non-discretionary bonuses, commissions or incentive pay to satisfy the salary level. These increased salary levels will not stay fixed for long. The salary levels for both the white-collar employees and the highly compensated employees will automatically increase every three years beginning on January 1, 2020. The salary levels will be based on the same criteria used to set the current increases. The Department of Labor will publish the new salary levels 150 days before the effective date, or on Aug. 1, 2019. There is only a short time remaining to review currently exempt positions that on December 1 will no longer meet the salary threshold. Employers should carefully evaluate how to address these changes and determine whether to implement increase salaries or reclassify currently exempt employees.

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THANK YOU GOLF CLASSIC SPONSORS! Because of your support, we raise over $100,000 every year for the NRA and FRLA PAC funds!

SEPTEMBER 26, 2016

Brians BBQ, KOBE Steakhouse, Duffy’s Grill, BJ's Restaurant, Tibby’s New Orleans Kitchen


A LA CARTE

GREAT TEAMS 16 Things High-Performing Organizations Do Differently If you enjoyed FRLA’s Summer Board Meeting speaker, Don Yaeger, then you will not want to miss his new book, “Great Teams: 16 Things High Performing Organizations Do Differently.” For more than five years, Don has studied the greatest teams in sports and business and has learned 16 habits of consistently successful teams. You should check it out! HERE IS THE LINK TO ORDER: https://goo.gl/uYF3AK

FLORIDA ASSOCIATION FOR FOOD SAFETY PROFESSIONALS RECOGNIZED The Florida Association for Food Protection was recently awarded the C.B. Shogren Memorial Award at thve International Association for Food Protection (IAFP) Annual Meeting for demonstrating exceptional overall achievement in promoting the International Association for Food Protection “to provide food safety professionals worldwide with a forum to exchange information on protecting the food supply.” For more information about the IAFP in Florida, visit them at: foodprotection.org/affiliates/directory/florida-association-for-food-protection

GOP CONVENTION & NOROVIRUS Just prior to the opening of the GOP Convention in Cleveland this summer, staff from the California delegation came up with the dreaded norovirus. Food Safety News reported that the resort where the group was staying took measures to curb the spread of the symptoms of this illness, including isolation of the sickened individuals and the installation of hand sanitizing stations. The local county health department was conducting an investigation into the matter at latest report.

TOP TRENDS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

FRIED CHICKEN BISCUITS BARBECUE FRYING FRENCH TOAST PULLED PORK

Top 15 Perennial Favorites — Tableservice Menus* HOT TEA 8. COMFORT FOODS 9. ZUCCHINI 10. CLASSIC PASTRIES 11. OYSTERS 12. CHICKEN WINGS 7.

13. EGGS

BENEDICT

14. CUSTARD-BASED

DESSERTS

15. DOUGHNUTS

SOURCE: National Restaurant Association, What’s Hot in 2016 chef survey, Food and Menu Trends Survey, 2015 w w w.FRL A .org

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HISTORIC TOURISM NUMBERS! Governor Rick Scott recently announced that Florida set another record in tourism by welcoming the highest amount of visitors of any six months in the state’s history with 57.4 million visitors. This record amount of out-of-state and international visitors represents a 4.3 percent increase over the previous year. In the second quarter of 2016 (April – June), 27.3 million visitors came to the state, an increase of 3.1 percent over the same period in 2015. The average number of direct travel-related jobs in quarter two of 2016 was also a record high, with 1,255,200 Floridians employed in the tourism industry — up 4.3 percent year over year. VISIT FLORIDA estimates that 23.6 million domestic visitors traveled to Florida in the second quarter of 2016, reflecting a 4.6 percent

increase over the same period last year. Estimates also show that 2.6 million overseas visitors and 1.1 million Canadians came to Florida in quarter two of 2016, reflecting 5.5 percent and 5.1 percent decreases respectively over the same period last year. Preliminary figures for the first half of 2016 show 49.4 million domestic visitors (up 6%), 5.3 million overseas visitors (down 5.6%) and 2.7 million Canadians (down 3.5%) have come to the Sunshine State. Will Seccombe, President and CEO of VISIT FLORIDA, noted “The Florida tourism industry has a tremendous amount of momentum because every month millions of new visitors experience the best tourism product on earth and return home to share their Florida memories with friends and family.”

on the FOOD NETWORK DATE

TITLE

LOCATIONS

CITY

9.30.16

“TAMPA’S ICONS”

Mise en Place Cigar City Bern’s/Haven/Elevage

Tampa Tampa Tampa

10.7.16

“TATTOOS, REBELS AND A ROOSTER”

Z Grille Rebel House Rooster & The Till

St. Petersburg Boca Raton Tampa

10.14.16

“IT’S SO MIAMI”

The Forge Joe’s Stone Crab Sugarcane

Miami Beach Miami Beach Miami

10.21.16

“SEAFOOD SHACKS”

Star Fish Co Mrs. Mac's Kitchen Crazy Fish

Cortez Key Largo Lake Wales

10.28.16

“SUGAR SAND PARADISE-ST. PETERSBURG/CLEAWATER”

Locale Market Guy Harvey’ s Rumfish Grill Palm Pavillion

St Petersburg St. Pete Beach Clearwater

11.4.16

“FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED”

Caragiulos Coolinary Café Market 17

Sarasota Palm Beach Gardens Fort Lauderdale

“SOUTH WALTON: THE HUB, A PUB & A CLUB”

The Hub Growler Garage WaterSound Beach Club

South Walton South Walton South Walton

11.18.16

“A TASTE OF EMERIL’S FLORIDA”

Arts & Culture in St. Petersburg A Taste of Emeril’s Florida A Taste of Emeril’s Florida

St. Petersburg St. Petersburg St. Petersburg

11.25.16

“RESORT RESTAURANTS”

Tchoup Chop at Loews Royal Pacific Scarpetta at the Fountainbleau Kuro at the Hard Rock Casino

Orlando Miami Beach Hollywood

12.2.16

“ORLANDO”

Morimoto The Coop/4 Rivers Primo

Orlando Orlando Orlando

12.9.16

“HIDDEN GEMS”

11 Maple OLA Scarpa’s Italian Restaurant

Jensen Beach Miami Beach Lakeland

12.16.16

“COOL PLACES FROM THE KEYS TO THE PANHANDLE”

Jimmy Johnson’s Big Chill Prato Bijoux

Key Largo Orlando South Walton

12.23.16

“THE ONE WITH CLASSY RESTAURANTS”

Cuvee 30A Christini’s Bizou at Le Meridien

South Walton Orlando Tampa

11.11.16

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Kyle Martin FPL energy expert

Let our smart tools help you save energy and money. FPL can help you save up to $500 a year on your bill. With your Online Business Energy Dashboard, and a free Business Energy Evaluation, you’ll find smart, new ways to help your business save energy and money. Schedule your free Business Energy Evaluation today at FPL.com/EasyToSave.


ENGAGE

FRLA Engage Update

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he Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Engage program has been continuing to gain momentum. The initiative has spread from Central Florida to Tampa, Miami, Broward County, Tallahassee and most recently Jacksonville. Members across the state have been involved in meeting with local elected officials including city and county Commissioners and mayors. Our focus is to build relationships with our local leaders and help change the nature of the conversation to show that our industry can be great partners across many platforms. Additionally, we have expanded outside of local elected officials and have also started to meet with city offices such as permitting and health departments to build relationships and better understand

the process in each city and how we can work better with these offices in the future. As a National Reputation Initiative for the month of September, the FRLA Engage program will highlight Hispanic Heritage Month and collect stories in the hospitality industry. This is an initiative the National Restaurant Association will be promoting across the country. We look forward to highlighting this across the state and will be planning multiple events to recognize these individuals in our industry. Last but not least, our Engage teams across the state recently participated in Dine Out for Orlando United to help victims of the Orlando tragedy on June 30, 2016. The Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association is honored to announce that the hospitality industry raised nearly $800,000

and counting to support the victims of the recent tragedy. Nearly 1,500 restaurant locations across the state participated and their contributions were submitted directly to the OneOrlando Fund. We are excited to continue growing our Engage program! For more information about how you or your operation can get involved in Engage, contact Dan Murphy at Dmurphy@frla.org, 850.224.2250 extension 235, or Rachel Moalli at 407.425.0300, Rachel.Moalli@AlignPublicStrategies.com.

Movers & Shakers FRLA Communications Office

Erin Hellkamp Power has recently joined as FRLA press secretary. No stranger to the industry, she kicked off her career at the Central Florida Hotel and Lodging Association where she served as public policy director for five years. Most recently, she’s represented a wide-range of clients, including many in hospitality, as an associate lobbyist for Spearman Management Inc. Erin is from Orlando, the “Tourism Capital of the World,” where she graduated from the University of Central Florida with a degree in political science. Elizabeth Ray, our communications and marketing director, will also be making a transition. After recently receiving her Master’s degree in integrated marketing communication, Florida State University offered her an assistantship and the opportunity to complete her Ph.D. in Communication. This is a pursuit of a life-long dream, and we are pleased to have the opportunity to SEE MORE keep her in the family as a communications consultant. Congratulations!

ERIN HELLK AMP POWER

MOVERS & SHAKERS PAGE 58

Maggie Dilger

Rosie Riccardi

Maggie Dilger recently moved back to Tallahassee and is thrilled to have the opportunity to work with FRLA. Maggie and her husband, Michael, were stationed at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, North Carolina, where Michael served as a Naval Officer with the Civil Engineer Corps. While in the Tar Hill state, Maggie continued her career in the hospitality industry working in administration at Porters Neck Country Club before taking time off to stay home with the couple’s son, Miles. Maggie will be working in the CEO’s office along with Sandy Moore.

Welcome Rosie Riccardi, FRLA’s new Central Florida regional director. She is based in Orlando and will split duties with Daniel Lavan. Rosie has over 20 years of experience in the hospitality industry including director of sales and marketing for Champions World Resort; guest and field service manager, Oakwood Worldwide; and senior sales manager Wyndham Orlando. Rosie received a degree in psychology from the University of Central Florida and is currently serving as Treasurer for the Boy Scouts of America, Pack 84.

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MARKETING TIPS

harvested by Native Americans — with preparation filtered through generations of immigrants.

How We Opened Ulele: A Case Study

By MICHAEL KILGORE, ANGELA GEML & JEFF HOUCK

COLUMBIA RESTAURANT GROUP/GONZMART FAMILY OF RESTAURANTS MARKETING

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or the newest restaurant in our family, Ulele, we knew we needed a lot of explanation. We had a new concept, an unusual name and a menu that for competitive reasons we couldn’t talk about until closer to opening. We also had a location that, while on the Tampa Riverwalk and with a western view of the Hillsborough River, was charitably called “a destination restaurant” — few surrounding businesses, no nearby restaurants. And we don’t have an advertising budget. (Our restaurants don’t advertise as a personal and business philosophy). But we did have a 110-year-old family-owned restaurant business, a co-owner (Richard Gonzmart) who’s media savvy and a social media savant, and some interest about what we would do next. w w w.FRL A .org

And we had a lot of stories to tell: • Ulele was the first new concept from the Gonzmart family in 25 years. • The name came from a Native American princess who may or may not have saved the life of a Spanish deckhand named Juan Ortiz — approximately 80 years before the Pocahontas-John Smith story. • The tables, front doors, wine room, bike rack and counters were created by local artists and craftsmen. • The building was the former water pumping station for the city of Tampa active from early 1900 until the late 1920s. • The restaurant’s art came from all over the world: Paris, Peru, Amsterdam, the United States, Spain and more. • We had an on-site brewery. • Our menu featured Fresh From Florida items — food that might have been grown, caught

We chose to share the journey with our potential guests: • For three months before opening, on the official web site, Twitter and Facebook, we provided behind-the-scenes pictures and descriptions of what we were doing. We had hoped for 2,000 Facebook followers when we opened; we had 3,000. And now we have 15,000 followers 19 months later — all organic, none paid. We’re still adding about 100 likes a week. • We allowed a daily newspaper access to every meeting, with an embargo close to the opening date. • We did selective tastings to community leaders and influencers. • We commissioned four mini-documentary videos titled “History in the Remaking”: “A Mayor’s Vision,” “A Restaurateur’s Dream,” “Turning a Building into a Work of Art” and “Native-Inspired Foods & Spirits.” We used quote excerpts from the short videos in social media. • We scheduled a few other events with Yelp Elite, prominent food bloggers and other influencers. • Using a reputation monitoring service, we responded quickly to comments about Ulele and frequently repurposed the overwhelmingly positive comments for our Facebook page accompanied by an appropriate image. • In the last six months, we have used Instagram much more for Ulele, and we’ve increased our use of video. Our videos average 9,000 views. • We sponsored and participated in selected community events that targeted potential guests via geography or demographics such as a Mac and Cheese event, chili cook-off and a major music festival, all in a public park less than one mile from the restaurant. A few tips on social media: • The content guidelines haven’t changed all that much since email — be relevant, interesting and entertaining. • Engagement is key. Just posting or tweeting isn’t enough. It’s a dialog. And while you have to have a company voice, it can be personal and funny when used properly. And don’t outsource this: Nobody knows your culture better than you. But it’s a 24/7 undertaking. • Used appropriately, video is a huge tool. Live video is very new and should be used sparingly and when worth it. Don’t kill the goose before its first golden egg. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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ENERGY

So What Is Energy Choice, Anyway?

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n the past, Florida business owners weren’t able to choose their own natural gas suppliers. Gas was only supplied by the utility, and customers couldn’t choose their own rate plans. Now that energy choice has come to the state, Florida businesses can choose their own natural gas suppliers. And just as they shop for paper goods, food vendors, internet and telephone services, business owners are able to shop for the best natural gas plan for their unique business needs. Of course, businesses can still receive natural gas supply from their utilities, such as TECO, Florida City Gas and Central Florida Gas. And whether a location has a different supplier or not, the utility still delivers the gas, reads the meter and performs all the same maintenance services it always has. However, different suppliers offer more rate options than utilities. Utilities can only offer a variable rate — that is, the rate per therm changes each month. One of the most common reasons businesses take advantage of energy choice and select a different supplier is to get a fixed rate instead. This option locks in a specific price per therm. Whether the natural gas market goes up or down, the fixed rate remains the same.

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While the final bill won’t be the same amount each month, the price per unit doesn’t change. It is an excellent budgeting tool because it makes for a more stable bill each month. Businesses can choose to lock in a fixed rate for just a few months up to several years. The best way to choose a fixed rate is to compare the offer with previous bills. If the fixed rate is something the business can easily afford, it often makes sense to guarantee always paying that same rate. Some businesses prefer to lock in short-term fixed rates for their busy seasons or for the winter months when the bills are typically highest. But even a business that isn’t ready to commit to a fixed rate can benefit from choosing an alternate supplier. Though the utility already offers a variable rate, it’s worth looking into the variable rates that suppliers can offer.

That’s because variable rates through suppliers are often constructed as a specific formula, which also adds stability to the bill. Utilities have more complex factors involved in setting the final price per therm, so the rate may not be a reflection of the market. In addition, a natural gas supplier’s variable rate is often lower than the utility’s. And choosing a supplier is easy. There’s no interruption in service, and the utility and supplier will coordinate to ensure the transition is seamless. Energy choice gives business owners the freedom to choose the suppliers and rate plans that works best for them. Whether a business needs to stay within a certain budget, increased flexibility or just lower bills, a good natural gas supplier can offer a plan to help achieve these energy goals.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


From the Ocean to the Everglades, between the Palm Beaches and Miami-Dade, the Broward Chapter has you covered!

Oct 6 • 9am - 5 pm

FRLA Broward Sustainable Sunshine Hospitality Showcase Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention Center

Oct 19 • 3:30

Broward Board Meeting - Bokampers Fort Lauderdale 3115 NE 32nd Ave, Fort Lauderdale, FL

Oct 19 • 5:30 - 7:30pm

• Complimentary Range Balls from 11:30am to 12:30pm • 12:30pm Shotgun Start • 18 Holes of Golf • Player Gift Bag

MIXER - Bokampers Fort Lauderdale 3115 NE 32nd Ave, Fort Lauderdale, FL

• Dinner & Awards After Golf at the Country Club

Nov 14

• Silent Auction & Amazing Prizes

9TH ANNUAL FRLA BROWARD GOLF INVITATIONAL Fort Lauderdale Country Club 415 E Country Club Circle, Fort Lauderdale, FL

Nov 16 • 3:30

Broward Board Meeting - Mai-Kai Restaurant 3599 N Federal Hwy, Oakland Park, FL

• Fabulous On-course Bars and Restaurant Stations!

REGISTER FOR EVENT AT www.frla-broward-9th-golf-invitational.eventbrite.com

Nov 16 • 5:30 - 7:30pm

MIXER - Mai-Kai Restaurant 3599 N Federal Hwy, Oakland Park, FL

Dec 5 • 6:00 - 8:30pm

Broward FRLA Holiday Party Club FRLA at the Sonesta 2017 Board Installation and Holiday Party 999 N Fort Lauderdale Beach Blvd, Fort Lauderdale, FL

DONATE AT: firstgiving.com/fundraiser/FRLABroward/GoOrange

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR QUESTIONS CALL FRLA BROWARD CHAPTER DIRECTOR ANNE SALLEE 954-253-0850 OR EMAIL ASALLEE@FRLA.ORG. Graphic Design: S.MARK Graphics | smark.com


F L O R I D A R E S TA U R A N T S H O W

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ver 8,000 restaurant and foodservice industry professionals will gather at the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show being held at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando Sept. 27 – 29, 2016. During this threeday event, attendees will find new ideas, new products and new solutions. The trade show and conference, produced by Urban Expositions and sponsored by the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association will offer educational programs, special events, new food products, and equipment and services from more than 400 leading industry suppliers. “We know a restaurant cannot survive on food alone, which is why we have created an education program to provide practical and relevant information as well as feature areas on the show floor to find fresh and new ideas,” said Ron Mathews, Vice President, Restaurant and Foodservice Events Portfolio. 52  FA L L

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“We are thrilled to be offering several new and exciting special features as well as returning crowd favorites and welcome all Florida restaurant and foodservice professionals to make plans to join us.” Returning events include the Ferdinand Metz Foodservice Forum, the Food Trends Experience, the prestigious ACF Culinary Competitions, the Beer, Wine & Spirits Pavilion, The Japan Pavilion, Key Buyer Alliance, Education Station and the Foodservice Council for Women event. Other exciting special events and networking opportunities being offered during the three-day event, include: FRLA/NRA Bob Leonard Golf Classic, Fall Board Meeting, and Hospitality Stars of the Industry, being held on Tuesday, Sept. 27, at the Hyatt Regency Orlando. During the celebration, FRLA will honor the first responders who humbly serve our community, install the Chairman of the Board and Executive

Committee and present the FRLA’s Hall of Fame winners, and the prestigious Hotelier, Restaurateur and Supplier of the Year. The reception begins at 6:00 p.m., followed by the dinner and awards at 7:00 p.m. and an After Party Celebration. Independent Operators Workshop is a half-day workshop on Tuesday, Sept. 27, focusing on growth opportunities and best practices, featuring speakers Kathleen Wood and Jim Knight followed by an FR&L Opening Party at Lafayette’s. This event is co-organized by the FRLA and is sponsored by Zenith, Heartland, Sysco and United Healthcare. The Torch Award will be presented to Melissa Kelly for her outstanding achievements and contributions to the restaurant and foodservice community. Kelly’s restaurant, Primo, introduced many diners across the East Coast to the idea of farm-to-table, F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY HEATHERHITT.COM

FIND NEW IDEAS, NEW PRODUCTS AND NEW SOLUTIONS AT THE 2016 FLORIDA RESTAURANT & LODGING SHOW


with up to 80 percent of ingredients coming from the restaurant’s own four-acre farm. When Melissa opened the satellite Primo location in Orlando she brought the farm-to-table concept to the Florida market. She will join Ferdinand Metz, Certified Master Chef, for a one-onone discussion on the Culinary Demonstration Theater stage, on Tuesday, Sept. 27, at 1:00 p.m. Sabor Latino Pavilion will focus on Hispanic and Latin American products for the restaurant, foodservice and retail markets — specifically new and traditional, authentic ingredients, flavors, products, prepared foods and private label. Rapid Fire Competition — Three chefs will take the stage to battle for the title Rapid Fire Challenge: Appetizer Edition Champion. The chefs will demonstrate their dish and provide samples for the judges and the audience. Each dish will feature a local ingredient — cheese, bread, protein, sauce. Attendees are invited to help the judges choose the winner on Wednesday, Sept. 28 at 2:00 p.m. The all-new APPstore (for Appetizers of course) has been created to meet the needs of operators and foodservice professionals. This new area will provide inspiration, ingredients and finished products to provide new tastes and flavor combinations for the hottest appetizers and small plates that will set the tone for visitor experiences. Beacon Award Presentation — ­ In honor of the 5th anniversary of the Foodservice Council for Women, Kathleen Wood and Ferdinand Metz will present the Beacon Award to Edna Morris, Managing Director at Axum and Industry Expert for Axum’s Limited Service Restaurant investments (LSR). Ms. Morris has over 30 years of experience in the restaurant industry and served as president of several restaurant companies, including Red Lobster and Blue Coral. The 2016 Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show will be held at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, from Tuesday, Sept. 27 through Thursday, Sept. 29 with the show floor opening at 11 a.m. each day. The show is sponsored by the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (frla.org). For more information on exhibiting or attending, visit the official show website at flrestaurantandlodgingshow.com. The tradeshow and conference is managed and produced by Urban Expositions (urban-expo.com), a division of Clarion Events (clarionevents.com). w w w.FRL A .org

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P R O S TA R T C U L I N A R Y C O M P E T I T I O N

High School Teachers Go Back to School During Summer Vacation FRLA Educational Foundation Hosts 20th Annual ProStart Teacher Training Institute at Johnson & Wales University

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Florida high school food instructors became students again for one week during their summer vacation. The teachers participated in the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Educational Foundation’s (FRLAEF) Twentieth Annual ProStart Teacher Training Institute June 19 – 24, 2016. For the 19th year, this event was held at Johnson & Wales University’s (JWU) North Miami Campus. Participating instructors teach FRLAEF’s two-year ProStart School-to-Career curriculum. The instructors returned to school to fine-tune their culinary skills and foodservice knowledge during this weeklong event. While the teachers were able to have a little fun, there was no skipping class! They spent countless hours hitting the books and studying hard. The teachers were divided into four groups based on their past attendance of the event. First-year attendees learned the basics of cooking methods, stocks and sauces as well as knife skills. Second-year ProStart instructors covered topics such as nutrition, breakfast foods, meat, poultry and seafood. There was no slacking off as third-year participants learned about salads and garnishing, desserts and baked goods along with global cuisines. The fourth-year attendees finished off their experience with business accounting, French pastries, introduction to yeast and cookies. All participants then participated in a capstone market basket and critique followed by a national exam for the Certified Secondary Foodservice Educator (CSFE) certification. The instructors will take the information learned during the weeklong training back to the classroom and share it with their students. UNIVERSAL SPONSOR

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This event would not be possible without the support of the FRLAEF’s partners. The FRLAEF would like to thank Global Sponsor Johnson & Wales University along with Universal Sponsors Coca Cola Refreshments, Cracker Barrel, Keiser University and National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). Top: Chef Bergman’s Level 3 class showing off their desserts and baked goods at the end of their day in the kitchen; Above: Tom Hietpas, from Titusville High School, working in the kitchens GLOBAL SPONSORS

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COMPLIANCE

ADA Compliance: Now What? By JR HARDING, ED.D, AUTHOR, SPEAKER AND ADVOCATE

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rom my perspective, as an advocate, author and leader within the disability community, I believe that the hospitality industry as a whole has done a good job with meeting the minimal accessibility standards found within the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). As a frequent customer of the hospitality industry, I experience their compliance as a “cost of doing business” rather than an “opportunity for more business.” Therefore, in order to thrive in the future, we need to design a more universal approach to better fulfill the expectations of both the disabled and the aging communities! I remember with great clarity during the late 1980s and early 1990s when persons with disabilities were unable to secure a room with accessible features, utilize a courtesy shuttle, and/or safely get in and out of a swimming pool. During the past 25 years, the hospitality industry has been grappling with how to implement the mandated minimum standards under the ADA into a more inclusive and sustainable business plan without creating the feel of “handicap rooms.” As a result, these challenges created unnecessary obstacles for persons with disabilities and the broader community. Because of the ADA, the structural and attitudinal barriers once found within the industry are no longer segregating members of the disabled community from their business colleagues and/or families. Now, these structural, programmatic and policy accommodations are fostering customer service innovations and a return on investment. The accessibility standards should no longer be seen as an 56  FA L L

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Many properties are still learning how to “ provide full and unfettered access. There are business groups composed of professionals with disabilities who are still being denied full and equal access because the industry is unable to accommodate the “whole group” within a single property.”

unfunded mandate but rather an opportunity to gain more market share. Today, 57 million Americans (nearly 20% of the population) can go on vacation, fully participate within a business conference, participate in a sporting event, host a family reunion and/or get married in one of thousands of different properties across this great nation. However, the industry is still learning how to maximize the inventory of rooms, services, and amenities for persons with disabilities and their families, especially during high demand community events. Many properties are still learning how to provide full and unfettered access. There are business groups composed of professionals with disabilities who are still being denied full and equal access because the industry is unable to accommodate the “whole group” within a single property. This barrier is generated by continuing to only build and renovate to the minimal standard, rather than a more universal approach. This lack of access is creating avoidable barriers for everyone and a loss of revenue for the industry.

Will minimal compliance with the accessibility standards be sufficient to meet our aging population, as well as our existing population of persons with disabilities? As a person with a disability and a frequent traveler, I see the following challenges confronting the industry: 1) How does the hospitality industry more appropriately meet and exceed the expectations of the marketplace? 2) How does the hospitality industry reinvent their properties, practices and services to better meet the needs of the changing demographics? 3) Will your business plan better capture the estimated $200 billion of discretionary spending currently found within the disability community? 4) When will your workforce diversity also include persons with disabilities? 5) Will the customer service choices at your property meet the growing demand for greater access to all goods and services? It is my belief that we can build a better business model to meet everyone’s needs. These observations and obstacles I have encountered compel me to ask … now what? F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


REGIONAL DIRECTOR & MANAGER TERRITORIES HOLMES

ESCAMBIA SANTA ROSA

JACKSON OKALOOSA

WALTON

NASSAU

WASHINGTON

GADSDEN LEON

CALHOUN

BAY

HAMILTON JEFFERSON

MADISON DUVAL

BAKER LIBERTY

WAKULLA

SUWANNEE

COLUMBIA

TAYLOR GULF

FRANKLIN

UNION CLAY

LAFAYETTE

DIXIE

SAINT JOHNS

BRADFORD

GILCHRIST

ALACHUA

PUTNAM FLAGLER

DANNETTE LYNCH DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP

LEVY

PINELLAS, HILLSBOROUGH, SUNCOAST, SOUTHWEST FL, POLK, SPACE COAST

VOLUSIA

dannette@frla.org

727.642.3404

MARION

727.953.6803

LAKE

CITRUS SUMTER

CORKEY BERGAMO 904.993.6287

NORTHEAST FLORIDA

cbergamo@frla.org

SEMINOLE

HERNANDO ORANGE PASCO

904.880.6964

OSCEOLA

HILLSBOROUGH

LOIS CROFT 561.410.0035

PALM BEACH & HENDRY COUNTY

PINELLAS

561.270.6878

DANIEL LAVAN

MANATEE

OKEECHOBEE

HARDEE

SAINT LUCIE

SOUTH FLORIDA

lhernandez@frla.org

407.280.6599

BREVARD

INDIAN RIVER

lcroft@frla.org

LYNNE HERNANDEZ 305.710.3962

POLK

888.612.7115

DESOTO SARASOTA

MARTIN CHARLOTTE

LEE

CENTRAL FLORIDA

HIGHLANDS

GLADES

PALM BEACH

HENDRY

dlavan@frla.org

BROWARD COLLIER

NICK LOWE 850.661.4256

TALLAHASSEE & NORTHWEST FLORIDA

w w w.FRL A .org

MIAMI-DADE

CENTRAL FLORIDA

rriccardi@frla.org

ANNE SALLEE 954.253.0850

MONROE

nlowe@frla.org

ROSIE RICCARDI 407.304.8773

MARCO ISLAND

BROWARD COUNTY

asallee@frla.org

844.253.0850

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MOVERS AND SHAKERS

CO N T I N U E D FRO M PAG E 48>>

Tijuana Flats Appoints New Chief Executive Officer TJF USA, LLC, parent company for Tijuana Flats Tex-Mex restaurants is pleased to announce Larry Ryback as the new Chief Executive Officer, reporting to the company’s Chairman of the Board and Partner at AUA Private Equity Partners, Steven Flyer. Larry brings with him over 25 years of demonstrated success in growth-oriented, leading restaurant brands. Most recently, Ryback was the President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) for True Food Kitchen where he oversaw the development of the new concept strengthening their unit level economics and preparing the company for aggressive expansion. Additionally, he served as the COO of P.F. Chang’s where he oversaw 212 restaurants, over 18,000 employees and $950M in annual revenue. Earlier in his career, Ryback was the COO for Kona Grill and Redstone American Grill where he was instrumental in building both brands.

Melissa Carmona FRLA welcomes Melissa Carmona as its new communications and marketing coordinator. Melissa started her time with the FRLA in 2014 as a bilingual customer service representative within our Education and Training Department. Prior to joining the FRLA team, she wrote, researched and designed content and developed advertising initiatives for a marketing firm and cultural arts magazine in South Florida. Melissa is a Florida State University graduate, with a degree in Media/Communication Studies and Creative Writing.

NRA / FRLA BOB LEONARD GOLF CLASSIC

INDEPENDENT OPERATORS WORKSHOP

SEPTEMBER 26 TH

SEPTEMBER 27 TH

FALL BOARD MEETING

HOSPITALITY STARS OF THE INDUSTRY

ChampionsgateGolf Course Championsgate, Florida

SEPTEMBER 27 TH

Orange County Convention Center Orlando, Florida

TH

Orange County Convention Center Orlando, Florida

Hyatt Regency Orlando Orlando, Florida

FLORIDA TOURISM DAY

SEPTEMBER 27 TH

MARCH 14 TH, 2017

Orange County Convention Center Orlando, Florida

We encourage you to get involved locally in our chapter events too. Contact your local FRLA Regional Director on www.FRLA.org, to find out what's happening next.

SEPTEMBER 28 TH

FLORIDA RESTAURANT & LODGING SHOW TH

The FRLA hosts a full slate of state and local industry events throughout Florida. Make plans to join us at our statewide events!

Tallahassee, Florida

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT WWW.FRLA.ORG/EVENTS

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AD


s r o t i s i V e r o M t A c D I a r R t t O A L F T I S I V p i a h s h r e n wit t r a P g n i t e k r a M AD

Learn more by contacting the Industry Relations Team at (877) 435-2872 or Partner@VISITFLORIDA.org.

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Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Fall 2016  

Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed towards our hotel a...

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Fall 2016  

Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed towards our hotel a...

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