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H THE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER OF BRIDGE CITY & ORANGEFIELD H

Vol. 58 No. 122

The

Record TheRecordLive.com

Distributed FREE To The Citizens of Bridge City and Orangefield

Week of Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Hurricane Ike: A Decade Ago This Week David Ball

For The Record

Hard to believe it’s already been ten years that Southeast Texans were waiting on Hurricane Ike to make landfall on Sept. 13, 2008. Bridge City bore the brunt of the storm with the storm surge that led to flooding of all but a handful of houses. There was misery, devastation, bad smells, heat and debris. Kirk Roccaforte, currently a Bridge City Councilman was then mayor of the city. He remembers that time well. He said 10 years ago, he and city staff were pre-planning what their moves would be. An evacuation was called earlier and most residents left the day prior. A mandatory evacuation was ordered two days before the hurricane made landfall on Saturday.

The storm surge from Hurricane Ike reaches Scoffield Addition in Bridge City on the morning of September 13, 2008. RECORD PHOTO: Mark Dunn

“The water started rising and people took it seriously,” Roccaforte said. “We were at city hall Friday evening

around 7 p.m. The police made a couple of rounds that evening before we evacuated to Little Cypress Elementary

School. “We were making rescues at first daylight the next morning (after Ike hit) and

assessing the situation. We were gathering equipment and boats. There were people up on the bridge, some stuck in their homes, on their rooftops. It was terrible.” Though the city prepared as much as it could for the onslaught of Ike, Roccaforte said no one is prepared for 13 feet of water rising from the surrounding waterways. He added that crews were figuring out damages and calling in support. “We had a contract with a company we could get supplies from,” he said. “In the short term, we were getting citizens back into town, back into their homes and they immediately started to clean up. We brought in temporary housing. We had water and sewer running. Entergy was on top of the power running. “Longterm was about bringing in assets for recovering from FEMA (Federal

Emergency Management Agency) and from the state who provided extra patrols here to protect citizens from looting. We went from house to house to make sure there were no bodies inside of homes, nobody died or if some had injuries.” Though Ike was devastating for Bridge City, Roccaforte believes the city recovered from it a year ago before Hurricane/Tropical Storm Harvey hit. He said the city was back and growing again, though there’s still some people in places who have never rebounded. “Our citizens are awesome,” he said. “They had a domino effect and helped each other. They didn’t sit around and wait for help. It’s a great feeling to live in this community and it’s a great feeling to be the leader of HURRICANE IKE Page 2A

Voters get registered, election day approaches County’s EDC survives judge’s wanted cuts David Ball

For The Record

Dave Rogers

For The Record

Like every other politician running for office in Orange County, Dean Crooks said during his spring campaign the county needs more economic development. But it turns out that Crooks, now County Judge, is no fan of the current Orange County Economic Development Corporation. Tuesday, he cast the only vote against continuing what county commissioners began a year ago, an annual budget of $375,000, which includes membership dues. Commissioners Johnny Trahan, Barry Burton, John Gothia and Jody Crump all voted in favor of the $375,000 amount, which is actually $150,000 less than commissioners set aside for OCEDC last year. The vote didn’t change the feelings of Crooks, who had put only $129,000 into the proposed 2019 budget for OCEDC. That’s basically the employment cost for OCEDC Director Jessica Hill – her $92,394 salary and benefits -- and $2,400 for utilities. That’s a cut of $246,000 from last year. Crooks noted with $246,000 the county could purchase four completely equipped Chevy Tahoes for the Sheriff’s Office or give a 1 percent raise to all its employees. “We have a $4 million [budget] deficit,” Crooks argued during Tuesday’s Commissioners’ Court meeting. “We’ve got to start looking for things to cut.” A Monday morning budget hearing for the OCEDC drew a standing-room-only crowd of supporters opposed to Crooks’ stringent cuts. The four commissioners

made their belief in the OCEDC known Monday  and  Tuesday. But the vote didn’t change Crooks Crooks’ mind. He let his hair down in a no-holds-barred interview after the court session ended. He said the OCEDC “hasn’t gotten any results,” and the only thing different about this organization from the one that was de-funded and reorganized in 2015, was the amount of money the county spent on it. He also noted that Hill, hired in 2016 after working in economic development for more than a decade in Beaumont, was getting a “5 percent raise and a $9,600 car allowance,” while regular county employees are getting no raise in 2019. Hill’s raise, from $88,846 to $92,394, is actually a 4 percent boost. Crooks, after refusing his job’s nearly $20,000 pay hike when he took office in May, earns $85,500 a year. “I don’t feel comfortable taking money from people who don’t have their home fixed yet [after last year’s Tropical Storm Harvey], to pay for something that hasn’t gotten any results,” Crooks said. “There’s nothing new about this EDC except for the money we’re giving them.” A year ago, commissioners, headed by then-County Judge Stephen Brint Carlton, tripled the county’s contribution to OCEDC to $375,000. They also set aside $150,000 in restricted funds to be used for land acquisiCOUNTY BUSINESS Page 3A

Election Day will be here before you know it. Tina Barrow, elections administrator for Orange County, wants to reminds residents who want to vote in the November 6, 2018 General Election, or early vote, can do so by stopping by the Orange County Elections Office at 206 Border Street, Orange, TX. 77630, during the hours from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday through Friday to fill out an application to register to vote and bring back to the office or mail it to the office. Residents may also visit their website at http:// www.co.orange.tx.us/Elections_Voter_Application. html, or vote.org, print out the application, fill it out and take it back or mail it to the office. Those who have moved away from the county may call their office at 409-8827973 to request an application for a mail ballot. Residents 65 or older, disabled residents or those who live out of state or out of the

Tina Barrow, elections administrator for Orange County in her office, would like to remind residents there’s a little less than a month, October 9, to register to vote in the November 6, 2018 General Election. RECORD PHOTO: David Ball

country may used mail ballots. The deadline to register to vote is Tuesday, October 9, 2018. There are two contested contested elections in November: Orange County

Precinct 2 Commissioner race between Republican Theresa Adams Beauchamp and Democrat Deborah Mitchell, Precinct 1 Justice of the Peace race between Republican Hershel Stagner Jr. and Democrat Gail Shaw

and a $25.75 million bond issue for West Orange-Cove CISD. Early voting will be from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, October 22 - Saturday, October 27 and from Monday, VOTERS Page 3A

Tunnel boat fans ready for ‘Showdown on the Sabine’ Dave Rogers

For The Record

The Orange Convention and Visitors Bureau will be hosting the 11th annual “Showdown on the Sabine” SPORT Tunnel Boat Races. The event at the City of Orange Boat Ramp  Friday  through Sunday, Sept. 14-16, is free to the public. This Southern Professional Outboard Racing Tour (SPORT) event will include 50 to 60 racers from the United States and Canada.  Food and drink vendors will be located on site, as well as a variety of children’s activities. The Orange Convention & Visitors Bureau is hosting the event, which will include live entertainment by Mixx

The 11th annual “Showdown on the Sabine” tunnel boat races will be held Friday afternoon and all day Saturday and Sunday Sept. 14-16 at the City of Orange Boat Ramp.

Fixxer beginning at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15. Boats will run from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.  Friday  and from  9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. SPORT Racing incorporates four classes of powerboat racing into all of its

events: SPORT F1, Formula Lights, Tri-Hull and J-Hydro. The SPORT F1 class features tunnel boats that can turn on a dime and accelerate to speeds of over 120 mph. Formula Lights are basically a smaller version of the

SPORT F1 class in appearance and handling characteristics. The Formula Light boats are shorter with smaller horsepower engines. They operate with a top speed of about 75 mph. The Tri-Hull class is based off of vintage walk-through windshield cruising boats with V4 fishing engines. This class always proves to be a crowd favorite. The J-Hydro class is used to train young drivers. They are able to learn the basics of racing through experience in these 12-foot knee-rider boats propelled by 9.9-hp outboard engines. Please note: no dogs, no pets, and no collers will be allowed at the City of Orange Boat Ramp.

SOUTHEAST TEXAS REGIONAL ALERTING & INFORMATION NETWORK

VISIT US AT:

www.setexasrain.org CMYK


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• The Record • Week of Wednesday, Sep. 12, 2018

Hurricane Ike a decade later

The depth of the storm surge can be seen by this typical street scene of flooded homes and vehicles in Bridge City on Arthur St. RECORD PHOTO: Mark Dunn

Elsie Lane in Bridge City is seen just after daybreak on the morning of Sept. 13, 2008. RECORD PHOTO: Mark Dunn

Residents of Schoofield Edition wade toward their homes as the storm surge began to recede. RECORD PHOTO: Mark Dunn

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ning. Harrison credits the school board’s leadership and the trust they gave to the administration for the quick turnaround. He told them they would have to spend much money to reopen, but they would get the money back through FEMA and through insurance. After assessing damages, two categories were created for recovery. Maintenance Director John Scales would work on anything that could be reopened in three weeks while Harrison would handle the list of structures that couldn’t be brought back in three weeks. Portable buildings were acquired in phases and Sims Elementary was set up in the parking lot next to the football stadium and baseball stadium at BCHS. Meanwhile, Hatton Elementary portable buildings were set up in a field adjacent to the school building. Harrison said the most difficult work was attaching the porches, decks and awnings to the portable buildings. Buses would pick up BCISD students who were staying in either Port Arthur or in Beaumont. Little Cypress-Mauriceville CISD and Orangefield ISD buses also picked up BCISD students. “It was crazy, but it was required. They still wanted to be Bridge City kids,” he said. The portable buildings would stick around campuses for three more years. Due to damages to Sims and Hatton, a large citizens committee decided to consolidate the two campuses and build Bridge City Elementary School through FEMA funds, insurance and the Texas Legislature gave a one time allotment to build without a tax increase for the district. The school was built in one year. “The school district and the city have a symbiotic relationship,” Harrison said. “Bridge City was hit really hard. It was really bad, but they survived it. To me, one of the big moments was to play a football game before the school reopened to give the kids a break from the dry walling and other work to their homes. “A community wide pep rally was held at Walmart with a big turnout. We couldn’t play a home game yet, so we traveled to Huntington and we won. It gave us a little reprieve.” Carl Thibodeaux was Orange County judge in 2008. He said AT&T was gracious enough to let emergency management personnel use their building downtown before Ike landed and afterward. “I lived there for about a week,” he said. “I was watching monitors. We went through (Hurricane) Rita before. We moved our command center to Mauriceville Elementary School because it had the least amount of windows.” Thibodeaux said Ike was a water event while Rita was a wind event. Ike had powerful storm surge that pushed a dome of water across the Gulf of Mexico. “We tried to do our best and guess what kind of storm it would be,” he said. “Evacuations went out. We had to get the prisoners in jail moved west to different locations. “Our emergency management people were very prepared. We had evacuation issues with Rita because of Gustav coming in before. It’s better to be on the wrong side of caution than on the wrong side of emergency management. Ike was a very good evacuation.” For the first few days after the storm, Thibodeaux said

water search and rescues were done. After Rita, residents could return to their homes two or three days later. With Ike, they couldn’t get home as quickly because of the flooding. For longterm planning, Orange County would seek FEMA funding, grants for housing, etc. “Orange County people are masters at recovery if they’re given the tools for recovery. Local people were responding. It was a team effort. I was blessed with the emergency response team we put together before Ike. They were well trained,” he said. “The sheriff’s department and the national guard had high water vehicles that all helped. There were people working behind the scenes. All the cities were on board, working together. I’ll remember that for as long as I live.”

The Beauchamp girls helping Mama-T put up campaign signs.

H H LE T ’S E LECT H H

Theresa Adams

Beauchamp For Your

County Commissioner Precinct 2 Political Advertising paid for by Frank Beauchamp, Treasurer, to elect Theresa Beauchamp County Commissioner, Pct.2 , Orange.

Hurricane Ike brought more than storm surge as high winds also toppled trees and washed in black mud from the marshes as seen here on Norbert St in Bridge City. RECORD PHOTO: Mark Dunn

that community at the time.” Jamey Harrison now works for the University Interscholastic League, but at that time he was superintendent of the Bridge City Independent School District. He said after assessing the damage, he and staff wondered how in the world they would open again. Yet, three weeks after Ike hit BCISD was opened, educating students. “We thought if we didn’t get the doors open quickly enough we would risk losing a large number of students and a large number of citizens,” Harrison said. “Getting to a place that’s normal for kids is important.” The only building in the district that didn’t flood was Bridge City High School. However, FEMA personnel were using it as a hub. They were surprised BCISD was ready to open within three weeks. FEMA was given two extra days to find a new command center and BCISD was off and run-

The Record Newspapers of Orange County, Texas The Record Newspapers- The County Record and the Penny Record- are published on Wednesday of each week and distributed free throughout greater Orange County, Texas. The publications feature community news, local sports, commentary and much more. Readers may also read each issue of our papers from our web site TheRecordLive.Com.

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• The Record • Week of Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 3A

At a Texas State town hall, college enthusiasm for O’Rourke was on display Teo Armus The Texas Tribune SAN MARCOS — Sunday was a day of college visits for U.S. Rep Beto O’Rourke, the Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate, as he spoke to packed town halls of university students here and in College Station. “It’s young people who are leading the charge right now in Texas, here in this community, and across the country,” the El Paso congressman told hundreds at an auditorium at Texas State University. “If I hope to serve and represent you, I’ve got to first show up and be here.” Students had lined up two hours ahead of time to see O’Rourke take the stage, as others peeked inside the auditorium for a glimpse. Wearing a maroon Texas State cap, O’Rourke told the crowd to have “uncomfortable conversations with your Republican mother,” just as O’Rourke did with his

Voters

U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-El Paso, speaks to college students at a town hall event in San Marcos on Sept. 9, 2018. PHOTO: Holly He/The Texas Tribune

own mom. “It worked,” he said, “because she’s going to vote for me in November.” O’Rourke’s campaign, which he said is operating the largest field organization in the history of Texas politics, has drawn much of its

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October 29 - Friday, November 2. There will also be early voting from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, October 23 and Tuesday, October 30 at the following locations: • Orange Public Library, 220 N. Fifth St. in Orange • Bridge City Public Works Building, 220 Nitsche St. in Bridge City • Mauriceville Volunteer Fire Dept., 10691 N. Highway 62 in Mauriceville • Raymond Gould Community Center, 385 Claiborne St. in Vidor For Election Day on November 6, 2018, polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. for 34 voting precincts. There are seven forms of identification listed to vote in Texas according to the secretary of State site: 1. Texas Driver License issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS); 2. Texas Personal Identification Card issued by DPS; 3. Texas Election Identification Certificate issued by DPS; 4. Texas Handgun License issued by DPS; 5. United States Military Identification Card containing the person’s photograph; 6. United States Citizenship Certificate containing the person’s photograph; 7. United States Passport (book or card). You are eligible to register to vote if: • You are a United States citizen; • You are a resident of the county where you submit the application; • You are at least 17 years and 10 months old, and you are 18 years of age on Election Day. • You are not a convicted felon (you may be eligible to vote if you have completed your sentence, probation, and parole); and • You have not been declared by a court exercising probate jurisdiction to be either totally mentally incapacitated or partially mentally incapacitated without the right to vote. To confirm your voter registration status, you may select one of three methods to perform a search: • Your Texas driver’s license number, if you provided it when you applied for voter registration; • Your Voter Unique Identifier (VUID), which appears on your voter registration certificate; • Your first and last name. For more information on voting, go to the Texas Secretary of State website at: http://www.sos.state.tx.us/.

core support from college campuses like this one. Yunuen Alvarado, a junior whose campus group, Student Community of Progressive Empowerment, helped bring the candidate to Texas State, said O’Rourke’s efforts to travel around the state and meet

County business tion. But then Harvey happened. Hill got commissioners’ permission to use that $150,000 and $50,000 of the $375,000 to give out $200,000 in Harvey Recovery grants to local small business. Each of the 40 grants was $5,000 and was available on a first-come, first-served basis. Hill, presenting in front of commissioners for the second day in a row, said Tuesday, “I would say our greatest accomplishment [last year] was we were able to give $200,000 back to our small businesses in Orange County. “Eighty percent of our economy in Orange County

with Texans at town halls like this one have won him strong support on campus. “A lot of candidates don’t tend to focus on young people, they don’t make the effort to go out to talk to people,” she said, adding that “for Beto, that’s his brand. Yes, he’s a politician, but he’s willing to listen to us.” Rhett Parr, another Texas State student, said that left-leaning students were fired up behind his campaign after feelings of disillusionment following the 2016 presidential election. Hays County, home to Texas State University and the college town of San Marcos,went narrowly in 2016 to Donald Trump, who edged out Hillary Clinton by less than one percentage point. “Students are excited to actually put their voice to use and feel like it matters,” Parr said. During the town hall, O’Rourke answered questions about what he

thinks about impeaching Trump, how to address the wealth gap between African-Americans and whites and whether he supports Betsy DeVos’ efforts to bring guns to campuses (“No,” he said). One man in the audience, who asked a question about school choice, said he identifies as a “Mexican-American conservative” and said it was important to come out and listen to a progressive candidate. Speaking to reporters before going onstage, O’Rourke said he wants to attract all sorts of young voters — Democrats, Republicans, and independents — as well as those who have never voted at all. “I’m struck by the number of young people who don’t think of themselves in partisan terms,” he told reporters before appearing onstage. “Political parties, for them, are a vestige of the 20th century.”

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is made up of small businesses. I’m proud that we were able to help them during a time that they weren’t getting a lot of funding and help from other areas.” Hill also outlined a lot of efforts she was making to attract large industry and small business to Orange County. She said OCEDC is currently engaged with new business prospects that could bring projects worth $9 billion to the county. “That represents over 1,000 permanent jobs and over 2,000 construction jobs,” she said. “Those industries are plastics, logistics and marine services.” Burton, who until recently represented Orange County on the Southeast Texas Re-

gional Planning Commission, joined with Carlton and officials of local cities in 2015 to re-envision and revise the ODEDC. He adamantly backed Hill Tuesday. “All the stuff you’re working on is very positive,” Burton said. “I’m tempted to let you have what you had last year. You’re doing good work. This is the only time we spend money that actually brings business here, brings jobs, brings sales tax, brings property tax. “This is our investment in the county. I make a motion we fund their budget at $375,000.” Commissioners also voted Tuesday to support Jasper

County in its bid to join Orange, Jefferson and Hardin counties in the Southeast Texas Regional Planning Commission. Jasper County is now a part of the Deep East Texas Council of Governments but Jasper County Judge Mark Allen said “we have a lot in common with the three SETRPC counties.” Commissioners also approved interlocal agreements between Orange County and the county’s seven municipalities to make a joint effort in procuring a pre-disaster contract for debris hauling and monitoring. They also paid $332,906.08 in bills and okayed a half dozen intradepartmental line-item transfers.

Orange council notes city manager’s departure Dave Rogers

For The Record

The City of Orange held tax rate and budget hearings, doled out its hotel occupancy tax funds and agreed on a new disaster pay policy. At Tuesday’s  city council meeting, Orange’s elected leadership also gave tentative approval to an ordinance allowing ice cream trucks and acknowledged it will soon by saying so long to Shawn Oubre, city manager for the past

13 years. Oubre was hired Friday to take the same position in Woodway, Texas, a Waco suburb of fewer than 10,000. He said  Tuesday  his contract with Orange requires 30 days of notice, but that he could stay as long as six weeks. No citizens came up to speak during the public hearings for the budget or tax rate. Council members will take a final vote on those at

their next meeting, 5:30 p.m. on Sept. 25. After some cutting in four budget workshops, the 2019 budget as currently proposed shows general fund revenues and expenses of $22 million, and a total budget of $37 million when water and sewer, capital outlay and debt service accounts are added. It is figured on a tax rate of 80.51 cents per $100 of valuation. This is a rise of 9.736 cents

Stay alert to developments in Gulf Staff Report For The Record Gulf Coast residents should keep their eyes opened and their fingers crossed in regard to a system that could form in the Gulf of Mexico and move this way. A surface trough over the southeast Gulf of Mexico will shift northwest across the forecast waters, according to information from the National Weather Service in Lake Charles. Low pressure will develop along the trough, with a medium probability of developing into a tropical cyclone over the western gulf waters later this week. The forecast for this week and weekend: Wednesday Night A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 75. Northeast wind around 5 mph. Thursday Showers and thunderstorms likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 85. Northeast wind around 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60 percent. Thursday Night: A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 76. East wind around 5 mph. Friday Showers and thunderstorms likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 87. East wind around 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70 percent. Friday Night A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 74. Southeast wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the evening. Saturday A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 90. Northeast wind around 5 mph becoming south in the afternoon. Saturday Night A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, with a low around 74. Sunday A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 91. Sunday Night

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per $100 value from last year, but it does not apply to senior citizens who have filed to have their rates frozen. With a drop in many property values because of Tropical Storm Harvey, many taxpayers will get a decrease in taxes. Councilman Brad Childs voted no in a 6-1 record vote for approving the budget. City council adopted a disaster pay policy similar to Orange County’s.


4A • The Record • Week of Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018

of Christ himself.*****Katie Couric, 56, to wed John Molner, 50. He gave the former Today host a ring last week. Katie’s husband Jay Monahan died of colon cancer in 1998. She has two daughters ages 21 and 17.***** We were sorry to learn of the death of Grady Leverne Smith, 58, who died Monday, Sept. 9. He was the brother of Kenneth and John Smith and son of the late Snuffy and Rachel Smith of Bridge City.***** A roast of everyone’s friend, Ross Smith, is being held by the Bridge City Chamber of Commerce this Thursday.***** Our friend Don Harmon is still battling his cancer problem but seems to be improving daily.***** Our longtime friend Gary Lusignan died Aug. 29 on his 62nd birthday. What are the odds of that?

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN

From The Creaux’s Nest LOOKING IKE IN THE EYE Should we go, should we stay, that’s what we debated about leaving as time was rushing away. It was Sept. 12, 2008, and Ike was predicted to make landfall probably around Sabine Pass by morning. The wind speed wasn’t going to be as high as other hurricanes I’d weathered so my family decided to hunker down and ride this storm out. The one thing we hadn’t considered was the storm surge, water, plenty of water. We were in a safe enough home to weather strong winds but about 2 a.m., while everyone else slept, the wind began howling so loud I started wondering if we had made a mistake. I headed downstairs to check the doors and about that time a rush of water pushed in through the French doors. I quickly found towels believing it was the swimming pool running over. Before I could get towels in place the room had filled with water. I woke everyone downstairs and told them to head upstairs. Strangely enough, within a couple of hours the water ran out as fast as it had entered. When daylight came it revealed that nothing and no one in Bridge City was spared the devastating water damage. Fortunately, our living quarters were out of the water, but as far as we could see Bridge City was part of Lake Sabine. We lost eight vehicles, two collectors. We would be without wheels for awhile. Two dogs, a Lab and a German Shepherd had been left by neighbors, locked in by a cyclone fence. Water was waist deep. The Shepherd howled, he couldn’t swim anymore. A friend staying with us cut the lock and brought them to our porch. It would be days before their owner could make it back or the water would recede. Shortly after daylight we heard a woman screaming. Madeline Bailey had escaped to her attic but the snakes were too plentiful, so she had made her way to the roof. She became a guest for the next couple of week. We had generators but in all our planning we had left the fuel outdoors, the wind and rushing water dumped all of it. We searched the neighborhood, found fuel and raided neighbors freezers. For two weeks we fed a dozen folks who had chosen to stay and ride out the storm. Otherwise, the city was deserted. No one could get to us and we couldn’t move. Shortly after 8 a.m. on that Sept. day, we spotted a figure coming in the distance, water above his waist. He was a welcomed sight. Mark and Sharon Dunn had also chosen to weather the storm. They were lucky not much water had gotten into their house. He related what everything else was like. His said his parents place, in Dugas Addition, in the first line of the storm, near the Intracoastal Canal and Sabine Lake, had probably taken a beating. In the next few weeks, thanks to volunteers, Red Cross, Salvation Army and Church groups, we survived Ike and started rebuilding our lives. Ten years have gone by since Ike. Harvey came last year. It’s become way of life on the Gulf Coast. I feel for the folks on the East Coast where Hurricane Florence is promising a 12-foot tidal wave. Most homes can withstand the winds, it’s the water. There is no escape. Two other storms swirl in the Atlantic, Helene and Isaac. The latter is a real threat in the Caribbean and the only one we should be concerned about if it should enter the Gulf this weekend.

TURNING BACK THE HANDS OF TIME 5 Years Ago-2013 This week on Sept. 13, we mark the fifth anniversary since Ike, the hurricane, blew into Orange County. Ike left the worse devastation on our community, since the storm of 1865, the year the Civil War ended, wiped out the city of Orange. That storm left only four homes standing. Today’s recovery, especially to the community of Bridge City, seemed a far away dream of five years ago. Thanks to the leadership of Mayor Kirk Roccaforte and help from Houston Mayor Bill White, we got needed help from FEMA. Thanks also to City Manager Jerry Jones and the city administration, the city has made a remarkable comeback. Much has changed in Bridge City since that horrible storm. In so many cases the improvements have been for the better. The entire infrastructure is far better today. Blight areas are no more. Streets, sewer and water improvements have all been advanced. Jones and the city continue to make necessary improvements. The vast improvements by the school district have given the students state-of-the-art school buildings second to none. Meanwhile, under the leadership of County Judge Carl Thibodeaux many improvements have added much value to Orange county assets. The county has been hit by two storms, Rita and Ike. Rita destroyed a million trees and left destruction, causing the county to dig deep into their cash reserves, then came Ike. Today many new buildings stand out across the county, all paid for, debt free. What changed the most in Bridge City is the makeup of its people. Many of my old friends have left, leery of facing more storms. New, young couples have come, like we all did many years ago. It’s a new day for an old community. Better days are yet to come as a good community continues to grow with a new generation of citizens.***** “American Idol” is betting that Jennifer (J-Lo) Lopez, Harry Connick, Jr. and Keith Urban will fare better with viewers than the bickering divas Mariah Carey and Nicki Minaj did last season. As judges for season 13, they will be the shows first panel consisting solely of singers. That has worked for NBC’s the “Voice.” Randy Jackson will be back in a new role, in-house mentor to the contestants. Ryan Seacrest will again host.*****New Orleans Saints’ fans are calling coach Sean Payton the “Payton Saint.” His return is like the return of John the Baptist and a black and gold return to the Super Bowl would be like the return

Norma Jean McCarty Procell, 69, of Orange, passed away Thursday, Sept. 12. She is survived by her husband, Kirby Procell, son, Kevin Pool, daughter, Kristi Simons, three granddaughters, and in-laws, Debbie and Mark Procell, Quincy and Nancy Procell, Sam and Ann Procell.***** Services for Katie Vee LaBry, 64, lifelong resident of Orange, were held Sept. 18. She was manager of cosmetics at Walgreens and was a member of the VFW Ladies Auxiliary. She is survived by her husband of 50 years, Glen J. LaBry, sons, Ronald J. LaBry and Phillip J. LaBry five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.***** James Edward “ Ed “ Riley, 77, of Orange, passed away Monday, Sept. 16. Services were held Friday, Sept. 20. He worked as a carpenter in the construction industry and spent twenty years as a member of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by his sons, Mike Riley and Brian Riley, daughter, Tracy Jones, ten grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.***** Rose C. Bourgeois, 93, of Orangefield, passed away Wednesday, Sept. 11. Service was held Saturday, Sept. 14. She was a member of St. Helen Catholic Church. She is survived by her sons, Harold Joseph Quebodeaux Jr., Anthony Charles Quebodeaux, daughter, Paula Legate, 10 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.***** Billie Jean Smith Sylvester, 84, of Orange passed away Tuesday, Sept. 10. Funeral service was held Friday, Sept. 13. She was a stenographer at DuPont and was a member of Sunset Country Club and the Women’s Club of Orange. Billie is survived by her husband of 60 years, Cecil Sylvester, son, Scott Sylvester and sister, Mary Louise Risinger.

15 Years Ago-2003 Two years have gone by since 9-11.*****Jim Turner, of Crocket, is our congressman.*****Orange Mayor Brown Claybar announces that the city has finalized the last purchase of land for a city park and boat ramp on Simmons Drive. *****Wayne Peveto, attorney and former state representative, holds the annual dove hunt at his farm. Wayne was ill so son Rex hosted the outing. Lots of folks, lots of food, prepared by James Claybar and served with Wayne’s famous beer biscuits.*****Pretty Ms. Sharon Fults Gearheart celebrated her 50 th birthday Sept. 9. She doesn’t look a day over 30.*****Bridge City’s Matt Bryant kicked three field goals for the New York Giants. He scored 11 points in all. The Giants beat St. Louis by 10 points, 23-13. Jason Mathews, of Bridge City, is a lineman for the Tennessee Titans.*****On Sept. 8, 1900, the great hurricane hit Galveston killing 6,000 people.***** *****The Record’s “Players of the Week” are Kerry Franks, WO-S; Shon Landry, LC-M; Michael Gauthier, BC; and Thomas Hamrick, OF. (Editor’s note: Gauthier is the fastest athlete to ever attend Bridge City. He won state championships in track and starred for Lamar.)

45 Years Ago-1973 Thrift and Gift Shop opening held Sept. 1 at 207 Fifth St. in Orange. Gift items, made by senior citizens, will be on sale. Part of the store will be a thrift shop where people can buy clothing and items donated by Orange Countians. This store is a new idea and could become a very special place in our community. (Editor’s note: 45-years later the Thrift and Gift Shop can be found at 350-37th St. inside the old Salk School.)*****The LC-M twirlers this year are Vicky Moore, Leesa Smith, Candie Brock, Sue Melton, Neva Lindley, Madelon Minton, Donnarie Campbell, Lauri Melton and Glenda Becker.*****The West Orange Chief’s cheerleaders are Chris Doyle, Sherry Sullivan, Debbie Chapman, Christi Hall, Terri Mouton, Jan Robinson and Candi Campbell.*****Football season kicks off this week. Some of the star players to watch are senior David Guidry, #20, a track star who goes both ways for the Cardinals; Also teammate senior quarterback Terry Bridgers; Little Cypress-Mauriceville features #11, quarterback Don McClain, who is scheduled to start against Kelly Friday night.. At West Orange, besides the Duhon brothers, senior tackle, 215 pound Rex Andrews is the pulling guard that coaches say is the most improved player. At Bridge City, Randy Fults, #73, 210 pounds, will be the only sophomore starting for the Cards. He replaces injured Dave Smith at defensive tackle. Steve Culp, #50, 190-pound senior, is the Cards starting center; next to him is pulling guard, #63, Craig Turner, 215-pounds, 6’2” senior. B.C. coach Chief Wilson held a seven-hour practice workout on Labor Day. Hurricane Delia was expected to bring winds and rain Tuesday, and it did, running the players indoors. Coach Wilson had guessed right by doubling Monday’s practice time.*****Marie LeBlanc becomes Mrs. Mayo Brasseaux on Sept. 1.*****Inez Runnels is wearing a cast on both arms. Her accident has something to do with walking into a moving truck.*****Glenn Earl, newsman on Channel 4, does a feature story on the grave markers found under the Orange Library.

Barry is a hard worker and has prepared himself well as commissioner to be able to fill the director job. I can say this, he learned a lot, it’s a non-patrician job and if he learned that he would be a good choice for the job. The Lunch Bunch will dine at Robert’s this week and at JB’s Barbeque next week. Everyone welcome.***** Several Dunn’s mark birthdays this week. Jenna Dunn Ballau celebrates on Sept. 13, Kerrie Dunn, mother of Jenna and Amber Dunn Greeson, celebrates on Sept. 14. Mark’s wife, Ethel, celebrates on Sept. 15 and Ms. Phyl, family monarch, celebrates Sept. 16. Two Dunn family friends, Faydra Thibeaux will be a year older on Sept. 13 and the Johnny Montagne’s family monarch, a beautiful, nice lady, Darlene Montagne, celebrates Sept. 17. Happy birthday to all. Please see birthday list for others.*****On Sept. 10, 1935, 83 years ago, the “Kingfish” Sen. Huey P. Long died after being shot in the Louisiana State Capitol. He was allegedly shot by Dr. Carl Weiss.*****Remembering Burt Reynolds who died Sept. 6, at age 82. It’s probably hard for any youngster to believe but Burt was once the biggest star in the world. His signature mustache set him apart in looks from other actors. The Michigan born actor’s debut was in “Deliverance” in 1972. The former Florida State halfback next starred in “The Longest Yard” in 1974, “Smokey and the Bandit,” in 1977. One of my favorite is “The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas” in 1982. Dolly Parton played the madam at the Chicken Ranch and he was the sheriff. I knew the story before I saw the movie and stage production. In 1997, Burt did “Boggie Nights.” There was a lot of Burt Reynolds in between. He had the personality of the good old boy, next-door neighbor, who kept you laughing and could make you cry. Least you forget, Burt was the first Cosmopolitan Magazine’s nude male centerfold.

BIRTHDAYS Folks we know celebrating birthdays this week. Sept. 12: Creg Ball, Karen Warner, Bryan Riedel, Buffy Bean, Cynthia Claybar, and our own Brenda Lund all celebrate today. They are joined by Pop singer Jennifer Hudson, 36, Country singer Kelsea Ballerini, 24 and basketball player Yao Ming who turns 37.*****Sept. 13: Celebrating on this day are Kade Hanks, Margaret Jeffcote and Connie Swope. Celebrities celebrating are producer and actor Tyler Perry, 48, reality star Michelle Duggar, 51. This is also the day Hurricane Ike paid the area a visit.*****Sept. 14: Jame Braus, Mary Garretson, Greg Choate, Justin Granger, Kim Norris, Nikki Wingate and Ms. Coastal Landscaping, Lori Lista all celebrate. They are joined by actors Andrew Lincoln, 44 and Sam Neill, 70.*****Sept. 15: Tara Smith, Lori Campbell, Jon Berry and Ginger Ellis celebrate. Also having birthdays on this day are UK’s Prince Harry, 33, actors Tom Hardy, 40 and Tommy Lee Jones, 71.*****Sept. 16: Celebrating today are Shoana Hunt, Anthony Walker, Ian Putman, Todd Estes, O’Shanique Foster and Mark Conner. They are joined by Pop singer Marc Anthony, 49, comedian Molly Shannon, 53 and actor Mickey Rourke, 65.***** Sept. 17: Celebrating today are Lynda Stout, Mark Anderson, Chase Burch. Also celebrating are TV show host Nate Berkus, 46 and race car driver Jimmie Johnson, 42.*****Sept. 18: Ben Ludwig, Debra Gauthier and Joy Evans celebrate. They are joined by cyclist Lance Armstrong, 46 and actress Jada Pinkett Smith, 46.

CAJUN STORY OF THE WEEK Da two Cajuns, Clovis Comeaux and Slim Desomeaux, were sipping on a few beers before getting a bite to eat at Tee-Boys Bar and Grill. Suddenly a woman, wat was at a nearby table eating an oyster loaf, started to cough. It became apparent to Clovis and Slim dat da lady her, is in real distress. Clovis axe her, “Can you swallow?” She shake her head no. Den he axe, “Can you breathe, hanh?” Da woman shake her head no. Slim him, he jump up, lifts dat lady dress up, yanks down her drawers and quickly gives her right cheek a lick wit his tongue. Da women her, is so shocked that she has a violent spasm and da lodged oyster flies out of her mout. As she begins to breath again she thanks him. He and Slim walks slowly back to his table. Clovis him, say, “Slim, you know me, I heard of dat dare, Hindlick Maneuver’ but I ain’t never seen nobody do it before.”

C’EST TOUT The Ruby-throated hummingbird is a common sight this time of year. Those are the ones that are migrating. They are eating plenty, preparing for a 24-hour journey over the Gulf. They’re getting their bodyweight up so they can go 24 hours without eating. They are easy to spot, the male has a ruby throat, the female does not. They winter in southern Mexico, South America, the West Indies and even Costa Rico. Did you know a hummingbird weighs as much as a penny and uses spider webs to secure its nest to a tree? The bird has a pellet size brain, lays an egg the size of a blueberry and has two broods a year from two eggs? I find them a delight to watch. They’re tough for their size. They don’t fly at the speed of a bullet, it just appears that way.*****Last thought, there is too much smoke not to be a fire. People better wake up and take seriously the chaos in the White House.***** Well folks, That’s all for me. I didn’t get around much this week so I didn’t pick up much news. Thanks for your time. Take care and God bless.

A FEW HAPPENINGS Capt. Chuck Uzzle woke up the dog lovers with his story about Sally, who departed recently. It’s easy to see why the Labrador retriever is the most popular dog in North America. They are great with children, have a lovable temperament and are easily trained. The original Labrador known as St. John’s dogs, were developed in Newfoundland in the 1700’s to help fishermen retrieve nets. As a result, they have several features designed specifically for swimming, such as webbed feet and a water resistant second coat. The St. John’s dog vanished from North America due to high dog tax, but was preserved by English breeders where it became the Labrador of today. By the way, the Shih Tzu, Lion Son in Chinese, is one of the world’s oldest dog breeds, going back over 2,000 years..***** Last week at the Wednesday Lunch Bunch, Commissioner Barry Burton stopped by. We had not seen him in awhile. Shaun Davis, East Texas Regional Planning Commission director, is leaving Oct. 1. Barry is applying to replace him.

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The Record • Week of Wednesday, September 12, 2018 •

Golden K Kiwanis to meet Golden K Kiwanis meets every Wednesday from 9:30-10:30 a.m. at the Orange Salvation Army Building, at the corner of MLK Drive and Strickland, also known as Old Highway 90. Coffee is always available and the public is always invited to hear a different speaker each week. e following speakers are scheduled: Wednesday, September 12, will be Orange County Commissioner Johnny Trahan will present the importance of the Orange County Airport, especially in times of natural disasters. en on Wed., Sept. 19 - Professional chef Monica Cobb, owner of Monica's Restaurant in Beaumont, will convey her many culinary experiences that brought the Kirbyville native back to southeast Texas. On Wed., Sept. 26 - Mary McKenna, Executive Director and founder of the local Southeast Texas Hospice, will discuss the many services offered by Hospice. e Hospice contact number is 409.886.0622. en on Wed., Oct. 3 Installation of 2018-19 Golden K Kiwanis officers and committee chairs. A reception will be held in their honor. New main officers are Reid Caruthers, president; Dennis Ferrell, president in training 2019-20; Vern Murray, treasurer; and Pat McCombs, secretary. On Wed., Oct. 10 we will host Dr. Arlene Turkel, professor at Lamar State College-Orange, will give information about the literary and artistic anthology she heads, and the opportunity for Golden K members to submit items. Accompanying her will be a recruiter of senior citizens for LSC-O, supplying up-to-date information about senior groups. And on Wed., Oct. 17 - Juan J. Venegas, a 25-year-old Wienerschnitzel franchise owner in Orange, Texas, and Oceanside, California, will convey his amazing story to franchise owner success. He recently assisted in the establishment of new Wienerschnitzel stores in Nederland and Lufkin, Texas. Remember coffee is always served and the public is welcome to attend.

BCHS Alumni Info Concerted efforts are being made to generate interest in Bridge City High School and its alumni members. Please read the following and help us in the projects: Frank Scales is hoping to "spotlight" nominated BCHS alumni on the BCHS alumni website. Charlotte Chiasson will coordinate and write the articles featuring persons nominated. You will make this work by submitting names and info to Charlotte at memelovesall4@outlook.com or to Frank at fscales@frankscalescreative.com. ey hope to share one or two articles a month. ose nominated may be any BCHS alum, faculty, or staff member from any class year. Also, BCHS Athletic Director DeShazo is asking the Alumni Association to spread the word about a project he is trying to implement. e Athletic Department would like to display 8x10 photos of BCHS alumni that played football at the college or pro level. Coach DeShazo would like a Wall of Honor displayed at the field house which would celebrate the talents of previous BCHS football players. Former players are asked to send

their names and photos to the Bridge City High School Athletic Department, 2690 Texas Avenue, Bridge City, Texas 77630. ank you in advance for helping in this endeavor. A reminder that our Classic Cardinal Reunion (classes 1957-1968 and any other interest persons) is scheduled for Saturday, October 13th at 5:30 in the Bridge City High School Cafeteria. Please mark your calendars and plan to attend. Registration forms will be sent out next week. Lastly, our next Alumni Association meeting is scheduled for September 6th at 5:00 at Bridge City High School.

Starlight COGIC to host Summit Starlight Church of God in Christ, 2800 Bob Hall Road presents their 23rd Annual Women’s Summit 2018. e event will be held September 14 -16 and will feature local speakers Litasha Barnes, Jacqueline Gayles and First Lady Josie Lindsey. Friday evening service will highlight Evangelist Gracie O’Bryant of Houston, Texas. e Annual Summit is designed to equip women with tools for victorious living and this year’s Powershops are built around the theme “e Source of my strength” of which workshop presenters will provide insight on various topics such as healing from emotional baggage to dealing with women’s health issues. e cost of the summit is $40.00 per person which includes powershop materials, conference agenda, a continental breakfast on Saturday morning as well as a ticket to the Saturday luncheon along with opportunities to win various door prizes. Special offers include Group registration for parties of 7 or more at a rate of $30.00 per person. Worship services for Friday night and Sunday morning as well as Sunday evening are open to the public and will not require registration. Local women of area churches are especially invited to attend Sunday’s 3:30pm service, as the Summit will climax with an evening service service highlighting “300 Women in White”. All women are asked to dress in white attire. Summit delegates can register on line at slcogicorange.org.

Orange County Ranchers Roundup e Texas A&M AgriLife Extension of Orange County is having an Orange County Ranchers Roundup on September 18, 2018 at 6:00 PM at the Extension office on Hwy 1442. e speaker will be Dr. Mike Meaux, DVM, Southwest LA Veterinary Clinic. He will be addressing Cattle Health and Nutrition in Southeast Texas & Southwest Louisiana. 2 CEU’s offered to licensed pesticide holders. ere will be door prizes and a 52 card drawing for a new shotgun. Dinner will be provided. Please call the Extension office at 409-882-7010 to register.

LCM Homecoming Parade Info Little Cypress-Mauriceville has announced its Homecoming Parade for September 21. is year’s theme is “Incredible Homecoming.” e parade will begin at Little Cypress Junior High at 2 p.m. and move north on Meeks, turn east on Bear

Path and conclude in the LCM High School parking lot. e parade is open to all LCMHS clubs, organizations and teams, homecoming court, all District departments, campuses and LCM graduating classes celebrating reunions in intervals of 5 or 10. Community floats or vehicles are also invited to participate. Parade fees for community entries are community groups $50, businesses $100, and political ads $150. e Parade Committee reserves the right to refuse any entry which does not conform to the guidelines or does not represent the values upheld by the LCM CISD. Details and registration form can be downloaded at: Factsheet https://bit.ly/2NWdACn and Registration https://bit.ly/2wRIHs3 e registration form should be returned by September 14, to Stacey Smith at LCM High School, 7327 Highway 87 North, Orange, Texas 77632.

LC High School Alumni Reunion to be held e Little Cypress High School Alumni of classes from1953-1979 will hold a reunion on Saturday, September 22, 2018 at the VFW Post 2775 Hall Ballroom, located at 5303 16th St (Hwy 87) in Orange. e Little Cypress Friends Reception will be held from 3 pm to 5:30 pm, with a Baking Contest Judging to begin at 6:30 pm. We will have Music and Dancing from 7:00 pm to 11:30 pm with live music by original Fun Fair Band featuring Mike Poutra, Keith Kyle and Sammy Parish, and DJ Jimmy Guidry. e cost is $15 per person and that includes snacks, soft drinks, coffee, water. Wine, beer and setups will be available at VFW cash bar. ,Mail checks ($15per person) to: LCM Class Multi Class Reunion c/o Bridget O’Bannion, PO Box 2177, Beaumont, Texas 77704-2177. Tickets at the door available for $20 each. (Please note graduation class year and number attending on your check.) All proceeds from this event will be donated to LCM School District and is being held In honor and memory of Kenneth Lewis ’67 and Violet Lewis, Former Educator/Teacher at Little Cypress.

Cowboy Family Day Mosey on over to downtown Orange for a day of fall fun at the Stark Museum of Art's Cowboy FAMILY DAY on Saturday, September 22, 2018 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Saddle up, there will be a stampede of activities throughout the Museum, in the courtyard, and in the Walter G. Riedel III Education Center. Round up your family, friends, and neighbors to enjoy a full day of free fun, art and edible crafts, cartoons, live horses, outdoor games, face painting, coloring activities, story time, gallery scavenger hunt, photo ops, and more! Visitors of all ages will have the opportunity to explore the special exhibition, Portraits from Cowboys of Color: Photographs by Don Russell and Cowboy Legends and Life. Take a selfie in our field of bluebonnets and design your own sweet and tasty rodeo artwork at our edible craft station! Watch a classic cartoon that is set in the West in our Mini Movie eater and then create

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your own pop up western landscape in our hands-on crafts area. Go on a scavenger hunt through the Museum and win a western photo frame to make and use at home. Don't get too tuckered out before heading to our courtyard outside the Walter G. Riedel III Education Center! Visit with some horses from the Orange County Sheriff Posse, and take a stick horse for a gallop on the grass. Visitors can enter a raffle to be drawn at 11am, Noon and 1 pm with gift basket prizes ranging in value from $10 to $100 (must be present to win). Curator of Education, Jennifer Restauri Dickinson stated, "We are looking forward to throwing the doors wide open and inviting the community to Cowboy FAMILY DAY. Staff members from across the STARK Cultural Venues will make this a memorable day to be creative, laugh and enjoy your family and friends in the Stark Museum of Art. From a mini movie theater to live horses, edible art to arts &crafts, there really is something for everyone at Cowboy Family Day."

The Thrift & Gift shopping Seeing is believing. Selected group of pictures $1, shoes (boots excluded) $1, men’s and women’s blouses, shirts and pants $1, lingerie $1, coats and jackets $1 and children’s clothes .50. Bargain room has some new donations. e next First Saturday will be October 6 from 9 am to 1 pm and will include outdoor sales. Rent a space for $10. e rift & Gift is located at 350 37th St. ( off Strickland Drive between the Salvation Army and Sabine Credit Union). Call 409-886-7649 for additional information.

Fresh Start to a Healthier You! Better Living for Texans a part of Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Orange County invites you to join us for A Fresh Start to a Healthier You series. You will learn tips on saving money at the grocery store, food safety, and meal planning. We will be meeting at the Raymond Gould Community Center 385 Claiborne Street in Vidor once a week on ursdays for four weeks, 11 am to 12 noon, dates are September 27th, October 4th, 11th, and 18th. is program is free and available to everyone. Please contact, Tommy Byers, 409-882-7010 for additional information or to sign up.

Do Well Be Well with Diabetes e Texas A&M AgriLife Extension of Orange County is having a free Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Series. is is a 5 week series on every Monday in October (Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, & 29) from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm. Join us in learning how to prevent and control your type 2 diabetes, eat healthy and much more. Please attend all of the classes to get the full educational benefit. e classes will be located at the Extension Office on 1442 in Orange. Call the Extension office at 409882-7010 to reserve your spot in the class.

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6A • The Record • Week of Wednesday, September 12, 2018

A spectacular weekend of professional rodeo was put on by Cowboy Church at the T2 Arena. Woman's barrel racing, seen at left, was among the many events that thrilled the hundreds of spectators who turned out for the rodeo. RECORD PHOTO: Lawrence Trimm

Professional rodeo competitors from across the nation took part in the Cowboy Church Pro Rodeo held at T2 Arena last weekend. Saddle bronc riding was one of the featured events as seen here. RECORD PHOTO: Lawrence Trimm

It's a tough job but someone has got to do it. This rodeo clown gets the attention of a bull during Cowboy Church's Pro Rodeo held at T2 Arena last weekend. RECORD PHOTO: Lawrence Trimm

Orange County rodeo hands help the youngsters during Mutton Bustin' competition at T2 Arena. The Cowboy Church Pro Rodeo held last weekend was attended by hundreds of spectators. RECORD PHOTO: Lawrence Trimm

A professional rodeo competitor is in pursuit during the Ladies Breakaway event at the Cowboy Church Pro Rodeo held at T2 Arena last weekend. RECORD PHOTO: Lawrence Trimm

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The Record • Week of Wednesday, September 12, 2018 •

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LUSCIOUS CAKE A friend of mine, Rebecca Flickinger, made this scrumptious cake for another friend's Book-Ins meeting for American Association of University Women (AAUW) a few months ago. I liked it so much, I begged her for the recipe. She obtained it from an old church cookbook from her church, First Christian of Orange.

Equipment Needed 2 mixing bowls, one for cake and one for icing Hand or counter electric mixer 2 large spoon for scooping as mixing, and one for icing Measuring cup Measuring spoons Rectangular baking pan, 11"X 9" Baker's choice spray of Crisco and flour or grease and flour pan

Cake Ingredients 2 cups sugar 2 large eggs 2 cups flour 1 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. vanilla 1 20-oz can crushed pineapple, undrained (use entire can) Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix well. Pour into greased and floured 11"X 9" sheet cake pan. Bake at 350 for 35-40 minutes, depending upon your oven. Remove from oven to stove top. Ice while still warm! You may want to poke holes lightly in top of cake to absorb more of icing.

Icing Ingredients 8 oz. box of creamed cheese, brought to room temperature

one stick butter, brought to room temperature 2 tsp. vanilla 1 box powdered sugar Mix all icing ingredients together and pour over warm cake, so mix the icing while cake is baking. According to my friend, Rebecca, this cake works best if first frozen, then taken out of freezer, and cut shortly afterwards, in order to hold its structure. en, cut cake into small to medium square pieces. e squares can then be decorated for the appropriate season. For example, now might be a good time for candy corn and pumpkins on top. Patriotic times could consist of red, white, and blue fruit or candies...e cake is totally a keeper! anks, Rebecca!

The OCF group met for its annual Get-Acquainted Coffee at the renovated Orange Train Depot at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, September 11 for a light brunch, coffee, and punch. The group's various activities were explained. Membership cost is $15 per year. Text or phone Carolyn at 409.779.0208 or email her at: Chasse_cal@yahoo.com for more information. New members in Orange County Friends (OCF) pause for a moment with their sponsor, Diane Dotson, far right, of Orangefield, retired Vidor ISD counselor. From left, standing, are Doris Haines of Vidor, Beth Vacek of Orangefield, and Gail Hamilton of Mauriceville. Seated is Kathy Fall of Mauriceville. All the ladies graduated from Stark High School Class of 1970. NOT pictured but also a member is Belinda Giarratano of Orange, retired Vidor ISD teacher.

Armstrong named Sept. student e Bridge City Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce that the September Student of the Month for Orangefield High School is Jonathan Armstrong. Jonathan was presented his certificate and gift bag by Bridge City Chamber Ambassador Christy Khoury, Orange County Treasurer, at the September coffee hosted by the Friends of the Bridge City Public Library. He received gift certificates and gifts from: COS Printing, Wellspring Credit Union, Tiger Rock Martial Arts of Bridge City, Sabine Federal Credit Union, Sabine River Ford, Complete Staffing, Neches Federal Credit Union, Bridge City Bank, Bridge City Walmart, Best Day Spa, Coastal Dream Travel, and Las Rosas Mexican Restaurant. Jonathan is the son Brad and Cheryl Armstrong. He has a GPA of 4.62 and is ranked 11 of 116. Jonathan’s awards and honors include: • Top 10 percent • Automatic admission to Texas A&M University • National Honor Society

Pictured left to right: Principal Zach Quinn, Brad Armstrong, Jonathan Armstrong, Christy Khoury, Cheryl Armstrong and Counselor Crissa Bonnin. Member • Stark Reading Contest Finalist • 4-year Bobcat Baseball Varsity Starter • All District Baseball player 3 years • Varsity Letterman in football freshman year • Boys State Nominee • Sports writer since the age of 14 for Astrosfuture.com and TexSR.com

Art Club members pictured are: (left to right) Elizabeth Quintero, Kendall Phillips, Maddie Smith, Abby Broussard, Bella Tran, Alyson McAllister, Reagan Pitre Lauren Corrao, Aidan McAllister, Victoria Cole, Jacob Gonzalez, Kiera Howington, Kolbe Hughes, Hannah Allison and William Pitre. Mrs. Cindy Claybar is sponsor of the Art Club and Junior Art Club of St. Mary Catholic School. The 2018-2019 Art Club Officers are Regan Pitre, President; Maddie Smith, Vice President; Bella Tran, Secretary; Cort Hickman, Treasurer; Natasha Negron, Attendance Clerk; Lauren Corrao, Historian; William Pitre, Sergeant at Arms; Abby Broussard, Chaplain.

• Guest contributor on sports podcast TexSR.com (commentator for sports review) Jonathan’s clubs and organizations include: • FCA - Fellowship of Christian Athletes • Uprising - Christian Fellowship • Class officer all 4 years of high school

See STUDENT, Page 5B

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8A • The Record • Week of Wednesday, Sept. 12,

2018

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Kaz’s Fearless Football Forecast

THE RECORD

SPORTS AND OUTDOORS

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GAMES THIS WEEK JOE KAZMAR FOR THE RECORD

WOS Mustangs over Newton Eagles The Mustangs are in danger of losing their second straight home game in a decade. They shouldn’t let that happen, but the Newton Eagles come to town boasting state championships, too. This game should be as close as the Nederland game two weeks ago— but with different results.

Jasper Bulldogs Over LCM Bears The Battlin’ Bears seem to go from one tough team to another, with no relief in sight. The Bulldogs have looked very impressive so far this season and should only get better at the expense of the punchless Bears.

BC Cardinals Over Anahuac The visitors should be excited to have an opponent that hasn’t won a game yet this season and has scored only one touchdown in the process. Perhaps the friendly home field will inspire the Cardinals against this Class 3A foe.

Bridge City Cardinal quarterback Cace Skinner scrambles behind blocks by the lineman and running back Gavin Villanueva against Jasper. After two weeks on the road the Cardinals will host their home opener this Friday against Anahuac. RECORD PHOTO: Lisa Anderson

Young Bobcats look for perfect start Dave Rogers

For The Record

A perfect non-district campaign is on the line Friday night when Orangefield travels to play similarly unbeaten, 2-0 Shepherd. The game’s location has been moved to Splendora High School and the game time shifted to  7:30 p.m.because of soggy field conditions at Shepherd and the availability of an artificial turf playing surface at Splendora. The Bobcats rolled to 2-0 with a 41-0 win over Woodville last week.

Shepherd, Orangefield’s next opponent, defeated Woodville 68-7 in week 1. “This will be the best opponent we’ve seen,” Coach Josh Smalley said of Shepherd. “They’re very good on offense with two or three real good running backs. Their defense is small up front but very aggressive. They’ll present a good challenge for our young offensive line.” Every offensive line starter, except senior Josh Landry, is new to the Bobcat varsity. “We are so young all over and

these guys have got to grow up pretty fast. We’re fortunate to have some good senior leadership, and our kids have been willing to come to work every day and get better.” “Josh has been good and he helps us a bunch,” Smalley said of his center. “If you can only have one lineman back, that’s a good place to start. He knows all the calls.” Quarterback Mason Gonzales, who also plays some at defensive end, and Blake Bradley, a starter at fullback and linebacker, are two more of the team’s top senior lead-

Shepherd Over Orangefield

ers, the coach said. Smalley listed a trio of juniors -guard-defensive tackle Brady Bellow, strong safety Chase Broussard and running back Heston Puckett – among the early surprises. Puckett leads the team in rushing with 14 carries for 176 yards and 2 touchdowns, a 12.6 yards-per-carry average; and Quy Tsan is next with 7 carries for 121 yards and 2 TDs (17.3 per carry). With his team averaging nearly 350 yards per game rushing, Gonzales has only been called upon to

FOOTBALL Page 3B

The undefeated Bobcats are hunting in another Class 4A team’s territory, this time at Shepherd which is also undefeated. And they surely won’t be as accommodating as Livingston was last week. An upset victory is just what the ‘Cats need to make this season one of their best.

Vidor Pirates Over Conroe Caney Creek The Pirates enjoyed an early open week which gives them much more time to prepare for their opening home game as an undefeated team.

Deweyville Pirates Over Kountze The Pirates evened their early record last week with a 36-0 shutout at Colmesneil and want to keep the streak alive against the visiting Lions.

LCM Battlin’ Bear running back Ethan McCollum trudges for yardage as WOS Mustang tacklers move in. RECORD PHOTO: Darian Simmons

Setting up the first touchdown of the game, tight end Keontae Strother takes a quick pass 9 yard to the two. Tyrone Wilson scored on the next play from two yards out, early in the first quarter. Strother was 3 for 3 for 37 yards, while Wilson started on defense but still scored two touchdowns. RECORD PHOTO: Meri Elen Jacobs

Community Christian Over Houston Emery The Lions open their season Friday at home and hope to treat their ardent supporters to a victory.

Lamar University Over Northwestern State Both teams have the same thing in common—they each were annihilated in their respective “sacrificial lamb” game against a major university for their big money game. The Cards have the home field advantage which hopefully will be enough.

See All This Week’s Fearless Forecast Including College and Pro Picks PAGE 3B

Sophomore Jalen Thompson hits Bear Ethan McCollum and causes him to fumble the ball. LC-M was plagued with fumbles all night long. RECORD PHOTO: Meri Elen Jacobs

The Chain Gang defense limited the Bears from LC-M to five first downs and 85 total yards. RECORD PHOTO: Meri Elen Jacobs

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2B • The Record • Week of Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Crazy Croaker may be answer

DICKIE COLBURN FISHING REPORT FOR THE RECORD

I was fishing with Bill Keller earlier this week and we were discussing Hurricane Florence which had drawn a bead on the east coast at that time. “It seems like yesterday that we were going through the same thing with Harvey,” said Keller. “We could never have dreamed that we would flood where we built, but we lost our dream house which we had lived in only two months, both cars and our dogs. at is a helpless feeling when you are in such danger that you can’t even consider your home or pets!” Like too many other folks, Keller and his wife had no flood insurance and were forced to sell “as is” and move. “We put a trailer on six acres of land we own near Montgomery, picked up a new dog that my wife named, Harvey, at the rescue shelter and all is well.” Bill and Sharon Stanley of Orange also made the tough decision to move rather than rebuild after Harvey and guess where they moved. Hopefully, they are far enough inland that Florence won’t wipe them out again. It never fails that just about the time we convince ourselves that the fishing is going to turn around in Sabine Lake, we get

more rain than is needed. I fished with L a m a r Belcher last Friday, the day after he had very nearly limited on both trout and redfish and we managed to put that bite to sleep. He had been at the right place at the right time on the right tide and found the fish following big white shrimp out of the marsh.I am not sure that we saw a single white shrimp the next morning, but that’s fishing. e following afternoon, a storm cut our trip short, but we boxed nine trout and five redfish, before seeing the first bolt of lightning. We were fishing a slow outgoing tide and found the fish beating up on schools of shad in four to six feet of water. When the rain slowed down Monday evening, we ran to the same area and the shad were nowhere to be found, but the fish were still there. We kept seven trout and four redfish while releasing a good number of undersize twelve to thirteen inch specks. Even with all of the rain and dirtier water I am eager to get back out there simply because we caught fish on a lure that I have not fished in a long time

See COLBURN, Page 3B

Bridge City running back Gavin Villanueva looks for running room against the Jasper Bulldogs. RECORD PHOTO: Lisa Anderson

Takin’ it on the chin Local fans disappointed by first week KAZ’S KORNER JOE KAZMAR

FOR THE RECORD Week One is in the books to the dismay of Orange Area National Football League fans as the Dallas Cowboys, Houston Texans, New Orleans Saints and Seattle Seahawks each eliminated themselves from the pressure of having an undefeated 2018 season. Perhaps all four franchises had a common element that got them started on the wrong foot Sunday—costly mistakes that led to easy opponents’ points. e Cowboys couldn’t overcome Carolina’s goal to “sack Dak” and were successful six times. It was quite apparent that the departures of Jason Witten, Dez Bryant and kicker Dan Bailey weakened the offense considerably as the 16-8 final score indicated. e Panthers’ defense kept the Cowboy’s one-two punch of quarterback Dak Prescott and featured running back Ezekiel Elliott in check. Prescott was limited to 170 yards passing while Elliott was able to manage 69 yards on only 15 carries, which was a two-year low for him. Neither Dallas nor the Houston Texans came to life offensively until they were at least two touchdowns down on the

scoreboard. e Cowboys found themselves behind 16-0 in the fourth quarter until Elliott scored from four yards out and a two-point conversion cut the lead in half. Prescott got stripped from the football to halt an attempt for the tying touchdown. is was the first time Dallas failed to score in the first half since 2002. Houston also waited until late in the third period for its offense to wake up after finding themselves on the short end of a 24-6 score. Poor clock management by Head Coach Bill O’Brien perhaps gave New England a touchdown just before halftime. Rob Gronkowski attempted to make a great 28-yard catch over the middle but replays clearly revealed the ball hit the ground when Gronk did. O’Brien, who had all three timeouts, should have called one or thrown a red flag to let the replay officials rule on the play. But the 41-year old Tom Brady hurriedly got his team to the line of scrimmage and ran a play before anyone could review the play. e Patriots scored near the end of the second period, which could very well have made the difference in New England’s seven-point victory, 27-20. Houston’s second-year quarterback Deshaun Watson played his worse game as a starter last season before suffering a season-ending injury. Monday’s edition of the Houston Chronicle graded his performance with an “F”. O’Brien did a smidgen better with an “F+”. e New Orleans Saints showed the 73,000 fans in the Superdome that offensive football in the NFL is not dead as 88

points and over 1,000 yards were rolled up by the Saints and Tampa Bay. However, anyone who visited the ‘Dome to see if New Orleans’ defense has improved from last season went home disappointed after watching a 48-40 Saints loss. Orange native Earl omas pleased the Seattle Seahawks’ fan base by ending his holdout last week and started at free safety Sunday against the Broncos at Denver. According to the Associated Press, Earl posted an Instagram Wednesday announcing his return saying he “never let his teammates, city or fans down as long as I have lived and don’t plan to start this weekend.” And Earl didn’t disappoint as he intercepted a pass in the first period that led to the first score of the game. Unfortunately, Denver’s oneman wrecking crew--Von Miller--did a number on the Seahawks’ offense, sacking quarterback Russell Wilson three times, forcing two fumbles and recovering one as the Broncos squeezed out a 27-24 victory. However, the NFL’s other news-making holdout, Pittsburgh’s All-Pro running back Le’Veon Bell, doesn’t feel the same way about his teammates or fans and held out of Sunday’s game which ended up in a 21-21 tie with the hapless Cleveland Browns. is marked the NFL’s first opening-day tie since 1971. Bell’s 100-plus rushing yard average per game certainly would have made a difference in the game in which Pittsburgh quarterback Ben Roethlisberger was picked off three times by the Browns, who apparently didn’t respect the running game without Bell. KWICKIES…Former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick called the only two NFL players who knelt down during the National Anthem Sunday “his

brothers.” Miami Dolphins teammates Kenny Still and Albert Wilson were the only players to kneel. Kaepernick, who is no longer welcome on an NFL sideline, made sure to offer his thanks to them via social media. Sunday’s 27-20 win by the New England Patriots over the Houston Texans marked the 78th straight time the Pats have won when leading by 10 or more points at halftime. It’s amazing the way Carolina Panthers’ quarterback Cam Newton loves to run with the football and hasn’t suffered any major injury. He has only missed three games in his seven-year career. Khalil Mack got off on the right foot with his new team— the Chicago Bears-- Sunday night as he became the only player since 1982 to register a sack, an interception, fumble recovery, forced fumble and a touchdown. e traded initiated by Oakland Raiders’ new head coach Jon Gruden could very well put him in the hot seat before the season gets too far along. JUST BETWEEN US…And while the Houston Texans were getting a football lesson Sunday afternoon, just a few miles down the road at Fenway Park, the Houston Astros were playing the major league’s winningest team, the Boston Red Sox in the final game of a threegame series. It was the Red Sox who were behind the 8-ball in this series as they hoped to prevent our Astros from sweeping the series. It looked like it wouldn’t be a problem as they jumped out to a 5-1 lead off lefthander Dallas Keuchel. But the Astros came roaring back and tied the game in the sixth inning and it remained tied until the Bosox scored the winning run with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning on a broken bat bloop single to the opposite field. All three games were fun to watch.

Tight end B'Jon Arvie made his first career touchdown on a short pass from Jerren Terrell that he took 27 yards before leaping into the end zone. Arvie, who has played basketball his entire life, played both offense and defense in only his second football game ever. RECORD PHOTO: Meri Elen Jacobs

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The Record • Week of Wednesday, September 12, 2018 •

Football pass four times. He has completed half his passes for 56 yards. Under his leadership, the Bobcats haven’t lost a turnover through two games. Clayson Choate has 7 punt returns for a 20-yard average, Tsan has a 26-yard kickoff return average and Choate has one interception he returned 85 yards for a TD. at interception return got the Bobcats on the scoreboard against Livingston. Puckett scored on a 49-yard gallop, Choate scored another defensive TD on a scoop and score and Gonzales made it 28-0 at halftime with a short rushing score. Gonzales and Tsan each ran for scores in the second half. While Shepherd definitely will test the Bobcats this week, Smalley says he would like more tests for his young team before it enters District 12-3A-I. “e last six years we had six non-district games and this year we have only three,” Smalley said, noting the district opener is next, after a bye week, at Buna Sept. 28. “at means we don’t have as much preparation time, especially with our inexperienced line. It’s definitely something we’ve got to be aware of. “In an eight-team district, we can’t afford a slip-up. We have to get ready.” Mustangs host No. 1 ranked Eagles After snapping a two-game losing streak with a 47-0 win over Little Cypress-Mauriceville, West Orange-Stark is looking to make it two wins in a row when it hosts defending Class 3A Division II state champ Newton Fridaynight. e return of injured tailback Kavyn Cooper and a 9-for-12 for 188 yards and three TDs by quarterback Jerren Terrell led WOS to a 34-0 halftime lead. e Mustangs’ Chain Gang Defense limited LCM to 40 yards in the first half, 85 yards total, and forced three turnovers. Ja’Marcus Ross rushed 10 times for 97 yards and one scores while Cooper added 90 yards on 10 carries. Quarterback Tyron Wilson scored two Mustang rushing TDs in the first half and receiver Brettlin Wiley caught two touchdown passes for 105 yards in all. WOS scored in the second

From Page 1B Southeast Texas Football Standings

District 11-4A Div. I ..................W Splendora ..................................2 Lumberton ..................................1 Bridge City..................................0 Huffman Hargrave......................0 LC-Mauriceville ..........................0 Livingston ..................................0

L 0 1 2 2 2 2

District 10-4A Div. II ................W Liberty ........................................2 Hamshire-Fannett ......................1 Hardin-Jefferson ........................1 West Orange-Stark ....................1 Silsbee ......................................0

L 0 1 1 1 2

District 12-3A Div. I ..................W Buna ..........................................2 East Chambers ..........................2 Hardin ........................................2 Orangefield ................................2 Woodville....................................2 Anahuac ....................................1 Kirbyville ....................................0 Warren ......................................0

L 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2

District 12-5A Div. II ................W Crosby........................................2 Nederland ..................................2 Vidor ..........................................1 Baytown Lee ..............................1 Barbers Hill ................................1 Port Neches-Groves ..................1 Dayton........................................0 Santa Fe ....................................0

L 0 0 0 1 1 1 2 2

District 12-2A Div. I ..................W Hull-Daisetta ..............................2 San Augustine ............................1 Deweyville ..................................1 Groveton ....................................1 West Sabine ..............................1 Shelbyville ..................................0

L 0 0 1 1 1 2

half on a 31-yard run By Ross and a pair of field goals (30 and 19 yards) by Angel Ibarra. In their home opener a couple of weeks ago, the Mustangs suffered their first home game since 2010, falling 19-18 to Nederland. State champions in 2015 and 2016, WOS had won 40 straight games before coming up short in the 2017 state championship game against Pleasant Grove. Cardinals take on Anahuac in home opener Bridge City is looking forward to some home cooking this week. After falling to Diboll and Jasper on the road, the Cardinals are looking to get a W on the ledger. While Jasper’s speedsters did their thing in a 45-7 win, BC’s team rushed for 245 yards on 54 carries. Andy Lara topped the century mark with 18 carries for 108 yards, Gavin Villanueva had 51 yards on 11 carries and Rylan Ply had 45 yards on eight carries. Trent Lagrappe had the Cardinals’ six-pointer. Lagrappe also had BC’s only pass reception, a 47-yarder

Kaz’s Fearless Forecast souri over Purdue, Northwestern over Akron, Kentucky over Murray State, Mississippi State over Louisiana-Lafayette, Texas A&M over Louisiana-Monroe, Louisville over Western Kentucky, USC over Texas, Arizona State over San Diego State, Ohio State over TCU, Washington over Utah, UCLA over Fresno State. PRO PICKS—Baltimore over Cincinnati (ursday Night); Philadelphia over Tampa Bay,

from Cace Skinner, as the Cards gained 291 total yards. Bears try to cool red-hot Bulldogs e Little Cypress-Mauriceville Bears will get a shot at another Southeast Texas high school football Goliath Friday night when they host Jasper. e Bulldogs are coming off a 45-7 win over Bridge City, while LCM’s Bears were blanked, 470, by West Orange-Stark. Losing three turnovers, the Bears ran only 36 offensive

plays in their matchup with the Mustangs. Quarterback Ethan McCollum led the Bears with 23 yards rushing and was 1 for 6 passing for 10 yards. Landon Bearden was the team’s leading receiver with two catches for 11 yards. Bearden had six kickoff returns for 75 total yards. Colt LeBleu came up with an interception off WOS quarterback Jerren Terrell.

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From Page 1B

Houston over Tennessee, Washington over Indianapolis, Green Bay over Minnesota, New Orleans over Cleveland, Kansas City over Pittsburgh, Miami over NY Jets, Atlanta over Carolina, LA Chargers over Buffalo, LA Rams over Arizona, San Francisco over Detroit, Denver over Oakland, New England over Jacksonville, Dallas over NY Giants (all Sunday); New England over Jacksonville (Monday Night).

Colburn and it may be a difference maker. We caught our first few fish on a small spook and a DOA shrimp under a cork, but Johnny changed the game when he tied on a Crazy Croaker for no good reason. ey ate it like it was candy over the next hour or so. e soft plastic crankbait has always been at its best when the shrimp start entering the lake. It also seems to be at its best when nothing else is working particularly well. e first time I really saw the lure do its thing was years ago on a trip to Big Lake. Brad Deslatte and I were catching trout here and there on Corkies and tails when he broke out a Crazy Croaker. We instantly started catching fish that we had obviously drifted through with little luck only moments before. It was also raining cats and dogs that day so maybe it is at its best in foul weather. I detest the stock hooks as they are small and a little on the weak side, but changing to a larger hook kills the effectiveness of the bait so I put up with a few missed fish. Getting strikes beats the hell out of casting practice with another lure. It is also a lure that you can easily throw a long way even when casting directly into the wind. It isn’t much to look at as it is short and compact and produces little or no vibration when retrieved. I think the smaller profile makes the difference. is is also a lure that I prefer to fish on monofilament rather than braid as the added stretch of the mono doesn’t overpower

In his first varsity start, sophomore quarterback Jerren Terrell ran the Mustang offense like a pro. Terrell completed 9 of 12 passes for 188 yards and three touchdowns. RECORD PHOTO: Meri Elen Jacobs

From Page 2B the smaller hooks. A softer action rod helps as well. I fish much of the time with a medium light action Laguna, but I will switch to the lighter Latis model when fishing the Crazy Croaker.

We will just have to see how all of this rain effects the bite, but I would recommend targeting balls of shad with the smaller crankbait on your next trip. And, yes, the redfish will eat it as well!

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3B


4B • The Record • Week of Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Teal season opens up this weekend and everyone including the dogs are ready.

Bridge City Cardinal quarterback Cace Skinner hands off to Gavin Villanueva as Andy Lara (36) and Braydon Little(71) pave the way against the Jasper Bulldogs. This week Big Red hosts Anahuac in Bridge City's home opener. RECORD PHOTO: Lisa Anderson

Local hunters set for start of teal season OUTDOORS WEEKLY CAPT. CHUCK UZZLE FOR THE RECORD

In what has become a highly anticipated yearly ritual, wingshooters from all over Texas will make there way to the fields and marshes as the 2018-2019 waterfowl hunting season officially gets underway. e teal season opener has become a real gathering of sorts, almost a social get together if you will. Hunters eagerly awaiting each new hunting season head to the fields for their first taste of what is in store and this one looks promising thanks to some recent rains. Both fields and marshes are abundant with life and fresh growth, a plus for some and a curse for others. e early teal season is a great September option for waterfowlers who want to get a jump on their hunting opportunities. e 16 day season opens statewide on Saturday and runs through Sept. 30th. Shooting hours are 30 minutes before sunrise to sunset and the bag limit is 6 teal, any species. Heavy rains in recent weeks have made the marshes flush with new vegetation and fresh water, both of which should really help the hunters as well as the birds. With the promise of the years first cool fronts coming in September it is understandable that the hunters have high hopes. So far nature and the weatherman have cooperated, at least up until this point. Now all we need is some cooperation from the birds and no crazy weather that would cause catastrophic changes in the outlook. September has been an active month historically in the Gulf of Mexico, hopefully we will spared any

problems. e outlook for Teal hunters is outstanding as the numbers of birds in our area is solid and continuing to build. Local scouting reports have been favorable and a huge push of birds should make their way into our part of the state during the next full moon. e first cool front will help usher more teal south as they continue along their migration towards Mexico and beyond. Rice fields and areas along the prairies that are holding water are seeing huge concentrations of teal while the same can be said for the coastal marshes. I wouldn't be surprised at all to see the public hunting areas along the coast do very well for this weekends opener, especially after a recent scouting trip I made. A few things to remember about the early teal season that shouldn't be ignored. First and foremost is safety for everyone involved in the hunt. It's warm outside and that means all the creepy crawlies will still be hanging around. Alligators and snakes will certainly make their presence felt so be on the lookout, especially if you bring a dog. Mosquitoes will be another concern and with the West Nile Virus lurking around it's important to take proper precautions so don't leave home without repellant. Now as far as hunting goes don't make it too complicated, teal are usually rather easy to decoy so scouting is more important than decoy placement or calling. Be in area where the birds want to be and you should be fine. If you feel like calling a whistle is the best call you can have on your lanyard, a few easy "peeps" on a whistle is often all you need to get teal to commit to your spread. e shooting can be fast and furious at times so always be aware of those around you, no bird is worth an accident. e forecast is good for opening morning so hopefully the birds cooperate, there are certainly enough of them out there to make this one a memorable opening day.

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CMYK


The Record • Week of Wednesday, September 12, 2018 •

5B

Pictured Left to Right: Wanda McGraw, Superintendent Todd Lintzen, Principal Tim Woolley, Brandon Curl, Crystal Curl, Jeff Curl, and Counselor Allisha Bonneaux.

Curl is BC student of month

Bridge City's Ethan Morgan returns a kick against the Jasper Bulldogs. After two weeks on the road the Cardinals will host their home opener this Friday against Anahuac. RECORD PHOTO: Lisa Anderson

The Lady Hornet Volleyball team from St. Mary Catholic School pulled off their first victory of the season. The 5th through 8th grade girls coached by Krystal Smith beat the Wildcats from St. Catherine. The Hornets have made great strides and showed a lot of progress since the beginning of the season. Pictured are front row (left to right) Regan Pitre, the only 8th grader on the team and Abby Broussard. Middle row Elizabeth Quintero, Paityn Golden, Alyson McAllister & Grace Wimberley. Back row Coach Krystal Smith, Lauren Corrao, Kiera Howington and Haley Johnson.

e Bridge City Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce that the September Student of the Month for Bridge City High School is Brandon Curl. Brandon was presented his certificate and gift bag by Ambassador/Board Member Wanda McGraw, Assistant Vice President of Marketing at Sabine Federal Credit Union, at the September Networking Coffee hosted by the Friends of the Bridge City Public Library. He received gift certificates and gifts from: COS Printing, Wellspring Credit Union, Tiger Rock Martial Arts of Bridge City, Sabine Federal Credit Union, Sabine River Ford, Complete Staffing, Neches Federal Credit Union, Bridge City Bank, Bridge City Walmart, Best Day Spa, Coastal Dream Travel and Las Rosas Mexican Restaurant. Brandon is the son of Jeff and Crystal Curl. He is ranked #1 of 187 with a GPA 4.89. Brandon’s Awards and Honors include: • National Merit Recognized Student • AP Scholar • National Honor Society • “A” Honor Roll • Edison Junior Inventor • TMEA All-Region Band Member • (6A Area Qualifier) • Superior Ratings at UIL Solo and Ensemble Contest Brandon’s Clubs and Organizations include: • UIL Academics State Competitor • Head Drum Major • Academic Team Captain • Culture Club Co-Founder & Co-President • “Students for Space” Congressional Advisory Council • Youth Leadership of SETX • Stark Reading Contest Competitor - County and District

In community service, Brandon has volunteered at: • Baptist Hospital Volunteer • St. Henry’s Catholic Church Alter Server and Confirmation Youth Group • “Hurricane Harvey Heroes” • “Cause for Paws” YLSET Service Project • Shady Meadows Nursing Home Tami Goss, Director of Bands, said, “Brandon is one of the most impressive students I have had the opportunity to teach. His academic achievements are beyond impressive, and his involvement in multiple clubs and organizations is admirable. Brandon strives to be well-rounded, and he is devoted to performing at the highest level in all things. Brandon also leads be sheer example and commands respect from his peers, though they give it willingly. His character and leader-

Student • Active member of church youth group Jonathan assisted with cleanup after Harvey, gutting and repairing homes in the area. Bridget Trawhon, Professional Communications Teacher, said, “Jonathan Armstrong has a bright future before him. He is a true Aggie fan and bleeds maroon. His communication skills are superb and I wish him the best of luck in his future. Gig' em, Johnny!” Simone Oregel, Math Teacher, said, “Jonathan was a great student to have in Honors PreCal. I wish he would have taken AP Calculus this year.” Jonathan plans on attending Texas A&M in the Fall of 2019

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ship are truly second to none.” Shannon King, Social Studies Teacher, said, “Brandon is a real go-getter. Brandon definitely understands the value of goal setting; he has set and achieved several goals for himself, namely earning several medals in Calculator at State UIL and becoming an AP Scholar, no small honor, all the while maintaining stellar grades.” When asked about his future plans, Brandon said, “I plan on attending the University of Texas at Austin to earn a BS in Biology with Honors and a BA in Plan II with Honors and a Pre-Med Concentration. After my undergraduate studies, I would like to attend Harvard Medical School followed by a residency in radiation oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and eventually go on to work at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.”

From Page 7A and major in Sports Management. He will work towards an internship with TexAgs.com while striving towards his dream job of a career in Major League Baseball or NCAA football, and hopefully become a general manager or football analyst for Fightin’ Texas Aggie Football! Jonathan also said that in the next 4-5 years he plans on being involved in Breakaway, a Christian ministry at Texas A&M. It is the largest weekly student gathering in the country. He plans to spend his summers at PineCove Christian camp as a counselor, where he will serve many children and families.


6B • The Record • Week of Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Orange County Church Directory

Preparing for the Storms of Life have in Christ, and how God uses suffering in our lives for our transformation and his glory. There are several important verses in Romans 8, such as Romans 8:18, 28–30, 35–39. 4. Pray. We need to develop an active prayer life. During the calm seasons of life, we need to grow in prayer and learn to turn to God for all things. The more we trust and rely on God in prayer, the more we will utilize prayer during the trials of life. In a crisis, we tend to do things by instinct. Prayer should be instinctual, like breathing. Christina Fox Guest Contributor desiringGod.org

The Storms of Life

Where I live it is hurricane season. And like anyone familiar with the Atlantic or Caribbean knows, it’s important to be prepared for a hurricane. Every summer we stock up on supplies of batteries, water, canned goods, and other necessities. We make sure to keep our tree limbs trimmed. We map out where we will go in the case of an evacuation. For many who live near the coast though, we can get lax in our preparations. When it’s been a few years since the threat of a storm, we let our stock of supplies go. Though the meteorologist warns us every year to be prepared, too often we prefer to wait until there actually is a storm churning out on the horizon. That’s what happened the year I was nine months pregnant and two category-three storms hit our coastal town. The stores were crowded with people buying food and water. I scrambled to figure out where to go and what to take with me. The lines at the gas stations were long. And after the storm, when everyone was without power for weeks, the realities of the need for storm readiness hit hard.

It seems like common sense to prepare ahead of time for a hurricane, tornado, or blizzard. How about the storms of life? Should we prepare in advance for periods of trial and suffering? I believe that it is important to prepare our minds and hearts for the inevitable trials of life. Without a theological foundation in place for how to face such storms, we are at greater risk for being blown over by the fierce winds of suffering when they arrive. What does it mean to have a theological foundation? It means having a theology of suffering: knowing what we believe and why about God, his sovereignty, and the hardships we experience in this world. Developing a Theology of Suffering So how do we develop a theology of suffering? What are some practical ways we can prepare for the storms of life? Here are four simple ways, like gathering hurricane supplies, that we can prepare for the storms of tomorrow. 1. Study the Word. We need to study what the Bible says about trials and suffering. Why do they exist? How

First United Methodist Church Orange 502 Sixth Street 886-7466 9:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship in the Family Life Center 11:00 a.m. Service - Traditional Worship in the Sanctuary Sunday School For All Ages 10:00 a.m.

www.fumcorange.org

Pastor: Rev. John Warren Director of Music and Fine Arts: Doug Rogers

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH ORANGEFIELD 9788 F.M. 105 Orangefield 409.735.3113

Sun: Bible Study 9:15 a.m., Worship Service 10:30 a.m., Evening Worship 6:30 p.m. Wednesday evening serviceS: Youth and Children 6:30 p.m., Praise and Prayer 6:30 p.m., Choir practice 7:30 p.m. Pastor Cody Hogden Email: office@fbcof.com / Website: www.fbcof.com

Starlight

Church of God in Christ 2800 Bob Hall Road • Orange • 886-4366 Pastor: Ernest B Lindsey

should we respond? How does God use suffering in our lives? We also need to study what Scripture teaches about God, who he is, and his character. It makes a big difference whether we believe God is out to get us or whether we believe that he is holy, righteous, and good in all that he does. 2. Affirm God’s sovereignty. What we believe about God’s sovereignty plays a significant role in how we face suffering. Do we believe that he is in absolute control over everything that happens? Do we trust that he will use all things, even our suffering, for our good and his glory? How can we trust in and find hope in his sovereignty? 3. Memorize Scripture. We need to learn and memorize verses that point to the truth about suffering and the trials of life. We can memorize passages on God’s promises toward us, the hope we

It was ten years ago that I delivered my first child after a hurricane blew through our town. It was a frightening time that is hard to forget. Facing the storms of life unprepared is frightening as well. It’s in the times of peace and calm that we need to develop a theology of suffering by steeping ourselves in Scripture and praying through hard questions. And we need to pray for a faith that faces the devastation that storms of life leave behind, a faith that can say, “Blessed be the name of the Lord!” Christina Fox (@christinarfox) writes for a number of Christian ministries and publications including True Woman, ERLC, and The Gospel Coalition. She is the author of Closer Than a Sister: How Union with Christ helps Friendships to Flourish. You can find her at www.christinafox.com and on Facebook. The above article was published June 25, 2014 by desiringGod.org

Full Gospel Holy Temple 911 Main Ave. Orange 883-5125

Pastor: Elder Larry Brooks Sr. Co-Paster: Evangelist Abbigail Brooks WORSHIP SERVICES Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Worship 11 am Sunday Night Service 7:30 pm Wednesday Night 7:30 pm Friday Night 7:30 pm

A Church For All People

CORNERSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH

2537 FM 1078 • Orange • 883-8835 Sunday School 9:45 - 10:45 a.m. Sunday Services: 10:50 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Faith United Methodist Church

8608 MLK• Orange • 886-1291 Pastor: Keith Tilley Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. Nursery Provided. (www.faithorange.org)

Harvest Chapel 1305 Irving St. • West Orange •409-313-2768

Wed. Bible Study - 6 p.m. Worship 7:30 p.m. VIM Youth 6 p.m.

Sunday Worship 10 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Nightly Service 6 p.m. Wednesday Night Service: 6 p.m.

Intercessory Prayer Daily 9:00 a.m. www.slcogicorange.org

Pastor: Ruth Burch

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Worship 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.

Patronize ‘The Record’ Church Sponsors

Become A Sponsor And List Your Business Here To Support Local Church News

LIKE NEW AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION SPECIALIST

Winfree Baptist Church 19525 Hwy 62 S • 409-735-7181 Bill Collier, Pastor Sunday School for all ages 9:15 am Morning Worship 10:30 am Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wednesday Evening Service & Mission Activities for Children 6:00 pm

Triangle Baptist Church 6446 Garrison at Hwy. 408 Orangefield “Come Worship With Us” 409-735-2661 Pastor: Bobby Oliver 409-659-5027 Sunday School 10 a.m. Worship Service 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m. We are a KJV independent Baptist Church

Email: Stpauls@stpaulsorangetx.com

St. Paul United Methodist Church

1155 W. Roundbunch • Bridge City • 409.735.5546 Sunday Morning Worship Experience: 8:30 a.m., Sunday school 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship 10:45 a.m. (Nursery provided). For middle and senior high youth 3:30 p.m. - 6 p.m. Taize’ service for children 6:30 p.m. “Kids For Christ” Wednesday 6 p.m.-7 p.m. For information on pre-school enrollment 409-735-5546

GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN CHURCH

945 W. Roundbunch • Bridge City • 409-735-4573 Worship Services: Tradition 9 a.m., Sunday School 10:15 a.m., Contemporary Service 11 a.m., Monday ‘Compassionate Friends’ 6 p.m., Wednesday ‘Compassionate Friends’ 10 a.m., Thursday Bible Study 10:00 a.m. Pastor Paul Zoch 409-988-3003 - golutheran.org Our church family invites you to join us. We are a friendly, caring church of the future.

Orange First Church of the Nazarene 3810 MLK Drive, Orange

Lead Pastor Ray McDowell. Worship Director: Leslie Hicks, Youth Pastors: Kenneth and Andrea Lauver Children’s Pastor Rebekah Spell. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship Service 10:45 a.m. / Wednesday Service 7 p.m.

Ofcnazarene.com or find us on Facebook

Wesley United Methodist Church

401 N. 37th St. Orange 409-886-7276

Pastor: Randy Branch Sunday School 10 a.m. Worship Service 11 a.m. Bible Study Wednesday 6 p.m.

www.orangewesley.org

TRINITY BAPTIST CHURCH ORANGE 1819 16th Street • Orange • 886-1333

We Welcome You To Join Us. Sunday Morning Worship 11 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Nursury Provided

MACARTHUR HEIGHTS BAPTISH CHURCH 3600 Nightingale • Orange • 409-883-4834 Sunday School: 9:45-10:30 am Sunday Worship - 10:45 am Sunday Disciple Training- 6 pm Tuesday Morning Men’s Coffee 9:30 am Wednesday Night Service 7:00 pm

COWBOY CHURCH OF ORANGE COUNTY

673 FM 1078 • Orange • 409-718-0269 Sunday Services: 10:30 AM

Bible Studies for Men and Women • Monday 6 p.m. Bible Studies for Co-Eds • Monday 6:30 p.m. Ladies Bible Study • Tuesday 10:00 a.m. Bible Studies & Youth Activities • Wed. 6:30 p.m.

West Orange Christian Church 900 Lansing Street • West Orange • 409-670-2701

Sunday school 9:30 a.m. / Sunday Worship 10:45 a.m. Bible Study Sunday and Wednesday at 6 p.m. Pastor: Dr. Dusty Garison

“Our church family welcomes you!”

CMYK


• The Record • Week of Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018

THE RECORD

• Garage Sales • Birthdays • For Sale • Weddings • Rentals • Memorials • Services • Engagements

• Just $10 For A 30 Word Ad In Both Papers And The Web • Classified Newspaper Deadline: Monday 5 P.M. For Upcoming Issue • You Can Submit Your Ad ANYTIME Online At TheRecordLive.com

Community Classifieds Your ads published in both newspapers, the County Record and the Penny Record plus on our web site TheRecordLive.com

Call 735-5305 • Penny Record Office: 333 West Roundbunch, Bridge City • County Record Office: 320 Henrietta, Orange Note: Offices Closed On Wednesday

APPLIANCES

FIREWOOD

GARAGE SALE

ANNOUNCEMENT S

HARRY’S APPLIANCES - Used appliances starting at $99.95, 302 10th. St. (10th. & main) Orange, We also buy used appliances, Call or come by 409-886-4111.

Free Firewood, on the ground, easy to get. Call 746-3582 or 734-7273

Moving & Garage Sale this Fri., Sept. 14 & Sat., Sept. 15 at 2282 Canal St. in Orange, 77632 from 8 am to 2 pm.

RAPE AND CRISIS CENTER of SETX provides critical services for those in crisis due to sexual assault, rape, suicide or general crisis. 24 Hour Hot line is provided for crisis intervention. Our number is 1-800-7-WE-CARE or 1-800-793-2273

FOR RENT Modern look Apt., clean 1 BR w/ 2 closets, wood blinds, granite counters in kitchen, dishwasher, self cleaning oven, all SS appliances, All tile Tub/shower, large closet & linen closet, vanity. Cathedral Ceilings w/ track lighting. Patio at 260 Canal St. No Pets, $700 month plus $500 deposit. 409-735-6277 or 409-626-1968 House for rent, nice 3 BR / 2 BA located at 509 3rd St. in Orange. 409-670-6166 3/2 Manufactured home, covered parking & porch w/ wheelchair ramp. No pets or smoking. Tenant must be 55 yr of age or older. $700 rent. Call Crepe Myrtle community at 409-5049296.

HOUSE FOR SALE Home for sale in Orange. 3 BR/1BA, large fenced yard, LCM schools, no flooding. Remodeled and clean. $29,000 Please call 409-746-3582 or 409-734-7273

Services Call Flower Power Housecleaning if you want to put your feet up and relax. We can do yard cleaning, patio androom clean out and much more. Call for appt. 409-599-4914 Hemming of jeans, pants, uniforms. Call 409-238-1230

FIREARMS For Sale: 12 guage Winchester Pump Shotgun, Armalite AR15 5.56 and a Reuger 357 Magnum Stainless. Call 409-882-1614

RV FOR SALE For Sale 35’ 2017 StarCraft Autumn Ridge Travel Trailer (Climatized) 2 BR / 2 AC’s 2 Slideouts 19 ft Electric Canopy w/ lights. Lived in 4 months. Lists for $35K Asking $24,500.00 409-988-5231 2018 Rockwood RV 35 ft long w/ 3 extensions. Quality & under warrenty, lots of extras, priced to sell & can be seen on property. Call for details 409-504-3191.

Garage Sale this Sat., 9/15 from 8 am to 1 pm at 12575 IH10 in Orange, take exit 869 Near Crawdads store & FM 1442. Antiques, collectibles, patio set, plants, old phones, tools, pink milk glass, too much to list. Garage Sale at 401 Henry St. in Bridge City on Friday, 9-14 and Saturday, 9-15 from 7 am to 2 pm. Furniture, housewares, craft supplies, teacher supplies, much more. Cash or local check with ID only.

NOW HIRING all

positions!

HELP WANTED Drivers Class-A CDL: Increased Pay & New Trucks with Dedicated Routes No CDL? No Problem! 855-292-2945 Drivers: New Dedicated positions, home weekly. Run ning TX, AR, CO, NM, OK, LA CALL 888-852-6250 Drivers CDL-A: Looking for an incredible career? Don’t Wait Earn Top Pay ($60K - $90K) Great Benefits: Health, Life, Dental & Vision Insurance, 401K and More! Must be a recent graduate from Accreditied truck driving school or 1YR CDL with X-end. Aooly @ www.gulfmarkenergy.com or call 866-448-4068 EOE

NO PHONE CALLS!!!

Apply in person at 1265 Texas Ave, Bridge City

HELP WANTED FULL TIME & PART TIME GROCERY STOCKERS GROCERY CHECKERS - DELI WORKERS APPLY IN PERSON ONLY - NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!

K-DAN”S 9604 FM 105 DANNY’S SUPER FOODS

Announcements Birthdays Engagements Weddings

Please call: 409-886-7183 / 409-735-5305 Or email: ads@therecordlive.com

Al-Anon meets Sundays and Wed., at 7:00 p.m., at the North Orange Baptist Church located at 4775 N. 16th St (Rear), in Orange, TX. Please call 4742171 or 988-2311 for more info or consultation. The RISE Center in Beaumont, a local nonprofit disability organization established in 1996, has received a grant to repair or replace home wheelchair ramps. Please contact the center at 409-832-2599 to find out if you or someone you know meets eligibility requirements.

TRACTOR WORK • Bush Hogging • Water

• Dirt & Shell • Sewer

• Electrical

Digging Services

SUPER FOODS _

2003 Western

Al-Anon meetings are held Thursday’s at 7p.m. in the Library at St. Henry’s Catholic Church Education building located at 475 W. Roundbunch Rd. Bridge City. Call Cindy at 749-9036 or Mike 718-0333

LOCAL

409-670-2040

7B

THEME: CIVIL WAR ACROSS 1. Rodeo garb 6. Prefix for prior 9. a.k.a. leaf cabbage 13. Conversation starter 14. “____ the land of the free ...” 15. Drunks 16. Tree in Latin 17. Exec’s degree 18. Full of emotion, in slang 19. *Meeting at Appomattox Court House 21. *Major Civil War issue 23. Sun in Mexico 24. Recover 25. *It was split during the Civil War 28. ____book 30. Be in the right place 35. Botticelli’s Venus, e.g. 37. Soccer ____, pl. 39. Excessive sternness 40. Orthodox artwork 41. Homeless cat’s home 43. Presented at customs 44. Galactic path 46. Desperate 47. Like never-losing Steven 48. Vital 50. Grannies 52. “C’____ la vie!” 53. “At ____, soldier” 55. Casual attire 57. *Spielberg’s 2012 movie 61. *”American Nightingale” 64. Remote in manner 65. Between Fla. and Miss. 67. IRS’ threat 69. Middle Eastern rice dish 70. Hi-____ graphics 71. Part of a whole 72. ____ Mall, in London 73. Cry of horror in comics 74. Ruhr’s industrial center

29. *”____ Mountain,” Charles Frazier’s novel 31. Like SNL 32. Nose of a missile 33. Olfactory organs 34. *General and post-Civil War President 36. Children’s author ____ Blyton 38. “Will be” in Doris Day song 42. Busybody, in Yiddish 45. Start a hole 49. Indian restaurant staple 51. Colorful Mexican wrap 54. Animal catcher 56. Lady’s pocketbooks 57. Nordic native 58. Pelvic parts 59. Steelers’s Chuck 60. *___ Torpedo, used by Confederacy against steam engines 61. Lounge, like in the sun 62. Words from Wordsworth 63. French Riviera city 66. *Commander of the Confederate States Army 68. Base of the decimal system

DOWN 1. Repeated Cuban dance step 2. Flavor-giving plant 3. “Fantastic Four” star 4. Land chunks 5. Somewhat 6. Fleshy fruit 7. *Johnny’s other nickname 8. Clear the chalkboard 9. Chicken ____ 10. Initial stake 11. Displeasure on one’s face 12. Grammy of sports 15. Melville’s “Pequod,” e.g. 20. “Is Your Mama a ____?” 22. Dr. Frankenstein’s workplace 24. Bottom of a dress 25. *Divided, it cannot stand 26. Sugar in Paris 27. PDF reader

FIX & RESTORE

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HANDYMAN PAINTING

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HARRY’S

APPLIANCE & SERVICE, INC.

• FREEZERS • DISHWASHERS • REFRIGERATORS • WASHERS & DRYERS • RANGES • AIR CONDITIONERS We sell parts for all major brands - We service what we sell! FREE LOCAL DELIVERY

Stakes Electric COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL OLD HOMES • LED UPGRADES ALL UNDERGROUND

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302 10th St. Orange

Great Rates & Better Quality, Guarenteed.

Thibeaux’s Lawn Service Call for free bids 409-216-9743 or 330-7793 Troy Thibeaux

CMYK


8B

• The Record • Week of Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018

LEGAL NOTICES

CITATION BY PUBLICATION

CITATION BY PUBLICATION

The State of Texas To any and all Unknown Heirs and all Persons Interested in the Estate of

The State of Texas To any and all Unknown Heirs and all Persons Interested in the Estate of

Harry Waddell, Deceased Cause No. P18281 in County Court at Law, Orange County, Texas

Cecil Wesley Reid, Deceased Cause No. P18279 in County Court at Law, Orange County, Texas

The alleged heir(s) at law in the above numbered and entitled estate filed AN APPLICATION FOR INDEPENDENT ADMINISTRATION AND LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION PURSUANT TO SECTION 401.003 OF THE TEXAS ESTATES CODE AND AN APPLICATION TO DETERMINE HEIRSHIP in this estate on AUGUST 31, 2018, requesting that the Court determine who are the heirs and only heirs of Harry Waddell, Deceased, and their respective shares and interests in such estate.

The alleged heir(s) at law in the above numbered and entitled estate filed AN APPLICATION FOR INDEPENDENT ADMINISTRATION AND LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION PURSUANT TO SECTION 401.003 OF THE TEXAS ESTATES CODE AND AN APPLICATION TO DETERMINE HEIRSHIP in this estate on AUGUST 30, 2018, requesting that the Court determine who are the heirs and only heirs of Cecil Wesley Reid, Deceased, and their respective shares and interests in such estate.

The court may act on this application at any call of the docket on or after 10:00 a.m. on the Monday next after the expiration of 10 days from the date of publication of this citation, at the County Courthouse, 801 W. Division., Orange, Texas 77630.

The court may act on this application at any call of the docket on or after 10:00 a.m. on the Monday next after the expiration of 10 days from the date of publication of this citation, at the County Courthouse, 801 W. Division., Orange, Texas 77630.

All persons interested in this case are cited to appear before this Honorable Court by filing a written contest or answer to this Application should they desire to do so. To ensure its consideration, you or your attorney must file any objection, intervention or response in writing with the County Clerk of Orange County, Texas.

All persons interested in this case are cited to appear before this Honorable Court by filing a written contest or answer to this Application should they desire to do so. To ensure its consideration, you or your attorney must file any objection, intervention or response in writing with the County Clerk of Orange County, Texas.

Given under my hand and the seal of the County Court at Law, Orange County, Texas at the office of the Orange County Clerk in Orange, Texas on August 31, 2018. BRANDY ROBERTSON, County Clerk, Orange County, Texas

By:

Kevin LeBoeuf, Deputy

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Notice is hereby given that original Letters of Administration for the Estate of EDNA M. KING, Deceased, were issued on the June 8, 2018, in Cause No. P18167, pending in the County Court at Law of Orange County, Texas, to: KATHY TIRRILL.

Notice is hereby given that original Letters Testamentary for the Estate of JOHN WEBSTER LANDRY, Deceased, were issued on June 22, 2018, in Cause No. P18161, pending in the County Court at Law of Orange County, Texas, Probate Division to: JONI MARGO LANDRY.

All persons having claims against this Estate which is currently being administered are required to present them to the undersigned within the time and in the manner prescribed by law. c/o: Tommy Gunn Attorney at Law 202 S. Border Street Orange, TX 77630

All persons having claims against this Estate which is currently being administered are required to present them to the undersigned within the time and in the manner prescribed by law.

Tommy Gunn Tommy Gunn Attorney for:

Dated the 7th day of September, 2018.

Kathy Tirrill

State Bar No.: 08623700 202 S. Border Street Orange, TX 77630 Phone: (409)882-9990 Fax: (409)882-0613 Email:tommy@gunnlaw.org

County Clerk, Orange County, Texas

By:

Kevin LeBoeuf

c/o: George B. Barron Attorney at Law P.O. Box 279 Orange, TX 77631-0279

Dated the 8TH day of June 2018.

Given under my hand and the seal of the County Court at Law, Orange County, Texas at the office of the Orange County Clerk in Orange, Texas on August 31, 2018. BRANDY ROBERTSON,

George B. Barron George B. Barron Attorney for Executrix State Bar No.: 01817500 P.O. Box 279 Orange, TX 77631-0279

Kevin LeBoeuf, Deputy Kevin LeBoeuf

CITATION BY PUBLICATION The State of Texas To any and all Unknown Heirs and all Persons Interested in the Estate of Sharon Arnaud Fontenot a/k/a Sherry Arnaud Fontenot, Deceased Cause No. P18278 in County Court at Law, Orange County, Texas The alleged heir(s) at law in the above numbered and entitled estate filed on August 30, 2018 in this estate AN APPLICATION FOR INDEPENDENT ADMINISTRATION AND LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION PURSUANT TO SECTION 401.003 OF THE TEXAS ESTATES CODE AND AN APPLICATION TO DETERMINE HEIRSHIP, requesting that the Court determine who are the heirs and only heirs of Sharon Arnaud Fontenot, Deceased, and their respective shares and interests in such estate. The court may act on this application at any call of the docket on or after 10:00 a.m. on the Monday next after the expiration of 10 days from the date of publication of this citation, at the County Courthouse, 801 W. Division., Orange, Texas 77630. All persons interested in this case are cited to appear before this Honorable Court by filing a written contest or answer to this Application should they desire to do so. To ensure its consideration, you or your attorney must file any objection, intervention or response in writing with the County Clerk of Orange County, Texas. Given under my hand and the seal of the County Court at Law, Orange County, Texas at the office of the Orange County Clerk in Orange, Texas on August 30, 2018. BRANDY ROBERTSON, County Clerk, Orange County, Texas

By:

Kevin LeBoeuf, Deputy Kevin LeBoeuf

Don’t Let Your Personal Data End up on the Dark Web Consumers today give out personal information all the time -- from shopping online to signing up for special promotional offers to filling out job applications. However, there are millions of identity theft victims each year, and when your information is stolen by a cyber-criminal, it will likely be sold on the dark web. Your social security number, for example, could be sold for as little as $1, according to Experian, one of the nation’s three credit bureaus. The end result is that criminals can open a credit card account in your name, steal your tax return, try to hack into your financial accounts and conduct other malicious activities. The Dark What? The dark web is a mystery to many. Only one in four people know what it is and what it’s used for, according to the Experian Cybersecurity Survey. It essentially allows criminals to conduct illegal activities in the deepest pockets of the Internet, undetected. For identity thieves, the dark web is a marketplace for personal information, including phone numbers, email addresses, account passwords and social security numbers that can be used to commit identity theft and fraud. While it’s doubtful that your local dry cleaner or gym will be targeted by an identity thief, any database is attractive to a cyber-criminal. Companies can also be victims of rogue employees, and smaller operations have less security. It’s best to err on the side of caution when giving out personal information. Better Manage Personal Data “Having your personal information exposed can be a threat to your identity and financial future, but there are ways to take control,” says Brian Stack, vice president of Dark Web Intelligence at Experian. “In a digital world, all of us are at some risk for identity theft and fraud. One step to get peace of mind is enrolling in an identity theft protection product so you are notified if credit is opened in your name or your personal data is on the dark web.”

APPLICATION TO DETERMINE HEIRSHIP No. P18280 IN THE ESTATE OF DOROTHIA ALICE REID, DECEASED IN COUNTY COURT AT LAW OF ORANGE COUNTY

• Change online account passwords periodically and use a unique password for each account. • Never access the Internet with unsecured public Wi-Fi. Only use secured public Wi-Fi with a password for browsing -- don’t shop or access accounts, including social media and email. • To log into accounts, enable authentication questions as well as two-factor authentication when available (and don’t use real answers such as your mother’s actual maiden name). • Several times per year, check your credit reports from all three credit bureaus for possible fraudulent accounts. Wondering if there’s already cause for concern? Experian offers a free Dark Web Triple Scan that searches thousands of dark web pages, networks and forums for your phone number, email address and social security number. This scan will inform you if any of this information is on the dark web. Learn more at experian.com/triplescan. Your daily routine doesn’t have to lead to a darkened outlook. Taking proactive steps can help you stay vigilant and offer you better protection.

IN COUNTY COURT AT LAW OF ORANGE COUNTY The following Applicant, BEVERLY ANN JOHNSON, furnishes the following information to the Court:

1. DOROTHY ALICE REID (“Decedent”) died on August 9, 2018, at the age of 94 years, in Vidor, Orange County, Texas. 2. An administration is pending upon Decedent’s Estate in the above entitled and numbered cause, and it is in the best interest of the Estate for the Court to determine who are the heirs and only heirs of the Decedent. 3. This Court has jurisdiction and venue is proper because this is the Court in which a proceeding administering Decedent’s Estate was most recently pending. 4. Applicant is the personal representative of the Decedent’s Estate. 5. The names and residences of all of Decedent’s heirs, the relationship of each heir to Decedent and the true interest of the Applicant and of each of the heirs in the Estate of Decedent are as follows:

1. CECIL WESLEY REID (“Decedent”) died on December 17, 1979, at the age of 63 years, in Halletsville, Lavaca County, Texas. 2. No administration is pending upon Decedent’s Estate and none is necessary. It is in the best interest of the Estate for the Court to determine who are the heirs and only heirs of the Decedent. 3. This Court has jurisdiction and venue is proper because this is the Court where venue would be proper for the commencement of an administration under Section 33.001 of the Texas Estates Code and no will has been probated and no administration of the decedent’s estate has been granted. 4. Applicant claims to be the owner of all or a part of Decedent’s Estate. The last three digits of the social security number of BEVERLY ANN JOHNSON are 072. The last three digits of the driver’s license number of BEVERLY ANN JOHNSON are 775. 5. The names and residences of all Decedent’s heirs, the relationship of each heir to Decedent and the true interest of the Applicant and of each of the heirs in the Estate of Decedent are as follows:

a. Name: KENNETH WAYNE REID, an adult Address: 3203 Vernon, Nederland, Texas 77627 Relationship: Son Share of Real Property: 1/4 (25%) Share of Personal Property: 1/4 (25%) b. Name: SHIRLEY RAE REID JOHNSON, an adult Address: 245 Yupon, Vidor, Texas 77662 Relationship: Daughter Share of Real Property: 1/4 (25%) Share of Personal Property: 1/4 (25%) c. Name: BEVERLY ANN REID JOHNSON, an adult Address: 4118 Meadowgold Lane, Kingwood, Texas 77345 Relationship: Daughter Share of Real Property: 1/4 (25%) Share of Personal Property: 1/4 (25%) d. Name: TAMMY JEAN REID, an adult Address: 155 Yupon, Vidor, Texas 77662 Relationship: Granddaughter Share of Real Property: 1/8 (12.5%) Share of Personal Property: 1/8 (12.5%) e. Name: WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER REID, an adult Address: 7350 Randi Lane, Vidor, Texas 77662 Relationship: Grandson Share of Real Property: 1/8 (12.5%) Share of Personal Property: 1/8 (12.5%) 6. At the time of Decedent’s death, Decedent owned real property in the State of Texas and personal property as follows: REAL PROPERTY a. Description: 155 Yupon, Vidor Texas Type: Separate Property Value: $373,432.00 b. Description: 8.176 acres in Vidor, Texas Type: Separate Property Value: $23,240.00 c. Description: 272.100 acres in Lavaca County Type: Separate Property Value: $903,445.00 d. Description: 75 acres in Lavaca County Type: Separate Property Value: $199,510.00 e. Description: 79.706 in Lavaca County Type: Separate Property Value: $337,766.00 PERSONAL PROPERTY Description: Furnishings, Jewelry, and personal effects. Type: Separate Property Value: $10,000.00 7. The listing of heirs includes any living child of the decedent. DOROTHY ALICE REID was predeceased by the following child: Name: ROBERT EUGENE REID Birth Date: 03/23/1943 Date of Death: 07/17/2016 8. At the time of her death, Decedent was not married but had been married previously. The circumstances of each prior marriage of the Decedent are as follows: Name of First Spouse: Cecil Wesley Reid Date of Marriage: 06/07/1942 Date of Termination: 12/17/1979 Place of Termination: Orange County, Texas Relevant Facts: Marriage ended on Husband’s death 9. All children born to or adopted by Decedent have been listed. Each marriage of Decent has been listed. 10. To the best of my knowledge, Decedent died intestate. 11. This Application does not omit any information required by the Texas Estates Code, Sections 202.004, 202.005, 202.007 and 202.008, except as follows: None. 12. There are no debts owed by Decedent that are not secured by liens upon real estate and there is a necessity for an administration of this Estate. 13. This Application contains all of the material facts and circumstances within the knowledge and information of the Applicant that might reasonably tend to show the time or place of death or the names or residences of all heirs, if the time or place of death or the names or residences of all the heirs are not definitely known to the Applicant, except as follows: None.

Respectfully submitted,

• Only provide personal information when it’s required.

No. P18279 IN THE ESTATE OF CECIL WESLEY REID, DECEASED

The Applicant, BEVERLY ANN JOHNSON, furnishes the following information to the Court:

Applicant prays that citation issue as required by law; that an attorney ad litem be appointed to represent the interests of unknown heirs; that upon hearing hereof, this Court determine who are the heirs and only heirs of Decedent and their respective shares and interests in this Estate; and that a necessity exists for an administration of Decedent’s Estate.

To proactively protect your identity, take the following key steps:

FIRST AMENDED APPLICATION TO DETERMINE HEIRSHIP

Beverly Ann Johnson

Beverly Ann Johnson, Applicant

Michael Catt

Michael Catt Attorney for Applicant State Bar No: 00796324 1705 16th Street Orange, TX 77630 Telephone: (409) 883-2107 Facsimile: (409) 883-2108 E-mail: deb@catlawfirm.com

a. Name: DOROTHY ALICE REID, an adult Address: Deceased Relationship: Spouse Share of Real Property: 100% Share of Personal Property: 100% b. Name: ROBERT EUGENE REID, an adult Address: Deceased Relationship: Son Share of Real Property: 0% Share of Personal Property: 0% c. Name: KENNETH WAYNE REID, an adult Address: 3203 Vernon, Nederland, Texas 77627 Relationship: Son Share of Real Property: 0% Share of Personal Property: 0% d. Name: SHIRLEY RAE REID JOHNSON, an adult Address: 245 Yupon, Vidor, Texas 77662 Relationship: Daughter Share of Real Property: 0% Share of Personal Property: 0% e. Name: BEVERLY ANN REID JOHNSON, an adult Address: 4118 Meadowgold Lane, Kingwood, Texas 77345 Relationship: Daughter Share of Real Property: 0% Share of Personal Property: 0% 6. At the time of Decedent’s death, Decedent owned real property in the State of Texas and personal property as follows: REAL PROPERTY a. Description: 155 Yupon, Vidor Texas Type: Community Property Value: $186,716.00 total, of which $93,358.00 is Decedent’s share. b. Description: 8.176 acres in Vidor, Texas Type: Community Property Value: $11,620.00 total, of which $5,810.00 is Decedent’s share. c. Description: 272.100 acres in Lavaca County Type: Community Property Value: $451,727.50 total, of which $225,863.75 is Decedent’s share. d. Description: 75 acres in Lavaca County Type: Community Property Value: $99,755.00 total, of which $49,877.50 is Decedent’s share. e. Description: 79.706 in Lavaca County Type: Community Property Value: $168,883.00 total, of which $84,441.50 is Decedent’s share. PERSONAL PROPERTY Description: Furnishings, Jewelry, and miscellaneous personal property Type: Community Property Value: $5,000.00 total, of which $2,500.00 is Decedent’s share. 7. The listing of heirs includes any living child of the decedent. 8. Decedent was not predeceased by any child. 9. At the time of his death, Decedent was married to DOROTHY ALICE REID. Other than this marriage, Decedent had never been married. 10. All children born to or adopted by Decedent have been listed. Each marriage of Decent has been listed. 11. To the best of my knowledge, Decedent died intestate. 12. This Application does not omit any information required by the Texas Estates Code, Sections 202.004, 202.005, 202.007 and 202.008, except as follows: None. 13. There are no debts owed by Decedent that are not secured by liens upon real estate and there is no necessity for an administration of this Estate. 14. This Application contains all of the material facts and circumstances within the knowledge and information of the Applicant that might reasonably tend to show the time or place of death or the names or residences of all heirs, if the time or place of death or the names or residences of all the heirs are not definitely known to the Applicant, except as follows: None. Applicant prays that citation issue as required by law; that an attorney ad litem be appointed to represent the interests of heirs whose names and/or locations are unknown and any incapacitated heir upon a finding that the appointment is necessary to protect the interests of that heir; that upon hearing hereof, this Court determine who are the heirs and only heirs of Decedent and their respective shares and interests in this Estate; and that no necessity exist for an administration of Decedent’s Estate. Respectfully submitted,

Beverly Ann Johnson

Beverly Ann Johnson, Applicant

Michael Catt

Michael Catt

Attorney for Applicant State Bar No: 00796324 1705 16th Street Orange, TX 77630 Telephone: (409) 883-2107 Facsimile: (409) 883-2108 E-mail: deb@catlawfirm.com

STATE OF TEXAS COUNTY OF ORANGE

STATE OF TEXAS COUNTY OF ORANGE

I, BEVERLY ANN JOHNSON, Applicant, having been duly sworn, hereby state on oath that insofar as is known to me, all of the allegations of the foregoing Application to Determine Heirship are true in substance and in fact and that no material fact or circumstance has, within my knowledge, been omitted from the Application.

I, BEVERLY ANN JOHNSON, Applicant, having been duly sworn, hereby state on oath that insofar as is known to me, all of the allegations of the foregoing Application to Determine Heirship are true in substance and in fact and that no material fact or circumstance has, within my knowledge, been omitted from the Application.

Beverly Ann Johnson

BEVERLY ANN JOHNSON, Applicant SWORN TO AND SUBSCRIBED BEFORE ME BY BEVERLY ANN JOHNSON, on the 29th day of August, 2018, to certify which witness my hand and seal of office.

Deb Tozer Deb Tozer

Notary Public, State of Texas

Beverly Ann Johnson

BEVERLY ANN JOHNSON, Applicant SWORN TO AND SUBSCRIBED BEFORE ME BY BEVERLY ANN JOHNSON, on the 29th day of August, 2018, to certify which witness my hand and seal of office.

Deb Tozer

Deb Tozer

Notary Public, State of Texas

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