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www.surreycc.gov.uk Spring 2014

Explore our

beautiful

countryside Get fostering l Keeping Surrey tidy l Cleaning up after the floods l Supporting families


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Inside 4

News from across the county

6  Turning the spotlight on Tracy, a volunteer for Home Start Spelthorne 7 Steven from West Molesey shares his ten favourite ways to explore Surrey’s countryside 8

 rudential RideLondon returns P this summer with thousands of cyclists coming through Surrey

10 The litter army in Tatsfield are keeping their village clean 11 The Community Improvements Fund helps a scout group to build a new home 12  How flooding affected Surrey this winter and what we’re doing to help prevent it happening again 14 A family coordinator explains how she gives support to families in need 16 Pete shares his story about being fostered 17  Visit Haslemere, a countryside retreat next to the South Downs 18

What’s on from now until September

www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters /surreymatters @surrey_matters Sign up to the monthly e-newsletter online at www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters. Email us: surreymatters@surreycc.gov.uk. Write to us: Surrey Matters, Communications Team, G29, Surrey County Council, Freepost, KT1 2EA. Call us: 03456 009 009 or +44 20 8541 9944 overseas Lines open Monday to Friday, 8am - 6pm Fax: 0208 541 6575. Minicom: 0208 541 9698 SMS: 07527 182861 If you didn’t receive your own copy of Surrey Matters, or you would like this magazine in large print, on tape or in another language, please contact us. A pdf version is available online.

Want to get news, features, events and competitions from Surrey Matters every month? Sign up to our e-newsletter at www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters.

Welcome

It’s been a really tough winter for Surrey with the floods damaging thousands of people’s homes and possessions. We’ve been doing everything we can to help and you can find out more about this on page 12. Now the sun is shining we’re also focusing our efforts on keeping the county litter-free. It’s a bug bear for me and many others. That’s why we’re encouraging people to throw their rubbish in the bin (see page 10) and highlighting that those who don’t could be fined up to £75. This summer will also see the return of the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 and Classic events. The organisers hope to see even more cyclists taking on the 100-mile challenge through London and Surrey raising money for worthy causes. More details are on page 8. Keep up to date with all the latest news by following @Surrey_Matters on Twitter or liking us on Facebook. You can also call us on 03456 009 009 or email surreymatters@surreycc.gov.uk. Helyn Clack Cabinet Member for Community Services

Produced by Surrey County Council Communications Team and printed on 100% recycled FSC paper. Please recycle this magazine. SJ/03/14/CS2767. Every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine, but Surrey County Council cannot accept responsibility for mistakes or omissions. Surrey County Council also does not accept responsibility for any goods or services offered by advertisers. Publication does not imply recommendation.

www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters 3 www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters

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News

The convenience of composting As summer approaches, there’s no better time to get composting for the cheapest and most natural way to get rid of your garden waste. All you need to start composting is a bin or a space to create a heap. You can compost more than you may realise. Not only can you dispose of your garden waste, you can also add fruit and vegetable peelings, paper, card, egg shells and even the contents of your vacuum cleaner. After nine to 12 months and only a small amount of care, you’ll have a free supply of environmentally-friendly organic compost to help your garden grow. To buy a reduced price composter from just £15 and for advice on how to compost, visit www.compostingsurrey.com or call 0844 571 4444.

DOWNLOAD FREE MAGAZINES  You can now read your favourite magazine on your smartphone or tablet with the new Surrey libraries magazine app.  There are lots of titles for the whole family to choose from, including Good Housekeeping, Elle, Cycling Active, Britain and Teen Now. If you’re already a member of the library, you’ll just need your library card number to set up an account and download your magazines for free, either on your internet browser or by downloading the app to your tablet or phone. To find out more about library apps and to become a member of your local library, visit www.surreycc.gov. uk/libraryapps or call 0300 200 1001.

Make steps with a free pedometer Health experts recommend that we walk around 10,000 steps a day to stay fit and healthy, so to help keep track of your leg power we’re offering free pedometers*. The giveaway is part of the Travel SMART programme, Surrey County Council’s initiative to encourage sustainable travel and cut carbon, calories and cost. The pedometer will tell you how many steps you’ve taken and come with helpful tips about how to add extra steps each day. To get your free pedometer send us your name, address, email and telephone number to Pedometer Giveaway, Travel SMART, Room 415, County Hall, Penrhyn Road, Kingston-upon-Thames, KT1 2DN. *A maximum of two pedometers per household. Offer closes on 30 June 2014.

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Getting dementia friendly

Community groups and businesses in Surrey are being offered free dementia training for customer-facing staff and volunteers. The training will help staff to recognise the signs and give advice on how to support people living with dementia. It’s part of a drive to help Surrey become a dementia friendly county. Around 150 individuals and organisations have already signed up to be a Dementia Friendly Surrey Champion, to raise awareness and offer support to people living with the condition. There are a variety of free training sessions available from three hours to a full day and there are also self-study packs for individuals. To find out more about Dementia Friendly Surrey and to book a course for your organisation or community group, visit www.dementiafriendlysurrey.org.uk or call 01483 519006.

Looking after someone? Do you look after a family member, partner or friend who is ill, frail or has a disability? If so, information and support is available to you. You could be entitled to assessments for ongoing support, carer payments and help from local organisations. Visit www.surreyinformationpoint.org.uk or call 0300 200 1005 to get the best support for you and the person you look after.

HAVE YOU HAD YOUR HEALTH CHECK?

If you’re aged 40-74 with no history of high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, stroke or kidney disease then you’re eligible for a free NHS health check. It will help you to find out your risk of developing these illnesses as you get older and you’ll get lots of advice to help you minimise this risk and avoid future health problems. It’s quick, easy and free and could make a big difference to your long-term health. Visit www.healthysurrey.org.uk/ healthchecks or call 03456 009 009 to find out more and see where you can get a health check near you.

HELP TO SHAPE SERVICES

Do you want to help shape health and social care services in the county? Healthwatch Surrey offers you a chance to share views and concerns about your local health and social care services and get information to make the most of what’s available to you. For more information about Healthwatch Surrey, visit your local Citizens Advice Bureau, go to www.healthwatchsurrey. co.uk or call 0303 303 0023. You can also text 07592 787533 to share your experience and receive information.

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IN THE

SPOTLIGHT

Surrey Matters turns the spotlight on Tracy Hould from Staines, who dedicates two or three hours a week to offer emotional and practical support to families experiencing difficulties.

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racy Hould had post natal depression when both of her children were born. She didn’t get the support she needed and that’s why she decided to volunteer for Home Start Spelthorne 14 years ago, a voluntary organisation that offers help to parents to build better lives for their children. She said: “Since I started volunteering for Home Start I’ve helped 17 families. “I spend a couple of hours a week with them either just chatting and listening, giving practical help and support or playing with the children while the parents catch up on things they need to do. “I supported a parent who had mental health issues related to post natal depression. She couldn’t even go to the shops as she had no confidence in her parenting skills. I reassured her that she was doing a good job and listened. I was with her for over a year and by the end, she’d managed to get a job and have a better social life, especially with other parents.” Tracy offers the help and support for as long as the parents need it – whether it’s a few months or a few

years. She added: “We’re offering them the support to feel empowered and able to develop good relationships with their children.” Families that get support from Home Start are usually referred by health visitors or children’s centres, but people can also refer themselves. They then have an initial meeting with a scheme co-ordinator to find out the needs of the family and match them with a volunteer that’s most suited to them. Tracy said: “It’s sad ending your time with a family but it’s lovely to see them on their feet. Volunteering with Home Start is so rewarding.” Spelthorne is one of a number of Home Start schemes in Surrey. To find out more, visit www. home-start.org.uk or call the Spelthorne scheme on 01784 463200.

“It’s sad ending your time with a family but it’s lovely to see them on their feet.”

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DISCOVER SURREY’S

Countryside Surrey’s beautiful countryside is what attracts so many people to the county and there’s a wealth of places to discover to make the most of what’s right on your doorstep.

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teven Shelley (pictured below) from West Molesey loves spending time exploring

Surrey’s countryside with his wife Sallie and three kids Ian, Matthew and Patrick. He’s picked their top 10 things that his family love to do*.

1. Box Hill

One of our favourite places to spend time together is Box Hill. It’s the beautiful panoramic views and the choice of walks that keep us coming back.

3. Frensham Great Pond

Frensham Great Pond is Surrey’s best kept secret and great in the summer months. Visit on a weekday afternoon and you might have the beach to yourself.

5. T  he Devil’s Punchbowl

7. Leith Hill

The Devil’s Punchbowl in Hindhead is another nice place for a walk, especially for dog walkers like us.

6. TAZ Family Adventure Zones

As a special treat we like to go to TAZ Family Adventure Zones in High Ashurst. There’s so much to do, including climbing, abseiling, mountain biking and sailing.

2. Sculpture Park

Our eldest Ian loves to visit The Sculpture Park in Churt. He loves to snapchat weird and wonderful sculptures to send to his friends.

4. Ranmore Common

We like to climb up to Leith Hill to see the views from the tower; it’s the highest point in the South East. On a clear day, you can see London from one side and the sea from the other.

8. River Wey

We don’t always stay on dry land when we’re out discovering Surrey. We sometimes hire a boat to float down the River Wey, starting from Farncombe Boathouse. It’s a lovely relaxing way to spend a summer’s day.

9. Savill Garden

The Savill Garden in Egham is definitely worth a visit. The kids love running around on the acres of land and climbing a tree or two. We particularly like The Azalea Walks.

Ranmore Common near Dorking, is a good place to fly a kite as there are hundreds of acres of open space.

10. Priory Park * Some attractions have an entry charge.

We sometimes head to Priory Park in Reigate for a picnic and bike ride... and usually a sneaky slice of cake and cup of tea in one of the town’s tea shops. For more ideas about what to see and do in Surrey, sign up to Explore’s e-newsletter at www.surreycc.gov.uk/ explore or call 03456 009 009.

www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters

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Cycling FOR

London-Surrey 100 & Classic route eLondon-Surrey 100 route

eLondon-Surrey Classic route

good causes

The Prudential RideLondon-Surrey ages and locations 100 and Classic events are back for h boundary another year and are set to be bigger ghs and better than ever. & borough councils 5 miles

E

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p to 24,000 cyclists will be taking to the closed N London and Surrey on Sunday 10 August roads of in the second Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100. 10 kilometres Later that day, the professionals will cycle through the county in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey Classic. This follows a similar route to the amateurs but the professionals will divert off towards Staple Lane. They will then complete one circuit through Leith Hill and Coldharbour Lane, then two more circuits through Denbies Vineyard in Dorking, before going around Box Hill and then heading back to London to cross the finish line on The Mall. Last year’s mass participation ride raised more than £7 million for charity with over 16,000 people taking part, making it the biggest cycling event to take place on closed roads in the UK. This year, the organisers are hoping to raise more than £12 million for worthy causes. The events are part of the annual weekend festival of cycling, which also includes the Prudential RideLondon FreeCycle in London the day before. Why not make the most of the day’s events and support the thousands of riders taking part in the challenge?

Show your support

Get the bunting out and host a garden party with friends and neighbours to show your support for the riders.

Plan your journey

If you need to get out on the day of the event, make sure you check your route before travelling. Roads that make up the route will be closed throughout the day and there could be extra traffic nearby.

Business advice

Do you have a business that’s affected by the events? There’s advice about planning ahead and making the most of the crowds on the Prudential RideLondon website.

Local events

Why not make a day of it by exploring the local area? There will be lots of great events around the route to keep you and your family entertained all day.

Stay safe

Hopefully the sun will be shining when the cyclists pedal by, so make sure you have plenty of healthy food, water and sun cream and watch your valuables. To find out more about the event, including an interactive map of the route and information about road closures, visit www.prudentialridelondon.co.uk or call 020 7902 0212.

oute

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SURREY’S litter ARMY

No one likes the unsightly scene of litter. That’s why the local district and borough councils keep communities tidy by picking up litter left on the streets and parks of Surrey.

 Bob David (pictured left) has lived in Tatsfield for 42 years. He is part of an army of volunteers that help keep their village looking smart and clean.  The group, known as Tatsfield in Bloom, meet every Saturday morning throughout the year to plant flowers, do weeding and pruning and pick up litter.  Bob said: “We have around 35 volunteers that help out when they can. Some of these people just like litter picking, while others prefer to do gardening, but we all do our bit to keep Tatsfield looking nice. “We try to focus on the village centre and the main roads in and out of the village, as these are where most litter is found. In around an hour, we usually collect around five or six bags of rubbish.” The group also run The Litter Initiative, where another 30 people have been provided with litter pickers so they so they can get rid of litter near to their homes as and when they can. Bob added: “This initiative means that we’ll be able to keep even more of the village clean. It’s great that more people are doing their bit. “Cans are most common but we also find that we pick up a lot of cigarette butts and crisp packets.”

But with such a large area to cover and limited money, many of the smaller towns and villages Our survey said... only get street A recent survey carried out by Surrey County Council revealed that bottles and cans, cleaners visiting takeaway packaging and dog fouling were the types of litter causing most concern to residents. People said litter is most commonly found near fast food outlets, on verges every couple of and gullies, footpaths and in town centres. months. That’s To find out more about keeping Surrey clean, call your local district and why volunteers borough council, visit their website or follow #KeepSurreyTidy on Twitter. across the county are doing their Did you know? bit to pick up You could be fined up to £75 the litter left for littering in Surrey. by others.

Why throw your money away when it’s free to put your rubbish in the bin?

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A NEW

home FOR THE

scouts

Mike Phillipson and Tony Brown successfully won community funding from Surrey County Council earlier this year, taking them one step closer to building a new scout hall.

W

hen the 17th Reigate scout group were no longer able to use the church hall because it was closed for housing redevelopment, it was nearly the end for the popular group. But after finding a temporary place to meet, they set about the challenge to raise nearly £160,000 to redevelop a garage and storage unit on the church’s site into a purpose-built scout hall and a place to call their home. The group raised more than £25,000 doing everything from packing bags to clearing a flat. Six Explorers – the oldest group of scouts – even raised £5,000 by doing a 120 mile sponsored trek in six days. They’ve also applied for grants and funds to help raise the money, including the Community Improvements Fund, an initiative set up by Surrey County Council Leader David Hodge to support local community projects. The £47,800 the scout group were awarded from the fund was given to make the building watertight. Tony Brown, the driving force in getting the funds together, said: “We applied for the Community Improvements Fund three times. The first two times we were unsuccessful, but got really good feedback to tell us to try again with more detail in our application and to be in a better position to carry out the work straight away. We were thrilled to be third time lucky.” Mike Phillipson, the group scout leader, added: “This new building will make a huge difference to our group.

We’ll not only be able to do more activities, including indoor rock climbing and archery, but with around 110 young people on our waiting list it means we’ll be able to eventually double the size of the group. “We’ll also be able to use the hall for in-house training sessions. We’re going to get interactive whiteboards, projectors and big screens so we can teach the scouts and the adult volunteers in a more engaging and exciting way.” The new hall will also be available for the rest of the community to use when it’s not occupied by the scout group. Mike said: “We’ve had lots of interest from people who want to use the hall for fitness and dance classes and a place for church groups to meet.” In the last five years, scouting has really increased, particularly in Reigate and the surrounding area. That’s why Mike and Tony are really dedicated to finding the funds for the new building. Tony said: “Seeing some of the young people progress keeps me coming back. It’s hugely rewarding when you see someone who hasn’t had a good start in life. Then four years later, they’re a completely different person.” The Community Improvements Fund is currently open for communities to bid for funding. To find out more about this and more of the council’s funding opportunities, visit www.surreycc.gov.uk/getinvolved or call 03456 009 009. www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters

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Recovering 1

4

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floods FROM THE

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These are just a few of your photos of the February floods, taken by: 1-3: Lorna Dennison-Wilkins, 4-6: Sharon Convisser, 7: Surrey Fire and Rescue, 8: Surrey Search and Rescue, 9,11: Kier Services, 10: Taleen Avanesian

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During the wettest winter in almost 250 years, thousands of people have been left with flooded homes, ruined furniture and possessions.

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 o help people clean up and rebuild their lives following the floods, Surrey County Council has continually worked with the district and borough councils, the Environment Agency and the National Flood Forum, a charity that gives affected people the support they need.

A helping hand Heather Shepherd is from the National Flood Forum, which has been supporting Surrey people since the floods hit in February. She said: “We’ve got experience in flood recovery so we’re here to give practical advice and answer questions that people have. It could be about their insurance cover, what they can do if they’re not insured or where they can get help if they can’t use their toilets or showers. Sometimes we even do jobs like talking to their insurance company for them. “It’s not just about giving advice though. It’s also about listening and empathising with people. My home was flooded three times around 10 years ago, so I know what they are going through. It could take up to 18 months to get back to normal so we’re planning to be giving support to Surrey people for a long time. The Flood Forum plans to stay in Surrey even after people have started to rebuild their lives. Heather added: “We’ll continue to work with local communities by facilitating

action groups and helping residents set up multi-agency meetings where their experiences shape the improvements for the future. “Back in March, we had a bus trailer that toured the county to visit all the communities affected by the floods, giving face-toface advice and emotional support. We were joined by people from the Environment Agency and local councils, so people could get the answers to any question at a place convenient to them. “Recovery is not all about information though, it’s about letting them know that they’re not alone and they have help available to people every step of the way. That’s what we’re here to do.”

Getting the help they need Tracy McCallum and Hazim Abbas live on a street in Egham that unexpectedly flooded. They saw around five inches of water in their home, which destroyed almost everything. Tracy said: “We never thought we’d be flooded so we weren’t prepared. I grabbed our passports, money and important documents and we were taken away by boat. We were planning to go to the community centre in Shepperton but a friend offered us a room at their house. “When we headed back home and saw the extent of the damage, it was quite overwhelming. We’re now trying to rebuild our home

and our lives. “We visited the Flood Forum trailer as a neighbour mentioned we could get council tax exemption which Surrey County Council is offering to people affected by the floods. We don’t have flood insurance so it’s going to be expensive and a long time until we’re back in our home again but it’s great

water companies, Surrey Fire and Rescue Service and local district and borough councils. Learning from the flooding this winter, the Board is working on a strategy to help manage local flood risk for each individual area. Earlier this year, Surrey County Council Leader David Hodge also

It’s estimated that more than

2,500 roads and bridges were damaged by the flooding, which will cost £12.5 million to repair.

The highways team is continuing to fix these roads as quickly as possible and keep Surrey moving. If you know about a pothole that needs filling, we need you to report it. Visit www.surreycc.gov.uk/ highwaysinfo or call 0300 200 1003

that the help is here for us.”

Planning for the future Although flooding can never be prevented completely, there are things that can be done to help protect homes in areas close to rivers. Working together to minimise the disruption floods cause, the Surrey Local Flood Risk Partnership Board is made up of all the relevant agencies, including Surrey County Council, the Environment Agency,

donated £15,000 from the members’ allocation fund to the Surrey Flood Recovery Appeal, which was launched by the Community Foundation for Surrey to help people get back on their feet. You can find out more about flooding, including support for those affected, grants available and contact numbers for all the organisations involved by visiting www.surreycc. gov.uk/floodingadvice or calling 03456 009 009.

www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters

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“They’re doing the hard work themselves; I just give them a helping hand.”

Support FOR THE whole

family

A year ago, Surrey County Council launched a new programme offering intensive support to families to help improve their lives. Family Support Coordinator, Lorna Sinclair talked to Surrey Matters to explain how she believes the programme and her role is making a difference. 14

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Q. Who do you support? The national programme is designed to support families who have a history of crime or anti-social behaviour, where a family member receives out of work benefits or the children have a low attendance or poor behaviour at school. Here in Surrey, we also offer support to families at risk of becoming homeless, people with mental health problems and those with substance misuse problems. In short, we support families that have a wide range of challenges to contend with. Many are referred to us by other agencies, like the police, social services and schools, but they can also contact us directly to discuss support. Q. Why do you think this support is needed? Most families have a number of services and agencies working with them already. This can make it a challenge for them to know which services to turn to or what support they need. Our programme is designed to bring together all the Surrey agencies and services including housing, health professionals, police, education and voluntary organisations. I act as a single point of contact for the family and the professionals and coordinate the support offered by them all. I also work with family members to explore and identify areas where they need support. Q. What support do you provide for these families? I work with five families at a time for about three months. The support we give is intensive, which has been proven to work best, so I visit them regularly and we work together to find solutions. For the first six weeks, we’re gathering information and working together to find out their strengths and needs. We then have a meeting with the family and all the agencies that have been identified to be involved, where everyone agrees

a plan of support. We’ll all review the action plan after another six weeks to see how the family are getting on and make any changes. I’ve done a range of things to support people. I’ve applied for funding for families to get new washing machines and carpets; I’ve helped to clean out a home; shown families how to cook healthy meals and I’ve played board games to teach children the value of sharing. My job is so varied and every family is different. It’s about helping people, rather than just putting plans in place. Q. What happens after the three months? The intensive support reduces, but the services continue to provide support for up to a year, during which time we get progress reports every six weeks so we can see how far the families have come. Q. Can you see a difference in the families you work with? The programme has been running for a year and we’ve seen lots of positive outcomes already. The programme empowers families and enables them to change their circumstances and achieve a lot more for themselves. One mum called me to say thank you for the support. Since I’d worked with her she’d found her own place, had taken on voluntary work and her son, who’d had a very low school attendance rate, wasn’t playing truant anymore.

Q. What do you like about your job? I always consider it an honour to get to know a family and play a role in their lives; it’s great to see them change and to hear about their successes. They’re doing the hard work themselves; I just give them a helping hand. To find out more about the family support programme and to see if you’re eligible for help, call 03456 009 009 or visit www.surreycc.gov.uk/ familysupportprogramme.

Family support... in numbers • Over 200 families

have received intensive support since the programme began a year ago.

• I t’s aimed that another

500 families will get support by the end of the year.

• Over 1,000 families in total will receive support by May 2015.

• E ach family receives

48

on average hours support from the family coordinators over a three month intensive support period.

www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters

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“Fostering

CHANGED MY LIFE

Pete moved to Walton-on-Thames with his twin brother Joe when he was fostered by Alison in 2007. Seven years later, 21 year old Pete has turned his life around and is studying Social Psychology at Loughborough University. He talked to Surrey Matters to tell us his story about fostering. Q. What was life like before you were fostered? I didn’t have a good start in life and didn’t feel myself. I felt very frustrated, and didn’t want to be at home. I ended up causing mischief and havoc at school. I wouldn’t have got to university if I’d stayed at home. Q. How did fostering change your life? It’s given me a lot of opportunities and experiences that I wouldn’t have had otherwise. I really love football and thanks to my foster carer Alison, I was able to train with Chelsea Football Academy after school. She encouraged me to join Surrey’s Care Council, a group of looked after teenagers who feedback their views, to influence changes. It’s also given me more personal freedom to explore what I want to achieve. Alison is a huge part of my life and always will be. Q. What’s your best memory of your time being fostered by Alison? She supports me so much, there are too many memories to just pick one. She attends every football match I play in and she took me on a fantastic trip to the Lake District too. For my birthday she made me a special album with photos of me growing up. She’s shown that she really cares

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www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters

for me and will always be there for me. I’m really glad Alison’s my foster carer, I really feel part of her family. Q. Why do you think fostering is important? It gives someone a home, when they don’t have anywhere else to go. But most importantly, fostering can make a huge difference to a child’s life. It’s helped me get into university for a start, and increased my confidence greatly. Q. What would you say to people considering becoming foster carers? There’s a stigma about bad behaviour with foster kids, and that’s not true. If you’ve got a spare room and you’re considering it, I’d say ‘do it!’. It’s a very rewarding job helping a young person get back on their feet, and helping them get somewhere in life. Q. What plans have you got for the future? I’m really enjoying university at the moment. I chose to study Social Psychology because of my background. Once I’m finished studying, I’d like to work with young people who find it hard to fit in. If you want to find out more about becoming a foster carer in Surrey, visit www.surreycc.gov.uk/fostering or call 08000 96 96 26.


VISIT

Haslemere

Nestled between the borders of Surrey, Sussex and Hampshire, Haslemere is a quaint and charming market town, steeped in beauty and rich in history.

O

ffering a perfect mix of town and country, it’s the ideal place for walkers, cyclists and horse riders to explore some of Surrey’s best countryside spots.

Looking back

The earliest record of Haslemere was in 1221 as a Godalming tithing. The name describes hazel trees standing beside a mere (lake). The lake doesn’t exist today, but there is a natural spring in West Street which could have provided its source.

Walkers welcome

Haslemere is the perfect pitstop for walkers as it’s a gateway to the South Downs National Park. Take a trip through the purple heather, green woods and golden valleys of the Serpent Trail, a 64-mile route starting at the serpent’s tongue in the High Street. Other walks include the Devil’s Punch Bowl and the historical Haslemere town trail.

Haslemere High Street

Food that’s local

Whether you’re with friends or family, there’s an abundance of cafes and restaurants to choose from. You can also visit the monthly farmers’ market held in the high street on the first Sunday of each month, where you’ll find lots of traders selling local delights like tasty bacon, rare breed beef, freshly baked bread, cheeses and cakes.

A place to rest your head If you’re planning to stay for a night or two, you can either opt for luxury hotels like The Georgian House Hotel, with stunning spa facilities or there are an abundance of family-run B&B’s like The Wheatsheaf Inn, providing comfortable rooms and a home cooked breakfast. For more ideas of what to do on your trip to Haslemere, visit The Haslemere Visitor and Local Information Centre, in the town’s famous Educational Museum.

rn The view across Swan Ba

Walk

Would you like to have your town or village featured in the next edition of Surrey Matters? Email us at surreymatters@surreycc.gov.uk or call 03456 009 009.

What do you think of Haslemere? Surrey Matters took to the streets to see what people think about the town.

Charlotte and Jamie Carter from Alton “We have lots of family history here and often come back to the same hairdressers. They have been cutting our family’s hair for generations.”

Kelvin Wint from Haslemere “I like to read my book in one of the town’s coffee shops during my lunch break. Hemingways is one of my favourite places to unwind.”

Christopher Ash from Fernhurst “It’s the nearest town to me so I come quite often. It’s a good place to stop off and have a wonder around the shops.”

International Network of Churches from the South East “We are staying the night so we can make the most of the beautiful town and scenic surroundings.”

www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters

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What's on… JUNE-SEPTEMBER

20 June-15 August

14-19 July

1 August

23-24 August

Guildford Summer Festival

Buddy

Jimmy Carr: Funny Business

Egham Royal Show

A diverse range of events throughout the borough of Guildford, including Walkfest, the town centre cycle race, Guildford festival craft fair and much more. Time and prices vary per event. 01483 444333 www.guildford.gov.uk/ guildfordsummerfestival

New Victoria Theatre, Woking Enjoy the most successful rock and roll show of all time. Watch as a talented cast take to the stage and perform the exciting story of Buddy Holly. 2.30 and 7.30pm. Tickets range from £12.90 - £32.40. 0844 871 76145 www.atgtickets.com 19-20 July

Farnborough Air Show

21-22 June

The Supercar Event

Dunsfold Park, Cranleigh Enjoy a wide range of activities and entertainment for all the family, including the chance to ride in a Supercar around the famous Top Gear track. 9am-4.30pm. Adults £15, Children £8. www.thechildrenstrust. org.uk/supercar 25 June

Wildlife Aid Open Day Leatherhead Get a behind-the-scenes look at the work of one of the country’s leading wildlife hospitals. See the British wildlife being cared for at the centre along with stalls, food and music.

Farnborough Aerodrome There’s lots to see and do at this family-friendly event, including a flying display, showground attractions and interactive exhibits. 9.30am. Adults £45. Kids go free. 0844 858 6752 www.farnborough.com 30 July

Tom Jones Live

Sandown Racecourse, Esher Enjoy a night of racing followed by a superstar performance from Tom Jones, who will sing a selection of his classic hits. Adults £40, Children £20. 01372 464348 www.sandown.co.uk

01372 377332 www.wildlifeaid.org.uk

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www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters

01306 881717 www.dorkinghalls.co.uk

Caddey’s field In its 155th year, you can still enjoy a range of activities including an animal marquee with livestock competitions, Punch and Judy shows, archery, falconry and entertainment in the main arena all day long. 10am-6.30pm (5.30pm Sunday).

11- 15 August

07989 563131 www.eghamroyalshow.org.uk

Dorking Halls Join Jimmy as he embarks on his brand new tour. Expect a stand-up show full of witty jokes and silly gags. 8pm. £28.90.

Mini Beast Safari Week

Birdworld, Farnham Take part in a jam-packed day of activities, including meeting the different slithering and crawling critters that belong to the park plus arts, crafts, trails and lots more. Adults £14.95, Children aged 3-6 £11.95, and 7-15s £12.95. 01420 22992 www.birdworld.co.uk

Enjoy a night’s stay for two at The Georgian House Hotel in Haslemere, where you’ll have access to the superb spa facilities throughout your stay. You will also receive a delicious homemade breakfast in the morning. For a chance to win the prize answer the following question by Friday 18 July at www.surreycc.gov.uk/ surreymatters:

What is the name of the hotel’s health club, spa and gym? You can also enter by posting your name, address and phone number to Surrey Matters, Room G29, Penrhyn Road, Kingston upon Thames, KT1 2DN. For terms and conditions, visit www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters.

Like this? Sign up to the Surrey Matters e-newsletter at www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters.


Paid summer Opportunities:

NCS with The Challenge The Challenge Network is a youth and community organisation and provider of the government’s National Citizen Service programme, a 3 week summer scheme which allows young people aged 15-17 to develop new skills, design and deliver community projects. We need MOTIVATED AND ENTHUSIASTIC STUDENTS to mentor and lead young people. • Do something different this summer • Gain experience in leadership and facilitation • Develop your CV • Earn money making a difference

Visit www.ncsthechallenge.org to apply now!

World class healthcare with a local approach St Anthony’s Hospital combines the most advanced medical procedures and skills with the kind of personal care that many hospitals have forgotten how to provide.

St. Anthony’s has been established at North Cheam for over 100 years. The only independent hospital in the area to provide full intensive care, it offers a safe and secure setting for complex and routine surgery. For further information please contact

020 8337 6691

St Anthony’s Hospital, North Cheam, Surrey SM3 9DW. Registered Charity no: 1068661.

www.stanthonys.org.uk

Regain the use of this valuable space and start enjoying your conservatory again by contacting iCon Roofs today for a free, no obligation quotation www.surreycc.gov.uk/surreymatters

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Home renewables are good for the environment and good for your pocket too. What’s more, with government financial incentives available, it’s never been a better time to install. Generate energy; generate £s

• The Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI)**

rewards homeowners choosing to heat their homes with renewable technology, such as solar hot water panels and ground source heat pumps, with high tariff payments. You can receive guaranteed levels of payment for the next seven years and slash your heating bills.

• The Feed-In Tariffs scheme (FIT)* promotes the use

of renewable electricity generating technology such as solar PV. You receive payment from an energy supplier and save money on your electricity bill.

 ction Surrey can provide free, impartial advice to help •A you understand the benefits of solar energy and how to claim your funding.

Get the most out of your renewable technology, make sure your home is as energyefficient as possible before you start. Action Surrey can advise you on the following:  reen Deal Assessments, Green •G Deal Finance and Government cashback vouchers*.

 o obligation quotes from local •N

installers for renewable technology, solid wall and cavity wall insulation, loft insulation and boilers.

 p to 100% funding is available •U

towards loft and cavity wall insulation*.

Action Surrey, your local energy advice centre, works in partnership with your local authority to provide homeowners with impartial energy advice. *Conditions apply **Green Deal Assessment required. Conditions apply Photography: National Insulation Association; Rex

Working in Partnership with:


Surrey Matters - Spring 2014