Issuu on Google+

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 YOUR NO. 1 SOURCE FOR NEWS, SPORTS, WEATHER AND ENTERTAINMENT

THENOWNEWSPAPER.COM

S U R R E Y - N O R T H D E LTA E D I T I O N

Walmart

12451 88 Av

e

Superstore

14650 104 Ave & 7550 King George Blvd

T&T Superm a

Central City

Viewpoint Community Sports Classifieds

8 11 18 19

Second SMH doctor resigns, calls for public inquiry into Code Blues

3

Surrey

An old Ford helps steer kids away from a life of crime SEE VIDEO WITH LAYAR

Gord Goble Now contributor

SURREY — It reads like the implausible plot for the feel-good movie of the year: The would-be hero – a cop, a good one – stumbles upon the rusted hulk of a 1935 Ford Slantback withering away in a far-off prairie pasture. Dude brings it halfway across the country, then spends the better part of a decade breathing life into it. Except he doesn’t work alone. Instead, he enlists the aid of disadvantaged kids from the poor side of town, kids who might otherwise be compelled to pilfer a car rather than lovingly restore one. Complications ensue, of course, but the closing scene – where the car and the cop and the kids lead a parade through the downtown core – is nothing short of a happiness factory. Only this isn’t a movie, it’s

real life, and we’re just now entering the final act. When VPD Sgt. Tim Houchen found the car, or what was left of it, in a Saskatchewan farmer’s field seven years ago, he likely didn’t know all it would spawn. Then again, maybe he did. Houchen is one of those guys who believes. He believes in ideals, and he believes in old-school wholesomeness. “When you look at meaningful conversations between a parent and kid,” Houchen says, “those conversations were over mechanics with my dad, fixing a car, a boat, a truck. That’s where our meaningful conversations took place.” And he believes that “if you remove the cultural stigma of the police and the Downtown Eastside (of Vancouver), it’s far easier for a youth to come to you and take those steps required to have a relationship. It’s personal.” And that’s what the NASKARZ (Never Again Steal Cars) program is all about. Currently using the see ‘WE FIND’ › page 5

Teens in the NASKARZ program with Ewald Penner (second from left) and police Sgt. Tim Houchen (right). (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

Grandview

rket

g George H

Corners Pla

2285 160 S

t

wy

za

Help for the homeless

Extremeweather beds open early Amy Reid Now staff Twitter @amyreid87

SURREY and WHITE ROCK — Extreme-weather beds opened early this year. While the program usually kicks off in mid- to late-November, a heavy rainfall warning triggered an early opening for Nov. 1 and 2 in Surrey and White Rock. “It was the first time in eight years we were ever open that early,” said Jonquil Hallgate, executive director of Surrey Urban Mission. The mission’s new location at 108th Avenue and King George Boulevard has a shower, which will be particularly useful for its clients this time of year. Hallgate said the mission saw nine people on Friday, Nov. 1 and 28 people on the Saturday. In Surrey and White Rock, there are 80 beds, with 20 more that can open if needed. Delta is not participating in the extreme weather program this year. The beds are called to open when weather conditions become dangerous for those on the street. Temperatures of -2 C, significant snowfall, gusty winds or prolonged rain can trigger an opening. The beds are then available on and off throughout the cold season. “Some years we’ve hardly been open and other years, we’ve been open 50 nights,” Hallgate said. In addition to providing an indoor place to sleep, the program includes a warm meal. Peter Fedos, extreme weather coordinator for Surrey-White Rock, said the service can make the difference between life and death. see TUQUES, GLOVES › page 3

111213

‘No faith’ in system

Inside

- 10153 Kin


A02

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

what makes us unique Supporting local and regional Canadian producers.

positive difference in the community • since 1989 over $86 million has been granted to more than 1.3 million children accross Canada through PC® Children’s Charity • PC® Children’s Charity supports children with disabilities and fights childhood hunger through our support of nutrition programs • supporting local food banks through the bi-annual Extra Helping Food Drive • ensuring that all kids can play through the support of KidSport

health & wellness • reformulated 208 existing control brand processed products, reducing sodium by an average of 19% • redesigned Blue Menu® packaging to make it easier for customers to see a product’s nutritional attributes • 93% of PC® and Blue Menu® products are free of artificial colours and artificial flavours, 100% by the end of 2013

respecting the

TM

®

environment 2013

• greatly reduced the number of shopping bags from our stores • continually improving product packaging; changing size and materials to be more environmentally friendly • converting the store light fixtures to fluorescent technology resulting in energy savings • sourcing sustainable seafood • placing a priority on local and regional fresh products

¤

our exclusive brands

¤

6,"  /‡, 9Ê*," 1 /-ÊÒ

F I N A N C I A L

• President’s Choice • no name • Joe Fresh • Blue Menu • PC Organics • PC GREEN • exact • Teddy’s Choice • PC FINANCIAL® - PC Financial® MasterCard®- no fee daily banking - earn PC® points - mortgages ..... and more ®

EFFECTIVE AY SD UNTIL THUR 13 NOV.14, 20

®

®

®

®

Spend $150 and receive 9 lb box ‹ Mandarin oranges

FREE

5.88 value

‹ Spend $150 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location and receive a free 9 lb box of Mandarin oranges. Excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated. The retail value of up to $5.88 will be deducted from the total amount of your purchase before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from Friday, November 8th until closing Thursday, November 14th, 2013. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges on free item. 862817

4

10000 02655

7

PC® Organics® baby spinach or field greens

D’Italiano thick slice bread

product of USA, 312 g clamshell

assorted varieties, 675 g

2

96

2

29

740110/ 781599 UPC3260190017/ 3260190007

235556 UPC 06340003035

ea

97

ea

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

2.97

Boost Meal Replacement

98

ea

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

9.88

29 3-8 years

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

10.97

21

98

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

29.97

FisherPrice Ocean Wonders Aquarium

34

with remote control

84

981394 UPC 74677516524

957541 UPC 4167915992

3.27

697124 UPC 3700086224

FisherPrice Imaginext Batcave

selected varieties, 6 x 237 mL

78

5

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

size n-6-58-128’s

630294 UPC 20688276

166537 UPC 6810004615

ea

Pampers Super Big Pack diapers

selected varieties, 12 double rolls

selected varieties, 414-475 mL

7

Cottonelle bathroom tissue

Kraft salad dressing

1

®

ORGANIC

product of China $

00

501723 UPC 2708452136

ea

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

49.99

ea

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

54.99

Prices are in effect until Sunday, November 17 2013 or while stock lasts. At our Burnaby 1105 Eaton Ctr. 4700 Kingsway / Surrey-7550 King George Boulevard & 14650-104th Ave. locations only

Every week, we actively check our major competitors’ flyers and match the price on hundreds of items*. Look for the Ad Match message in store for the items we’ve actively matched. Plus, we’ll match any major competitor’s flyer item if you show us!

*Price Matched Look for the symbol in store. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match select items in our major supermarket competitors’ flyers throughout the week. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes, and carried at this store location) and for fresh produce, meat and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us).Guaranteed Lowest Prices applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ print advertisements (i.e. flyer, newspaper). We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s print advertisement. We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this promise at any time. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, pattern, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2013 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

superstore.ca


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

A03

NEWS

Send your story ideas or photo submissions to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Health care

In brief

Second SMH doctor resigns, calls for public inquiry

IIO investigating Guildford shooting

Hospital’s Code Blue system is broken, frustrated doctor says Tom Zytaruk Now staff Twitter @tomzytaruk

SURREY — Yet another Surrey Memorial Hospital doctor has resigned over how the embattled hospital is handling Code Blues, and is calling for a public inquiry into the matter. “Despite public assurances I have no faith that SMH has a functional Code Blue system,” Dr. Giuseppe Giustino told the Now on Friday. “I have resigned my critical care privileges. I will never work in critical care again. This requires a public enquiry of all the players involved that allowed this to happen. At the end of the day, it will be a very sad statement if I am the only person that has lost their job over this situation.” Last week a Now exclusive revealed that Dr. Grant McCormack, director of SMH’s intensive care unit for 27 years, resigned his post after the hospital’s emergency doctors refused to provide Code Blue service to cardiac arrest patients in the hospital’s ICU. “I just find it unconscionable; I can’t support that,” McCormack said. A Code Blue is called when a patient suffers heart or respiratory failure and needs to be revived. McCormack said Friday that Giustino’s resignation is the hospital’s loss. “It’s sad because he’s a very good physician,” he said. “I think it’s Surrey hospital’s loss.”

GUILDFORD — The Independent Investigations Office is probing a police shooting in Surrey after an anti-gang cop shot a man in Guildford on Thursday. Ralph Krenz, of the IIO, said the shooting happened during a vehicle check. An officer with the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit shot into a Toyota sedan near a strip mall near 108th Avenue and 148th Street. It happened at about 5 p.m. A man was taken to hospital with a wound that wasn’t considered to be life threatening. While the IIO is investigating the shooting, Krenz said, “the Surrey RCMP remains responsible for any and all parallel investigations.” Surrey RCMP Cpl. Bert Paquet said Surrey’s part might be to look into why the vehicle was pulled over. “We assisted in the aftermath of the incident but don’t know why the guy was pulled over,” he said. Tom Zytaruk

New city hall to open Feb. 17, 2014

ER doctors showed up, but an ICU doctor responded. Tasleem Juma, senior public affairs consultant for Fraser Health, said that if that’s the case, she’d “almost bet her life” the ER physicians were dealing with a similar emergency in their own department.

SURREY — The City of Surrey’s website says the new $97-million city hall will be officially open for business on Feb. 17, 2014. A grand opening event for the 180,000square-foot facility is planned, but a date has not yet been set. At one point, the website had September, 2013 as the targeted grand opening date, but Surrey’s general manager of human resources Nicola Webb has said the building has always been scheduled for completion in fall 2013. The new city hall is accompanied by City Hall Plaza, an outdoor civic square that will connect city hall, the City Centre Library, 3 Civic Plaza and SFU.

tzytaruk@thenownewspaper.com

Amy Reid

Dr. Giuseppe Giustino: “Despite public assurances, I have no faith that (Surrey Memorial Hospital) has a functional Code Blue system.” (Photo: JACOB ZINN) Surrey Memorial Hospital’s medical director, Dr. Urbain Ip, said on Nov. 4 that the hospital’s emergency doctors will provide Code Blue coverage for patients in the intensive care unit “when requested and available.” From another source, the Now has learned that a Code Blue was called in the hospital’s kidney dialysis unit midday Nov. 6 and no

Extreme-weather beds

Tuques, gloves, cough drops needed

Download the free Layar App

INTERACTIVE PRINT ‹ from page 1

“We want to make sure people can make it through one more night,” he said. “They’re alive one more day. This is basic raw care and it’s really important. If we’re not there and they’re cold, they’re not going to make it. They’re going to be exposed to getting really, really sick or they could die. Hypothermia doesn’t have to be at zero degrees, it can happen even higher

than that. It’s very critical and it saves lives.” Fedos said in Cloverdale, there’s talk of shuttling people into the program because it’s not easy for many in the area to get to the available beds. “It takes a lot of resources to do it – you need someone to be on the road at all times. If we can pull it off, we’ll do it.” In addition to a place to sleep and a meal, the program tries to provide clothing for those they serve.

Tuques, gloves, socks and underwear are most needed, as are cough drops, Fedos said. “People coming in, they’re coming in with coughs and stuff like that. Cough drops help them manage their cough and it helps some people sleep longer. We never thought it was a big deal, but it is,” Fedos said, adding that clean winter coats are also in demand. “The real focus is to just keep people alive overnight,” he said. areid@thenownewspaper.com

Why read about how this issue comes alive with Layar when we can tell you in person? SCAN THIS BOX

Scan this page

Discover interactive content


A4 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWS

november 2 to 29 win a hard rock

vacation

every week!

Languages

draws every friday at 9pm

New census data breaks down Surrey population

four vacations to be won.

REDEEM THIS AD FOR AN ENTRY BALLOT One bonus per person, per day. Must be present to win.

round-trip airfare 5 night stay up to $5000 + up to $3000 to spend worth

HardRockCasinoVancouver

REBORN AS

@HardRockCasinoV

@HardRockCasinoV

HardRockCasinoVancouver.com | 2080 United Boulevard, Coquitlam BC | 604 523 6888

NEWSPAPER.COM

2

SURREY — Nearly half of Surrey’s residents don’t speak English as a first language, according to more detailed statistics from the 2011 census. The information was revealed in a corporate report that went before council recently, showing stats on immigrant populations, visible minorities, education, housing and aboriginal ancestry. Between 2001 and 2011, English declined as the most spoken mother tongue from 61.8 per cent to 51.7 per cent. Punjabi placed second at 20.2 per cent – an increase from 14.6 per cent in 2001 – followed by Tagalog (three per cent), Hindi (2.6 per cent), Mandarin (2.2 per cent), Korean (1.7 per cent) and a combination of all others (18.7 per cent). The new results also looked at the birthplaces of Surrey residents, showing that 40.7 per cent of the city’s new immigrants – residents who moved to Canada between January 2006 and the last census day – came from India. Other countries include the Philippines (16.3 per cent), China (8.7 per cent), Europe (3.8 per cent), Africa (3.4 per cent) and the United States (2.3 per cent).

The report also analyzed visible minorities, noting that the largest minority group is the South Asian community at 142,445 people in 2011 – up from 107,810 people in 2006. The Chinese community was the second largest group with more than 28,400 people. Visible minorities as a whole grew by 34.7 per cent between 2006 and 2011. Looking at ancestral descent, the census notes that Surrey’s largest ethnic origin group is the South Asian community (29.5 per cent), including origins such as the Punjab province of India, other parts of India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan. This was followed by residents who identified their ethnic origin as British Isles (27.6 per cent) and East and Southeast Asia (17.7 per cent), which includes Taiwan, Vietnam, Korea, Japan, the Philippines and China. An estimated 13,300 people of aboriginal ancestry were accounted for in the 2011 census, taking into consideration people of Indian, Inuit and Métis background. Surrey currently has the second largest aboriginal population in B.C. behind Vancouver. Jacob Zinn

OPEN HOUSE

ROYAL HEIGHTS PARK PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE Please join us for a Public Open House. The purpose of the Open House is to provide information and to collect community feedback for the proposed renovations of Royal Heights Park. The preliminary plan includes potential improvements such as an update to the playground and a paved walking loop. This information was received through informal community feedback. Date and Location Time: 6:00 – 8:00pm Date: Thursday, November 14, 2013 Place: Royal Heights Elementary — Gymnasium 11665 - 97 Avenue, Surrey Staff from the Parks Division will be on hand to receive community feedback and to answer questions on potential plans. If you have any questions, please call 604 501-5050 or email parksrecculture@surrey.ca. We look forward to hearing from the community. Parks, Recreation & Culture Department City of Surrey

www.surrey.ca

110713

A04


NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

NEWS

Surrey’s

NASCARZ program in Surrey

‘We find that kids need a focal point in their lives’ slowly evolving Ford as its focal point, the program puts at-risk and disadvantaged kids on the same playing field with adults – some of whom are police officers – working toward a common goal. That goal is a fully tricked-out hot rod, complete with painted-on flames and a multitude of flashing lights. When it’s fully restored, the vehicle will continue to act as a motorized conduit between cops and kids as it travels to schools, in parades and the like. And yes, there is a very definite Surrey angle to all of this. The Ford currently resides at Jellybean AutoCrafters on 64th Avenue, where it will remain until it shifts to Vancouver Community College for painting. This is no small effort on the part of Jellybean owner Ewald Penner, brother and fabricator Kurt Penner, and the rest of the gang at the car restoration shop. There’s no official budget for the NASKARZ program,

so the countless hours the Penners and staff dedicate to the cause are on a fully volunteer basis. “We find that kids need a focal point in their lives, and cars are the thing that kept us out of trouble when we were younger,” Ewald Penner said. “So now we’re able to give back to society and do the same thing for them.” The rain pounded on the pavement outside Jellybean as Penner spoke. The Ford, in an advanced state of disassembly, sat on a hoist above us. Jellybean employee John Potvin noisily cut sheet metal with a grinder, sparks flying to and fro. And when the front door opened and in walked a vanload of enthusiastic kids from Vancouver’s mean streets, Houchen and the Penners and Potvin were reminded why they do this. Those wishing to contribute to the NASKARZ program can call the Jellybean auto shop at 604-594-6800 or email jellybeanautocrafters@telus.net. goble@shaw.ca

k c u r T d o o F P ro g ra m

The City of Surrey is developing a food truck program and we need your input!

Street food is growing in popularity across North America. Many cities are embracing the trend and allowing food trucks to become culinary attractions on city streets.

www.surrey.ca/food

Visit www.surrey.ca/food for more information on the program, upcoming public and stakeholder consultation opportunities, and to participate in a survey.

OPEN HOUSE #1 Monday, November 18, 2013 1:30pm – 4:00pm CITY CENTRE LIBRARY, RM. 120 – 10350 University Drive, Surrey

OPEN HOUSE #2 Monday, November 25, 2013 3:30pm – 7:00pm CITY CENTRE LIBRARY, RM. 120 – 10350 University Drive, Surrey

110713

‹ from page 1

A05

111213

THE

www.surrey.ca/food


A06

A6 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

NEWS Hügelkultur

Fleetwood couple defending ‘unsightly’ garden Jacob Zinn Now contributor Twitter @jacobzinn

FLEETWOOD — Nearly three months after Jess Thompson and Cindy Quach were handed an infraction letter for their “unsightly” garden, the City of Surrey has yet to reach a solution other than to dig it up. The Fleetwood couple said they’ve tried to negotiate with the city to save their hügelkultur garden – a form of permaculture, loosely defined as self-maintained agriculture – but have yet to hear any alternative answers. “The city is refusing to speak to us,” said Quach, adding that they’ve invited members of Surrey city council to their property four times each. “We don’t get any replies whatsoever. That’s the most frustrating thing.” Because the couple rents their oneacre property, discussions over the bylaw infraction are between the landlord and the city. Thompson and Quach have requested to attend the meetings, but have yet to be allowed. Quach said they’ve also applied to go before council as a delegation to defend their garden, but were denied because the bylaw case is still open. “We just feel that if the city just understands the benefits of what we’re doing and how good it is for the environment, maybe they’ll rethink their position, but we don’t even get a chance to say that to them,” she said. Quach said the city’s engineering department estimated the removal, if done by the city and charged to her and her husband, would cost $40,000. Following the media coverage of their situation, Quach said she has heard from

Cindy Quach and Jess Thompson with their children, Nikola, 2, and six-month-old Roial, say the city hasn’t offered any solution to what some of their neighbours call an “unsightly” garden, other than to remove it entirely. (Photo: JACOB ZINN) other Surrey residents who also have permaculture gardens, but they haven’t had problems “because their neighbours never complained.” The infraction letter, which the couple received in August, raised concerns with the height of woodchip piles, the odour of manure and unsightliness. The smell of manure has long since subsided and the heavy rainfall has helped compress the garden beds significantly. Quach stands just over five feet tall and the beds are now below her waist. As for the so-called unsightliness of

the garden, their property is fenced and surrounded on most sides by trees, including large evergreens lining the front yard along 168th Street. Quach said she and her husband have tried to organize times when bylaw officers can come by and see how the garden has grown recently, but said the inspectors come by when they’re not home – or, if they are home, they don’t even set foot on the property. “They come when we’re not home, or they do a drive-by – they don’t even get out of their car,” said Quach. “We’ve watched one of them from our window. He pulled up, rolled down

his window, looked, and then drove off, and that was his assessment.” Quach and Thompson have a petition of support with more than 150 signatures, most from residents in the area. However, Quach said the city has received a petition with eight names against their garden – except one of the names was fraudulently added to the list. “We found out recently that at least one name was falsified,” said Quach. “It draws into question the validity of this petition.” Dr. Robert Ironside, a professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, told the Now he received a call from a bylaw officer to confirm that he had signed the petition, which he claims he had never seen. In fact, he said he fully supports Quach and Thompson’s efforts. “I think that what they’re doing is laudable,” he said. “I certainly admire them for what they’re doing.” Quach said she is not sure who is circulating the anti-garden petition, but said two people who signed it have since changed their minds, making the running total of opponents five. Jas Rehal, bylaw manager for the City of Surrey, said he had not heard if any other names on the petition were false. When asked about the alternative solutions to the situation, he reiterated that the investigation is ongoing. Quach and Thompson simply want city council to see the garden for themselves and give it some time to grow before they decide whether or not it has to go. “The buzzword around city hall is sustainability – it beats us why they wouldn’t be open to learning this method,” said Quach. “My husband and I would like urban gardening to be legalized, because the way that we’re being treated, it feels like it’s illegal.”

Bullying damages our kids. Do something about it.

110513

uwlm.ca/preventbullying

4364-0913

Insulin is not a cure.

For more information about how you can help find a cure call

931-1937

The Diabetes Research Foundation Juvenile Diabetes Foundation Canada


NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

Enter to WIN a Large

A07

Pizza & 4 Pop for Your Family!

Colouring Contest!

Name: First _______________________________________________ Age:___________________________ Name: Last _______________________________________________ Phone:_________________________ Drop off at any of the Surrey Public Library locations or the Now Newspaper at #201-7889 132nd Street, Surrey, BC. Deadline: November 19, 2013.

DROP OFF AT ANY OF THESE LOCATIONS: Cloverdale

Guildford

Ocean Park

Semiahmoo

5642 – 176A St

15105 – 105th Ave

12854 – 17th Ave

1815 – 152nd St

City Centre

Fleetwood

Newton

Port Kells

Strawberry Hill

10350 University Dr

15996 – 84th Ave

13795 – 70th Ave

18885 – 88th Ave

7399 – 122nd St

OR the NOW Newspaper, #201-7889 132nd Street

111213

THE


A08

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

VIEWPOINT

Address: The Surrey Now, #201 7889 132nd St., Surrey, B.C. V3W 4N2

Publisher: Alvin Brouwer

B.C. politics

Nearly $66M wasted on ‘talking’ InTheHouse Keith Baldrey

T

he notion that aboriginal communities are like black holes when it comes to government funding was strengthened considerably with the release of the latest scathing report by B.C.’s Children and Youth Representative. Mary Ellen TurpelLafond’s investigation of government-funded services for aboriginal youth was highly critical but not particularly shocking. Her main finding was that almost $70 million was given to aboriginal organizations over a dozen years without a shred of evidence that any of it was actually spent on services for young people. The money was, instead, largely used to pay people to go to meetings and conferences and to do a lot of talking. Turpel-Lafond’s report is entitled “When Talk Trumped Service” and many people presumably made a lot of money talking about young people

without helping them. She is characteristically blunt in her assessment of what she found, as in this: “There could not be a more confused, unstable and bizarre area of public policy than that which guides Aboriginal child and family services in B.C.” Or this: “This story may read more like fiction than truth, but the numbers speak for themselves. Nearly $66 million has been spent without any functional public policy framework, no meaningful financial or performance accountability, and without any actual children receiving additional services because of these expenditures.” No beating around the bush here. A fundamental problem she uncovered was the B.C. government’s decision to treat aboriginal-run care agencies on a “nation-tonation” basis. As she points out, B.C. is not a “nation” and neither are these agencies. The government opted to simply send “staggering expenditures” out the door to organizations that lacked resources or the expertise to fulfil service obligations.

She found that nearly $35 million alone was spent “discussing” something called Regional Aboriginal Authorities. Essentially, a bunch of meetings were held and reports were done. But problems facing aboriginal youth – parental addiction, domestic violence, poverty, neglect, mental health, etc. – were not dealt with. But why this report is not particularly shocking is that this disconnected relationship between governments of various levels and First Nations is evident in other areas. The lack of accountability, the maddening pace of improvements and a political cautiousness are ingrained in the relationship. For instance, billions of dollars have been spent on treaty negotiations,

with precious little to show for it. Again, lawyers and consultants and bands make money via governments but can’t point to many accomplishments. The aboriginal communities receive huge amounts of government funding, yet many of their members are mired in a state of chronic poverty. Health outcomes among aboriginal people are among the worst in the country. There is a tendency among governments to simply write large cheques for aboriginal groups, as if that assuages any guilt that stems from taking away vast tracts of their ancestral lands. There is little followup to ensure money is spent properly or in ways that actually improve things. But the First Nations

must share in the responsibility for this situation. First Nations themselves insist on being treated as quasiindependent nations capable of managing their own affairs, albeit with significant amounts of government funding. Some can and do just that, but in many instances there is a complete failure of leadership among its leaders. And so we are left with scandalous findings like those uncovered by Turpel-Lafond. She talks about the need to stop directing money into “the big theoretical fixes” and concentrate more on the front line services. As she points out, those front line services have suffered because so much money was rerouted from them in favour of all those

meetings and discussions. There have been many troubling and outrageous reports on various government entities over the years, but this one has to rank as one of the most outrageous. I’m told things have improved on this front in the last couple of years, and I hope that’s true. But I have a hard time believing the basic system of handing over government funding with no accountability or follow-up will change in any significant way. Hopefully I will be proven wrong, but given the shameful history of the treatment of First Nations by governments and by some of their own leaders, I’m not betting on it. Keith Baldrey is chief political reporter for Global BC Keith.Baldrey@globalnews.ca

Our Commitment to You

We want to hear from you

The Surrey Now Newspaper, a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership, respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at thenownewspaper.com.

The NOW newspaper is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. You can reach us by phone at 604-572-0064, by email at edit@thenownewspaper.com or by mail at Suite 201-7889 132 Street, Surrey, B.C. V3W 4N2

Distribution: 604-534-6493 Circulation: delivery@thenownewspaper.com

WATCH VIDEO Beau Simpson Editor

Ellyn Schriber Manager, Integrated Advertising Sales

Second Class Mail Registration 7434. Delivered free every Tuesday and Thursday to 118,000 homes and businesses.

Publisher: Alvin Brouwer Editor: Beau Simpson Manager, Intergrated Advertising Sales: Ellyn Schriber Sports Editor: Michael Booth Entertainment Editor: Tom Zillich Reporters/photographers: Tom Zytaruk, Carolyn Cooke, Amy Reid, Christopher Poon


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

A09

OPINION Letters

Op-ed

MP Grewal once again puts own interests first in the House

Donors help fuel key classroom projects

The Editor, I wrote two weeks ago about MP Nina Grewal not standing up for her constituents. This week I find out that her father died of colon cancer recently, and she immediately stands up in the House of Commons and wants people to get tested for colon cancer. This is again about her family and what she is interested in. She is not interested in the lives of her constituents, or the things that they are suffering from. Tanis Moore, Surrey

Doctors did right thing by speaking out on Code Blue situation The Editor, Re: “Top doctor resigns over ER move,” the Now, Nov. 5. Kudos to Drs. McCormack and Giustino for their stand on the appalling situation at Surrey Memorial Hospital of emergency room doctors refusing to respond to ICU Code Blue cardiac arrest. Most physicians swear the Hippocratic oath to “the utmost respect for human life from its beginning.” Have you other doctors forgotten what an oath means? It supersedes any contract negotiations. Most people class doctors as the highest profession of all. What is more important than saving lives? If that is not the most important thing to you, perhaps you should hang up your stethoscopes, slide down the humanity scale and become lawyers... You’ve certainly got the makings. You are a disgrace to your present profession. Ray Elliott, Delta

Amy Coupal Contributor Twitter @AmyCoupal

A

s a former teacher, I have had the privilege to work on a variety of programs for students from Kindergarten to Grade 12. The teachers I have worked with were never short of ideas, but there is often a gap between what they want to do with their students and the resources they need to start a new, innovative project. They might need unique supplies for their classroom to bring an idea to life. Teachers often reach into their own pockets to purchase supplementary resources for their classrooms. But they Amy Coupal sometimes need more help to make their creative strategies come to life. That’s why I’m so proud to be a part of MyClassNeeds, a registered Canadian charity that provides teachers with an immediate opportunity to tell the world about their creative ideas to support their students, and what is needed to make those ideas happen. Inspired by the emergence of crowdfunding platforms, we created myclassneeds.ca to connect donors from around the world to Canadian teachers and classrooms helping them access the resources that expand learning opportunities for students in a fast-paced world. Amazing things are happening in education today. Students and teachers across Canada are undertaking inspiring projects that support learning, skill development and innovation.

Teachers are helping their students develop 21stcentury learning skills that will prepare them for what is, in many ways, an unknown future. We don’t know what kind of jobs they might have, what type of technology they will use or how workplaces could look very different than today. So how do we help prepare Canadian students to be ready for these changes? Regardless of their job, we know key skills such as communication, collaboration and problem solving will be critical, no matter what they do. Industry leaders and educators believe science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) will play a key role in our students’ futures. Building their knowledge and enthusiasm for these subjects today will help support their future success. This is why we partnered with Chevron’s Fuel Your School program. During the month of October, for every unique purchase of 30 litres or more of fuel at Surrey and White Rock Chevron stations, Chevron contributed $1, up to a total possible contribution of $200,000, to fund eligible public school classroom projects posted on myclassneeds.ca, with priority given to STEM projects. We are proud to partner with Chevron on this program, particularly to support STEM projects that help engage kids’ imagination, ingenuity and build the skills they will need for the future. New resources are already getting into the hands of students. In the first three weeks since its launch, the Fuel Your School program has funded 40 projects, raising a total of $41,564.34. This means Ms. Manery of Bear Creek Elementary school in Surrey can encourage creativity while teaching her students about the importance of teamwork, design and engineering with new building materials. We are thrilled to support her efforts to creatively engage her

New resources are already getting into the hands of students.… The Fuel Your School program has funded 40 projects, raising a total of $41,564.34. students and innovatively integrate STEM into her class. But there is more to be done. To date, Surrey and White Rock teachers have submitted more than 40 projects that still need funding. These projects range from classroom technology, such as tablets and projectors, to experiential learning materials, such as robotics and model-building supplies, to art supplies, and gardening tools. With your help, we can reach even more students. Visit www.fuelyourschool.ca to learn more, see the materials teachers are requesting and which schools will be impacted by the funds generated through the program. You can also encourage teachers in your school district to post their classroom projects today or share the projects through your social networks. Right now, we have the opportunity to help more students get the materials they need for a great education, learn more about STEM and prepare them for careers of the future. Amy Coupal is the executive director of the My Class Needs Foundation, a registered Canadian charity that uses a crowdfunding website to support students and teachers by providing resources that enrich their learning experiences.

UP TO 71% OFF!

61% OFF! 20pc Belmont

Stainless steel Nature Trust pan with enviro-friendly ceramic coating, PFOA and PTFE Free. Safe for induction stovetops. 20cm/8” Nature Trust fry pan. List: $139.99. Now $39.99! 24cm/9.5” Nature Trust fry pan. List: $159.99. Now $44.99! 28cm/11” Nature Trust fry pan. List: $179.99. Now $59.99!

flatware set. List: $89.99.

$3499

65% OFF! 6pc knife set. UP TO 52% OFF! A selection of Paderno Premier

List: $99.99.

72% OFF!

Our 11pc Canadiana Cookware set is made from 18/10 stainless steel and features an impact bonded base that’s safe for all stovetops of modern kitchens, including induction. Durable riveted handles, no-drip lips, oven and dishwasher safe, the Canadiana is built to last and we stand behind it with our exceptional 25 year warranty. Set includes: 1.5L, 2L, 3L saucepans, 6L stock pot, 2.5L steamer, 24cm/9.5” frying pan, 20cm/8” ceramic non-stick frying pan, and 4 covers. List: $899.00.

$24999

bakeware. Made from durable steel with a unique triple layer of non-stick coating. Features an ergonomic and oven safe silicone grip. PFOA & PTFE free and oven safe to 450°F. Starting at

$699 $3499 50% OFF!4pc deluxe mixing bowl set

with lids. 18/10 stainless steel with interior measurements and silicone non-slip base available in blue and red. List: $69.99.

$3499

64% OFF!

45cm extra large high dome 18/10 stainless steel roasting pan. Includes rack for easy lifting and riveted handles. List: $249.99.

$8999 NOVEMBER 13

TH

TO 17

TH

ONLY AT:

Ladner Village Hardware 4821 Delta St.

LANGLEY (con’t) Steveston Marine & Hardware 19700 Langley Bypass Langley Home Hardware & BBQ Shop 20427 Douglas Crescent

LANGLEY

NORTH DELTA

COQUITLAM Reliable Parts Coquitlam 85 North Bend St.

LADNER

PORT COQUITLAM Port Coquitlam Building Supplies 2650 Mary Hill Rd.

Walnut Grove Pharmasave Nordel Pharmasave 11198 – 84th Ave. 8850 Walnut Grove Dr.

Information & dealers: 1-800-A NEW-POT or www.paderno.com. Not all locations open Sunday. Quantities limited, please be early. Sale items may not be exactly as shown.


A10

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

:PNU<W6USPUL HUKNL[HJJLZZ[VHSSVM V\YL_JS\ZP]LKLHSZ







  

;^V5PNO[:[H`MVY (K\S[Z7S\Z:WH*YLKP[ /HYYPZVU/V[:WYPUNZ



  





(:L[VM/HPY*OHSRZ^P[O (ZZVY[LK*VSV\YZ;H_  :OPWWPUN0UJS\KLK 6USPUL









>VY[OVM-YVaLU@VN\Y[ HUK;VWWPUNZ 5VY[O=HUJV\]LY)\YUHI`

BUY ONLINE

.com

SCAN TO BUY WITH LAYAR


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

A11

COMMUNITY

Send your story ideas or photo submissions to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Book launch

Svend ‘really did politics differently’ Bio about wellknown politician now out, with Surrey event Nov. 16 Carolyn Cooke Now staff Twitter @carolyncooke1

Regardless of whether you agreed with his politics or not, few people would argue that Svend Robinson is a fascinating character. The former Burnaby NDP MP was a polarizing figure, said his biographer, but he was also unusually effective, even though he was an opposition MP. And yet, his promising career came to a screeching halt in 2004 with an infamous ring theft that baffled everyone across the political spectrum. Graeme Truelove, author of the just released book Svend Robinson: A life in politics, said that even if the ring incident hadn’t happened, the book would still have been a worthwhile project. “I think that it’s always going to be an asterisk on his career in a sense (because of the ring). People will remember him for a very significant legacy in the fields of human rights and environmental protection, but they will also always remember this undignified unseemly end to his career – at least to his electoral career,” said Truelove. “This is a guy who really did politics differently and was really effective in what he did and that

Graeme Truelove (above) has written a biography called ‘Svend Robinson: A life in politics.’ There is a book launch in Vancouver on Nov. 15 and a book signing in Surrey the next day.

would be worth a book on its own, it’s just that there so happened there’s a dramatic personal story that runs along with it.” Truelove, who grew up in North Delta, worked as a volunteer in Robinson’s office while at university studying political science. At 18 he went

to Ottawa to work in the page program and stayed on. Now, at 30, he still works on Parliament Hill in the House of Commons administration. Truelove said he didn’t know Robinson that well when he proposed the book idea to him in 2009. However, he undertook

an exhaustive research process involving interviews with family, friends, and politicians of every stripe as well as relying on House of Commons records and even Robinson’s personal correspondence and diaries. But for all that, the book is anything but salacious. It is a wellwritten, thoroughly researched account of an unusual politician who was involved in notable pieces of legislation and lent his efforts to individual and public movements. “Svend was involved in an incredible array of causes and anyone who wants to go behind the scenes on any of the big activist causes over the last 25 to 30 years will find something in this book,” said Truelove. “Anyone who needs reassurance that change can happen will be inspired by this book. I think throughout all time at all periods in history, people outside the mainstream have felt powerless in the face of the status quo and

RIVER ROCK IT And sleep it off in one of our luxurious rooms. LIVE Music. ROCK’IN Bars. GREAT Food. Have an incredible night out that ends with a great night’s sleep at River Rock. No driving. No Cabs. Just FUN. RESERVE NOW! Call 1-866-748-3718

from just

119

$

*

per night

FREE WI-FI & PARKING

8811 River Road, Richmond BC

www.riverrock.com/riverrockit

*Rooms start at $119 at The Hotel and $149 for a one bedroom suite at The Resort. Plus applicable taxes. Offer expires Dec 30, 2013. Subject to availability at time of reservation.

Svend’s story shows that they shouldn’t,” said Truelove. Some of the highlights of Robinson’s work include speaking out against human rights abuses while in China, for which he was arrested and expelled from that country, protesting alongside environmentalists in Claquot Sound and Haida Gwaii, being at Sue Rodriguez’s side and championing her fight for the right to assisted suicide. On the legislative front, Robinson pushed to have the reference to god removed from the constitution as it has no legal weight, he stood for protection of sexual orientation from discrimination in the Human Rights Act and hate propaganda law and amendments to justice legislation such as the Young Offenders Act. Since leaving politics, Robinson now works for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, based in Geneva. Truelove said there are three book launches planned, one each in Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver. The first, in Vancouver is hosted by publisher New Star Books on Friday, Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. at the Bill Reid Gallery, 639 Hornby St. in Vancouver. Robinson will be on hand for the event. As well, Truelove has confirmed there will be a book signing on Saturday, Nov. 16 at the Strawberry Hills Chapters store, at 72nd Avenue and Scott Road in Surrey. It will run from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. ccooke@thenownewspaper.com


AN12

A 12

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

BOB SHIVJI

NEWSPAPER.COM

COMMUNITY

GUILDFORD DENTURE CLINIC Over 30 years of experience

T Are your dentures so uncomfortable you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wear them? T Cannot eat your favourite foods? T Do they make your mouth sore? T Are they loose?

LIBRARY EVENTS BOB SHIVJI* AND ADIL SHIVJI 2013 DENTURIST OF THE YEAR*

IF YES, WE CAN HELP YOU! COME IN AND RECEIVE A COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION Established since 1982 *Denturist Association of BC Awarded

ND

10246 - 152 ST., SURREY â&#x20AC;˘ (604) 588-5211 CertiďŹ ed BPS guildent@telus.net Denture Centre â&#x20AC;&#x153;ALWAYS KEEPING OUR PATIENTS SMILINGâ&#x20AC;?

Author Ted Kuntz (â&#x20AC;&#x153;8 Weeks to a Better Relationshipâ&#x20AC;?) visits George Mackie Library at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13, 8440 112 St., North Delta. Kuntz will share his insights and wisdom from having worked with countless couples over a 25-year period. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Learn what causes relationships to fail, and more importantly, what makes them succeed.â&#x20AC;?

EDUCATION Education and Career Fair on

STAY AND PLAY! Owned by Upper Skagit Indian Tribe

ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL

$134 *

USD

SUNDAY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; THURSDAY

GAMING PACKAGE

$    (Regularly $99)

$25 Player-Bucks

$25  

Recently Renovated!

0, #/, 1,-*

LIMITED AVAILABILITY! CALL NOW 1-877-275-2448 Mention OďŹ&#x20AC;er Code: SVC134

*OďŹ&#x20AC;er valid November 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 28, 2013.  !  "#% &! !#' !#(  )* +, , -# .# /* Subject to availability. Taxes not included. Restrictions apply. Rates do not apply to groups. Upgrades to suites available at additional cost.

Staying the night, or just a day trip?

Get PAR on your Gaming Buy-In, Up To $500! Valid once a month, Sunday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursday, Nov. 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dec. 26, 2013 Must be a Rewards Club Member

Wednesday, Nov. 13 at Queen Elizabeth Secondary, 9457 King George Blvd., Surrey, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Get connected at free two-hour event aimed at high school students. Get plugged into education & career pathways, leadership & volunteer opportunities, scholarship information. More than 50 exhibitors, including post-secondary schools, youth organizations and more.â&#x20AC;?

CHRISTMAS Sources Season of Trees displays at Sheraton Vancouver Guildford Hotel (from Nov. 8-26) and Fraser Downs Racetrack & Casino (Nov. 19 to Dec. 5), with wine/cheese events on Nov. 26

(at Sheraton) and Dec. 5 (at Fraser Downs). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come network, enjoy delicious wines and bid on your favourite â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;locally decoratedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tree for your home or business.â&#x20AC;? Tickets $50, info at www.sources.bc.ca.

GALAS Viva Surrey celebration of Latin music, dance and food presented by Surrey Christmas Bureau and Save-on-Foods, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 23 at St. Bernadetteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hall, 6566 132nd St., Surrey, featuring performances by Movieendolo Bien, Mayan Marimba and Hot Salsa Dance Zone, food prepared by Pachamami Sabor. Proceeds help local low-income families.

YOUR HEALTH Frequent BATHROOM TRIPS? Bell Prostate Ezee Flow Tea #4a Bell Bladder Control Tea #4b Men have relief in 3-5 days from dribbling, burning Women have relief within days from

and rushing to the toilet. Works also for male incontinence. Works in virtually every case. If you are considering surgery, try this tea first. Hundreds of delighted men testifying on our web site: Had to get up every hour at #4a NPN 80022782 night. Now I get up once a night. Joseph Whittaker, Sewell, NJ  I cancelled my prostate surgery. Get up once a night. I'm so happy not to have to face the torment of a prostate operation and possible incontinence and impotence. Albert E. Blain, 74, Schumacher, ON Even after TURP prostate surgery and microwave therapy had to get up many times. Now down to 1-2 times. Tea is 100% better than drugs. Robert G. Stocker, Eustasis, FL After 1st year drinking tea my PSA went down to 4.5; after 2nd year to 2.9; after 3rd year to 2.3. I highly recommend the tea. A real life saver. Thomas M. Thurston, Forsyth, GA

incontinence, frequency, urgency and pain. Stop needless suffering and embarrassments. Go shopping & traveling with confidence. Stop wearing padding or diapers. True evidence with full names and towns. No more wetting accidents. Within a week I was in complete control. No side effects like with drugs I took. Deborah Haight, 49, Collingwood, ON Incredible results. It's hard to believe a non-drug item is producing such quick relief. I suffered for 20 years with frequency and embarrassments. I now sleep through the night. Linda Kleber, 62, Milford, NJ  Tea represents truth in advertising! #4b NPN 80038878 Being a skeptic, I ordered this Bladder Control Tea for Women as a more or less last resort, after trying every medication in the last 5 years. It worked better than I hoped for. Had relief within 6 days. Thank you for this great product, and above all, for truth in advertising. Marina Rosa, 57, Las Vegas, NV

Heartburn Reflux

By Dr. Chakib Hammoud, M.H.,PhD.

We should eat more alkaline food. We all know that swimming pools can only work if they are acidic/alkaline neutral. This is still more critical for our body. Basic information to have an alkaline body: USDA now recommended on their website. MY plate.gov 50% should be alkaline food (vegetables, salads, legumes, fruit, berries, mushrooms) 50% can be acidic food (Meat, fish, shellfish, eggs, rice, nuts, cheese. Less or no bread, noodles, cereals, cakes. No sweets, deep frieds.) Most North American diet is 90% acidic food. If you have trouble to achieve at least a 50% in alkaline food and 50% acidic food, consider to take a supplement like Bell Acidic Stomach/Alkaline Balance #39. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s #39 inexpensive and comes with a guarantee. It helps to have a healthy alkaline balanced body and prevents many discomforts, including indigestion and stomach acid reflux coming up, which a majority of people suffer with. 60 million in North America. We should not ignore that Dr. Otto Warburg M.D. was awarded 2 Nobel Prizes for proving that an alkaline balanced body can absorb up to 20 times more oxygen than an acidic body. Makes our immune system more effective to fight disease-producing bacteria including cancer cells we have in our body every day of our life. Reflux gave me a sore throat and I could not sing in the church choir anymore. After taking Bell #39 I have no more reflux and rejoice in singing again. Helene Giroux, 65, Quebec, QC  Have family history of heartburn. For last 10 years I suffered a lot with acid reflux. I told all family members about #39 being all natural, giving quick relief with noside effects and no antacids needed anymore. Michael Fasheh, 49, Port Ranch, CA  Very happy with acid reflux relief. Last 4 years had increasing reflux despite taking antacid products. Grzegorz Smirnow, 43, Mt. Prospect, IL

Supreme Immune Booster Immune system for life ! I have been taking the Bell Supreme Immune Booster #52

      All prices in U.S. Dollars. Management reserves all rights. Casino opens at 9 am daily. Must be 21 or older with valid ID. CPMP Skagit Player-Bucks are non-transferable and cannot be redeemed for cash. =FCCFNLJFEKN@KK<I7K_\EFNE\njgXg\i

for two years. I am amazed and delighted how it has strengthened my immune system. I do not get colds or flus anymore. I am taking this supplement every day. Like a miracle it strengthens my whole defense system against all attacks of bacteria, viruses and cancers that our body has to get rid of if we want to stay healthy.John Grace, 52, Broomall, PA I was diagnosed with stage II breast cancer. I had to complete 6 rounds of chemo. The Bell Supreme Immune Booster#52 helped me to keep White Blood cell count elevated during the treatment. By using #52 my white blood cells were above the normal range. The nurses were completely amazed as the WBC count blew off the charts. Deborah Hailey-Glass, 44, Richmond,VA. White blood cells increased to 8.6. I have lymphocyte depleted hodgkins lymphoma. After each session of chemotherapy my white blood cell count would not return to a healthy level (4-10 is healthy). My count was .2, #52 NPN 80044236 .3 etc. After using your Bell#52 my white blood cells count went to 3.0, 2.6 and 8.6. In other words good enough for me to enjoy life. Thanks Bell. Andrew A Ament, 59, Merrill, WI. Try your local health food stores first. If they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have it and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to order it for you, order on our website or call us with Visa or Mastercard.

1-800-333-7995 www.BellLifestyle.com Bell uses the power of nature to help put life back into your lifestyle

Tickets $15, 604-581-9623.

BUSINESS 15th annual Surrey Business Excellence Awards on Thursday, Nov. 14 to feature Pamela Martin as emcee, with awards in seven categories Pamela Martin plus special achievement awards to Murray Dinwoodie, retiring City Manager of the City of Surrey, and Mike McKay, retiring Superintendent of Surrey Schools, at Sheraton Vancouver Guildford Hotel. Info: 604-581-7130.

Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own story: 15 years ago I started to have arthritis, prostate, kidney, snoring and sleep apnea problems, which were all helped quickly with natural health products. I made it my lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s purpose to help others. Nick A. Jerch

Great Sex Happiness for couples is a satisfying sex life.

FOR MEN

EroxilTM helps most men to #6 GUARANTEED perform like in their 20â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Evidence of a few hundred testimonials on our web site with full names and towns. All 100% true: Eroxil is the best of all the supplements for men Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried. Boosts my sex drive and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m able to function anytime. Angus Gutke, 45, Calgary, AB Regained virility in 3 days. My libido was restored for good sex. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve given it also to friends with the same results. One of them is a diabetic and overweight. Dr. Louis Rolland, 72, St. Hyacinthe, QC Having orgasms off the Richter scale. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a teenager again. The world owes you big time. Lawrie Roberts, 47, Toronto, ON Wonderful to feel like a man again. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wonderful to feel close to my wife again. God bless you! Charles E. Palen, 77, Burnaby, BC Women Yes! We have Erosyn#7 which works for women as well as Eroxil for men to regain your libido, interest in love making and ability to climax like in your honeymoon. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s satisfaction guaranteed.

STOP HAIR LOSS Dr. C. Hammoud, Ph.D. recommends: To reduce or stop hair loss for men and women With powerful DHT block, the recognized #1 cause of hair loss. Unique combination of ingredients make it a guaranteed superior product. Helps to rejuvenate your hair for a fuller and thicker appearance. Early prevention of baldness for those that have a family history. Pattern baldness (Androgenic Alopecia) is caused by an oversupply of hormones DHT #77 NPN 80035077 (Dihydrotestosterone). It damages hair follicles over Super advanced time unless preventive action is taken. Help for people who are on radiation or chemo therapy or taking formula #77 Has been used other drugs that cause hair loss. successfully for Many testimonials on the Bell website: First product that worked for me. I have tried many other many years KING SIZE - 2 methods and I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see any results. With #77 I noticed months supply a difference within a few weeks. Thank you Bell. Paul Scivoletto, 40, Markham, ON. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My hair has stopped falling out...and my hair looks shinier and healthier.â&#x20AC;?; â&#x20AC;&#x153;After 30 days use I noticed I am losing less hair! My hair now looks fuller and the texture has improved.â&#x20AC;?; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hair loss was noticeably reduced with first bottle!â&#x20AC;?; â&#x20AC;&#x153;After using Bell Stop Hair Loss #77 for 2 weeks my hair was not as thin anymore and at the end of the treatment of 2 months my little bald spot on the back of my head was growing over with little hair. This product helped to restore my youthful look.â&#x20AC;?

HRT Menopause Hot flashes and night sweats

stopped completely! I was having a horrible time. The night sweats kept me awake. During the daytime I experienced at least 20 hot flashes. After taking Bell #33 HRT my hot flashes and night sweats were gone. I am sleeping well again. Other menopause products didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work well enough. Charlene Currie, 52, Winnipeg, MB  Headaches, sweating, dizzy, insomnia, mood swings, hot flashes all gone! For 15 years I was suffering with menopausal health problems. Premarin made me sick to the stomach. I was in bad shape until I #33 NPN 80005070 found Bell HRT Menopause #33. I feel great now. This is no lie. It does work! Sandra Mountney, 50, Bancroft, ON For the last 2-3 years my life was miserable, had mood swings, extreme anger, depression, feeling suicidal because of my menopausal emotions. After about 3 days on Bell HRT Menopause #33 I felt like a new person. I was singing in the kitchen and my partner was wondering what I was so happy about. I feel hopeful, positive and now have often a smile on my face. I thank you soooo much! Christina Kearns, 53, Kingston, ON 100% Truthful testimonials with full name and towns. Real people you can call, if you want more reassurance. More testimonials on the Bell website. No money is paid for testimonials.To ensure this product is right for you, always read and follow the label.

111213

Local events

For Denture/Partial Wearers:


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

AN13

COMMUNITY Health

Get tested for colon cancer, grieving MP Grewal urges Tom Zillich Now staff Twitter @tomzillich

SURREY — Nina Grewal’s father was diagnosed with colon cancer just 15 days before he died last month. “It was all very sudden,” an emotional Grewal, the MP for Fleetwood-Port Kells, told the Now. “It’s very difficult – now there’s

“He fought the disease bravely, but had discovered it when it was too advanced,” Grewal stated. “Like too many other Canadians, my father had not been screened for colon cancer.” Colon cancer is the third most common occurring form of cancer in the country, according to the National Cancer Institute of Canada. Research shows that it accounts for

nobody to call me a little girl.” Grewal’s father, Nihal Singh Dhillon, died Oct. 17 in Calgary, where he lived. He was 77. “I was there when he took his last breath,” Grewal said. In a speech to the House of Commons last week, Grewal urged all Canadians over age 50 to get tested for colorectal cancer, more commonly known as colon cancer.

one in eight of all cancer deaths in Canada, resulting in more than 9,000 deaths each year. “I urge all Canadians to be vigilant and get tested regularly – if not for you, then for your family,” Grewal stated. Grewal described her father as a talented and very vibrant man who wrote poetry in several languages. tzillich@thenownewspaper.com

MP Nina Grewal

PATIO COVERS & RAILINGS NOW ON*

BLOW OUT!

SALE *Limited Time Offer

• BEST SERVICE • BEST PRICE

12mm • Was 1.99

$ 19 ERATED D & OP Y OWNE LOCALL

*Call for details

SUPER SALE!

Rustic Maple

1

604-763-5853 •www.globalrailing.ca 604-618-8335

SF

VISIT US TODAY! • HUGE SELECTION • EXPERT SERVICE

Patterned Berber INSTALLED

1

$ 99

MANY MORE SPECIALS! SURREY 6716 King George Boulevard 604-598-8298

SF

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Mon - Fri: 9:30am-6pm | Saturday: 10am-5pm | Sunday: 11am-4pm

111213

D PERATE ED & O Y OWN LOCALL

A+ Rating

111213

091013

GLOBAL RAILINGS & AWNING

www.FloorDepotStore.com

End the Bloating, Pain, Strain & Waiting of Constipation!

Marks Pharmacy 101-8035 120 St. Delta Corner of 80th Ave and 120 Street

Alan Glasser

111213

No weird herbs. No harsh fibre. No complicated diets. No habit-forming laxatives. Instead, our clinically-tested system eases constipation by putting back the natural friendly bacteria your body needs for healthy, regular bowel movements. Come in an ask one of our qualified staff about our Guaranteed Constipation Relief Program today. 111213

BRING IN THIS AD FOR YOUR FREE GIFT WITH PURCHASE

CLINICALLY - TESTED CONSTIPATION RELIEF


A14

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

Independent Living for Seniors

FOREVER YOUNG

very affordable prices • 1 Bedroom - 1 Bedroom & Den • Suites with Balconies • 24/7 Security • Home Cooked Meals • Recreation Activities & Poppy Bus Outings • Housekeeping • Guest Suite • Near Metrotown & Services

Event Saturday, Nov. 17

Carefoot’s one-day sale to help launch bursary for new artists

We call it home Call for your personal tour today:

604-568-5563

5291 Grimmer Street, Burnaby • www.thepoppyresidences.com

111213

connect to our website with

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Advertising Feature –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

ADVICE FROM PEOPLE WHO LIVE IN THE ROYALE PENINSULA RETIREMENT RESIDENCE:

Ask the Residents

Panel of residents: Sheila D., Ernest B. (on leave), Jim and Coral B. live at the Royale Peninsula Retirement Residence: they draw upon their personal experiences to provide comprehensive answers. Send questions about the retirement living lifestyle to: “ASK THE RESIDENTS” c/o THE ROYALE PENINSULA 2088 152 Street, Surrey V4A 9Z4” or by email with “ASK THE RESIDENTS” in the subject line to Ask-the-residents@theroyale.ca. Dear Residents: I am overwhelmed with the idea of downsizing my house: any tips? – June H Dear June H: Here are a few pointers we learned while downsizing our houses: Don’t delay - it gets harder the older you get and the longer you accumulate. Tackle one area at a time otherwise you will get overwhelmed. Do big things first: the decisions are faster and the results will encourage you. Consider having your photo albums transferred

NEWSPAPER.COM

to disc. Some things may be too big to move, but a photo of it can be kept. Consider having your photo albums transferred to disc. Learn what your kids want (don’t assume), and make them take it at next visit. Don’t get too many people involved in helping as it raises the risk for miscommunication. Garage sales can be emotionally hard when people haggle over items you love, so try selling via dealers, or online. Professional downsizers can help you with selling things of value and are experts at facilitating this difficult time. Most retirement residences will be able to refer one of these services to you. Keep motivated by focussing on the good things to come when the project is complete! – the Residents – the Residents

2088 152ND STREET, SURREY 604-538-2033

Fund is ‘something I would have enjoyed having when I started’ Carolyn Cooke Now staff Twitter @carolyncooke1

WHITE ROCK — Local artist Elizabeth Carefoot has organized a special one-day art sale to support aspiring artists in launching special projects. She is following a longtime dream of setting up a fund to help support artists through bursaries, and has secured seed money from Art for Art. Carefoot, who retired from her job at SFU and turned her full attention to the arts, said she has always wanted to set up a small fund to help artists get started on special projects – “something I would have enjoyed having when I started out in my own career.” The Crescent Beacharea resident teaches Middle Eastern dance and culture, and continues to give lectures on the area’s costume and customs. She also creates visual art, having studied etching and painting at Emily Carr College of Art and Design. She said she still practices

Artist Elizabeth Carefoot, seen here at her Crescent Beacharea studio, is setting up a fund to help support artists through bursaries. (Photo: KEVIN HILL) the “way of the artist,” as advocated by Gordon Smith, which is to be involved in art every day, and be mindfully creative in all activities. The art sale will raise money for the bursaries. It is slated for Saturday, Nov. 17 from noon to 4 p.m. at Semiahmoo Arts Centre, 14600 North Bluff Rd. in White Rock, next to

Centennial Arena. Carefoot said all the artwork will be less than $200 and most will be under $50. These one-ofa-kind pieces will include paintings, fibre art, rattles, art dolls, soft sculpture, collage, art cards and banners. Coffee and cookies will be provided. ccooke@ thenownewspaper.com

We are known and appeciated for our innovation, quality and excellent service t Relines & Soft Liners (Same Day Service)

Open Monday to Friday

604.530.9936 #102 . 20103 40th Ave., Langley www.yourdenture.com

t Complete Dentures

t Cosmetic Options

t Precision Dentures

t Gender Specific Teeth

t Dentures on Implants

t All Dental Plans Accepted

t Repairs While You Wait

t On Site Lab to Ensure Quality


NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

FOREVER YOUNG

SURREY CENTRE OPTOMETRY UNIT A - 10501 KING GEORGE BLVD

604-582-0221

Crime Prevention Week

SERVICES PROVIDED:

We can all help protect seniors from being victims of crime

❏ Eye Health Examinations ❏ Children’s Eye Exams ❏ Retinal Imaging ❏ Designer Frames ❏ Sunglasses ❏ Contact Lenses

SURREY — Seniors in communities throughout B.C. continue to be a key target of criminals. These crimes can happen in a variety of ways and places – in a senior’s own home and, increasingly, on social media. To help keep seniors safe, the provincial government shared the following safety tips with B.C. seniors and their families as part of Crime Prevention Week (Nov. 1 to 7):

GET TO KNOW YOUR NEIGHBOURS Joining a watch group, such as Block Watch, encourages community cohesiveness and increases awareness of what is happening in the neighbourhood. When out and about in the community, stay in open areas with good visibility, keep an eye out for suspicious activity and carry a cellphone in case of emergency.

statements, should be closely monitored and shredded prior to disposal. Only trusted and reputable organizations should be used. These can be verified by contacting the Better Business Bureau.

DON’T OVER SHARE ON SOCIAL MEDIA RECOGNIZE THE SIGNS OF ELDER ABUSE Perpetrators are often known to the victim, which can make it even more difficult for seniors to break the cycle of abuse. Prevention begins with the recognition of the signs of elder abuse and reaching out to someone trusted for help. This can include family, friends and local authorities.

LEARN HOW TO AVOID BEING DEFRAUDED Personal information, including information on receipts and bank

More of today’s seniors are using social media such as Facebook and Twitter. Being aware of the risks and taking necessary precautions to keep information private is essential to creating and maintaining a safe and enjoyable social media experience. For a copy of the BC Crime Prevention Association’s Senior Safety Booklet, call 604-501-9222. To learn more about elder abuse, visit the BC Centre for Elder Advocacy and Support online at www.bcceas.ca. To report a case of elder abuse or to get help, call the Seniors Abuse and Information Line (SAIL) at 604-437-1940.

EVERY DAY IS SENIOR’S DAY AT

CROSSROADS MOBILITY SOLUTIONS ucation

• Scooters - New & Used • Powerchairs • Liftchairs • Walkers • Wheelchairs • Bathroom Safety • Transport Chairs • Aids for Daily Living • Hospital Beds • Power Equipment Safety check out our quality home medical & mobility equipment with

solutions CROSSROADS mobility H O M E M E D I C A L E Q U I P M E N T SALES • SERVICE • RENTALS ND

111213

We are here to help!

AAuthorized Veteran Affairs Canada provider.

FREE In-home Demos • 9547 - 152 STREET, SURREY • 778.395.2221

A15

DR. R. G. DYCK

SPECIALIZING IN FAMILY EYECARE FOR 30 YEARS

“new patients welcome”

SURREY DENTURE CLINIC Unit B, 10501 King George Hwy

604-588-4333

For Denture/Partial Wearers: ❑ Are

your dentures so uncomfortable you can’t wear them? ❑ Cannot eat your favourite foods? ❑ Do they make your mouth sore? ❑ Are they loose?

If yes, we can help you!

COME IN AND RECEIVE A COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION AND DENTURE CARE PACKAGE. 5 year warranty on precision dentures.

“Always keeping our patients smiling”

111213

THE


AN 16 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

COPING THROUGH THE HOLIDAYS

COMMUNITY

An evening of practical ideas to help people of all ages cope with grief on the difficult days. Opportunity for informal sharing and questions Refreshments Provided

Sunnyside Lawn

White Rock’s Ryan Ashe to be memorialized with bench

Thursday, November 14th, 2013 from 7pm - 8:30pm Surrey Arts Centre (Bear Creek Park, Main lot off 88th Avenue) 13750 - 88th Avenue, Surrey BC

Please pre-register by calling:

(604) 584-7006 There is no fee for this evening.

Christopher Poon 110713

Surrey Hospice Society

FREE TO ATTEND

SENIORS’ BAZAAR SATURDAY 10:00AM - 2:00PM Chuck Bailey Recreation Centre 13458 - 107A Avenue, Surrey

NOVEMBER 16 DECEMBER 7

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 604-329-7323 seniorsbazaar@shaw.ca Presented by the Surrey Seniors’ Planning Table with support from our sponsors:

Mission Statement: “Promoting social participation and inclusion of seniors”

111213

The Surrey Seniors’ Bazaar is a marketplace to buy and sell handmade craft items and small new or gently used household goods in a friendly atmosphere. There will be information booths from local organizations and seniors can enjoy musical entertainment throughout the event. Light snacks, coffee and tea will also be provided free of charge during the early morning welcome for seniors visiting the Bazaar. The marketplace is open to everyone!

Now staff Twitter @questionchris

SOUTH SURREY — For years, the late Ryan Ashe could usually be found on benches around the White Rock and South Surrey area, chatting with passersby or just enjoying the view. According to those who knew him, Ashe brought smiles to those around him and, following his death in August from cancer, Ashe’s memory will now be forever honoured at the Sunnyside Lawn cemetery in South Surrey with a commemorative bench. Paid for by the City of Surrey, the bench will be set up beneath a large tree for passersby to enjoy, something that Ashe’s sister Orphee Martin was happily surprised to hear about. “They said they heard of the story where he touched so many lives and the cemetery supervisor said they would like to dedicate a bench to him in Sunnyside

THE BEST SEASON OF THE YEAR IS HERE!

FR A SER D OWN S

T R E E D I S P L AY Nov. 8 - 26 WINE & CHEESE Nov. 26 - 6:30 pm

T R E E D I S P L AY Nov. 19 – Dec. 5 WINE & CHEESE Dec. 5 - 6:30 pm

15269 104 Ave., Surrey

17755 60 Ave., Surrey

Lawns in South Surrey,” said Martin. Martin was also asked if she would like an inscription put on the bench and she came up with the following: “Ryan was a kind soul with a radiant smile and a community of caring friends. A bench was his home, finally a bench of his own. Sept. 23, 1956 to Aug. 13, 2013. Now he finally has one of his own.” The idea came about when Anna Terrace, the City of Surrey’s cemetery coordinator, was in the midst of organizing some benches for Sunnyside Lawn. A colleague told Terrace about Ashe’s story and from there, Terrace did the rest. “I had never heard of

him but then I Googled his name and started reading the stories about who he was,” explained Terrace. “After I heard his story I felt that I wanted to donate one of our benches to having something about him inscribed and have it placed in the cemetery under one of the trees.” According to Terrace, marking Ashe’s memory on a bench was only fitting, seeing how he became something of a fixture of the South Surrey and White Rock area. “The benches are nice to add to the community, but to dedicate one to somebody who made a difference in so many people’s lives, putting smiles on their faces,” she said. “It would be nice if

people came in and read about who he was and just reflected upon him.” The bench is set to go in sometime this month at Sunnyside Lawn. “I wanted to put this bench under a really nice tree we have,” said Terrace. “We don’t have anywhere for people to sit and reflect and if we could have a bench for people to do that and maybe find out who this person was, maybe it would make all of us stop and think.” Martin said she was grateful for the bench commemorating her brother. “It’s just very kind of them,” said Martin. “I’m sure he’d appreciate it and he’ll be liking his bench.” cpoon@thenownewspaper.com

see those fine lines and wrinkles just about disappear in less than an hour

The perfect way to kick off the holiday season! Come network, enjoy delicious wines and bid on your favourite “locally decorated” tree for your home or business! S H E R ATO N

Ryan Ashe is to be remembered with a bench of his own. (Photo: JACOB ZINN)

Transform your skin in 30 minutes...

WINE & CHEESE TREE FUNDR AISER

GUILDFORD HOTEL

NEWSPAPER.COM

Offer! Bring this ad to Mark’s Pharmacy, buy the Feels Like a Facelift Intensive Serum & Mud Mask together & receive a

RACETRACK & CASINO

Tickets :

FREE

Feels Like a Facelift 120 ml Cleanser!

BEFORE AFTER AFTER - 38 minutes using Intensive Serum & Mud Masque.

$50 ea.

BUY ONLINE

111213

www.sourcesbc.ca

Marks Pharmacy www.lookslikeafacelift.ca #101-8035 - 120th Street, Delta | 604.596.1774

WARNIN G

:

USE OF PRODUC THIS RESULT IN T MAY 7 YEARS LOOKING YOUNGE R!

111213

AN16


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

BEST of YOUR

AN17

It’s time for the 2013 Now Newspaper Readers’ Choice Awards!

NEIGHBOURHOOD

North Surrey, North Delta & Cloverdale By voting for your favorite locally owned and operated businesses, you will be entered to win a $300 SHOPPING SPREE AT GUILDFORD TOWN CENTRE Mark your ballot for each section and drop it off or mail in to The Now Newspaper. A minimum of forty categories must be completed for your ballot to count. Details are on the bottom of the back page. Please write the name of your favourite locally owned and operated business in the space provided.

FOOD & DRINK

SERVICES

LIFESTYLE

Chinese ............................................................ Greek ................................................................. Indian ................................................................ Italian ................................................................ Thai .................................................................... Japanese ......................................................... Sushi .................................................................. Tapas ................................................................. Seafood ............................................................ Steak ................................................................. Fish and Chips .............................................. Pizza .................................................................. Burgers ............................................................ Ice Cream ........................................................ Family with Kids ........................................... Patio .................................................................. Romantic ......................................................... Pub ..................................................................... Karaoke ............................................................ Sports Bar ....................................................... Cocktails .......................................................... Breakfast ......................................................... Sunday Brunch ............................................. Dessert ............................................................. Tea Shop .......................................................... Certified Organic Grocery ........................ Produce Market ............................................ Seafood Market ............................................... Deli ..................................................................... Butcher ............................................................ Indian Sweet Shop ....................................... Bakery .............................................................. Specialty Wine ............................................... U Brew .............................................................. U Vin ..................................................................

Accountant .....................................................

Golf Course .....................................................

Auto Parts and Supplies ..........................

Golf Clubhouse .............................................

Auto Repair ....................................................

Bowling ............................................................

Carwash/Detailer ....................................... Caterer ............................................................ House Cleaning ........................................... Dentist ............................................................. Driving School .............................................. Dry Cleaner ................................................... Financial Planner ....................................... Hearing Centre ............................................

Dance Studio .................................................. Martial Arts .................................................... Equestrian ...................................................... Running Club ................................................. Fitness Equipment ...................................... Gym (Women) ................................................ Gym (Men) .......................................................

Heating, Cooling, and Duct Cleaning

Personal Trainer ..........................................

...............................................................................

Weight Loss ....................................................

Hotel .................................................................

Chiropractor ...................................................

Insurance ......................................................

Massage Therapy .........................................

Landscaper ....................................................

Physiotherapist .............................................

Law Firm ........................................................

Acupuncturist ................................................

Locksmith ......................................................

Orthotics ..........................................................

Mortgage Broker ........................................

Naturopathic Clinic .....................................

Pet Food Store .............................................

Supplement Store ........................................

Photo Finishing ............................................

Laser Clinic ....................................................

Plumber ..........................................................

Cosmetic Surgery ........................................

Shoe Repair ...................................................

University ........................................................

Storage Service ........................................... Tailor ................................................................ Tire Service .................................................... Travel ............................................................... Veterinarian ................................................... Watch Repair ................................................

College ............................................................. Private School ............................................... Trade School .................................................. Tutoring ............................................................ Music Lessons ..............................................

PERSONAL STYLE Art Gallery ......................................................... Shopping Centre ............................................ Bikes .................................................................... Books .................................................................. Camera Store .................................................. Cellular Phones ............................................. Duty Free ........................................................... Dollar Store ...................................................... Pawn Shop ........................................................ Florist .................................................................. Gifts ...................................................................... Liquidation Store ........................................... Motorsports and Accessory ...................... Sporting Goods ............................................... Barbeque ........................................................... Fireplace ............................................................ Carpet ................................................................. Hardwood .......................................................... Furniture ........................................................... Garden Centre/Nursery .............................. Tile ........................................................................ Home Appliances (independent) ...................... Home Décor ..................................................... Lighting .............................................................. Mattress ............................................................. Plumbing Fixtures ......................................... Hot Tub ............................................................... Jewelry ............................................................... Men’s Clothing ................................................ Women’s Clothing .......................................... Kids’ Clothing .................................................. Thrift .................................................................... Consignment ................................................... Hair Salon ......................................................... Barber ................................................................ Nail Bar .............................................................. Day Spa .............................................................. Eyewear .............................................................

Please let us know more about where you do most of your shopping by circling your neighbourhood. Clayton Heights, Cloverdale, Fraser Heights,Fleetwood, Guildford, Newton, North Delta, Sunshine Hills, Panorama, Bridgeview, Tynehead

One entry per person.

V3W 4N2

Name: Phone:

Postal Code

All entries must be original newspaper ballot. Deadline for entries is Fri. Dec. 6, 2013. Personal information will not be sold or made public. The NOW reserves the right to publish contest winners’ names.

110513

YOUR VOTE COUNTS

Please drop off or mail your ballot to: The Now Newspaper Suite 201-7889 132 Street Surrey, BC


A18

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

SPORTS

Send your team’s highlights to Sports editor, Michael Booth at mbooth@thenownewspaper.com or call 604-572-0064

High school football

Cross-country

Lyles comes up short in MVP vote Abreha 5th in BC Michael Booth

Now staff Twitter @boothnow

Averaging more than 200 yards rushing and three touchdowns per game wasn’t enough to earn offensive MVP honours for Lord Tweedsmuir star running back Jamel Lyles. The class AAA Eastern Conference teams handed out their league awards at the end of regular season play last weekend and Lyles ended up the loser on a tough choice for offensive MVP honours. W.J. Mouat running back Maleek Irons took the silverware after rushing for 2,346 yards and 27 touchdowns in nine games. Lyles matched Irons in rushing touchdowns and also added scores on reception, kick returns and interceptions, but finished well back in yardage with 1,855 in nine games. “Jamel had the same amount of touchdowns, but it’s one of those things where they are both in the same conference and only one could be selected,” said Panthers coach Kurt Thornton. “They’re both extremely valuable to their teams. Jamel was still selected the top running back in the conference and he will still most likely be selected as a provincial all-star. He was disappointed by the vote and I was too because he is certainly worthy of the honour.” One major piece of silverware did land in Cloverdale as Austin Thornton, Kurt’s son, was honoured as the defensive MVP. From his defensive end post, Austin Thornton recorded 55 tackles and a dozen sacks this season

Lord Tweedsmuir running back Jamel Lyles (22) averaged more than 200 yards rushing and three touchdowns per game for the Panthers this season. (Photo: JACOB ZINN) plus returned one interception for a touchdown. “He’s my son so obviously I’m proud of him, but I had nothing to do with it because I can’t vote for my own players,” the Panthers coach said.

“It was the other coaches who recognized him with the award and he definitely deserved it.” Lyles and Thornton headed a list of five Panthers who made the Eastern Conference all-star honour roll. The list also included

offensive lineman Andrew Diachuk, defensive lineman Reece Russell and linebacker Michael Carter. The Panthers finished second in the Eastern Conference and were ranked third in the province at the end of the regular season.

University

Russell honoured with Ray Lepp scholarship Surrey’s Alex Russell is one of two UBC Thunderbirds honoured as recipients of Volleyball BC’s 2013 Ray Lepp scholarship award. Russell and Abbotsford’s Rosie Schlagintweit were the two winners announced last week. Ray Lepp was a founding member of Volleyball B.C. and served on the board of directors for 22 years. Russell is a middle blocker in his third season with the UBC Thunderbirds men’s team. A graduate of Surrey’s Kwantlen Park Secondary, Russell has been a member of Canada’s national junior men’s team for the last two years. This summer, Russell helped Canada to a 12thplace finish at the FIVB Men’s Under-21 World Championships in Turkey. In 2012, Russell was on the Canadian squad

that won silver at the U-21 Men’s Continental Championship in Colorado Springs, Colo. With UBC last season, Russell finished fourth in the Canada West conference in blocks per set (1.36). He has also twice earned Academic AllCanadian status as an engineering student.

Academic team Surrey’s James Young is one of eight members of the Simon Fraser University cross-country team to be named to the Great Northwest Athletic Conference All-Academic team for the 2013 season. Young is the only repeat winner on the Clan, appearing on the team thanks to a 3.76 grade

point average. To qualify for the academic team athletes must have a minimum GPA of at least 3.20 and competing in at least their second season at their respective universities.

Einarsson top rookie Surrey’s Sean Einarsson has been named the Canada West rookie of the year for his season with the UBC Thunderbirds. Einarsson is one of five players from Surrey and Delta who helped UBC win the Canada West title. The list includes midfielders Reynold Stewart and Einarsson, defenders Andrew Grange and Harry Lakhan, and forward Otis Sandhu.

Kwantlen Park’s Michael Abreha slogged his way to a fifth place finish in the senior boys’ race at the B.C. High School Crosscountry Championships in Aldergrove Nov. 2. Abreha completed the 6.3-kilometre route in 21 minutes, 2.2 seconds, 30 seconds back of gold medalist Nathan Wadhwani of Terry Fox. Wadhwani beat out Abreha for the Fraser Valley championships last month, but this time around the cold, wet weather took a toll on the Kwantlen Park harrier. “It was a tough race and the weather was not good for running,” Abreha said. “It affected me quite a bit because it was cold and my legs were numb. I couldn’t run as fast as I wanted to. If the weather was better I think I would have done much better. After finishing second in the Fraser Valleys, my goal was to finish in the top three at provincials but with all the hills and the rain and the puddles, I was much slower than I wanted to be.” Seaquam’s Michael Milic placed eighth overall. Abreha’s top-five showing helped the Timberwolves to a seventh place finish in the team standings. Kwantlen Park runners included Mitchell Smart, Allen Wang, Derek Swift, Daniel Vas, Ahmad Rezai and Mtwkl Mohamed. In the 4.3-km senior girls’ event, Semiahmoo’s Chelsea Ribeiro was the top Surrey finisher in 19th place. The Semiahmoo Totems crushed the field in the junior girls’ team standings with three runners finishing in the top-13. The Totems team included Haley Ribeiro (6th), Jessica Williams (7th) Dominika Paige (11th) and Julia Greer (13th) as well as Emily Liang and Alexa Porpaczy. In junior boys’ competition, Semiahmoo’s Connor Jackson finished fifth overall while Totems teammate Dawson Ribeiro was 15th.


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

A19


A20

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

A21


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Tis the season to share your story! Tell us your Holiday Traditions and we will publish them in our Christmas Album Feature

A

Christmas Album

We want our readers to share in your holiday traditions Please send us your special recipes, favourite Christmas songs or holiday photos and we will publish them in our Christmas Album.

All entries will be placed in a draw for a family dinner at Boston Pizza Newton which includes a large pizza and 4 pop.

103113

Please email or mail in your entries with your name, address & phone number. Email: contest@thenownewspaper.com Mail: #201 - 7889 132nd Street, Surrey, BC, V3W 4N2 111213

A22


NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

A23

ve a h le p o e p s le a s p to e Thes . earned your businessyou n e h w ll a c a m e th e iv G r u o y r fo g in k o lo e r a next vehicle. Christopher Jamieson Wolfe Mitsubishi 19360 Langley ByPass

Call

604-575-0275

Ziyaad Badshah

Haley's White Rock Dodge

Rhett Marchildon

3050 King George Blvd., Surrey

White Rock Honda

Call

2466 King George Blvd., Surrey

Call

604-531-9156

604-536-2111

Dan Jillings Ocean Park Ford

3050 King George Blvd. Call

2

604-531-6100

MONTHS RUNNING

Travis Scarf

Murray Hyundai 3150 King George Blvd., Surrey

Call

Matthew Hale

604-538-7022

Wolfe Subaru

19372 Langley ByPass

Call

604-534-2660

2 MONTHS RUNNING

Brad Timmath Applewood KIA 19764 Langley By-pass, Langley

Call

604-533-7881

Raza Bhimani

Jim Pattison Chrysler 15377 Guildford Drive

Call

1-888-309-5436

Harv Sian Freeway Mazda 154th & 104th, Surrey

Call

604-227-5579

Rick Orzol Applewood KIA 16299 Fraser Hwy., Surrey

Call

604-635-3010

Rommel Delfin Surrey Honda 15291 Fraser Hwy., Surrey

Call

604-583-7421

George McDonald

SHINING STARS sponsored by:

Wolfe Mazda 19265 Langley By-Pass

Call

604-534-0181 111213

THE


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

111213

A24


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 YOUR NO. 1 SOURCE FOR NEWS, SPORTS, WEATHER AND ENTERTAINMENT

THENOWNEWSPAPER.COM

SOUTH SURREY - WHITE ROCK EDITION

Walmart

12451 88 Av

e

Superstore

14650 104 Ave & 7550 King George Blvd

T&T Superm a

Central City

Viewpoint Community Sports Classifieds

8 11 18 19

Well-known figure will be remembered with a special bench at cemetery

16

Surrey

An old Ford helps steer kids away from a life of crime SEE VIDEO WITH LAYAR

Gord Goble Now contributor

SURREY — It reads like the implausible plot for the feel-good movie of the year: The would-be hero – a cop, a good one – stumbles upon the rusted hulk of a 1935 Ford Slantback withering away in a far-off prairie pasture. Dude brings it halfway across the country, then spends the better part of a decade breathing life into it. Except he doesn’t work alone. Instead, he enlists the aid of disadvantaged kids from the poor side of town, kids who might otherwise be compelled to pilfer a car rather than lovingly restore one. Complications ensue, of course, but the closing scene – where the car and the cop and the kids lead a parade through the downtown core – is nothing short of a happiness factory. Only this isn’t a movie, it’s

real life, and we’re just now entering the final act. When VPD Sgt. Tim Houchen found the car, or what was left of it, in a Saskatchewan farmer’s field seven years ago, he likely didn’t know all it would spawn. Then again, maybe he did. Houchen is one of those guys who believes. He believes in ideals, and he believes in old-school wholesomeness. “When you look at meaningful conversations between a parent and kid,” Houchen says, “those conversations were over mechanics with my dad, fixing a car, a boat, a truck. That’s where our meaningful conversations took place.” And he believes that “if you remove the cultural stigma of the police and the Downtown Eastside (of Vancouver), it’s far easier for a youth to come to you and take those steps required to have a relationship. It’s personal.” And that’s what the NASKARZ (Never Again Steal Cars) program is all about. Currently using the see ‘WE FIND’ › page 5

Teens in the NASKARZ program with Ewald Penner (second from left) and police Sgt. Tim Houchen (right). (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

Grandview

rket

g George H

Corners Pla

2285 160 S

t

wy

za

Help for the homeless

Extremeweather beds open early Amy Reid Now staff Twitter @amyreid87

SURREY and WHITE ROCK — Extreme-weather beds opened early this year. While the program usually kicks off in mid- to late-November, a heavy rainfall warning triggered an early opening for Nov. 1 and 2 in Surrey and White Rock. “It was the first time in eight years we were ever open that early,” said Jonquil Hallgate, executive director of Surrey Urban Mission. The mission’s new location at 108th Avenue and King George Boulevard has a shower, which will be particularly useful for its clients this time of year. Hallgate said the mission saw nine people on Friday, Nov. 1 and 28 people on the Saturday. In Surrey and White Rock, there are 80 beds, with 20 more that can open if needed. Delta is not participating in the extreme weather program this year. The beds are called to open when weather conditions become dangerous for those on the street. Temperatures of -2 C, significant snowfall, gusty winds or prolonged rain can trigger an opening. The beds are then available on and off throughout the cold season. “Some years we’ve hardly been open and other years, we’ve been open 50 nights,” Hallgate said. In addition to providing an indoor place to sleep, the program includes a warm meal. Peter Fedos, extreme weather coordinator for Surrey-White Rock, said the service can make the difference between life and death. see TUQUES, GLOVES › page 3

111213

Memorial for Ashe

Inside

- 10153 Kin


A02

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

what makes us unique Supporting local and regional Canadian producers.

positive difference in the community • since 1989 over $86 million has been granted to more than 1.3 million children accross Canada through PC® Children’s Charity • PC® Children’s Charity supports children with disabilities and fights childhood hunger through our support of nutrition programs • supporting local food banks through the bi-annual Extra Helping Food Drive • ensuring that all kids can play through the support of KidSport

health & wellness • reformulated 208 existing control brand processed products, reducing sodium by an average of 19% • redesigned Blue Menu® packaging to make it easier for customers to see a product’s nutritional attributes • 93% of PC® and Blue Menu® products are free of artificial colours and artificial flavours, 100% by the end of 2013

respecting the

TM

®

environment 2013

• greatly reduced the number of shopping bags from our stores • continually improving product packaging; changing size and materials to be more environmentally friendly • converting the store light fixtures to fluorescent technology resulting in energy savings • sourcing sustainable seafood • placing a priority on local and regional fresh products

¤

our exclusive brands

¤

6,"  /‡, 9Ê*," 1 /-ÊÒ

F I N A N C I A L

• President’s Choice • no name • Joe Fresh • Blue Menu • PC Organics • PC GREEN • exact • Teddy’s Choice • PC FINANCIAL® - PC Financial® MasterCard®- no fee daily banking - earn PC® points - mortgages ..... and more ®

EFFECTIVE AY SD UNTIL THUR 13 NOV.14, 20

®

®

®

®

Spend $150 and receive 9 lb box ‹ Mandarin oranges

FREE

5.88 value

‹ Spend $150 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location and receive a free 9 lb box of Mandarin oranges. Excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated. The retail value of up to $5.88 will be deducted from the total amount of your purchase before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from Friday, November 8th until closing Thursday, November 14th, 2013. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges on free item. 862817

4

10000 02655

7

PC® Organics® baby spinach or field greens

D’Italiano thick slice bread

product of USA, 312 g clamshell

assorted varieties, 675 g

2

96

2

29

740110/ 781599 UPC3260190017/ 3260190007

235556 UPC 06340003035

ea

97

ea

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

2.97

Boost Meal Replacement

98

ea

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

9.88

29 3-8 years

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

10.97

21

98

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

29.97

FisherPrice Ocean Wonders Aquarium

34

with remote control

84

981394 UPC 74677516524

957541 UPC 4167915992

3.27

697124 UPC 3700086224

FisherPrice Imaginext Batcave

selected varieties, 6 x 237 mL

78

5

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

size n-6-58-128’s

630294 UPC 20688276

166537 UPC 6810004615

ea

Pampers Super Big Pack diapers

selected varieties, 12 double rolls

selected varieties, 414-475 mL

7

Cottonelle bathroom tissue

Kraft salad dressing

1

®

ORGANIC

product of China $

00

501723 UPC 2708452136

ea

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

49.99

ea

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

54.99

Prices are in effect until Sunday, November 17 2013 or while stock lasts. At our Burnaby 1105 Eaton Ctr. 4700 Kingsway / Surrey-7550 King George Boulevard & 14650-104th Ave. locations only

Every week, we actively check our major competitors’ flyers and match the price on hundreds of items*. Look for the Ad Match message in store for the items we’ve actively matched. Plus, we’ll match any major competitor’s flyer item if you show us!

*Price Matched Look for the symbol in store. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match select items in our major supermarket competitors’ flyers throughout the week. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes, and carried at this store location) and for fresh produce, meat and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us).Guaranteed Lowest Prices applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ print advertisements (i.e. flyer, newspaper). We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s print advertisement. We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this promise at any time. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, pattern, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2013 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

superstore.ca


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

A03

NEWS

Send your story ideas or photo submissions to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Health care

In brief

Second SMH doctor resigns, calls for public inquiry

IIO investigating Guildford shooting

Hospital’s Code Blue system is broken, frustrated doctor says Tom Zytaruk Now staff Twitter @tomzytaruk

SURREY — Yet another Surrey Memorial Hospital doctor has resigned over how the embattled hospital is handling Code Blues, and is calling for a public inquiry into the matter. “Despite public assurances I have no faith that SMH has a functional Code Blue system,” Dr. Giuseppe Giustino told the Now on Friday. “I have resigned my critical care privileges. I will never work in critical care again. This requires a public enquiry of all the players involved that allowed this to happen. At the end of the day, it will be a very sad statement if I am the only person that has lost their job over this situation.” Last week a Now exclusive revealed that Dr. Grant McCormack, director of SMH’s intensive care unit for 27 years, resigned his post after the hospital’s emergency doctors refused to provide Code Blue service to cardiac arrest patients in the hospital’s ICU. “I just find it unconscionable; I can’t support that,” McCormack said. A Code Blue is called when a patient suffers heart or respiratory failure and needs to be revived. McCormack said Friday that Giustino’s resignation is the hospital’s loss. “It’s sad because he’s a very good physician,” he said. “I think it’s Surrey hospital’s loss.”

GUILDFORD — The Independent Investigations Office is probing a police shooting in Surrey after an anti-gang cop shot a man in Guildford on Thursday. Ralph Krenz, of the IIO, said the shooting happened during a vehicle check. An officer with the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit shot into a Toyota sedan near a strip mall near 108th Avenue and 148th Street. It happened at about 5 p.m. A man was taken to hospital with a wound that wasn’t considered to be life threatening. While the IIO is investigating the shooting, Krenz said, “the Surrey RCMP remains responsible for any and all parallel investigations.” Surrey RCMP Cpl. Bert Paquet said Surrey’s part might be to look into why the vehicle was pulled over. “We assisted in the aftermath of the incident but don’t know why the guy was pulled over,” he said. Tom Zytaruk

New city hall to open Feb. 17, 2014

ER doctors showed up, but an ICU doctor responded. Tasleem Juma, senior public affairs consultant for Fraser Health, said that if that’s the case, she’d “almost bet her life” the ER physicians were dealing with a similar emergency in their own department.

SURREY — The City of Surrey’s website says the new $97-million city hall will be officially open for business on Feb. 17, 2014. A grand opening event for the 180,000square-foot facility is planned, but a date has not yet been set. At one point, the website had September, 2013 as the targeted grand opening date, but Surrey’s general manager of human resources Nicola Webb has said the building has always been scheduled for completion in fall 2013. The new city hall is accompanied by City Hall Plaza, an outdoor civic square that will connect city hall, the City Centre Library, 3 Civic Plaza and SFU.

tzytaruk@thenownewspaper.com

Amy Reid

Dr. Giuseppe Giustino: “Despite public assurances, I have no faith that (Surrey Memorial Hospital) has a functional Code Blue system.” (Photo: JACOB ZINN) Surrey Memorial Hospital’s medical director, Dr. Urbain Ip, said on Nov. 4 that the hospital’s emergency doctors will provide Code Blue coverage for patients in the intensive care unit “when requested and available.” From another source, the Now has learned that a Code Blue was called in the hospital’s kidney dialysis unit midday Nov. 6 and no

Extreme-weather beds

Tuques, gloves, cough drops needed

Download the free Layar App

INTERACTIVE PRINT ‹ from page 1

“We want to make sure people can make it through one more night,” he said. “They’re alive one more day. This is basic raw care and it’s really important. If we’re not there and they’re cold, they’re not going to make it. They’re going to be exposed to getting really, really sick or they could die. Hypothermia doesn’t have to be at zero degrees, it can happen even higher

than that. It’s very critical and it saves lives.” Fedos said in Cloverdale, there’s talk of shuttling people into the program because it’s not easy for many in the area to get to the available beds. “It takes a lot of resources to do it – you need someone to be on the road at all times. If we can pull it off, we’ll do it.” In addition to a place to sleep and a meal, the program tries to provide clothing for those they serve.

Tuques, gloves, socks and underwear are most needed, as are cough drops, Fedos said. “People coming in, they’re coming in with coughs and stuff like that. Cough drops help them manage their cough and it helps some people sleep longer. We never thought it was a big deal, but it is,” Fedos said, adding that clean winter coats are also in demand. “The real focus is to just keep people alive overnight,” he said. areid@thenownewspaper.com

Why read about how this issue comes alive with Layar when we can tell you in person? SCAN THIS BOX

Scan this page

Discover interactive content


A4 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWS

november 2 to 29 win a hard rock

vacation

every week!

Languages

draws every friday at 9pm

New census data breaks down Surrey population

four vacations to be won.

REDEEM THIS AD FOR AN ENTRY BALLOT One bonus per person, per day. Must be present to win.

round-trip airfare 5 night stay up to $5000 + up to $3000 to spend worth

HardRockCasinoVancouver

REBORN AS

@HardRockCasinoV

@HardRockCasinoV

HardRockCasinoVancouver.com | 2080 United Boulevard, Coquitlam BC | 604 523 6888

NEWSPAPER.COM

2

SURREY — Nearly half of Surrey’s residents don’t speak English as a first language, according to more detailed statistics from the 2011 census. The information was revealed in a corporate report that went before council recently, showing stats on immigrant populations, visible minorities, education, housing and aboriginal ancestry. Between 2001 and 2011, English declined as the most spoken mother tongue from 61.8 per cent to 51.7 per cent. Punjabi placed second at 20.2 per cent – an increase from 14.6 per cent in 2001 – followed by Tagalog (three per cent), Hindi (2.6 per cent), Mandarin (2.2 per cent), Korean (1.7 per cent) and a combination of all others (18.7 per cent). The new results also looked at the birthplaces of Surrey residents, showing that 40.7 per cent of the city’s new immigrants – residents who moved to Canada between January 2006 and the last census day – came from India. Other countries include the Philippines (16.3 per cent), China (8.7 per cent), Europe (3.8 per cent), Africa (3.4 per cent) and the United States (2.3 per cent).

The report also analyzed visible minorities, noting that the largest minority group is the South Asian community at 142,445 people in 2011 – up from 107,810 people in 2006. The Chinese community was the second largest group with more than 28,400 people. Visible minorities as a whole grew by 34.7 per cent between 2006 and 2011. Looking at ancestral descent, the census notes that Surrey’s largest ethnic origin group is the South Asian community (29.5 per cent), including origins such as the Punjab province of India, other parts of India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan. This was followed by residents who identified their ethnic origin as British Isles (27.6 per cent) and East and Southeast Asia (17.7 per cent), which includes Taiwan, Vietnam, Korea, Japan, the Philippines and China. An estimated 13,300 people of aboriginal ancestry were accounted for in the 2011 census, taking into consideration people of Indian, Inuit and Métis background. Surrey currently has the second largest aboriginal population in B.C. behind Vancouver. Jacob Zinn

OPEN HOUSE

ROYAL HEIGHTS PARK PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE Please join us for a Public Open House. The purpose of the Open House is to provide information and to collect community feedback for the proposed renovations of Royal Heights Park. The preliminary plan includes potential improvements such as an update to the playground and a paved walking loop. This information was received through informal community feedback. Date and Location Time: 6:00 – 8:00pm Date: Thursday, November 14, 2013 Place: Royal Heights Elementary — Gymnasium 11665 - 97 Avenue, Surrey Staff from the Parks Division will be on hand to receive community feedback and to answer questions on potential plans. If you have any questions, please call 604 501-5050 or email parksrecculture@surrey.ca. We look forward to hearing from the community. Parks, Recreation & Culture Department City of Surrey

www.surrey.ca

110713

A04


NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

NEWS

Surrey’s

NASCARZ program in Surrey

‘We find that kids need a focal point in their lives’ slowly evolving Ford as its focal point, the program puts at-risk and disadvantaged kids on the same playing field with adults – some of whom are police officers – working toward a common goal. That goal is a fully tricked-out hot rod, complete with painted-on flames and a multitude of flashing lights. When it’s fully restored, the vehicle will continue to act as a motorized conduit between cops and kids as it travels to schools, in parades and the like. And yes, there is a very definite Surrey angle to all of this. The Ford currently resides at Jellybean AutoCrafters on 64th Avenue, where it will remain until it shifts to Vancouver Community College for painting. This is no small effort on the part of Jellybean owner Ewald Penner, brother and fabricator Kurt Penner, and the rest of the gang at the car restoration shop. There’s no official budget for the NASKARZ program,

so the countless hours the Penners and staff dedicate to the cause are on a fully volunteer basis. “We find that kids need a focal point in their lives, and cars are the thing that kept us out of trouble when we were younger,” Ewald Penner said. “So now we’re able to give back to society and do the same thing for them.” The rain pounded on the pavement outside Jellybean as Penner spoke. The Ford, in an advanced state of disassembly, sat on a hoist above us. Jellybean employee John Potvin noisily cut sheet metal with a grinder, sparks flying to and fro. And when the front door opened and in walked a vanload of enthusiastic kids from Vancouver’s mean streets, Houchen and the Penners and Potvin were reminded why they do this. Those wishing to contribute to the NASKARZ program can call the Jellybean auto shop at 604-594-6800 or email jellybeanautocrafters@telus.net. goble@shaw.ca

k c u r T d o o F P ro g ra m

The City of Surrey is developing a food truck program and we need your input!

Street food is growing in popularity across North America. Many cities are embracing the trend and allowing food trucks to become culinary attractions on city streets.

www.surrey.ca/food

Visit www.surrey.ca/food for more information on the program, upcoming public and stakeholder consultation opportunities, and to participate in a survey.

OPEN HOUSE #1 Monday, November 18, 2013 1:30pm – 4:00pm CITY CENTRE LIBRARY, RM. 120 – 10350 University Drive, Surrey

OPEN HOUSE #2 Monday, November 25, 2013 3:30pm – 7:00pm CITY CENTRE LIBRARY, RM. 120 – 10350 University Drive, Surrey

110713

‹ from page 1

A05

111213

THE

www.surrey.ca/food


A06

A6 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

NEWS Hügelkultur

Fleetwood couple defending ‘unsightly’ garden Jacob Zinn Now contributor Twitter @jacobzinn

FLEETWOOD — Nearly three months after Jess Thompson and Cindy Quach were handed an infraction letter for their “unsightly” garden, the City of Surrey has yet to reach a solution other than to dig it up. The Fleetwood couple said they’ve tried to negotiate with the city to save their hügelkultur garden – a form of permaculture, loosely defined as self-maintained agriculture – but have yet to hear any alternative answers. “The city is refusing to speak to us,” said Quach, adding that they’ve invited members of Surrey city council to their property four times each. “We don’t get any replies whatsoever. That’s the most frustrating thing.” Because the couple rents their oneacre property, discussions over the bylaw infraction are between the landlord and the city. Thompson and Quach have requested to attend the meetings, but have yet to be allowed. Quach said they’ve also applied to go before council as a delegation to defend their garden, but were denied because the bylaw case is still open. “We just feel that if the city just understands the benefits of what we’re doing and how good it is for the environment, maybe they’ll rethink their position, but we don’t even get a chance to say that to them,” she said. Quach said the city’s engineering department estimated the removal, if done by the city and charged to her and her husband, would cost $40,000. Following the media coverage of their situation, Quach said she has heard from

Cindy Quach and Jess Thompson with their children, Nikola, 2, and six-month-old Roial, say the city hasn’t offered any solution to what some of their neighbours call an “unsightly” garden, other than to remove it entirely. (Photo: JACOB ZINN) other Surrey residents who also have permaculture gardens, but they haven’t had problems “because their neighbours never complained.” The infraction letter, which the couple received in August, raised concerns with the height of woodchip piles, the odour of manure and unsightliness. The smell of manure has long since subsided and the heavy rainfall has helped compress the garden beds significantly. Quach stands just over five feet tall and the beds are now below her waist. As for the so-called unsightliness of

the garden, their property is fenced and surrounded on most sides by trees, including large evergreens lining the front yard along 168th Street. Quach said she and her husband have tried to organize times when bylaw officers can come by and see how the garden has grown recently, but said the inspectors come by when they’re not home – or, if they are home, they don’t even set foot on the property. “They come when we’re not home, or they do a drive-by – they don’t even get out of their car,” said Quach. “We’ve watched one of them from our window. He pulled up, rolled down

his window, looked, and then drove off, and that was his assessment.” Quach and Thompson have a petition of support with more than 150 signatures, most from residents in the area. However, Quach said the city has received a petition with eight names against their garden – except one of the names was fraudulently added to the list. “We found out recently that at least one name was falsified,” said Quach. “It draws into question the validity of this petition.” Dr. Robert Ironside, a professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, told the Now he received a call from a bylaw officer to confirm that he had signed the petition, which he claims he had never seen. In fact, he said he fully supports Quach and Thompson’s efforts. “I think that what they’re doing is laudable,” he said. “I certainly admire them for what they’re doing.” Quach said she is not sure who is circulating the anti-garden petition, but said two people who signed it have since changed their minds, making the running total of opponents five. Jas Rehal, bylaw manager for the City of Surrey, said he had not heard if any other names on the petition were false. When asked about the alternative solutions to the situation, he reiterated that the investigation is ongoing. Quach and Thompson simply want city council to see the garden for themselves and give it some time to grow before they decide whether or not it has to go. “The buzzword around city hall is sustainability – it beats us why they wouldn’t be open to learning this method,” said Quach. “My husband and I would like urban gardening to be legalized, because the way that we’re being treated, it feels like it’s illegal.”

Bullying damages our kids. Do something about it.

110513

uwlm.ca/preventbullying

4364-0913

Insulin is not a cure.

For more information about how you can help find a cure call

931-1937

The Diabetes Research Foundation Juvenile Diabetes Foundation Canada


NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

Enter to WIN a Large

A07

Pizza & 4 Pop for Your Family!

Colouring Contest!

Name: First _______________________________________________ Age:___________________________ Name: Last _______________________________________________ Phone:_________________________ Drop off at any of the Surrey Public Library locations or the Now Newspaper at #201-7889 132nd Street, Surrey, BC. Deadline: November 19, 2013.

DROP OFF AT ANY OF THESE LOCATIONS: Cloverdale

Guildford

Ocean Park

Semiahmoo

5642 – 176A St

15105 – 105th Ave

12854 – 17th Ave

1815 – 152nd St

City Centre

Fleetwood

Newton

Port Kells

Strawberry Hill

10350 University Dr

15996 – 84th Ave

13795 – 70th Ave

18885 – 88th Ave

7399 – 122nd St

OR the NOW Newspaper, #201-7889 132nd Street

111213

THE


A08

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

VIEWPOINT

Address: The Surrey Now, #201 7889 132nd St., Surrey, B.C. V3W 4N2

Publisher: Alvin Brouwer

B.C. politics

Nearly $66M wasted on ‘talking’ InTheHouse Keith Baldrey

T

he notion that aboriginal communities are like black holes when it comes to government funding was strengthened considerably with the release of the latest scathing report by B.C.’s Children and Youth Representative. Mary Ellen TurpelLafond’s investigation of government-funded services for aboriginal youth was highly critical but not particularly shocking. Her main finding was that almost $70 million was given to aboriginal organizations over a dozen years without a shred of evidence that any of it was actually spent on services for young people. The money was, instead, largely used to pay people to go to meetings and conferences and to do a lot of talking. Turpel-Lafond’s report is entitled “When Talk Trumped Service” and many people presumably made a lot of money talking about young people

without helping them. She is characteristically blunt in her assessment of what she found, as in this: “There could not be a more confused, unstable and bizarre area of public policy than that which guides Aboriginal child and family services in B.C.” Or this: “This story may read more like fiction than truth, but the numbers speak for themselves. Nearly $66 million has been spent without any functional public policy framework, no meaningful financial or performance accountability, and without any actual children receiving additional services because of these expenditures.” No beating around the bush here. A fundamental problem she uncovered was the B.C. government’s decision to treat aboriginal-run care agencies on a “nation-tonation” basis. As she points out, B.C. is not a “nation” and neither are these agencies. The government opted to simply send “staggering expenditures” out the door to organizations that lacked resources or the expertise to fulfil service obligations.

She found that nearly $35 million alone was spent “discussing” something called Regional Aboriginal Authorities. Essentially, a bunch of meetings were held and reports were done. But problems facing aboriginal youth – parental addiction, domestic violence, poverty, neglect, mental health, etc. – were not dealt with. But why this report is not particularly shocking is that this disconnected relationship between governments of various levels and First Nations is evident in other areas. The lack of accountability, the maddening pace of improvements and a political cautiousness are ingrained in the relationship. For instance, billions of dollars have been spent on treaty negotiations,

with precious little to show for it. Again, lawyers and consultants and bands make money via governments but can’t point to many accomplishments. The aboriginal communities receive huge amounts of government funding, yet many of their members are mired in a state of chronic poverty. Health outcomes among aboriginal people are among the worst in the country. There is a tendency among governments to simply write large cheques for aboriginal groups, as if that assuages any guilt that stems from taking away vast tracts of their ancestral lands. There is little followup to ensure money is spent properly or in ways that actually improve things. But the First Nations

must share in the responsibility for this situation. First Nations themselves insist on being treated as quasiindependent nations capable of managing their own affairs, albeit with significant amounts of government funding. Some can and do just that, but in many instances there is a complete failure of leadership among its leaders. And so we are left with scandalous findings like those uncovered by Turpel-Lafond. She talks about the need to stop directing money into “the big theoretical fixes” and concentrate more on the front line services. As she points out, those front line services have suffered because so much money was rerouted from them in favour of all those

meetings and discussions. There have been many troubling and outrageous reports on various government entities over the years, but this one has to rank as one of the most outrageous. I’m told things have improved on this front in the last couple of years, and I hope that’s true. But I have a hard time believing the basic system of handing over government funding with no accountability or follow-up will change in any significant way. Hopefully I will be proven wrong, but given the shameful history of the treatment of First Nations by governments and by some of their own leaders, I’m not betting on it. Keith Baldrey is chief political reporter for Global BC Keith.Baldrey@globalnews.ca

Our Commitment to You

We want to hear from you

The Surrey Now Newspaper, a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership, respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at thenownewspaper.com.

The NOW newspaper is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. You can reach us by phone at 604-572-0064, by email at edit@thenownewspaper.com or by mail at Suite 201-7889 132 Street, Surrey, B.C. V3W 4N2

Distribution: 604-534-6493 Circulation: delivery@thenownewspaper.com

WATCH VIDEO Beau Simpson Editor

Ellyn Schriber Manager, Integrated Advertising Sales

Second Class Mail Registration 7434. Delivered free every Tuesday and Thursday to 118,000 homes and businesses.

Publisher: Alvin Brouwer Editor: Beau Simpson Manager, Intergrated Advertising Sales: Ellyn Schriber Sports Editor: Michael Booth Entertainment Editor: Tom Zillich Reporters/photographers: Tom Zytaruk, Carolyn Cooke, Amy Reid, Christopher Poon


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

A09

OPINION Letters

Op-ed

MP Grewal once again puts own interests first in the House

Donors help fuel key classroom projects

The Editor, I wrote two weeks ago about MP Nina Grewal not standing up for her constituents. This week I find out that her father died of colon cancer recently, and she immediately stands up in the House of Commons and wants people to get tested for colon cancer. This is again about her family and what she is interested in. She is not interested in the lives of her constituents, or the things that they are suffering from. Tanis Moore, Surrey

Doctors did right thing by speaking out on Code Blue situation The Editor, Re: “Top doctor resigns over ER move,” the Now, Nov. 5. Kudos to Drs. McCormack and Giustino for their stand on the appalling situation at Surrey Memorial Hospital of emergency room doctors refusing to respond to ICU Code Blue cardiac arrest. Most physicians swear the Hippocratic oath to “the utmost respect for human life from its beginning.” Have you other doctors forgotten what an oath means? It supersedes any contract negotiations. Most people class doctors as the highest profession of all. What is more important than saving lives? If that is not the most important thing to you, perhaps you should hang up your stethoscopes, slide down the humanity scale and become lawyers... You’ve certainly got the makings. You are a disgrace to your present profession. Ray Elliott, Delta

Amy Coupal Contributor Twitter @AmyCoupal

A

s a former teacher, I have had the privilege to work on a variety of programs for students from Kindergarten to Grade 12. The teachers I have worked with were never short of ideas, but there is often a gap between what they want to do with their students and the resources they need to start a new, innovative project. They might need unique supplies for their classroom to bring an idea to life. Teachers often reach into their own pockets to purchase supplementary resources for their classrooms. But they Amy Coupal sometimes need more help to make their creative strategies come to life. That’s why I’m so proud to be a part of MyClassNeeds, a registered Canadian charity that provides teachers with an immediate opportunity to tell the world about their creative ideas to support their students, and what is needed to make those ideas happen. Inspired by the emergence of crowdfunding platforms, we created myclassneeds.ca to connect donors from around the world to Canadian teachers and classrooms helping them access the resources that expand learning opportunities for students in a fast-paced world. Amazing things are happening in education today. Students and teachers across Canada are undertaking inspiring projects that support learning, skill development and innovation.

Teachers are helping their students develop 21stcentury learning skills that will prepare them for what is, in many ways, an unknown future. We don’t know what kind of jobs they might have, what type of technology they will use or how workplaces could look very different than today. So how do we help prepare Canadian students to be ready for these changes? Regardless of their job, we know key skills such as communication, collaboration and problem solving will be critical, no matter what they do. Industry leaders and educators believe science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) will play a key role in our students’ futures. Building their knowledge and enthusiasm for these subjects today will help support their future success. This is why we partnered with Chevron’s Fuel Your School program. During the month of October, for every unique purchase of 30 litres or more of fuel at Surrey and White Rock Chevron stations, Chevron contributed $1, up to a total possible contribution of $200,000, to fund eligible public school classroom projects posted on myclassneeds.ca, with priority given to STEM projects. We are proud to partner with Chevron on this program, particularly to support STEM projects that help engage kids’ imagination, ingenuity and build the skills they will need for the future. New resources are already getting into the hands of students. In the first three weeks since its launch, the Fuel Your School program has funded 40 projects, raising a total of $41,564.34. This means Ms. Manery of Bear Creek Elementary school in Surrey can encourage creativity while teaching her students about the importance of teamwork, design and engineering with new building materials. We are thrilled to support her efforts to creatively engage her

New resources are already getting into the hands of students.… The Fuel Your School program has funded 40 projects, raising a total of $41,564.34. students and innovatively integrate STEM into her class. But there is more to be done. To date, Surrey and White Rock teachers have submitted more than 40 projects that still need funding. These projects range from classroom technology, such as tablets and projectors, to experiential learning materials, such as robotics and model-building supplies, to art supplies, and gardening tools. With your help, we can reach even more students. Visit www.fuelyourschool.ca to learn more, see the materials teachers are requesting and which schools will be impacted by the funds generated through the program. You can also encourage teachers in your school district to post their classroom projects today or share the projects through your social networks. Right now, we have the opportunity to help more students get the materials they need for a great education, learn more about STEM and prepare them for careers of the future. Amy Coupal is the executive director of the My Class Needs Foundation, a registered Canadian charity that uses a crowdfunding website to support students and teachers by providing resources that enrich their learning experiences.

UP TO 71% OFF!

61% OFF! 20pc Belmont

Stainless steel Nature Trust pan with enviro-friendly ceramic coating, PFOA and PTFE Free. Safe for induction stovetops. 20cm/8” Nature Trust fry pan. List: $139.99. Now $39.99! 24cm/9.5” Nature Trust fry pan. List: $159.99. Now $44.99! 28cm/11” Nature Trust fry pan. List: $179.99. Now $59.99!

flatware set. List: $89.99.

$3499

65% OFF! 6pc knife set. UP TO 52% OFF! A selection of Paderno Premier

List: $99.99.

72% OFF!

Our 11pc Canadiana Cookware set is made from 18/10 stainless steel and features an impact bonded base that’s safe for all stovetops of modern kitchens, including induction. Durable riveted handles, no-drip lips, oven and dishwasher safe, the Canadiana is built to last and we stand behind it with our exceptional 25 year warranty. Set includes: 1.5L, 2L, 3L saucepans, 6L stock pot, 2.5L steamer, 24cm/9.5” frying pan, 20cm/8” ceramic non-stick frying pan, and 4 covers. List: $899.00.

$24999

bakeware. Made from durable steel with a unique triple layer of non-stick coating. Features an ergonomic and oven safe silicone grip. PFOA & PTFE free and oven safe to 450°F. Starting at

$699 $3499 50% OFF!4pc deluxe mixing bowl set

with lids. 18/10 stainless steel with interior measurements and silicone non-slip base available in blue and red. List: $69.99.

$3499

64% OFF!

45cm extra large high dome 18/10 stainless steel roasting pan. Includes rack for easy lifting and riveted handles. List: $249.99.

$8999 NOVEMBER 13

TH

TO 17

TH

ONLY AT:

Ladner Village Hardware 4821 Delta St.

LANGLEY (con’t) Steveston Marine & Hardware 19700 Langley Bypass Langley Home Hardware & BBQ Shop 20427 Douglas Crescent

LANGLEY

NORTH DELTA

COQUITLAM Reliable Parts Coquitlam 85 North Bend St.

LADNER

PORT COQUITLAM Port Coquitlam Building Supplies 2650 Mary Hill Rd.

Walnut Grove Pharmasave Nordel Pharmasave 11198 – 84th Ave. 8850 Walnut Grove Dr.

Information & dealers: 1-800-A NEW-POT or www.paderno.com. Not all locations open Sunday. Quantities limited, please be early. Sale items may not be exactly as shown.


A10

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

:PNU<W6USPUL HUKNL[HJJLZZ[VHSSVM V\YL_JS\ZP]LKLHSZ







  

;^V5PNO[:[H`MVY (K\S[Z7S\Z:WH*YLKP[ /HYYPZVU/V[:WYPUNZ



  





(:L[VM/HPY*OHSRZ^P[O (ZZVY[LK*VSV\YZ;H_  :OPWWPUN0UJS\KLK 6USPUL









>VY[OVM-YVaLU@VN\Y[ HUK;VWWPUNZ 5VY[O=HUJV\]LY)\YUHI`

BUY ONLINE

.com

SCAN TO BUY WITH LAYAR


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

A11

COMMUNITY

Send your story ideas or photo submissions to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Book launch

Svend ‘really did politics differently’ Bio about wellknown politician now out, with Surrey event Nov. 16 Carolyn Cooke Now staff Twitter @carolyncooke1

Regardless of whether you agreed with his politics or not, few people would argue that Svend Robinson is a fascinating character. The former Burnaby NDP MP was a polarizing figure, said his biographer, but he was also unusually effective, even though he was an opposition MP. And yet, his promising career came to a screeching halt in 2004 with an infamous ring theft that baffled everyone across the political spectrum. Graeme Truelove, author of the just released book Svend Robinson: A life in politics, said that even if the ring incident hadn’t happened, the book would still have been a worthwhile project. “I think that it’s always going to be an asterisk on his career in a sense (because of the ring). People will remember him for a very significant legacy in the fields of human rights and environmental protection, but they will also always remember this undignified unseemly end to his career – at least to his electoral career,” said Truelove. “This is a guy who really did politics differently and was really effective in what he did and that

Graeme Truelove (above) has written a biography called ‘Svend Robinson: A life in politics.’ There is a book launch in Vancouver on Nov. 15 and a book signing in Surrey the next day.

would be worth a book on its own, it’s just that there so happened there’s a dramatic personal story that runs along with it.” Truelove, who grew up in North Delta, worked as a volunteer in Robinson’s office while at university studying political science. At 18 he went

to Ottawa to work in the page program and stayed on. Now, at 30, he still works on Parliament Hill in the House of Commons administration. Truelove said he didn’t know Robinson that well when he proposed the book idea to him in 2009. However, he undertook

an exhaustive research process involving interviews with family, friends, and politicians of every stripe as well as relying on House of Commons records and even Robinson’s personal correspondence and diaries. But for all that, the book is anything but salacious. It is a wellwritten, thoroughly researched account of an unusual politician who was involved in notable pieces of legislation and lent his efforts to individual and public movements. “Svend was involved in an incredible array of causes and anyone who wants to go behind the scenes on any of the big activist causes over the last 25 to 30 years will find something in this book,” said Truelove. “Anyone who needs reassurance that change can happen will be inspired by this book. I think throughout all time at all periods in history, people outside the mainstream have felt powerless in the face of the status quo and

RIVER ROCK IT And sleep it off in one of our luxurious rooms. LIVE Music. ROCK’IN Bars. GREAT Food. Have an incredible night out that ends with a great night’s sleep at River Rock. No driving. No Cabs. Just FUN. RESERVE NOW! Call 1-866-748-3718

from just

119

$

*

per night

FREE WI-FI & PARKING

8811 River Road, Richmond BC

www.riverrock.com/riverrockit

*Rooms start at $119 at The Hotel and $149 for a one bedroom suite at The Resort. Plus applicable taxes. Offer expires Dec 30, 2013. Subject to availability at time of reservation.

Svend’s story shows that they shouldn’t,” said Truelove. Some of the highlights of Robinson’s work include speaking out against human rights abuses while in China, for which he was arrested and expelled from that country, protesting alongside environmentalists in Claquot Sound and Haida Gwaii, being at Sue Rodriguez’s side and championing her fight for the right to assisted suicide. On the legislative front, Robinson pushed to have the reference to god removed from the constitution as it has no legal weight, he stood for protection of sexual orientation from discrimination in the Human Rights Act and hate propaganda law and amendments to justice legislation such as the Young Offenders Act. Since leaving politics, Robinson now works for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, based in Geneva. Truelove said there are three book launches planned, one each in Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver. The first, in Vancouver is hosted by publisher New Star Books on Friday, Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. at the Bill Reid Gallery, 639 Hornby St. in Vancouver. Robinson will be on hand for the event. As well, Truelove has confirmed there will be a book signing on Saturday, Nov. 16 at the Strawberry Hills Chapters store, at 72nd Avenue and Scott Road in Surrey. It will run from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. ccooke@thenownewspaper.com


AS12

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

BOB SHIVJI

NEWSPAPER.COM

COMMUNITY

GUILDFORD DENTURE CLINIC Over 30 years of experience

T Are your dentures so uncomfortable you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wear them? T Cannot eat your favourite foods? T Do they make your mouth sore? T Are they loose?

BOB SHIVJI* AND ADIL SHIVJI 2013 DENTURIST OF THE YEAR*

IF YES, WE CAN HELP YOU! COME IN AND RECEIVE A COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION Established since 1982 *Denturist Association of BC Awarded

ND

10246 - 152 ST., SURREY â&#x20AC;˘ (604) 588-5211 CertiďŹ ed BPS guildent@telus.net Denture Centre â&#x20AC;&#x153;ALWAYS KEEPING OUR PATIENTS SMILINGâ&#x20AC;?

STAY AND PLAY! Owned by Upper Skagit Indian Tribe

ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL

$134 *

USD

SUNDAY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; THURSDAY

GAMING PACKAGE

$    (Regularly $99)

$25 Player-Bucks

$25  

Recently Renovated!

0, #/, 1,-*

LIMITED AVAILABILITY! CALL NOW 1-877-275-2448 Mention OďŹ&#x20AC;er Code: SVC134

*OďŹ&#x20AC;er valid November 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 28, 2013.  !  "#% &! !#' !#(  )* +, , -# .# /* Subject to availability. Taxes not included. Restrictions apply. Rates do not apply to groups. Upgrades to suites available at additional cost.

Staying the night, or just a day trip?

Get PAR on your Gaming Buy-In, Up To $500! Valid once a month, Sunday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursday, Nov. 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dec. 26, 2013 Must be a Rewards Club Member

Local events

$10 at door. Contact: Michelle, info@ wrssjcc.org, 604-541-9995.

FILM EVENTS

CHRISTMAS

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hava Nagila-The Movieâ&#x20AC;?: The public is invited to attend the screening of documentary film, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16 at 12160 Beecher St., Surrey (Crescent Beach). Following the film, Sarona Mynhardt (artistic director of the White Rock Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choir) will teach everyone to sing and dance the Hora. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Join the White Rock South Surrey Jewish Community Centre for this fun interactive, yet informative evening. The event will conclude with a scrumptious selection of Jewish desserts and coffee/tea.â&#x20AC;?Admission

Sources Season of Trees displays at Sheraton Vancouver Guildford Hotel (from Nov. 8-26) and Fraser Downs Racetrack & Casino (Nov. 19 to Dec. 5), with wine/cheese events on Nov. 26 (at Sheraton) and Dec. 5 (at Fraser Downs). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come network, enjoy delicious wines and bid on your favourite â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;locally decoratedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tree for your home or business.â&#x20AC;? Tickets are $50; for more info, visit www. sources.bc.ca. Christmas in Morgan Creek: Pair of holiday luncheons in annual

event series at Morgan Creek golf course on Nov. 14 and 15, to raise funds for White Rock-South Surrey Hospice Society and Make-AWish Foundation. Event emcees are TV personalities Dawn Chubai (Nov. 14) and Fiona Forbes (Nov. 15). Tickets $65, info online at theshopsatmorgancrossing.com.

SENIORS Dinner/dance for seniors at Kent Street Activity Centre on Saturday, Nov. 16, in White Rock. Dance to the music of Stardust orchestra. Doors open 5:30 pm for happy hour, dinner served at 6:30 pm and dancing starts at 7:30 pm. Tickets required a week ahead: $17 for members and $19 for

YOUR HEALTH Frequent BATHROOM TRIPS? Bell Prostate Ezee Flow Tea #4a Bell Bladder Control Tea #4b Men have relief in 3-5 days from dribbling, burning Women have relief within days from

and rushing to the toilet. Works also for male incontinence. Works in virtually every case. If you are considering surgery, try this tea first. Hundreds of delighted men testifying on our web site: Had to get up every hour at #4a NPN 80022782 night. Now I get up once a night. Joseph Whittaker, Sewell, NJ  I cancelled my prostate surgery. Get up once a night. I'm so happy not to have to face the torment of a prostate operation and possible incontinence and impotence. Albert E. Blain, 74, Schumacher, ON Even after TURP prostate surgery and microwave therapy had to get up many times. Now down to 1-2 times. Tea is 100% better than drugs. Robert G. Stocker, Eustasis, FL After 1st year drinking tea my PSA went down to 4.5; after 2nd year to 2.9; after 3rd year to 2.3. I highly recommend the tea. A real life saver. Thomas M. Thurston, Forsyth, GA

incontinence, frequency, urgency and pain. Stop needless suffering and embarrassments. Go shopping & traveling with confidence. Stop wearing padding or diapers. True evidence with full names and towns. No more wetting accidents. Within a week I was in complete control. No side effects like with drugs I took. Deborah Haight, 49, Collingwood, ON Incredible results. It's hard to believe a non-drug item is producing such quick relief. I suffered for 20 years with frequency and embarrassments. I now sleep through the night. Linda Kleber, 62, Milford, NJ  Tea represents truth in advertising! #4b NPN 80038878 Being a skeptic, I ordered this Bladder Control Tea for Women as a more or less last resort, after trying every medication in the last 5 years. It worked better than I hoped for. Had relief within 6 days. Thank you for this great product, and above all, for truth in advertising. Marina Rosa, 57, Las Vegas, NV

Heartburn Reflux

By Dr. Chakib Hammoud, M.H.,PhD.

We should eat more alkaline food. We all know that swimming pools can only work if they are acidic/alkaline neutral. This is still more critical for our body. Basic information to have an alkaline body: USDA now recommended on their website. MY plate.gov 50% should be alkaline food (vegetables, salads, legumes, fruit, berries, mushrooms) 50% can be acidic food (Meat, fish, shellfish, eggs, rice, nuts, cheese. Less or no bread, noodles, cereals, cakes. No sweets, deep frieds.) Most North American diet is 90% acidic food. If you have trouble to achieve at least a 50% in alkaline food and 50% acidic food, consider to take a supplement like Bell Acidic Stomach/Alkaline Balance #39. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s #39 inexpensive and comes with a guarantee. It helps to have a healthy alkaline balanced body and prevents many discomforts, including indigestion and stomach acid reflux coming up, which a majority of people suffer with. 60 million in North America. We should not ignore that Dr. Otto Warburg M.D. was awarded 2 Nobel Prizes for proving that an alkaline balanced body can absorb up to 20 times more oxygen than an acidic body. Makes our immune system more effective to fight disease-producing bacteria including cancer cells we have in our body every day of our life. Reflux gave me a sore throat and I could not sing in the church choir anymore. After taking Bell #39 I have no more reflux and rejoice in singing again. Helene Giroux, 65, Quebec, QC  Have family history of heartburn. For last 10 years I suffered a lot with acid reflux. I told all family members about #39 being all natural, giving quick relief with noside effects and no antacids needed anymore. Michael Fasheh, 49, Port Ranch, CA  Very happy with acid reflux relief. Last 4 years had increasing reflux despite taking antacid products. Grzegorz Smirnow, 43, Mt. Prospect, IL

Supreme Immune Booster Immune system for life ! I have been taking the Bell Supreme Immune Booster #52

      All prices in U.S. Dollars. Management reserves all rights. Casino opens at 9 am daily. Must be 21 or older with valid ID. CPMP Skagit Player-Bucks are non-transferable and cannot be redeemed for cash. =FCCFNLJFEKN@KK<I7K_\EFNE\njgXg\i

for two years. I am amazed and delighted how it has strengthened my immune system. I do not get colds or flus anymore. I am taking this supplement every day. Like a miracle it strengthens my whole defense system against all attacks of bacteria, viruses and cancers that our body has to get rid of if we want to stay healthy.John Grace, 52, Broomall, PA I was diagnosed with stage II breast cancer. I had to complete 6 rounds of chemo. The Bell Supreme Immune Booster#52 helped me to keep White Blood cell count elevated during the treatment. By using #52 my white blood cells were above the normal range. The nurses were completely amazed as the WBC count blew off the charts. Deborah Hailey-Glass, 44, Richmond,VA. White blood cells increased to 8.6. I have lymphocyte depleted hodgkins lymphoma. After each session of chemotherapy my white blood cell count would not return to a healthy level (4-10 is healthy). My count was .2, #52 NPN 80044236 .3 etc. After using your Bell#52 my white blood cells count went to 3.0, 2.6 and 8.6. In other words good enough for me to enjoy life. Thanks Bell. Andrew A Ament, 59, Merrill, WI. Try your local health food stores first. If they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have it and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to order it for you, order on our website or call us with Visa or Mastercard.

1-800-333-7995 www.BellLifestyle.com Bell uses the power of nature to help put life back into your lifestyle

others. Everyone over 50 welcome. For tickets or information, call 604541-2231 or 604-538-7079.

BUSINESS 15th annual Surrey Business Excellence Awards on Thursday, Nov. 14 to feature Pamela Martin as emcee, with awards in seven categories plus special achievement awards to Murray Dinwoodie, retiring City Manager of the City of Surrey, and Mike McKay, retiring Superintendent of Surrey Schools, at Sheraton Vancouver Guildford Hotel. Tickets are $110 (+GST) each or $1,050 (+GST) for a table of 10, call Surrey Board of Trade at 604581-7130.

Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own story: 15 years ago I started to have arthritis, prostate, kidney, snoring and sleep apnea problems, which were all helped quickly with natural health products. I made it my lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s purpose to help others. Nick A. Jerch

Great Sex Happiness for couples is a satisfying sex life.

FOR MEN

EroxilTM helps most men to #6 GUARANTEED perform like in their 20â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Evidence of a few hundred testimonials on our web site with full names and towns. All 100% true: Eroxil is the best of all the supplements for men Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried. Boosts my sex drive and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m able to function anytime. Angus Gutke, 45, Calgary, AB Regained virility in 3 days. My libido was restored for good sex. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve given it also to friends with the same results. One of them is a diabetic and overweight. Dr. Louis Rolland, 72, St. Hyacinthe, QC Having orgasms off the Richter scale. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a teenager again. The world owes you big time. Lawrie Roberts, 47, Toronto, ON Wonderful to feel like a man again. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wonderful to feel close to my wife again. God bless you! Charles E. Palen, 77, Burnaby, BC Women Yes! We have Erosyn#7 which works for women as well as Eroxil for men to regain your libido, interest in love making and ability to climax like in your honeymoon. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s satisfaction guaranteed.

STOP HAIR LOSS Dr. C. Hammoud, Ph.D. recommends: To reduce or stop hair loss for men and women With powerful DHT block, the recognized #1 cause of hair loss. Unique combination of ingredients make it a guaranteed superior product. Helps to rejuvenate your hair for a fuller and thicker appearance. Early prevention of baldness for those that have a family history. Pattern baldness (Androgenic Alopecia) is caused by an oversupply of hormones DHT #77 NPN 80035077 (Dihydrotestosterone). It damages hair follicles over Super advanced time unless preventive action is taken. Help for people who are on radiation or chemo therapy or taking formula #77 Has been used other drugs that cause hair loss. successfully for Many testimonials on the Bell website: First product that worked for me. I have tried many other many years KING SIZE - 2 methods and I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see any results. With #77 I noticed months supply a difference within a few weeks. Thank you Bell. Paul Scivoletto, 40, Markham, ON. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My hair has stopped falling out...and my hair looks shinier and healthier.â&#x20AC;?; â&#x20AC;&#x153;After 30 days use I noticed I am losing less hair! My hair now looks fuller and the texture has improved.â&#x20AC;?; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hair loss was noticeably reduced with first bottle!â&#x20AC;?; â&#x20AC;&#x153;After using Bell Stop Hair Loss #77 for 2 weeks my hair was not as thin anymore and at the end of the treatment of 2 months my little bald spot on the back of my head was growing over with little hair. This product helped to restore my youthful look.â&#x20AC;?

HRT Menopause Hot flashes and night sweats

stopped completely! I was having a horrible time. The night sweats kept me awake. During the daytime I experienced at least 20 hot flashes. After taking Bell #33 HRT my hot flashes and night sweats were gone. I am sleeping well again. Other menopause products didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work well enough. Charlene Currie, 52, Winnipeg, MB  Headaches, sweating, dizzy, insomnia, mood swings, hot flashes all gone! For 15 years I was suffering with menopausal health problems. Premarin made me sick to the stomach. I was in bad shape until I #33 NPN 80005070 found Bell HRT Menopause #33. I feel great now. This is no lie. It does work! Sandra Mountney, 50, Bancroft, ON For the last 2-3 years my life was miserable, had mood swings, extreme anger, depression, feeling suicidal because of my menopausal emotions. After about 3 days on Bell HRT Menopause #33 I felt like a new person. I was singing in the kitchen and my partner was wondering what I was so happy about. I feel hopeful, positive and now have often a smile on my face. I thank you soooo much! Christina Kearns, 53, Kingston, ON 100% Truthful testimonials with full name and towns. Real people you can call, if you want more reassurance. More testimonials on the Bell website. No money is paid for testimonials.To ensure this product is right for you, always read and follow the label.

111213

For Denture/Partial Wearers:


AS 13 THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

AS13

COMMUNITY Grandview Heights

South Surrey aquatic centre featured in new book Christopher Poon Now staff Twitter @questionchris

SOUTH SURREY — While the Grandview Heights Aquatic Centre is still a year away from being finished, those interested can get a detailed preview of the facility in a new book by the site’s architects, Hughes Condon Marler Architects (HCMA). According to HCMA managing principal Darryl Condon, one of the main focuses in designing the building was to ensure it met the requirements as set out by the City of Surrey. “First and foremost it’s a community facility and it supports the widest array of community needs and also supports necessary social aspects of the community so there would be a hub for community gathering and interaction and so on,” explained Condon. On top of general recreational use, Condon said they were also tasked with integrating amenities for sports teams and the like. “So while we’re focused on the social role of the project, we’re also very cognizant of the technical aspects that are necessary for this facility to function for sport and competitive standpoints.” Looking back at past aquatic centres by HCMA, Condon said each structure is defined

An artist’s rendering of the Grandview Heights aquatic centre. by the space upon which it is to be built. While some centres may appear tall and blocky, the Grandview location offered much more space for the designers to work with, which they took full advantage of. “All of our projects are very site specific, so our design response is a result of the opportunities the site presents,” said Condon. “This project, because we might have more freedom in terms of the site, enables us to be more expressive and the opportunities with

the site and the elements within the project allow us to be more expressive.” One of those features is the distinctive wave-like roof of the facility. “There’s no question that the roof structure is very unique and it is a wood roof and we’re using wood in a very innovative way,” he said. “We’re using it in a tension structure, which is very unique; it’s more common to see steel used in this type of capacity.” According to Condon, while most facilities

would make use of steel when it comes to tension structures, for this centre they opted to use wood due to the harsh environment produced by humid air and chlorine. And with the shape of the roof being what it is, that makes the facility all the more efficient when it comes to operating costs. “Because we also used this innovative roof structure we were also able to reduce the depth of the roof system,” said Condon. “If it was a conventional structure we would have had a deeper system spanning over the pool resulting in a taller building and more volume, so we’ve been able to significantly reduce the volume of the build, which has long term operating cost advantages.” The Grandview Heights Aquatic Centre is set to open sometime in 2014, but those itching for a better look can do so in the HMCA’s book called Pools: Aquatic Architecture, which launches Nov. 14. “It was really valuable for us to learn again from our old projects and see the threads of development that go from one project another,” said Condon. “The projects really build upon one another and that’s an interesting story we’ve tried to convey here.” cpoon@thenownewspaper.com

F R E E K I D S WO R K S H O P Celebrate children! For kids grades 1-7 SURREY

NOVEMBER 15 & 16 CLAYTON HEIGHTS SECONDARY 7003 188 Street

NOVEMBER 22 & 23 CHUCK BAILEY RECREATION CENTRE 13458 107A Avenue

Get your free online subscription BEAUTY | FASHION | DECOR | TRAVEL | DINING

Theme this year is

Healthy Communities

PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

Registration starts now! All participants receive a special Conference Package! Space is limited. Workshops designed to support:

Healthy Lifestyles Social Responsibility Personal Development

Canada’s premiere online lifestyle magazine

Participants can only participate at one location and in one package.

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REGISTER

111213

604-501-5100

SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE AT VITAMINDAILY.COM

13545

Vancouver Calgary Toronto Montreal Montréal (français)

www.surrey.ca/events


A14

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

Independent Living for Seniors

FOREVER YOUNG

very affordable prices • 1 Bedroom - 1 Bedroom & Den • Suites with Balconies • 24/7 Security • Home Cooked Meals • Recreation Activities & Poppy Bus Outings • Housekeeping • Guest Suite • Near Metrotown & Services

Event Saturday, Nov. 17

Carefoot’s one-day sale to help launch bursary for new artists

We call it home Call for your personal tour today:

604-568-5563

5291 Grimmer Street, Burnaby • www.thepoppyresidences.com

111213

connect to our website with

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Advertising Feature –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

ADVICE FROM PEOPLE WHO LIVE IN THE ROYALE PENINSULA RETIREMENT RESIDENCE:

Ask the Residents

Panel of residents: Sheila D., Ernest B. (on leave), Jim and Coral B. live at the Royale Peninsula Retirement Residence: they draw upon their personal experiences to provide comprehensive answers. Send questions about the retirement living lifestyle to: “ASK THE RESIDENTS” c/o THE ROYALE PENINSULA 2088 152 Street, Surrey V4A 9Z4” or by email with “ASK THE RESIDENTS” in the subject line to Ask-the-residents@theroyale.ca. Dear Residents: I am overwhelmed with the idea of downsizing my house: any tips? – June H Dear June H: Here are a few pointers we learned while downsizing our houses: Don’t delay - it gets harder the older you get and the longer you accumulate. Tackle one area at a time otherwise you will get overwhelmed. Do big things first: the decisions are faster and the results will encourage you. Consider having your photo albums transferred

NEWSPAPER.COM

to disc. Some things may be too big to move, but a photo of it can be kept. Consider having your photo albums transferred to disc. Learn what your kids want (don’t assume), and make them take it at next visit. Don’t get too many people involved in helping as it raises the risk for miscommunication. Garage sales can be emotionally hard when people haggle over items you love, so try selling via dealers, or online. Professional downsizers can help you with selling things of value and are experts at facilitating this difficult time. Most retirement residences will be able to refer one of these services to you. Keep motivated by focussing on the good things to come when the project is complete! – the Residents – the Residents

2088 152ND STREET, SURREY 604-538-2033

Fund is ‘something I would have enjoyed having when I started’ Carolyn Cooke Now staff Twitter @carolyncooke1

WHITE ROCK — Local artist Elizabeth Carefoot has organized a special one-day art sale to support aspiring artists in launching special projects. She is following a longtime dream of setting up a fund to help support artists through bursaries, and has secured seed money from Art for Art. Carefoot, who retired from her job at SFU and turned her full attention to the arts, said she has always wanted to set up a small fund to help artists get started on special projects – “something I would have enjoyed having when I started out in my own career.” The Crescent Beacharea resident teaches Middle Eastern dance and culture, and continues to give lectures on the area’s costume and customs. She also creates visual art, having studied etching and painting at Emily Carr College of Art and Design. She said she still practices

Artist Elizabeth Carefoot, seen here at her Crescent Beacharea studio, is setting up a fund to help support artists through bursaries. (Photo: KEVIN HILL) the “way of the artist,” as advocated by Gordon Smith, which is to be involved in art every day, and be mindfully creative in all activities. The art sale will raise money for the bursaries. It is slated for Saturday, Nov. 17 from noon to 4 p.m. at Semiahmoo Arts Centre, 14600 North Bluff Rd. in White Rock, next to

Centennial Arena. Carefoot said all the artwork will be less than $200 and most will be under $50. These one-ofa-kind pieces will include paintings, fibre art, rattles, art dolls, soft sculpture, collage, art cards and banners. Coffee and cookies will be provided. ccooke@ thenownewspaper.com

We are known and appeciated for our innovation, quality and excellent service t Relines & Soft Liners (Same Day Service)

Open Monday to Friday

604.530.9936 #102 . 20103 40th Ave., Langley www.yourdenture.com

t Complete Dentures

t Cosmetic Options

t Precision Dentures

t Gender Specific Teeth

t Dentures on Implants

t All Dental Plans Accepted

t Repairs While You Wait

t On Site Lab to Ensure Quality


NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

FOREVER YOUNG

SURREY CENTRE OPTOMETRY UNIT A - 10501 KING GEORGE BLVD

604-582-0221

Crime Prevention Week

SERVICES PROVIDED:

We can all help protect seniors from being victims of crime

❏ Eye Health Examinations ❏ Children’s Eye Exams ❏ Retinal Imaging ❏ Designer Frames ❏ Sunglasses ❏ Contact Lenses

SURREY — Seniors in communities throughout B.C. continue to be a key target of criminals. These crimes can happen in a variety of ways and places – in a senior’s own home and, increasingly, on social media. To help keep seniors safe, the provincial government shared the following safety tips with B.C. seniors and their families as part of Crime Prevention Week (Nov. 1 to 7):

GET TO KNOW YOUR NEIGHBOURS Joining a watch group, such as Block Watch, encourages community cohesiveness and increases awareness of what is happening in the neighbourhood. When out and about in the community, stay in open areas with good visibility, keep an eye out for suspicious activity and carry a cellphone in case of emergency.

statements, should be closely monitored and shredded prior to disposal. Only trusted and reputable organizations should be used. These can be verified by contacting the Better Business Bureau.

DON’T OVER SHARE ON SOCIAL MEDIA RECOGNIZE THE SIGNS OF ELDER ABUSE Perpetrators are often known to the victim, which can make it even more difficult for seniors to break the cycle of abuse. Prevention begins with the recognition of the signs of elder abuse and reaching out to someone trusted for help. This can include family, friends and local authorities.

LEARN HOW TO AVOID BEING DEFRAUDED Personal information, including information on receipts and bank

More of today’s seniors are using social media such as Facebook and Twitter. Being aware of the risks and taking necessary precautions to keep information private is essential to creating and maintaining a safe and enjoyable social media experience. For a copy of the BC Crime Prevention Association’s Senior Safety Booklet, call 604-501-9222. To learn more about elder abuse, visit the BC Centre for Elder Advocacy and Support online at www.bcceas.ca. To report a case of elder abuse or to get help, call the Seniors Abuse and Information Line (SAIL) at 604-437-1940.

EVERY DAY IS SENIOR’S DAY AT

CROSSROADS MOBILITY SOLUTIONS ucation

• Scooters - New & Used • Powerchairs • Liftchairs • Walkers • Wheelchairs • Bathroom Safety • Transport Chairs • Aids for Daily Living • Hospital Beds • Power Equipment Safety check out our quality home medical & mobility equipment with

solutions CROSSROADS mobility H O M E M E D I C A L E Q U I P M E N T SALES • SERVICE • RENTALS ND

111213

We are here to help!

AAuthorized Veteran Affairs Canada provider.

FREE In-home Demos • 9547 - 152 STREET, SURREY • 778.395.2221

A15

DR. R. G. DYCK

SPECIALIZING IN FAMILY EYECARE FOR 30 YEARS

“new patients welcome”

SURREY DENTURE CLINIC Unit B, 10501 King George Hwy

604-588-4333

For Denture/Partial Wearers: ❑ Are

your dentures so uncomfortable you can’t wear them? ❑ Cannot eat your favourite foods? ❑ Do they make your mouth sore? ❑ Are they loose?

If yes, we can help you!

COME IN AND RECEIVE A COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION AND DENTURE CARE PACKAGE. 5 year warranty on precision dentures.

“Always keeping our patients smiling”

111213

THE


AS16

AS 16 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

COMMUNITY Sunnyside Lawn

Ryan Ashe remembered with memorial bench Christopher Poon

111213

Now staff Twitter @questionchris

SOUTH SURREY — For years, the late Ryan Ashe could usually be found on benches around the White Rock and South Surrey area, chatting with passersby or just enjoying the view. According to those who knew him, Ashe brought smiles to those around him and, following his death in August from cancer, Ashe’s memory will now be forever honoured at the Sunnyside Lawn cemetery in South Surrey with a commemorative bench. Paid for by the City of Surrey, the bench will be set up beneath a large tree for passersby to enjoy, something that Ashe’s sister Orphee Martin was happily surprised to hear about. “They said they heard of the story where he touched so many lives and the cemetery supervisor said they would like to dedicate a bench to him in Sunnyside Lawns in South Surrey,” said Martin. Martin was also asked if she would like an inscription put on the bench and she came up with the following: “Ryan was a kind soul with a radiant smile and a community of caring friends. A bench was his home, finally a bench of his own. Sept. 23, 1956 to Aug. 13, 2013. Now he finally has one of his own.” The idea came about when Anna Terrace, the City of Surrey’s cemetery coordinator, was in the midst of organizing some benches for Sunnyside Lawn. A colleague told Terrace about Ashe’s story and from there, Terrace did the rest. “I had never heard of him but then I Googled his name and started reading the stories about who he was,” explained Terrace. “After I heard his story I felt that I wanted to donate one of our benches to having something about him inscribed and have it placed in the cemetery under one of the trees.”

Ryan Ashe, a well-known figure in South Surrey and White Rock, died in August, but is being memorialized with a bench at Sunnyside Lawn. (Photo: JACOB ZINN)

According to Terrace, marking Ashe’s memory on a bench was only fitting, seeing how he became something of a fixture in the South Surrey and White Rock area. “The benches are nice to add to the community, but to dedicate one to somebody who made a difference in so many people’s lives, putting smiles on their faces,” she said. “It would be nice if people came in and read about who he was and just reflected upon him.” The bench is set to go in sometime this month at Sunnyside Lawn. “I wanted to put this bench under a really nice tree we have,” said Terrace. “We don’t have anywhere for people to sit and reflect and if we could have a bench for people to do that and maybe find out who this person was, maybe it would make all of us stop and think.” Martin said she was grateful for the bench commemorating her brother. “It’s just very kind of them,” said Martin. “I’m sure he’d appreciate it and he’ll be liking his bench.” cpoon@thenownewspaper.com

PETER’S SHOE REPAIR Semiahmoo Shopping Centre

Specializing in: • Shoe Dying • Alterations • Leather • Handbag Repairs

download app from get.layar.com and scan

604.531.5251

Open Monday-Saturday 10am-6pm Closed Sundays & Holidays

111213

bring your ad to life!


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

BEST of YOUR

AS17

It’s time for the 2013 Now Newspaper Readers’ Choice Awards!

NEIGHBOURHOOD South Surrey & White Rock

By voting for your favorite locally owned and operated businesses, you will be entered to win a $300 SHOPPING SPREE AT GUILDFORD TOWN CENTRE Mark your ballot for each section and drop it off or mail in to The Now Newspaper. A minimum of forty categories must be completed for your ballot to count. Details are on the bottom of the back page. Please write the name of your favourite locally owned and operated business in the space provided.

FOOD & DRINK

SERVICES

LIFESTYLE

Chinese ............................................................ Greek ................................................................. Indian ................................................................ Italian ................................................................ Thai .................................................................... Japanese ......................................................... Sushi .................................................................. Tapas ................................................................. Seafood ............................................................ Steak ................................................................. Fish and Chips .............................................. Pizza .................................................................. Burgers ............................................................ Ice Cream ........................................................ Family with Kids ........................................... Patio .................................................................. Romantic ......................................................... Pub ..................................................................... Karaoke ............................................................ Sports Bar ....................................................... Cocktails .......................................................... Breakfast ......................................................... Sunday Brunch ............................................. Dessert ............................................................. Tea Shop .......................................................... Certified Organic Grocery ........................ Produce Market ............................................ Seafood Market ............................................... Deli ..................................................................... Butcher ............................................................ Indian Sweet Shop ....................................... Bakery .............................................................. Specialty Wine ............................................... U Brew .............................................................. U Vin ..................................................................

Accountant .....................................................

Golf Course .....................................................

Auto Parts and Supplies ..........................

Golf Clubhouse .............................................

Auto Repair ....................................................

Bowling ............................................................

Carwash/Detailer ....................................... Caterer ............................................................ House Cleaning ........................................... Dentist ............................................................. Driving School .............................................. Dry Cleaner ................................................... Financial Planner ....................................... Hearing Centre ............................................

Dance Studio .................................................. Martial Arts .................................................... Equestrian ...................................................... Running Club ................................................. Fitness Equipment ...................................... Gym (Women) ................................................ Gym (Men) .......................................................

Heating, Cooling, and Duct Cleaning

Personal Trainer ..........................................

...............................................................................

Weight Loss ....................................................

Hotel .................................................................

Chiropractor ...................................................

Insurance ......................................................

Massage Therapy .........................................

Landscaper ....................................................

Physiotherapist .............................................

Law Firm ........................................................

Acupuncturist ................................................

Locksmith ......................................................

Orthotics ..........................................................

Mortgage Broker ........................................

Naturopathic Clinic .....................................

Pet Food Store .............................................

Supplement Store ........................................

Photo Finishing ............................................

Laser Clinic ....................................................

Plumber ..........................................................

Cosmetic Surgery ........................................

Shoe Repair ...................................................

University ........................................................

Storage Service ........................................... Tailor ................................................................ Tire Service .................................................... Travel ............................................................... Veterinarian ................................................... Watch Repair ................................................

College ............................................................. Private School ............................................... Trade School .................................................. Tutoring ............................................................ Music Lessons ..............................................

PERSONAL STYLE Art Gallery ......................................................... Shopping Centre ............................................ Bikes .................................................................... Books .................................................................. Camera Store .................................................. Cellular Phones ............................................. Duty Free ........................................................... Dollar Store ...................................................... Pawn Shop ........................................................ Florist .................................................................. Gifts ...................................................................... Liquidation Store ........................................... Motorsports and Accessory ...................... Sporting Goods ............................................... Barbeque ........................................................... Fireplace ............................................................ Carpet ................................................................. Hardwood .......................................................... Furniture ........................................................... Garden Centre/Nursery .............................. Tile ........................................................................ Home Appliances (independent) ...................... Home Décor ..................................................... Lighting .............................................................. Mattress ............................................................. Plumbing Fixtures ......................................... Hot Tub ............................................................... Jewelry ............................................................... Men’s Clothing ................................................ Women’s Clothing .......................................... Kids’ Clothing .................................................. Thrift .................................................................... Consignment ................................................... Hair Salon ......................................................... Barber ................................................................ Nail Bar .............................................................. Day Spa .............................................................. Eyewear .............................................................

Please let us know more about where you do most of your shopping by circling your neighbourhood. Chantell • Crescent Beach • Douglas Crossing • Elgin • Grandview Corners • Morgan Creek • Ocean Park • Rosemary Heights • White Rock

One entry per person.

V3W 4N2

Name: Phone:

Postal Code

All entries must be original newspaper ballot. Deadline for entries is Fri. Dec. 6, 2013. Personal information will not be sold or made public. The NOW reserves the right to publish contest winners’ names.

110513

YOUR VOTE COUNTS

Please drop off or mail your ballot to: The Now Newspaper Suite 201-7889 132 Street Surrey, BC


A18

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

SPORTS

Send your team’s highlights to Sports editor, Michael Booth at mbooth@thenownewspaper.com or call 604-572-0064

High school football

Cross-country

Lyles comes up short in MVP vote Abreha 5th in BC Michael Booth

Now staff Twitter @boothnow

Averaging more than 200 yards rushing and three touchdowns per game wasn’t enough to earn offensive MVP honours for Lord Tweedsmuir star running back Jamel Lyles. The class AAA Eastern Conference teams handed out their league awards at the end of regular season play last weekend and Lyles ended up the loser on a tough choice for offensive MVP honours. W.J. Mouat running back Maleek Irons took the silverware after rushing for 2,346 yards and 27 touchdowns in nine games. Lyles matched Irons in rushing touchdowns and also added scores on reception, kick returns and interceptions, but finished well back in yardage with 1,855 in nine games. “Jamel had the same amount of touchdowns, but it’s one of those things where they are both in the same conference and only one could be selected,” said Panthers coach Kurt Thornton. “They’re both extremely valuable to their teams. Jamel was still selected the top running back in the conference and he will still most likely be selected as a provincial all-star. He was disappointed by the vote and I was too because he is certainly worthy of the honour.” One major piece of silverware did land in Cloverdale as Austin Thornton, Kurt’s son, was honoured as the defensive MVP. From his defensive end post, Austin Thornton recorded 55 tackles and a dozen sacks this season

Lord Tweedsmuir running back Jamel Lyles (22) averaged more than 200 yards rushing and three touchdowns per game for the Panthers this season. (Photo: JACOB ZINN) plus returned one interception for a touchdown. “He’s my son so obviously I’m proud of him, but I had nothing to do with it because I can’t vote for my own players,” the Panthers coach said.

“It was the other coaches who recognized him with the award and he definitely deserved it.” Lyles and Thornton headed a list of five Panthers who made the Eastern Conference all-star honour roll. The list also included

offensive lineman Andrew Diachuk, defensive lineman Reece Russell and linebacker Michael Carter. The Panthers finished second in the Eastern Conference and were ranked third in the province at the end of the regular season.

University

Russell honoured with Ray Lepp scholarship Surrey’s Alex Russell is one of two UBC Thunderbirds honoured as recipients of Volleyball BC’s 2013 Ray Lepp scholarship award. Russell and Abbotsford’s Rosie Schlagintweit were the two winners announced last week. Ray Lepp was a founding member of Volleyball B.C. and served on the board of directors for 22 years. Russell is a middle blocker in his third season with the UBC Thunderbirds men’s team. A graduate of Surrey’s Kwantlen Park Secondary, Russell has been a member of Canada’s national junior men’s team for the last two years. This summer, Russell helped Canada to a 12thplace finish at the FIVB Men’s Under-21 World Championships in Turkey. In 2012, Russell was on the Canadian squad

that won silver at the U-21 Men’s Continental Championship in Colorado Springs, Colo. With UBC last season, Russell finished fourth in the Canada West conference in blocks per set (1.36). He has also twice earned Academic AllCanadian status as an engineering student.

Academic team Surrey’s James Young is one of eight members of the Simon Fraser University cross-country team to be named to the Great Northwest Athletic Conference All-Academic team for the 2013 season. Young is the only repeat winner on the Clan, appearing on the team thanks to a 3.76 grade

point average. To qualify for the academic team athletes must have a minimum GPA of at least 3.20 and competing in at least their second season at their respective universities.

Einarsson top rookie Surrey’s Sean Einarsson has been named the Canada West rookie of the year for his season with the UBC Thunderbirds. Einarsson is one of five players from Surrey and Delta who helped UBC win the Canada West title. The list includes midfielders Reynold Stewart and Einarsson, defenders Andrew Grange and Harry Lakhan, and forward Otis Sandhu.

Kwantlen Park’s Michael Abreha slogged his way to a fifth place finish in the senior boys’ race at the B.C. High School Crosscountry Championships in Aldergrove Nov. 2. Abreha completed the 6.3-kilometre route in 21 minutes, 2.2 seconds, 30 seconds back of gold medalist Nathan Wadhwani of Terry Fox. Wadhwani beat out Abreha for the Fraser Valley championships last month, but this time around the cold, wet weather took a toll on the Kwantlen Park harrier. “It was a tough race and the weather was not good for running,” Abreha said. “It affected me quite a bit because it was cold and my legs were numb. I couldn’t run as fast as I wanted to. If the weather was better I think I would have done much better. After finishing second in the Fraser Valleys, my goal was to finish in the top three at provincials but with all the hills and the rain and the puddles, I was much slower than I wanted to be.” Seaquam’s Michael Milic placed eighth overall. Abreha’s top-five showing helped the Timberwolves to a seventh place finish in the team standings. Kwantlen Park runners included Mitchell Smart, Allen Wang, Derek Swift, Daniel Vas, Ahmad Rezai and Mtwkl Mohamed. In the 4.3-km senior girls’ event, Semiahmoo’s Chelsea Ribeiro was the top Surrey finisher in 19th place. The Semiahmoo Totems crushed the field in the junior girls’ team standings with three runners finishing in the top-13. The Totems team included Haley Ribeiro (6th), Jessica Williams (7th) Dominika Paige (11th) and Julia Greer (13th) as well as Emily Liang and Alexa Porpaczy. In junior boys’ competition, Semiahmoo’s Connor Jackson finished fifth overall while Totems teammate Dawson Ribeiro was 15th.


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

A19


A20

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

A21


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Tis the season to share your story! Tell us your Holiday Traditions and we will publish them in our Christmas Album Feature

A

Christmas Album

We want our readers to share in your holiday traditions Please send us your special recipes, favourite Christmas songs or holiday photos and we will publish them in our Christmas Album.

All entries will be placed in a draw for a family dinner at Boston Pizza Newton which includes a large pizza and 4 pop.

103113

Please email or mail in your entries with your name, address & phone number. Email: contest@thenownewspaper.com Mail: #201 - 7889 132nd Street, Surrey, BC, V3W 4N2 111213

A22


NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

A23

ve a h le p o e p s le a s p to e Thes . earned your businessyou n e h w ll a c a m e th e iv G r u o y r fo g in k o lo e r a next vehicle. Christopher Jamieson Wolfe Mitsubishi 19360 Langley ByPass

Call

604-575-0275

Ziyaad Badshah

Haley's White Rock Dodge

Rhett Marchildon

3050 King George Blvd., Surrey

White Rock Honda

Call

2466 King George Blvd., Surrey

Call

604-531-9156

604-536-2111

Dan Jillings Ocean Park Ford

3050 King George Blvd. Call

2

604-531-6100

MONTHS RUNNING

Travis Scarf

Murray Hyundai 3150 King George Blvd., Surrey

Call

Matthew Hale

604-538-7022

Wolfe Subaru

19372 Langley ByPass

Call

604-534-2660

2 MONTHS RUNNING

Brad Timmath Applewood KIA 19764 Langley By-pass, Langley

Call

604-533-7881

Raza Bhimani

Jim Pattison Chrysler 15377 Guildford Drive

Call

1-888-309-5436

Harv Sian Freeway Mazda 154th & 104th, Surrey

Call

604-227-5579

Rick Orzol Applewood KIA 16299 Fraser Hwy., Surrey

Call

604-635-3010

Rommel Delfin Surrey Honda 15291 Fraser Hwy., Surrey

Call

604-583-7421

George McDonald

SHINING STARS sponsored by:

Wolfe Mazda 19265 Langley By-Pass

Call

604-534-0181 111213

THE


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

111213

A24


Surrey NOW November 12 2013