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Education

Year in Review

The faces of 2013 ❚ Surrey’s smiles made for great year, 3 ❚ Top five picks for stories of the year, 5

34 more schools will be ditching letter grades Amy Reid Now staff Twitter @amyreid87

Malcolm Gendall’s relentless courage earned him a spot on the front page in April. The 13-year-old hasn’t let Down’s syndrome stop him from participating in sports, particularly wrestling. See more photos from 2013 on page 3. (Photo: KEVIN HILL)

Also inside We share some of our favourite editorial cartoons from the past year. See page 7.

Passages Surrey lost two former politicians who left huge marks on their city. See page 9.

SURREY — A Surrey school district pilot project that removed letter grades from report cards at five elementary schools is being expanded to include 34 more schools. District spokesperson Doug Strachan said the project is a consultative effort to involve parents, students and staff. “It’s about finding feedback that is constructive and doesn’t take the wind out of the sails and the fun out of learning.... Ultimately, the intent of grades is to ensure that students learn and understand their curriculum,” Strachan said. “And that doesn’t have to be done by just a letter grade and a comment in a report card. It can be done in a number of ways, so we’re looking at trying to find out what might work best.” The pilot program began in September and in lieu of grades, students in Grade 4 and higher were evaluated without using letter grades. Instead, they were graded using “in-depth constructive feedback,” parent involvement and working with students’ strengths. The whole school at George Vanier Elementary was involved in the pilot project’s first term, and select classes from Bear Creek, David Brankin, Rosemary Heights and Sunrise Ridge elementaries also took part. see NEW GRADING › page 3


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R E C YC L E YO U R C H R I ST M AS T R E E

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Saturday January 4

Please ensure your live tree is free of wires, decorations and tree stands.

10 am - 4 pm NEWTON ATHLETIC PARK 128 Street & 74 Avenue

Surrey Firefighters will be on hand to chip your tree for a donation. All donations go to the Surrey Firefighters Charitable Society

The City of Surrey’s Chip-In event supports the Clean City Campaign dedicated to promoting a clean, healthy community for all to enjoy.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 604-591-4203 OR VISIT US ONLINE.

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NEWS

Send your story ideas or photo submissions to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Dancer/choreographer Susan L. Lehmann was at an opening night reception at the Surrey Arts Centre. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

Betty Sing is president of Surrey Memorial Hospital Auxiliary. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

Year in Review

The year’s best smiles

Debbie Palmer was at SEEDS’ inaugural Business Leadership Awards ceremony on Aug. 25. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

Karen-Lee Batten wowed the Cloverdale crowd at the first Gone Country concert in July, which raised money for cancer research and for renovations to the Easter Seals House in Vancouver. (Photo: JACOB ZINN)

DID WE MISS A GREAT PHOTO? LET US KNOW WITH LAYAR Len Haig, 83, made the long trek from Coquitlam to White Rock Museum & Archives to celebrate the former train station’s 100th birthday. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

SFU students Kashif Pasta and Shyam Valera made the front page in August for starting Creative Surrey, a project that aims to help artists engage with the business community. (Photo: KEVIN HILL)

Joey Gaffney, 14, of Surrey placed in the top four at PokÈmon World Championships this past August in Vancouver. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

New grading system will focus on specific feedback ‹ from page 1

For the latter part of the year, 34 schools – some elementary and some secondary – are set to sign onto the pilot project. At the secondary level, it will likely be Grade 8 and 9 students involved. The pilot project is incorporating technology in many of the trials. “Once a student actually finishes a project, they can share it in real time with their parents,” Strachan said. The student, parents and teacher can discuss the project, also in real time, to see what was learned and what could be improved.

“It’s really about providing fuller information – and even more frequently – over the course of the school year. And ensuring, of course, the focus is more for the student to learn where their weaknesses might be, and the parent as well, the parent can assist the student with those areas of concern.” The grade system has been around for decades, Strachan said, and this move is to bring it up to date. He said letter grades often motivate highachieving students, but sometimes fail to motivate those who aren’t excelling. “There’s a larger number of students who may be getting Cs, Bs and lesser marks, and

seeing the letter grades does not help them. It demotivates them, or it can. And it doesn’t get at the heart of what it is that they’re doing well, and what it is that they need to work on.” Students who work really hard and end up with a C can feel “deflated,” he said. Parental reactions have varied. “We involve the parents, right at the start, to let them know this is what we would like to try. We certainly have already heard from parents in a broad way, that they’re finding it quite interesting to be involved in.” Strachan said, generally, the feedback has been positive. “There’s been parents who have been

reluctant to participate and have stated that they didn’t think this was a good idea, that there needed to be the motivation, the letter grades provided, goals or targets, and that there needed to be a very straightforward summary of the performance of a student. But a couple of parents that I’m aware of have come around and have said now that they see how it works, or could work, they’re satisfied that it’s actually worth pursuing.” Strachan said at the end of the school year, the district will look at what it has learned from the project and decide where to go from there. areid@thenownewspaper.com


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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013

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Whalley couple accused of plotting to terrorize Victoria

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ational and international media descended on Surrey with a mighty “thunk” in July after the RCMP revealed they had arrested two alleged homegrown terrorists. Amanda Korody, 29, and her husband, John Stuart Nuttall, 38, of Whalley, are accused of plotting to blow up pressure cooker bombs containing rusty nails, and nuts and bolts, outside of the B.C. Legislative Buildings in Victoria on Canada Day. They have yet to be tried in court. The RCMP’s Integrated National Security Enforcement Team (INSET) launched its investigation, dubbed Project Souvenir, in February after receiving information from the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. Police said they monitored the couple, who rented a basement suite on 97A Avenue, for five months before arresting them in Abbotsford on Canada Day. The RCMP allege Nuttall and Korody were “self-radicalized” and acted independent of any national or international terrorist organization.

A photo from the suspects’ suite in Whalley. (Photo: KEVIN HILL) Assistant RCMP Commissioner James Malizia said during a press conference after the couple’s arrest that the alleged plot was “inspired by al-Qaida ideology.” The pair was married under Islamic faith, Nuttall’s lawyer revealed. Nuttall clutched a Qur’an when he appeared in Surrey provincial court.

Some people who know the couple said at the time that they don’t believe the accused are sophisticated enough to have conceived of such a plot by themselves. After their arrest, it was revealed that the couple were recovering drug addicts on welfare. Tom Zytaruk

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Countdown continued from Thursday

Cloverdale’s Fraser Downs due for a ‘refresh’ SURREY — While Coquitlam’s rebranded and renovated Hard Rock Casino Vancouver is set to be a destination for live music, its parent company hasn’t forgotten about residents south of the Fraser River. Raj Mutti, executive director of Hard Rock Casino Vancouver, said recently that Great Canadian Gaming (GCG) is looking into adding a theatre at Surrey’s Fraser Downs.

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published online, GCG executive director Chuck Keeling told the Now there are no definitive plans for a theatre at the Cloverdale casino. “There’s no contemplation for some type of dedicated theatre like we’ve got at Hard Rock or River Rock that way,” he said. “We’ve got a desire to look at what I would call a refresh of that facility.”

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“One of our biggest next steps and tasks is to really develop Fraser Downs into more than just being a racetrack and casino,” he said, adding that GCG will take a serious look at the possibility in 2014. “We’re working on plans with Fraser Downs, working with the City of Surrey and working with our planning and development company.” However, after this story was


NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013

NEWS

ROTARY CLUB OF SURREY GUILDFORD

Top 10 stories of 2013

Coal causes uproar in Surrey, White Rock and North Delta

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hile local headlines for 2012 may have been dominated by talks of the South Surrey casino, 2013 seemed to have been all about coal. At issue is a proposed coal terminal expansion at Fraser Surrey Docks that would see a total increase of 640 trains coming through White Rock and South Surrey to deliver coal. Those concerned with the project cite the potential negative effects of coal dust blowing off of the trains along rail communities as well as the potential harm on the environment at the docks itself, which sits on the Fraser River. However, unlike the South Surrey casino (see more on the casino on page 8), the proposed coal terminal expansion has so far been met with almost universal opposition. That opposition has come in the form of citizen groups, businesses, municipalities and regional health authorities seeking a process much more transparent and inclusive than the one exhibited thus far. While Fraser Surrey Docks has gone ahead and commissioned its own environmental impact assessment, those concerned are calling for a more comprehensive study that looks at all aspects of how a project like this would impact communities. Included in that list are the cities of Surrey, White Rock, New Westminster and the Corporation of Delta, as well as the two chief medical officers of the province’s health authorities, Fraser Health and Vancouver Coastal.

Tree Chipping by Donation January 4th and 5th, 2014 10 AM - 4 PM Bring your Christmas Tree to our Tree Chipping location North Surrey Secondary School at 96 Ave and 160 St

A proposed coal terminal expansion has been met with widespread opposition. So far, Fraser Surrey Docks and Port Metro Vancouver have been resistant to the idea of any more consultation, with the port CEO saying that a decision could come down “reasonably soon.” But while the casino was up to Surrey council to have the final say, this time around it’s Port Metro Vancouver, an unelected body, who will be making the decision. There is still no fixed date for when Port Metro Vancouver will make the decision on the terminal, but it is expected sometime early in the new year.

All proceeds go to local community charities!

www.RotarySurrey.ca 121913

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Christopher Poon

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VIEWPOINT

Address: The Surrey Now, #201 7889 132nd St., Surrey, B.C. V3W 4N2

Publisher: Alvin Brouwer

B.C. politics

New year promises big change InTheHouse Keith Baldrey

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here’s not much point at looking back at the big political stories of the past year. The stunning result of the May provincial election pretty well dwarfs everything else. The election result almost redefined B.C. politics, or at least many of its conventions. The future of the NDP (long the alternative to the free enterprise coalition party) is now very uncertain, political polling (the mainstay of political strategy and media coverage) may no longer be reliable, older voters appear to hold a disproportionately high level of political power because they actually cast ballots, and a lot of issues and controversies the media and political opposition make hay over don’t seem to count with many voters. So instead of dwelling on the past, let’s look ahead at what are expected to be some key issues and decisions in the coming year:

1. To build or not to build: megaprojects are everywhere! The federal government will announce sometime this spring whether the Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline will get the green light to proceed. Although the project has been met with overwhelming opposition from First Nations and much of the general public, it is commonly thought the Harper government strongly backs the idea of building a pipeline through remote northern wilderness to hook up with oil tankers along a pristine coastline that has never seen a tanker. In the coming year, focus will also shift toward the other big pipeline proposal: Kinder Morgan’s plan to twin its existing pipeline. The bigger issue here is the five-fold increase in tanker traffic that will result from the new pipeline, but Kinder Morgan has done a better job of “selling” its project than Enbridge did when it comes to garnering public support. Nevertheless, look for a lot of public protests and demonstrations targeted at Kinder Morgan over the next year.

Another proposed megaproject will also get a lot of attention this year: the Site C dam on the Peace River. Public hearings will last until January, and eventually the provincial government will formally announce what everyone already knows: it supports the project, and so construction will begin. Again, there will be a lot of anti-Site C dam protests in the coming year, but I suspect they will have little impact on the decision to green light the project. Other big projects to take significant strides forward this coming year include a number of mines and expansion of port facilities in Metro Vancouver. The B.C. Liberals will support all of them, while the NDP will tie itself in knots as it tries to accommodate both the

environmental movement and the private sector unions. Speaking of the NDP... 2. Doesn’t anyone want this job? NDP leader Adrian Dix announced back in September he would step down to make way for a new leader, and so far the only thing notable about a contest to replace him is the fact that no one seems to want the job. The number of potential candidates has dwindled to just a handful, with longtime MLA Mike Farnworth heading the list. Others may include rookie MLAs David Eby, Judy Darcy and George Heyman. But none of these candidates appear to scare the B.C. Liberals whatsoever. Farnworth, if he wins, will

be painted by them as a nice guy who is controlled by the special interest groups (unions, enviros, etc.) who control the NDP. Heyman and Darcy are former leaders of public sector unions, which are hardly viewed as representative of most people’s interests. And Eby has a laundry list of unpopular positions he took when he ran the B.C. Civil Liberties Association (I suspect the B.C. Liberals will be rooting for him, more than anyone else, to emerge as the victor). 3. Everyone wants more transit but doesn’t want to pay for it. That, in a nutshell, is the conundrum that TransLink finds itself forever mired in. But next fall’s pivotal referendum on how to fund transit operations may finally provide some clarity

Keith Baldrey is chief political reporter for Global BC Keith.Baldrey@globalnews.ca

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Our Commitment to You The Surrey Now Newspaper, a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership, respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at thenownewspaper.com. Distribution: 604-534-6493 Circulation: delivery@thenownewspaper.com

on the issue. We haven’t seen the question yet, and Premier Christy Clark and Transportation Minister Todd Stone seem to be on different pages on the issue (Clark favours a multiple choice ballot, while Stone wants a single, clear question). Nevertheless, the transit referendum has the potential to have more impact on Metro Vancouver than any single municipal election. 4. Enough of the talk, let’s see some results. As in, just one contract signed, sealed and delivered to build a liquefied natural gas plant in B.C. would be nice.

WATCH VIDEO ABOUT LAYAR Beau Simpson Editor

Ellyn Schriber Manager, Integrated Advertising Sales

The NOW newspaper is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. You can reach us by phone at 604-572-0064, by email at edit@thenownewspaper.com or by mail at Suite 201-7889 132 Street, Surrey, B.C. V3W 4N2 Second Class Mail Registration 7434. Delivered free every Tuesday and Thursday to 118,000 homes and businesses.

Publisher: Alvin Brouwer Editor: Beau Simpson Manager, Intergrated Advertising Sales: Ellyn Schriber Sports Editor: Michael Booth Entertainment Editor: Tom Zillich Reporters/photographers: Tom Zytaruk, Carolyn Cooke, Amy Reid, Christopher Poon


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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013

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VIEWPOINT

Send your letters to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Letters

Community starts with us The Editor, I understand the feelings of frustration of fellow residents and business operators of Surrey. I have lived in Surrey since 1994, and worked in Surrey since 2008, and much has changed, some positive, some negative. The responsibilities for our communities fall upon all our shoulders, including our elected officials. When more of us take ownership of the communities in which we live and work, the sooner positive changes can occur. Too many people turn a blind eye to the events occurring around them, unwillingly to speak up and speak out. Unless more people are willing to show pride for our home, Surrey, changes will not occur as quickly as desired. Money spent on facilities will not foster “community” unless there is already a community present. Doug Elford’s references to Newton Arena being “decrepit” bother me. I have worked with a great crew of individuals who strive to keep facilities like Newton Arena a safe and functional place to be well used by fellow Surrey residents. Newton Arena is an older facility, but is very well maintained, and very well used. I have lived in Whalley for my entire time in Surrey. Whalley has gone through changes, as has Newton, but the community of Whalley has not changed. From the Round-Up Café, to the Amsterdam Bakery, Tom the Tire Guy to Budget Appliance, businesses have stuck it out through good and bad. There is a lot of room for improvement throughout Surrey, but my, we have come a long way. Hoping for the future. Kris S., Surrey

Newton just as drab, boring as rest of Surrey The Editor, Re: “Scary. Sketchy. Depressed.” the Now, Dec. 17. That description of Newton seems extreme. More accurate would be, “Drab. Unfriendly. Boring.” And that’s no different from the so-called town centres of Guildford, Fleetwood, Cedar Hills and lots of other Surrey neighbourhoods. In years of walking around this town, I find the indifferent, lifeless sidewalks of Newton are just like the indifferent, lifeless sidewalks of any other part of Surrey. No doubt there are optimists who live in Surrey because they think it’s wonderful. But lots of us live here because it’s what we can afford, it’s close to work, and – if we are fortunate enough to have some buffer from all the roaring traffic – relatively quiet. Let’s just not kid ourselves that our own part of Surrey is really so much different from Newton. Susan Doubles, Surrey

Year in Review

Cartoons came with a point Here are some of our favourite Ingrid Rice editorial cartoons from 2013


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NEWS Top 10 stories of 2013

Top 10 stories of 2013

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Provincial election results bewilder local New Democrats

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o many people figured the longgoverning Liberal government was due for a political smack-bottom at the polls, over the HST and whatnot. But just the opposite happened during May’s provincial election. The Liberals won 50 seats, one more than they did in the 2009 election, while the New Democrats dropped by two seats, to 33. Local New Democrats looked like they were shell shocked on election night as it dawned on them that they’d just snatched defeat out of the jaws of victory. Of Surrey’s incumbent NDP MLAs, Bruce Ralston (Surrey-Whalley), Sue Hammell (Surrey-Green Timbers) and Harry Bains (Surrey-Newton) kept their seats, but veteran NDP MLA Jagrup Brar lost the new riding of Surrey-Fleetwood to Liberal Peter Fassbender. The governing Liberals gained ground, locally. Gordon Hogg (Surrey-White Rock) was re-elected, as was Stephanie Cadieux, this time in Surrey-Cloverdale. Amrik Virk held onto Surrey-Tynehead for the Liberals, after MLA Dave Hayer resigned. Veteran Surrey city councillor Marvin Hunt grabbed Surrey-Panorama for the governing party, and Delta councillor Scott Hamilton took Delta North away from the Liberals.

South Surrey casino saga comes to a dramatic end with ‘no’ vote

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Peter Fassbender took the new riding of Surrey-Fleetwood for the Liberals. Some people at the NDP headquarters in Surrey looked like they’d been gutpunched. Hammell called the provincial results an “incredible disappointment.” “I sense there’s a bit of bewilderment from everybody, about the results,” she said. “I’m actually quite shocked.” Ralston echoed that. “Certainly I didn’t expect it. It’s a surprise for sure. It wasn’t to be.” Tom Zytaruk

he saga of the South Surrey casino came to a close early this year – and the highly controversial vote is No. 2 on our list of the year’s top stories. Following months of public debate over Gateway Casinos & Entertainment Limited’s proposal to put a $100-million casino and entertainment complex in South Surrey, council voted five to four against approving the project, citing public opposition as the deciding factor. The proposal would have seen a 60,000square-foot gaming area, a 27,000-squarefoot convention/entertainment centre, a 200room four star hotel and several restaurants and lounges built on the 25-acre site, located in an otherwise rural part of South Surrey. The city’s cut of the project would have been an estimated $3 million a year. However, the divisive issue led to residents and businesses all over the city taking sides, and following a dramatic 13-hour public hearing that spanned two nights, council narrowly voted against moving the project forward, with Mayor Dianne Watts casting the tiebreaking vote. As a result of council’s decision, Gateway would instead continue operations of slot machines at a gaming centre in Newton as that gaming licence would have been transferred to the South Surrey location. Fallout from the decision also led to Jim Lightbody, vice president of casino

The Now’s front page of Jan. 22, 2013 announces the results of the casino vote. and gaming for the British Columbia Lottery Corporation, to say that Surrey had essentially blown its chances for future gaming opportunities. And while the decision came as a shock to many, opposition organizer Terry McNiece said the vote showed democracy was still “alive and well” in Surrey. “A lot of people said this was a done deal but we always said it wasn’t a done deal until it was put to a vote,” he said.

In court

A six-suite apartment building catches fire on Boxing Day. (Photo: SHANE MACKICHAN)

New trial ordered in Surrey sex assault SURREY — The B.C. Court of Appeal has ordered a new trial for a man accused of sexually assaulting a woman he met at a Surrey convenience store. A jury convicted Terry Ian Muller of sexual assault following a seven-day trial, during which Muller’s defence

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lawyer had twice sought a mistrial, without success. A publication ban shields the alleged victim’s identity. Muller testified the sex was consensual but she testified he forced himself on her after threatening to knock her out or get a knife. The court heard that Muller met the woman in a Surrey convenience store. She had been upset her boyfriend didn’t meet her there, like he was supposed to. Muller consoled her and invited her for drinks and to smoke some pot in a basement suite. The court heard that while driving her home, Muller turned down a dark street, parked his car, and the two had sex in the back seat. The alleged victim later got out at a SkyTrain station and took a taxi to a nearby hotel, where the staff called police. After hearing Muller’s appeal in Vancouver, two of three appeal court judges – Justices Ian Donald and Nicole Garson – decided he should get a new trial. They found that the trial judge erred by telling the jury why he excluded certain evidence. It was an error for him to repeat it and then tell the jury the reason why they couldn’t consider it was because of a technical rule about notice requirements, they decided. “In other words, what was communicated to the jury was not that the evidence was unreliable or untrustworthy, but rather that the Crown had failed to comply with a technical notice requirement,” Donald explained. Tom Zytaruk

Christopher Poon

Fire displaces 11 Jacob Zinn Now contributor Twitter @jacobzinn

NEWTON — A fire broke out at a six-suite apartment building on the Surrey side of Scott Road early Boxing Day, forcing 11 residents out of their homes. Surrey and Delta firefighters responded to the blaze at the complex, located above a motor repair shop and an alterations store, in the 8300-block of Scott Road around 7:30 a.m. Crews rescued four residents from a balcony using the ladder on a fire truck. Acting Battalion Chief Brian Carmichael of the Surrey fire department said there has been significant damage to the building and power has been shut off. He added that Emergency Social Services will take in tenants of the affected units who don’t have anywhere to go. As of press time, no injuries had been reported. The cause of the fire is under investigation, though residents reported strange sounds coming from inside the building shortly before the fire started. With files from Vancouver Sun


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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013

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NEWS Top 10 stories of 2013

1

Surrey sets new record for number of murders in a year

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urrey set a new record in 2013 with 24 homicides – at least at this time of writing. The previous record was 21, in 2005. Comparatively, Surrey recorded 15 homicides in 2011, 13 in 2010, 20 in 2009, 16 in 2008, 14 in 2007, 11 in 2006, 21 in 2005, 10 in 2004 and five in 2003. After this year’s 22nd homicide, in November, Surrey Mayor Dianne Watts struck a task force to “drill down” on what’s caused this spike in numbers. That particular homicide tied Surrey, with a population of 502,010, with Edmonton, population 812,000, but Edmonton’s number of homicides has since reached 28. Local New Democrat MP Jinny Sims blasted the federal Conservative government for “failing” to curb crime after the new homicide record was reached. “The numbers speak for themselves. It’s

NEW YEAR’S EVE The Twisters: Live music at party on Tuesday, Dec. 31 at the Rumba Room bar of Pacific Inn Resort, 1160 King George Blvd., Surrey, an event presented by White Rock Blues Society. Theme is “Bayou Blues Banquet,” with a wide assortment of Southern Cuisine. Only 120 tickets will be sold. Special hotel room rates and morning buffet are available to party-goers. Tickets are $100 per person, 604-542-6515 and tickets.surrey.ca. Sparkling Apple and House Party: Classic rock party Dec. 31 at Donegal’s pub, 12054 96th Ave., Surrey, tickets $25 in advance. Appies at 10:30 p.m., champagne at midnight. Info: 604-5888548. White Rock Elks party with music by DJ Johnny Two Cats, tickets $10 at 1469 George St., White Rock. Info: 604-538-4016. Sanskriti Cultural Awareness Society of B.C. celebrates Dec. 31 at India Banquet Hall (13030 76th Ave., Surrey) at 7 p.m. Bollywood singing, including 100 years of Bollywood cinema, Bollywood dancing, mix of Bhangra, Gidda with traditional Dhol “to motivate you to come on the floor to dance,” plus North American salsa champions. Info: 778-578-1149, Facebook. com/bigdotproduction.

TREE CHIPPING Christmas Tree Chipping event at Seaquam Secondary in North Delta, on Saturday, Jan. 4 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., in support of the school’s basketball program. At 11584 Lyon Rd., $5 minimum donation; pick-up available upon request (call 778-228-7799). Time and equipment kindly donated by Morris the Arborist. The Now

getting worse on Stephen Harper’s watch,” she said. Watts’s task force comprises RCMP brass, a criminologist, crime analysts, representatives from the school district and the city’s bylaw department, and is expected to soon release a report revealing a comprehensive strategy to tackle the problem. In the meantime, Surrey RCMP Chief Supt. Bill Fordy has dedicated a team of 40 plainclothes and uniformed police officers of all ranks, and coming from a variety of enforcement sections, to disrupt activity that results in violence. “The task force intends to be proactive,” Fordy said. “Disrupting, intelligence-led enforcement.” So far this year, there have been five homicides in Newton, eight in Whalley, five in the Panorama Ridge area, two in

This was an all-too familliar scene in Surrey during 2013. (File photo) Guildford, one in Fleetwood, and three in South Surrey. The victims were John McGivern, Geordie Carlow, Manjot Singh Dhillon, Manjinder Singh Hairan, Jaskaran Singh Sandhu, Janice Shore, Vimal Chand, Amritpal Saran, Brett Sheldon Lietz, Nicole Madelynn Brochu, Jackie Olson, Craig Widdifield,

Gurpreet Kaur, Scott Ashley McMillan, Kyle Yellowbird, Robert Patterson, Ezar Ahmed Khan, a shooting victim whose identity hasn’t been released, Satwant Singh Bains, Lisa Ann Zielke, Corey Bennett, Mark Winston Berry, Ronald Richard Lomas and Phillip Oun. Tom Zytaruk

Year in Review

Surrey loses Bill Reid, Gary Robinson Former politicians both left their mark on the city they loved SURREY – The City of Surrey lost two former politicians in 2013 who contributed immensely to the city over the last several decades. Bill Reid, called “Mr. Surrey” and “Mr. Cloverdale” by some, lost his battle with cancer in May. The former car dealer was Surrey’s MLA from 1983 to 1986 and represented SurreyWhite Rock-Cloverdale from 1986 to 1991. Before that, he was a Delta alderman from 1973 to 1978. Many will still remember Reid’s very public fall from grace more than two decades ago. In 1989, Reid was forced to resign from his post as Socred tourist minister after he awarded more than $250,000 in GO B.C. lottery grants to a project that was run by a family friend and a former campaign manager. The RCMP recommended that he be charged with breach of trust but he was not prosecuted. After his departure from provincial politics, Reid made good on his redemption by proving himself to be a quintessential Surrey booster. Over the years he served as vice-president of the Cloverdale Business Improvement Association, executive director and president of the Cloverdale Chamber of Commerce, co-chairman of the Surrey Spirit of B.C. Committee, and

Bill Reid

Gary Robinson

numerous other seats. In 2013, he was chosen as the Surrey Good Citizen of the Year. He’s been described as a dreamer, a visionary and an unrelenting supporter of all good things Surrey.

ROBINSON BATTLED HARD Then, in November, former Surrey councillor Gary Robinson passed away of a heart attack at 57 years old, after a night of hockey. In 1987, at the age of 30, Robinson was the youngest alderman ever elected to Surrey municipal council. During his 12 years in office he played an instrumental role in preserving Surrey Bend, oversaw more ice rinks being built in the city, became chairman of the city’s police committee and more. But his promising political career was destroyed by a cocaine addiction that saw him disappear from public life in 1999. In 2004, he was hospitalized with second- and third-degree burns after being doused with rubbing alcohol and set on fire following a drug binge. Following recovery, he booked into a

recovery home and eventually became its manager. He and his wife, Susan Sanderson, later set up a program to help others shed their drug addictions, and he became the executive director of the Realistic Success Recovery Society. Robinson was attempting a political comeback. Most recently, he ran under the Surrey Civic Coalition banner in the 2011 municipal election, in a bid for a Surrey council seat. When he died, he was the president of the Surrey Matters Voters Association, which replaced the SCC slate. Coun. Judy Villeneuve worked alongside Robinson on council in the ’90s and said she admired his ability and courage to come back. “He worked hard to become clean and sober,” she said, adding that he was an inspiration to others trying to do the same. Robinson was fortunate to have his wife, Sanderson, remain by his side through turbulent years. “I was on the opposite side of his journey,” she told the Now earlier this year. “We were separated for eight years, and at one point I said, yes, I’d help him find a recovery house. After that experience, Gary said that in order for him to stay clean and sober, he needed to remain in this (recovery) industry. We did that together, and it led us to reconciliation. Of his time on council, Sanderson said Robinson would “battle, and battle fiercely, just like in hockey. At the end of it he would walk away and have a cup of coffee” with his opponent. Amy Reid


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COMMUNITY every Sunday at White Rock Library at 1:30 p.m. Info: 604-536-2175. Calypso Hut Dance Society: Caribbean events hosted by not-for-profit group based in South Surrey. “Our objective is to provide social entertainment with a Caribbean flavour.” For info, email calypsodancesociety2@gmail.com or Orvis, 604-209-5081, 778-829 7107. Surrey International Folk Dancing Society meets Thursday evenings (Sept. to June) at Walnut Road Elementary, 16152 82nd Ave., North Surrey, from 7-10 p.m. Beginners welcome. No partner or costume required. “A fun way to exercise and keep your mind active.” Info: www.surreyfolkdance.org. Old-time dance events at Sunnyside Hall at 1 p.m. every Monday (from Labour Day to June), corner of 18th Ave. & 154 St., South

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Bingo at Kent Street Activity Centre in White Rock every Tuesday from 1-3 p.m. Small cash prizes and jackpot games. “Join us for some fun and relaxation. Membership required.” Call 604-5412231 for more information. Scottish Country Dance Classes: Wednesdays at Sullivan Hall, 6303 152nd St., Surrey. First class is free for newcomers. Info: 604-536-1367 or 604-531-4595, www.wrscdc.org. Toastmasters By The Sea meets

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profit Dutch-Canadian Cultural Society of Greater Vancouver, incorporated in 1965. “Our goal is to provide entertaining venues in the Lower Mainland whereby DutchCanadians and their friends can come together to preserve, enhance and celebrate, their heritage and cultural traditions.” Info: 604-5363394, www.dutchnetwork.ca. North Delta Lions Club seeks new members for community activities such as North Delta Family Days, Christmas hampers, cooking and serving food at school and community events, various projects in the area. Funding is provided for the projects by the work of members, including Ladies Diamond Night, Playhouse raffle, vending hot dogs, etc. For info, contact Bill Fraser at 604-594-3473, email billfras@telus. net, visit www.northdeltalions.org.

Now accepting 35 volunteers to remove pain in 90 seconds. Apply now at Marks Pharmacy #101-8035 - 120th Street, Delta. We can help stop your pain in 90 seconds so you can go back to playing golf, walking around and picking up your grand children. TRY BEFORE YOU BUY! As heard on . The HealthWorx Radio Show 6pm every Saturday. Check out the website Healthworxradio.com or phone 604-596-1774

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communications skills. Info: Call Kim Gramlich, 604-940-5019 or email victimservices@deltapolice.ca. Big Sisters of BC-Lower Mainland is looking for women, age 19 or older, to volunteer as Big Sister mentors. The organization provides Little Sisters with a mentor who is there to listen to her, have fun with her, and be a supportive friend. Call 604-873-4525, email info@ bigsisters.bc.ca. Surrey Hospice Society hosts volunteer training sessions to prepare individuals to assist those dealing with a life-limiting illness, their loved ones and the bereaved in its palliative and bereavement programs. Call Barbara Morningstar,

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Become a volunteer literacy or math tutor to help a child struggling to learn: Tutoring locations in Surrey and Langley, extensive training provided. Information sessions held on Monday, Jan. 6 and Tuesday, Jan. 7, at 7 p.m., in the Learning Disabilities Association office, also 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 8 at Douglas Park School in Langley. Register at 604591-5156, www.ldafs.org. VOKRA Surrey branch is always looking for volunteers and foster homes for our cats awaiting adoption. Food, supplies and vet care for the foster cats are covered. Info: www.vokra.com/volunteer. White Rock Blues Society: “We are always looking for people to join us in our efforts to promote roots music in our community. There are a number of areas of expertise we are looking to add to our team.” To get involved, contact Rod Dranfield via e-mail rodneyd@shaw.ca or call 604-723-3905. Delta Police Victim Services seeks volunteers 19 and older who have exceptional interpersonal and

Surrey. Live music (piano, violin and two guitars). All seniors welcome. Info: 604- 538-5657 or 604-575-8236. Salsa dance classes held every Tuesday at Sullivan Community Hall, 6306 152 St., Surrey. “No partner needed, no experience required, all ages. For more info (604) 725-4654, (604) 572-9199, www. HotSalsaDanceZone.com. Surrey Square Wheelers Square Dance Club hosts events at Port Kells community hall, 18918 88th Ave. Lessons start Sept., first lesson free. Great exercise, friendly atmosphere, everyone welcome. Call 604-513-9901 or 604-594-6415.


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COMMUNITY Business Notebook

Fruiticana and customers boost Surrey Food Bank SURREY — Fruiticana and its customers have made a healthy donation to the Surrey Food Bank. All Fruiticana locations collected donations from customers and matched it weight-wise for a grand total of 26,500 pounds of food. The company noted in a press release that it has a tradition of serving humanity, helping unfortunate people and sharing with them. “Without customers’ contribution this would not have been possible in such a big and proper way!” concluded the press release. ❚ BMO Bank of Montreal has announced Ashish Arora as the new regional vicepresident of personal banking for Surrey and the Fraser Valley. Arora leads a team of 250 people in BMO’s 16 branches in the region. He holds an MBA from Dalhousie and has 15 years’ experience with the bank. “Throughout his career at BMO, Ashish has demonstrated a commitment and passion to customer service and sales, in addition to being actively involved in BMO’s fundraising for B.C. Children’s Hospital,” said Joanne Gassman, senior VP, B.C. and

Fruiticana matched customers’ donations for the Surrey Food Bank, resulting in a total of 26,500 pounds of food given to the charity. Yukon division. “With the establishment of regional vice-president positions in local marketplaces, we wanted to ensure that BMO leaders are closely attuned to our clients’ needs in the communities we serve.” ❚ Christmas has come early to Delta

Hospice. The society has received more than $3,300 from the fifth annual one-day sale held by Open Space Yoga, Potters for Hospice, Sonja Picard Jewelry, The Crows Nest, The Portal, Lyck Bodycare, Pebble Creations, Prana Clothing, Chocolate Love

and LARA cuisine. All the vendors committed to giving Delta Hospice 15 per cent of their sales from the day, except for Potters for Hospice, which donated 100 per cent of their proceeds. ❚ CIBC has announced the roster of athletes who are part of its inaugural CIBC Team Next. “This program will provide for these aspiring athletes many of the tools they’ll need to achieve their goals for Pan Am and beyond,” said Simon Whitfield, winner of multiple Olympic medals in triathlon and mentor for the team. Of the 67 amateur athletes on the list, 11 are from B.C. – and of those are Christabel Netley (athletics), Isabella Bertold (sailing) and Sukhi Panesar (field hockey) of Surrey, and Danielle Kisser (swimming) of Delta. ❚ Dr. Mehrzad Hakimi will now be treating patients to oral care at 5 Corner Dental, a general dentist office serving Cloverdale and surrounding areas. Hakimi, DDS, has joined the team as the new primary dentist. He has 15 years’ experience and is “eager to work with new and existing patients at 5 Corner Dental’s established dental office,” at 1-5989 168th St., Surrey.

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SPORTS

Send your team’s highlights to Sports editor, Michael Booth at mbooth@thenownewspaper.com or call 604-572-0064

Marathon winner Tatsuya Hatachi gets hugs from his wife Rika after the Coquitlam couple swept the men’s and women’s races at the Surrey International World Music Marathon Sept. 30. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

Surrey United players celebrate after scoring what turned out to be the winning goal in a come-from-behind 2-1 win over Mountain United in the provincial girls’ Under-15 championship game in July. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

Year in Review

Best sports photos: June to December

Canadian Olympian Zach Bell finally conquored the Tour de White Rock road race in his sixth try in July. (Photo: LUIZ LOPES)

Earl Marriott’s Kathry Van Ryswyk pulls away from the field en route to the gold medal in the senior girls’ 100m hurdles at the B.C. High School Track and Field Championships in June. (Photo: LUIZ LOPES)


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Register online at www.centralcityarena.ca or in person at Central City Arena 10240 City Parkway, Surrey ph. 604-584-3887

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ADULT ROLLER HOCKEY (starts Jan 13) - Non Contact - 6 Divisions from Beginner to Advanced - 14-16 weeknight games (1 per week) - Register individually or as a team INDOOR SOCCER (starts Jan 17) - Ages 6-9 (stay dry playing indoors) - $99 registration fee - 9 weeks of fun (1 game per week) - Games played Fridays at 5 or 6 pm.

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Education

Year in Review

The faces of 2013 ] Surrey’s smiles made for great year, 3 ] Top five picks for stories of the year, 5

34 more schools will be ditching letter grades Amy Reid Now staff Twitter @amyreid87

Malcolm Gendall’s relentless courage earned him a spot on the front page in April. The 13-year-old hasn’t let Down’s syndrome stop him from participating in sports, particularly wrestling. See more photos from 2013 on page 3. (Photo: KEVIN HILL)

Also inside We share some of our favourite editorial cartoons from the past year. See page 7.

Passages Surrey lost two former politicians who left huge marks on their city. See page 9.

SURREY — A Surrey school district pilot project that removed letter grades from report cards at five elementary schools is being expanded to include 34 more schools. District spokesperson Doug Strachan said the project is a consultative effort to involve parents, students and staff. “It’s about finding feedback that is constructive and doesn’t take the wind out of the sails and the fun out of learning.... Ultimately, the intent of grades is to ensure that students learn and understand their curriculum,” Strachan said. “And that doesn’t have to be done by just a letter grade and a comment in a report card. It can be done in a number of ways, so we’re looking at trying to find out what might work best.” The pilot program began in September and in lieu of grades, students in Grade 4 and higher were evaluated without using letter grades. Instead, they were graded using “in-depth constructive feedback,” parent involvement and working with students’ strengths. The whole school at George Vanier Elementary was involved in the pilot project’s first term, and select classes from Bear Creek, David Brankin, Rosemary Heights and Sunrise Ridge elementaries also took part. see NEW GRADING › page 3


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R E C YC L E YO U R C H R I ST M AS T R E E

n I p i Ch

Saturday January 4

Please ensure your live tree is free of wires, decorations and tree stands.

10 am - 4 pm NEWTON ATHLETIC PARK 128 Street & 74 Avenue

Surrey Firefighters will be on hand to chip your tree for a donation. All donations go to the Surrey Firefighters Charitable Society

The City of Surrey’s Chip-In event supports the Clean City Campaign dedicated to promoting a clean, healthy community for all to enjoy.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 604-591-4203 OR VISIT US ONLINE.

www.surrey.ca/events 121069


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NEWS

Send your story ideas or photo submissions to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Dancer/choreographer Susan L. Lehmann was at an opening night reception at the Surrey Arts Centre. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

Betty Sing is president of Surrey Memorial Hospital Auxiliary. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

Year in Review

The year’s best smiles

Debbie Palmer was at SEEDS’ inaugural Business Leadership Awards ceremony on Aug. 25. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

Karen-Lee Batten wowed the Cloverdale crowd at the first Gone Country concert in July, which raised money for cancer research and for renovations to the Easter Seals House in Vancouver. (Photo: JACOB ZINN)

DID WE MISS A GREAT PHOTO? LET US KNOW WITH LAYAR Len Haig, 83, made the long trek from Coquitlam to White Rock Museum & Archives to celebrate the former train station’s 100th birthday. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

SFU students Kashif Pasta and Shyam Valera made the front page in August for starting Creative Surrey, a project that aims to help artists engage with the business community. (Photo: KEVIN HILL)

Joey Gaffney, 14, of Surrey placed in the top four at PokÈmon World Championships this past August in Vancouver. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

New grading system will focus on specific feedback ‹ from page 1

For the latter part of the year, 34 schools – some elementary and some secondary – are set to sign onto the pilot project. At the secondary level, it will likely be Grade 8 and 9 students involved. The pilot project is incorporating technology in many of the trials. “Once a student actually finishes a project, they can share it in real time with their parents,” Strachan said. The student, parents and teacher can discuss the project, also in real time, to see what was learned and what could be improved.

“It’s really about providing fuller information – and even more frequently – over the course of the school year. And ensuring, of course, the focus is more for the student to learn where their weaknesses might be, and the parent as well, the parent can assist the student with those areas of concern.” The grade system has been around for decades, Strachan said, and this move is to bring it up to date. He said letter grades often motivate highachieving students, but sometimes fail to motivate those who aren’t excelling. “There’s a larger number of students who may be getting Cs, Bs and lesser marks, and

seeing the letter grades does not help them. It demotivates them, or it can. And it doesn’t get at the heart of what it is that they’re doing well, and what it is that they need to work on.” Students who work really hard and end up with a C can feel “deflated,” he said. Parental reactions have varied. “We involve the parents, right at the start, to let them know this is what we would like to try. We certainly have already heard from parents in a broad way, that they’re finding it quite interesting to be involved in.” Strachan said, generally, the feedback has been positive. “There’s been parents who have been

reluctant to participate and have stated that they didn’t think this was a good idea, that there needed to be the motivation, the letter grades provided, goals or targets, and that there needed to be a very straightforward summary of the performance of a student. But a couple of parents that I’m aware of have come around and have said now that they see how it works, or could work, they’re satisfied that it’s actually worth pursuing.” Strachan said at the end of the school year, the district will look at what it has learned from the project and decide where to go from there. areid@thenownewspaper.com


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Whalley couple accused of plotting to terrorize Victoria

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ational and international media descended on Surrey with a mighty “thunk” in July after the RCMP revealed they had arrested two alleged homegrown terrorists. Amanda Korody, 29, and her husband, John Stuart Nuttall, 38, of Whalley, are accused of plotting to blow up pressure cooker bombs containing rusty nails, and nuts and bolts, outside of the B.C. Legislative Buildings in Victoria on Canada Day. They have yet to be tried in court. The RCMP’s Integrated National Security Enforcement Team (INSET) launched its investigation, dubbed Project Souvenir, in February after receiving information from the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. Police said they monitored the couple, who rented a basement suite on 97A Avenue, for five months before arresting them in Abbotsford on Canada Day. The RCMP allege Nuttall and Korody were “self-radicalized” and acted independent of any national or international terrorist organization.

A photo from the suspects’ suite in Whalley. (Photo: KEVIN HILL) Assistant RCMP Commissioner James Malizia said during a press conference after the couple’s arrest that the alleged plot was “inspired by al-Qaida ideology.” The pair was married under Islamic faith, Nuttall’s lawyer revealed. Nuttall clutched a Qur’an when he appeared in Surrey provincial court.

Some people who know the couple said at the time that they don’t believe the accused are sophisticated enough to have conceived of such a plot by themselves. After their arrest, it was revealed that the couple were recovering drug addicts on welfare. Tom Zytaruk

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Countdown continued from Thursday

Cloverdale’s Fraser Downs due for a ‘refresh’ SURREY — While Coquitlam’s rebranded and renovated Hard Rock Casino Vancouver is set to be a destination for live music, its parent company hasn’t forgotten about residents south of the Fraser River. Raj Mutti, executive director of Hard Rock Casino Vancouver, said recently that Great Canadian Gaming (GCG) is looking into adding a theatre at Surrey’s Fraser Downs.

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“One of our biggest next steps and tasks is to really develop Fraser Downs into more than just being a racetrack and casino,” he said, adding that GCG will take a serious look at the possibility in 2014. “We’re working on plans with Fraser Downs, working with the City of Surrey and working with our planning and development company.” However, after this story was


NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013

NEWS

ROTARY CLUB OF SURREY GUILDFORD

Top 10 stories of 2013

Coal causes uproar in Surrey, White Rock and North Delta

W

hile local headlines for 2012 may have been dominated by talks of the South Surrey casino, 2013 seemed to have been all about coal. At issue is a proposed coal terminal expansion at Fraser Surrey Docks that would see a total increase of 640 trains coming through White Rock and South Surrey to deliver coal. Those concerned with the project cite the potential negative effects of coal dust blowing off of the trains along rail communities as well as the potential harm on the environment at the docks itself, which sits on the Fraser River. However, unlike the South Surrey casino (see more on the casino on page 8), the proposed coal terminal expansion has so far been met with almost universal opposition. That opposition has come in the form of citizen groups, businesses, municipalities and regional health authorities seeking a process much more transparent and inclusive than the one exhibited thus far. While Fraser Surrey Docks has gone ahead and commissioned its own environmental impact assessment, those concerned are calling for a more comprehensive study that looks at all aspects of how a project like this would impact communities. Included in that list are the cities of Surrey, White Rock, New Westminster and the Corporation of Delta, as well as the two chief medical officers of the province’s health authorities, Fraser Health and Vancouver Coastal.

Tree Chipping by Donation January 4th and 5th, 2014 10 AM - 4 PM Bring your Christmas Tree to our Tree Chipping location North Surrey Secondary School at 96 Ave and 160 St

A proposed coal terminal expansion has been met with widespread opposition. So far, Fraser Surrey Docks and Port Metro Vancouver have been resistant to the idea of any more consultation, with the port CEO saying that a decision could come down “reasonably soon.” But while the casino was up to Surrey council to have the final say, this time around it’s Port Metro Vancouver, an unelected body, who will be making the decision. There is still no fixed date for when Port Metro Vancouver will make the decision on the terminal, but it is expected sometime early in the new year.

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VIEWPOINT

Address: The Surrey Now, #201 7889 132nd St., Surrey, B.C. V3W 4N2

Publisher: Alvin Brouwer

B.C. politics

New year promises big change InTheHouse Keith Baldrey

T

here’s not much point at looking back at the big political stories of the past year. The stunning result of the May provincial election pretty well dwarfs everything else. The election result almost redefined B.C. politics, or at least many of its conventions. The future of the NDP (long the alternative to the free enterprise coalition party) is now very uncertain, political polling (the mainstay of political strategy and media coverage) may no longer be reliable, older voters appear to hold a disproportionately high level of political power because they actually cast ballots, and a lot of issues and controversies the media and political opposition make hay over don’t seem to count with many voters. So instead of dwelling on the past, let’s look ahead at what are expected to be some key issues and decisions in the coming year:

1. To build or not to build: megaprojects are everywhere! The federal government will announce sometime this spring whether the Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline will get the green light to proceed. Although the project has been met with overwhelming opposition from First Nations and much of the general public, it is commonly thought the Harper government strongly backs the idea of building a pipeline through remote northern wilderness to hook up with oil tankers along a pristine coastline that has never seen a tanker. In the coming year, focus will also shift toward the other big pipeline proposal: Kinder Morgan’s plan to twin its existing pipeline. The bigger issue here is the five-fold increase in tanker traffic that will result from the new pipeline, but Kinder Morgan has done a better job of “selling” its project than Enbridge did when it comes to garnering public support. Nevertheless, look for a lot of public protests and demonstrations targeted at Kinder Morgan over the next year.

Another proposed megaproject will also get a lot of attention this year: the Site C dam on the Peace River. Public hearings will last until January, and eventually the provincial government will formally announce what everyone already knows: it supports the project, and so construction will begin. Again, there will be a lot of anti-Site C dam protests in the coming year, but I suspect they will have little impact on the decision to green light the project. Other big projects to take significant strides forward this coming year include a number of mines and expansion of port facilities in Metro Vancouver. The B.C. Liberals will support all of them, while the NDP will tie itself in knots as it tries to accommodate both the

environmental movement and the private sector unions. Speaking of the NDP... 2. Doesn’t anyone want this job? NDP leader Adrian Dix announced back in September he would step down to make way for a new leader, and so far the only thing notable about a contest to replace him is the fact that no one seems to want the job. The number of potential candidates has dwindled to just a handful, with longtime MLA Mike Farnworth heading the list. Others may include rookie MLAs David Eby, Judy Darcy and George Heyman. But none of these candidates appear to scare the B.C. Liberals whatsoever. Farnworth, if he wins, will

be painted by them as a nice guy who is controlled by the special interest groups (unions, enviros, etc.) who control the NDP. Heyman and Darcy are former leaders of public sector unions, which are hardly viewed as representative of most people’s interests. And Eby has a laundry list of unpopular positions he took when he ran the B.C. Civil Liberties Association (I suspect the B.C. Liberals will be rooting for him, more than anyone else, to emerge as the victor). 3. Everyone wants more transit but doesn’t want to pay for it. That, in a nutshell, is the conundrum that TransLink finds itself forever mired in. But next fall’s pivotal referendum on how to fund transit operations may finally provide some clarity

Keith Baldrey is chief political reporter for Global BC Keith.Baldrey@globalnews.ca

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on the issue. We haven’t seen the question yet, and Premier Christy Clark and Transportation Minister Todd Stone seem to be on different pages on the issue (Clark favours a multiple choice ballot, while Stone wants a single, clear question). Nevertheless, the transit referendum has the potential to have more impact on Metro Vancouver than any single municipal election. 4. Enough of the talk, let’s see some results. As in, just one contract signed, sealed and delivered to build a liquefied natural gas plant in B.C. would be nice.

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The NOW newspaper is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. You can reach us by phone at 604-572-0064, by email at edit@thenownewspaper.com or by mail at Suite 201-7889 132 Street, Surrey, B.C. V3W 4N2 Second Class Mail Registration 7434. Delivered free every Tuesday and Thursday to 118,000 homes and businesses.

Publisher: Alvin Brouwer Editor: Beau Simpson Manager, Intergrated Advertising Sales: Ellyn Schriber Sports Editor: Michael Booth Entertainment Editor: Tom Zillich Reporters/photographers: Tom Zytaruk, Carolyn Cooke, Amy Reid, Christopher Poon


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VIEWPOINT

Send your letters to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Letters

Community starts with us The Editor, I understand the feelings of frustration of fellow residents and business operators of Surrey. I have lived in Surrey since 1994, and worked in Surrey since 2008, and much has changed, some positive, some negative. The responsibilities for our communities fall upon all our shoulders, including our elected officials. When more of us take ownership of the communities in which we live and work, the sooner positive changes can occur. Too many people turn a blind eye to the events occurring around them, unwillingly to speak up and speak out. Unless more people are willing to show pride for our home, Surrey, changes will not occur as quickly as desired. Money spent on facilities will not foster “community” unless there is already a community present. Doug Elford’s references to Newton Arena being “decrepit” bother me. I have worked with a great crew of individuals who strive to keep facilities like Newton Arena a safe and functional place to be well used by fellow Surrey residents. Newton Arena is an older facility, but is very well maintained, and very well used. I have lived in Whalley for my entire time in Surrey. Whalley has gone through changes, as has Newton, but the community of Whalley has not changed. From the Round-Up Café, to the Amsterdam Bakery, Tom the Tire Guy to Budget Appliance, businesses have stuck it out through good and bad. There is a lot of room for improvement throughout Surrey, but my, we have come a long way. Hoping for the future. Kris S., Surrey

Newton just as drab, boring as rest of Surrey The Editor, Re: “Scary. Sketchy. Depressed.” the Now, Dec. 17. That description of Newton seems extreme. More accurate would be, “Drab. Unfriendly. Boring.” And that’s no different from the so-called town centres of Guildford, Fleetwood, Cedar Hills and lots of other Surrey neighbourhoods. In years of walking around this town, I find the indifferent, lifeless sidewalks of Newton are just like the indifferent, lifeless sidewalks of any other part of Surrey. No doubt there are optimists who live in Surrey because they think it’s wonderful. But lots of us live here because it’s what we can afford, it’s close to work, and – if we are fortunate enough to have some buffer from all the roaring traffic – relatively quiet. Let’s just not kid ourselves that our own part of Surrey is really so much different from Newton. Susan Doubles, Surrey

Year in Review

Cartoons came with a point Here are some of our favourite Ingrid Rice editorial cartoons from 2013


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NEWS Top 10 stories of 2013

Top 10 stories of 2013

3

2

Provincial election results bewilder local New Democrats

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o many people figured the longgoverning Liberal government was due for a political smack-bottom at the polls, over the HST and whatnot. But just the opposite happened during May’s provincial election. The Liberals won 50 seats, one more than they did in the 2009 election, while the New Democrats dropped by two seats, to 33. Local New Democrats looked like they were shell shocked on election night as it dawned on them that they’d just snatched defeat out of the jaws of victory. Of Surrey’s incumbent NDP MLAs, Bruce Ralston (Surrey-Whalley), Sue Hammell (Surrey-Green Timbers) and Harry Bains (Surrey-Newton) kept their seats, but veteran NDP MLA Jagrup Brar lost the new riding of Surrey-Fleetwood to Liberal Peter Fassbender. The governing Liberals gained ground, locally. Gordon Hogg (Surrey-White Rock) was re-elected, as was Stephanie Cadieux, this time in Surrey-Cloverdale. Amrik Virk held onto Surrey-Tynehead for the Liberals, after MLA Dave Hayer resigned. Veteran Surrey city councillor Marvin Hunt grabbed Surrey-Panorama for the governing party, and Delta councillor Scott Hamilton took Delta North away from the Liberals.

South Surrey casino saga comes to a dramatic end with ‘no’ vote

T

Peter Fassbender took the new riding of Surrey-Fleetwood for the Liberals. Some people at the NDP headquarters in Surrey looked like they’d been gutpunched. Hammell called the provincial results an “incredible disappointment.” “I sense there’s a bit of bewilderment from everybody, about the results,” she said. “I’m actually quite shocked.” Ralston echoed that. “Certainly I didn’t expect it. It’s a surprise for sure. It wasn’t to be.” Tom Zytaruk

he saga of the South Surrey casino came to a close early this year – and the highly controversial vote is No. 2 on our list of the year’s top stories. Following months of public debate over Gateway Casinos & Entertainment Limited’s proposal to put a $100-million casino and entertainment complex in South Surrey, council voted five to four against approving the project, citing public opposition as the deciding factor. The proposal would have seen a 60,000square-foot gaming area, a 27,000-squarefoot convention/entertainment centre, a 200room four star hotel and several restaurants and lounges built on the 25-acre site, located in an otherwise rural part of South Surrey. The city’s cut of the project would have been an estimated $3 million a year. However, the divisive issue led to residents and businesses all over the city taking sides, and following a dramatic 13-hour public hearing that spanned two nights, council narrowly voted against moving the project forward, with Mayor Dianne Watts casting the tiebreaking vote. As a result of council’s decision, Gateway would instead continue operations of slot machines at a gaming centre in Newton as that gaming licence would have been transferred to the South Surrey location. Fallout from the decision also led to Jim Lightbody, vice president of casino

The Now’s front page of Jan. 22, 2013 announces the results of the casino vote. and gaming for the British Columbia Lottery Corporation, to say that Surrey had essentially blown its chances for future gaming opportunities. And while the decision came as a shock to many, opposition organizer Terry McNiece said the vote showed democracy was still “alive and well” in Surrey. “A lot of people said this was a done deal but we always said it wasn’t a done deal until it was put to a vote,” he said.

In court

A six-suite apartment building catches fire on Boxing Day. (Photo: SHANE MACKICHAN)

New trial ordered in Surrey sex assault SURREY — The B.C. Court of Appeal has ordered a new trial for a man accused of sexually assaulting a woman he met at a Surrey convenience store. A jury convicted Terry Ian Muller of sexual assault following a seven-day trial, during which Muller’s defence

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lawyer had twice sought a mistrial, without success. A publication ban shields the alleged victim’s identity. Muller testified the sex was consensual but she testified he forced himself on her after threatening to knock her out or get a knife. The court heard that Muller met the woman in a Surrey convenience store. She had been upset her boyfriend didn’t meet her there, like he was supposed to. Muller consoled her and invited her for drinks and to smoke some pot in a basement suite. The court heard that while driving her home, Muller turned down a dark street, parked his car, and the two had sex in the back seat. The alleged victim later got out at a SkyTrain station and took a taxi to a nearby hotel, where the staff called police. After hearing Muller’s appeal in Vancouver, two of three appeal court judges – Justices Ian Donald and Nicole Garson – decided he should get a new trial. They found that the trial judge erred by telling the jury why he excluded certain evidence. It was an error for him to repeat it and then tell the jury the reason why they couldn’t consider it was because of a technical rule about notice requirements, they decided. “In other words, what was communicated to the jury was not that the evidence was unreliable or untrustworthy, but rather that the Crown had failed to comply with a technical notice requirement,” Donald explained. Tom Zytaruk

Christopher Poon

Fire displaces 11 Jacob Zinn Now contributor Twitter @jacobzinn

NEWTON — A fire broke out at a six-suite apartment building on the Surrey side of Scott Road early Boxing Day, forcing 11 residents out of their homes. Surrey and Delta firefighters responded to the blaze at the complex, located above a motor repair shop and an alterations store, in the 8300-block of Scott Road around 7:30 a.m. Crews rescued four residents from a balcony using the ladder on a fire truck. Acting Battalion Chief Brian Carmichael of the Surrey fire department said there has been significant damage to the building and power has been shut off. He added that Emergency Social Services will take in tenants of the affected units who don’t have anywhere to go. As of press time, no injuries had been reported. The cause of the fire is under investigation, though residents reported strange sounds coming from inside the building shortly before the fire started. With files from Vancouver Sun


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NEWS Top 10 stories of 2013

1

Surrey sets new record for number of murders in a year

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urrey set a new record in 2013 with 24 homicides – at least at this time of writing. The previous record was 21, in 2005. Comparatively, Surrey recorded 15 homicides in 2011, 13 in 2010, 20 in 2009, 16 in 2008, 14 in 2007, 11 in 2006, 21 in 2005, 10 in 2004 and five in 2003. After this year’s 22nd homicide, in November, Surrey Mayor Dianne Watts struck a task force to “drill down” on what’s caused this spike in numbers. That particular homicide tied Surrey, with a population of 502,010, with Edmonton, population 812,000, but Edmonton’s number of homicides has since reached 28. Local New Democrat MP Jinny Sims blasted the federal Conservative government for “failing” to curb crime after the new homicide record was reached. “The numbers speak for themselves. It’s

NEW YEAR’S EVE The Twisters: Live music at party on Tuesday, Dec. 31 at the Rumba Room bar of Pacific Inn Resort, 1160 King George Blvd., Surrey, an event presented by White Rock Blues Society. Theme is “Bayou Blues Banquet,” with a wide assortment of Southern Cuisine. Only 120 tickets will be sold. Special hotel room rates and morning buffet are available to party-goers. Tickets are $100 per person, 604-542-6515 and tickets.surrey.ca. Sparkling Apple and House Party: Classic rock party Dec. 31 at Donegal’s pub, 12054 96th Ave., Surrey, tickets $25 in advance. Appies at 10:30 p.m., champagne at midnight. Info: 604-5888548. White Rock Elks party with music by DJ Johnny Two Cats, tickets $10 at 1469 George St., White Rock. Info: 604-538-4016. Sanskriti Cultural Awareness Society of B.C. celebrates Dec. 31 at India Banquet Hall (13030 76th Ave., Surrey) at 7 p.m. Bollywood singing, including 100 years of Bollywood cinema, Bollywood dancing, mix of Bhangra, Gidda with traditional Dhol “to motivate you to come on the floor to dance,” plus North American salsa champions. Info: 778-578-1149, Facebook. com/bigdotproduction.

TREE CHIPPING Christmas Tree Chipping event at Seaquam Secondary in North Delta, on Saturday, Jan. 4 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., in support of the school’s basketball program. At 11584 Lyon Rd., $5 minimum donation; pick-up available upon request (call 778-228-7799). Time and equipment kindly donated by Morris the Arborist. The Now

getting worse on Stephen Harper’s watch,” she said. Watts’s task force comprises RCMP brass, a criminologist, crime analysts, representatives from the school district and the city’s bylaw department, and is expected to soon release a report revealing a comprehensive strategy to tackle the problem. In the meantime, Surrey RCMP Chief Supt. Bill Fordy has dedicated a team of 40 plainclothes and uniformed police officers of all ranks, and coming from a variety of enforcement sections, to disrupt activity that results in violence. “The task force intends to be proactive,” Fordy said. “Disrupting, intelligence-led enforcement.” So far this year, there have been five homicides in Newton, eight in Whalley, five in the Panorama Ridge area, two in

This was an all-too familliar scene in Surrey during 2013. (File photo) Guildford, one in Fleetwood, and three in South Surrey. The victims were John McGivern, Geordie Carlow, Manjot Singh Dhillon, Manjinder Singh Hairan, Jaskaran Singh Sandhu, Janice Shore, Vimal Chand, Amritpal Saran, Brett Sheldon Lietz, Nicole Madelynn Brochu, Jackie Olson, Craig Widdifield,

Gurpreet Kaur, Scott Ashley McMillan, Kyle Yellowbird, Robert Patterson, Ezar Ahmed Khan, a shooting victim whose identity hasn’t been released, Satwant Singh Bains, Lisa Ann Zielke, Corey Bennett, Mark Winston Berry, Ronald Richard Lomas and Phillip Oun. Tom Zytaruk

Year in Review

Surrey loses Bill Reid, Gary Robinson Former politicians both left their mark on the city they loved SURREY – The City of Surrey lost two former politicians in 2013 who contributed immensely to the city over the last several decades. Bill Reid, called “Mr. Surrey” and “Mr. Cloverdale” by some, lost his battle with cancer in May. The former car dealer was Surrey’s MLA from 1983 to 1986 and represented SurreyWhite Rock-Cloverdale from 1986 to 1991. Before that, he was a Delta alderman from 1973 to 1978. Many will still remember Reid’s very public fall from grace more than two decades ago. In 1989, Reid was forced to resign from his post as Socred tourist minister after he awarded more than $250,000 in GO B.C. lottery grants to a project that was run by a family friend and a former campaign manager. The RCMP recommended that he be charged with breach of trust but he was not prosecuted. After his departure from provincial politics, Reid made good on his redemption by proving himself to be a quintessential Surrey booster. Over the years he served as vice-president of the Cloverdale Business Improvement Association, executive director and president of the Cloverdale Chamber of Commerce, co-chairman of the Surrey Spirit of B.C. Committee, and

Bill Reid

Gary Robinson

numerous other seats. In 2013, he was chosen as the Surrey Good Citizen of the Year. He’s been described as a dreamer, a visionary and an unrelenting supporter of all good things Surrey.

ROBINSON BATTLED HARD Then, in November, former Surrey councillor Gary Robinson passed away of a heart attack at 57 years old, after a night of hockey. In 1987, at the age of 30, Robinson was the youngest alderman ever elected to Surrey municipal council. During his 12 years in office he played an instrumental role in preserving Surrey Bend, oversaw more ice rinks being built in the city, became chairman of the city’s police committee and more. But his promising political career was destroyed by a cocaine addiction that saw him disappear from public life in 1999. In 2004, he was hospitalized with second- and third-degree burns after being doused with rubbing alcohol and set on fire following a drug binge. Following recovery, he booked into a

recovery home and eventually became its manager. He and his wife, Susan Sanderson, later set up a program to help others shed their drug addictions, and he became the executive director of the Realistic Success Recovery Society. Robinson was attempting a political comeback. Most recently, he ran under the Surrey Civic Coalition banner in the 2011 municipal election, in a bid for a Surrey council seat. When he died, he was the president of the Surrey Matters Voters Association, which replaced the SCC slate. Coun. Judy Villeneuve worked alongside Robinson on council in the ’90s and said she admired his ability and courage to come back. “He worked hard to become clean and sober,” she said, adding that he was an inspiration to others trying to do the same. Robinson was fortunate to have his wife, Sanderson, remain by his side through turbulent years. “I was on the opposite side of his journey,” she told the Now earlier this year. “We were separated for eight years, and at one point I said, yes, I’d help him find a recovery house. After that experience, Gary said that in order for him to stay clean and sober, he needed to remain in this (recovery) industry. We did that together, and it led us to reconciliation. Of his time on council, Sanderson said Robinson would “battle, and battle fiercely, just like in hockey. At the end of it he would walk away and have a cup of coffee” with his opponent. Amy Reid


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COMMUNITY Wellbeing guide Email all Wellbeing listings to edit@thenownewspaper.com. Publication is not guaranteed.

VOLUNTEERING Become a volunteer literacy or math tutor to help a child struggling to learn: Tutoring locations in Surrey and Langley, extensive training provided. Information sessions held on Monday, Jan. 6 and Tuesday, Jan. 7, at 7 p.m., in the Learning Disabilities Association office, also 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 8 at Douglas Park School in Langley. Register at 604591-5156, www.ldafs.org. VOKRA Surrey branch is always looking for volunteers and foster homes for our cats awaiting adoption. Food, supplies and vet care for the foster cats are covered. Info: www.vokra.com/volunteer. READ Surrey/White Rock Society is looking for individuals who are interested in being trained to become volunteer tutors. Applicants must have excellent English skills. Training is provided by a certified teacher/trainer. For details, call 778-871-5319 or email safullam1@ gmail.com. Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB): “For only a few

hours a week, you can make a huge difference in the life of someone with vision loss. Become a ‘Vision Mate’ and be matched with someone living near your home, work or school. Assist with reading, errands, shopping, or going for walks. You set up mutually convenient times to meet.” Contact Jaishree via 604431-2121, ext. 6032, or email her, jaishree.narsih@cnib.ca. Fraser Health Crisis Line is recruiting volunteers to provide assistance to people in the region who are experiencing emotional distress. No previous experience is needed as extensive training and ongoing support is provided. “If you are interested in learning more about this challenging and rewarding opportunity, visit our website at www.options.bc.ca and follow the link for the Crisis Line. Next training starts soon.” White Rock Blues Society: “We are always looking for people to join us in our efforts to promote roots music in our community. There are a number of areas of expertise we are looking to add to our team.” To get involved, contact Rod Dranfield via e-mail rodneyd@shaw.ca or call 604-723-3905. PICS assisted-living facility, at 12075 75A Ave., Surrey, is looking for volunteers who can teach basic computer operation and piano to senior residents. “We are looking for person who can devote four hours

per week.” Call 604-596-0052. Big Sisters of BC-Lower Mainland is looking for women, age 19 or older, to volunteer as Big Sister mentors. The organization provides Little Sisters with a mentor who is there to listen to her, have fun with her, and be a supportive friend. Call 604-873-4525, email info@ bigsisters.bc.ca. Surrey Hospice Society hosts volunteer training sessions to prepare individuals to assist those dealing with a life-limiting illness, their loved ones and the bereaved in its palliative and bereavement programs. Call Barbara Morningstar, 604-543-7006, or visit www. surreyhospice.com.

Kent Street Activity Centre has regular Bingo games every Tuesday afternoon and there are small cash prizes and jackpot games as well. See listing under Activities.

ACTIVITIES Bingo at Kent Street Activity Centre in White Rock every Tuesday from 1-3 p.m. Small cash prizes and jackpot games. “Join us for some fun and relaxation. Membership required.” Call 604-5412231 for more information. Scottish Country Dance Classes: Wednesdays at Sullivan Hall, 6303 152nd St., Surrey. First class is free for newcomers. Info: 604-536-1367 or 604-531-4595, www.wrscdc.org. Toastmasters By The Sea meets every Sunday at White Rock Library at 1:30 p.m. Info: 604-536-2175. Calypso Hut Dance Society:

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Caribbean events hosted by not-for-profit group based in South Surrey. “Our objective is to provide social entertainment with a Caribbean flavour.” For info, email calypsodancesociety2@gmail.com or Orvis, 604-209-5081, 778-829 7107. Surrey International Folk Dancing Society meets Thursday evenings (Sept. to June) at Walnut Road Elementary, 16152 82nd Ave., North Surrey, from 7-10 p.m. Beginners welcome. No partner or costume required. “A fun way to exercise and keep your mind active.” Info: www.surreyfolkdance.org. White Rock Drum Circle “Rhythm Friends”: “Bring your drum, percussion instrument or old pail and join in this fun community drum circle. Improvise together and create music on the spot. No experience necessary and we have some percussion instruments for you to play with.” Gatherings are Thursdays from 1 to 2 p.m. at White Rock Community Centre (hall B), 15154 Russell Ave. Drop-in fee is $3. Old-time dance events at Sunnyside Hall at 1 p.m. every Monday (from Labour Day to June), corner of 18th Ave. & 154 St., South Surrey. Live music (piano, violin and two guitars). All seniors are welcome. Info: 604- 538-5657 or 604-575-8236. Salsa dance classes held every Tuesday at Sullivan Community Hall, 6306 152 St., Surrey. “No partner needed, no experience required, all ages. For more info (604) 725-4654, (604) 572-9199, www. HotSalsaDanceZone.com. Surrey Square Wheelers Square

Dance Club hosts events at Port Kells community hall, 18918 88th Ave. Lessons start Sept., first lesson free. Great exercise, friendly atmosphere, everyone welcome. Call 604-513-9901 or 604-594-6415.

CLUBS/GROUPS The Netherlands Association (“Je Maintiendrai”) is the not-forprofit Dutch-Canadian Cultural Society of Greater Vancouver, incorporated in 1965. “Our goal is to provide entertaining venues in the Lower Mainland whereby DutchCanadians and their friends can come together to preserve, enhance and celebrate, their heritage and cultural traditions.” Info: 604-5363394, www.dutchnetwork.ca. Soup Sisters/Broth Brothers of Surrey: Soup-making social events hosted by charitable group monthly at Bistro 72 restaurant in Newton, as donation to Evergreen Transition House shelter for women and children. Fee per person is $50; event calendar and more details at www. soupsisters.org. Mixed Singles over Sixty in White Rock/South Surrey: Social active group offering theatre, dinners out, golf, dancing, walking and much more. For more info, contact Colin at 604-538-7799. On the web: seniorsoversixtyclub.weebly.com. Laughter Yoga Club in White Rock: Club hosts events on the last Tuesday of each month at White Rock Library, from 7 to 8 p.m., starting for the fall on Sept. 24. Info: www.lafunnygirl.com.

South Surrey Garden Club: Club meets at 7:30 p.m. every fourth Wednesday (except August and December) at St. Mark’s Anglican Church, 12953 20th Avenue. “We have a very active and full program with great speakers, field trips and workshops.” For info, contact Kathy at 604-250-1745. Visitor fee is $3, credited toward annual membership fee of $20. Newcomers Club of White Rock and South Surrey is a club for women who are new to the area. The club meets the first Tuesday of the month (September to May) from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Mount Olive Lutheran Church, 2350 148 St., Surrey. First visit is free. Membership is $35 per year. Info: www.wrssnewcomers.com. W.O.L.F.S. (Women of Leisure,Fun, Support): “This is a group of Caribbean women, welcoming women of all nationalities to join us to have fun, leisure and support each other. We go on outings, dances, travel, dining and participate in all nationalities’ activities. We meet monthly to socialize.” For info, phone Jennifer at 778-395-1524. White Rock and District Garden Club meets at Cranley Hall, 2141 Cranley Dr., South Surrey. Club information: Angela, 604-536-3076. Ubuntu Ogogo: “Compassionate grandmothers” group meets on the second Wednesday of the month at various locations; starting in September, meetings will be held at Bear Creek Villa, 8233 140th St., Surrey. Group works to raise funds to assist grandmothers in subSaharan Africa who are supporting their grandchildren due to AIDS/HIV pandemic there. Info: 778-565-3555, bwarren567@gmail.com. The Rock Christian Toastmasters Club meets in White Rock/S. Surrey. “We are welcoming visitors and new members any Tuesday until summer recess at the end of June.” Meetings 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Peninsula Estates rec. centre at 15135 St. (151A St.) and 20th Ave. “Improve public speaking ability, increase leadership skills, learn listening skills, and make new friends. Everyone welcome.” Info: Call Deanne, 604-542-1183. Sew N’ So Quilters: Group meets on Wednesdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Sunnyside hall in South Surrey (1845 154th St., at Bakerview Park). For more information, contact Pauline Bruce at 604-596-4413.


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COMMUNITY Business Notebook

Fruiticana and customers boost Surrey Food Bank SURREY — Fruiticana and its customers have made a healthy donation to the Surrey Food Bank. All Fruiticana locations collected donations from customers and matched it weight-wise for a grand total of 26,500 pounds of food. The company noted in a press release that it has a tradition of serving humanity, helping unfortunate people and sharing with them. “Without customers’ contribution this would not have been possible in such a big and proper way!” concluded the press release. ❚ BMO Bank of Montreal has announced Ashish Arora as the new regional vicepresident of personal banking for Surrey and the Fraser Valley. Arora leads a team of 250 people in BMO’s 16 branches in the region. He holds an MBA from Dalhousie and has 15 years’ experience with the bank. “Throughout his career at BMO, Ashish has demonstrated a commitment and passion to customer service and sales, in addition to being actively involved in BMO’s fundraising for B.C. Children’s Hospital,” said Joanne Gassman, senior VP, B.C. and

Fruiticana matched customers’ donations for the Surrey Food Bank, resulting in a total of 26,500 pounds of food given to the charity. Yukon division. “With the establishment of regional vice-president positions in local marketplaces, we wanted to ensure that BMO leaders are closely attuned to our clients’ needs in the communities we serve.” ❚ Christmas has come early to Delta

Hospice. The society has received more than $3,300 from the fifth annual one-day sale held by Open Space Yoga, Potters for Hospice, Sonja Picard Jewelry, The Crows Nest, The Portal, Lyck Bodycare, Pebble Creations, Prana Clothing, Chocolate Love

and LARA cuisine. All the vendors committed to giving Delta Hospice 15 per cent of their sales from the day, except for Potters for Hospice, which donated 100 per cent of their proceeds. ❚ CIBC has announced the roster of athletes who are part of its inaugural CIBC Team Next. “This program will provide for these aspiring athletes many of the tools they’ll need to achieve their goals for Pan Am and beyond,” said Simon Whitfield, winner of multiple Olympic medals in triathlon and mentor for the team. Of the 67 amateur athletes on the list, 11 are from B.C. – and of those are Christabel Netley (athletics), Isabella Bertold (sailing) and Sukhi Panesar (field hockey) of Surrey, and Danielle Kisser (swimming) of Delta. ❚ Dr. Mehrzad Hakimi will now be treating patients to oral care at 5 Corner Dental, a general dentist office serving Cloverdale and surrounding areas. Hakimi, DDS, has joined the team as the new primary dentist. He has 15 years’ experience and is “eager to work with new and existing patients at 5 Corner Dental’s established dental office,” at 1-5989 168th St., Surrey.

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SPORTS

Send your team’s highlights to Sports editor, Michael Booth at mbooth@thenownewspaper.com or call 604-572-0064

Marathon winner Tatsuya Hatachi gets hugs from his wife Rika after the Coquitlam couple swept the men’s and women’s races at the Surrey International World Music Marathon Sept. 30. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

Surrey United players celebrate after scoring what turned out to be the winning goal in a come-from-behind 2-1 win over Mountain United in the provincial girls’ Under-15 championship game in July. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

Year in Review

Best sports photos: June to December

Canadian Olympian Zach Bell finally conquored the Tour de White Rock road race in his sixth try in July. (Photo: LUIZ LOPES)

Earl Marriott’s Kathry Van Ryswyk pulls away from the field en route to the gold medal in the senior girls’ 100m hurdles at the B.C. High School Track and Field Championships in June. (Photo: LUIZ LOPES)


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Register online at www.centralcityarena.ca or in person at Central City Arena 10240 City Parkway, Surrey ph. 604-584-3887

YOUTH BALL HOCKEY (starts Jan 10) - Ages 7-17 (No Contact) - $149 early registration - 11 or 12 games (usually 1 game per week) - No weekend games. Beginners are welcome. - See website for days/times for each age group

ADULT BALL HOCKEY (starts Jan 24) - Non Contact - 6 Divisions from Beginner to Advanced - 14-16 weekend games (1 per week) - Register individually or as a team - $2380 / team $189 / individuals

All games played out of Central City Arena in Surrey

ADULT ROLLER HOCKEY (starts Jan 13) - Non Contact - 6 Divisions from Beginner to Advanced - 14-16 weeknight games (1 per week) - Register individually or as a team INDOOR SOCCER (starts Jan 17) - Ages 6-9 (stay dry playing indoors) - $99 registration fee - 9 weeks of fun (1 game per week) - Games played Fridays at 5 or 6 pm.

www.funkymonkeyfunpark.com

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13853 104 Ave, Surrey Phone 604-498-4644

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BIRTHDAY PARTY $89 Mon-Fri $129 Sat & Sun


Surrey NOW December 31 2013