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Marathon closures will be reassessed Amy Reid Now staff Twitter @amyreid87

CITY CENTRE – Organizers of the Surrey International World Music Marathon will be re-evaluating their traffic strategy in the face of harsh criticism about the extent of road closures – especially those around Surrey Memorial Hospital. Elizabeth Model, marathon chair, said the society received about nine complaints about the closures, but had much more positive feedback. She said with any large event, traffic is going to be impacted. See also LETTERS › page 9

Christopher Poon Now staff Twitter @questionchris VIEW VIDEO, NEWTON — It was a promise made more PHOTOS than a year ago, and on Sept. 27, Sheila Fedoruk

made good on her pledge to shave her head if the students at W.E. Kinvig Elementary could raise

$500 for cancer research. With more than $2,324 raised, Fedoruk, whose granddaughter and grandson attend the school, shed her locks in the school’s packed gymnasium. “My ears are a little cold but that’s about it.” see HEAD SHAVE › page 6

areid@thenownewspaper.com

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Sheila Fedoruk hugs her granddaughter Ariel Nerada after having her head shaved at W.E. Kinvig Elementary. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

“The marathon is a very big event and the citizens are used to a different type of neighbourhood. As we move forward, they just have to go out and realize that people will be impacted for three to five hours on marathon morning,” she said. When asked if the road closures around the hospital will be reassessed for next year’s event, Model said “absolutely.” “If you look at cities like Vancouver, and the New York City marathon, Boston, everybody’s impacted with the traffic. If it’s institutions like the hospital, Fraser Health, we have to work out something with them to ensure that employees get to work on time and doctors see patients. Those are the fine details we have to work out – it’s only the second year,” she said. Model urged residents in the marathon area to plan their route ahead of time if they need to go out during marathon day next year. “Preplan, phone ahead, check the website and give yourself extra time.”


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

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NEWS

Send your story ideas or photo submissions to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Surrey

Raised bed garden causes bylaw stink Jacob Zinn Now contributor Twitter @jacobzinn

FLEETWOOD — The City of Surrey wants Jess Thompson and Cindy Quach’s “unsightly” garden to be removed, despite the garden’s health benefits to their family and environmental perks to their community. In the summer, Thompson and Quach started a hügelkultur garden on their rented one-acre property in the 8300-block of 168th Street. Hügelkultur is a European farming technique that has proven to be a popular method sustainable food gardening. “You bury biomass at the base before you warm the bed – you would take things such as branches, leaves, tree trunks, and then put your growing medium over top,” said Quach. “Over time, the biomass decomposes and releases heat and nutrients.” The garden provides fresh fruits and vegetables for them and their two children while also preventing the growth of hogweed, an invasive plant with sap that can cause long-lasting blisters, scars and even blindness. Following hügelkultur methods, the couple mowed down the hogweed, suppressed it with recycled coconut husk, put woodchips on top and created raised bed gardens around their house. But despite the prevention of hogweed growth, neighbours have complained to the city’s bylaw and licensing department about the garden. Nearby residents initially raised a stink over, well, the stink of the manure when it was first brought in. “When the woodchips and the manure were freshly delivered onto the property – before the beds were actually built – that was when the complaints started coming in to bylaws,” said Quach. “Before we even had a chance to level out the piles to form the garden beds, the bylaw officer came and

Cindy Quach and Jess Thompson – with their children, Nikola, 2, and four-monthold Roial – are disputing a bylaw infraction from the City of Surrey stating that their hügelkultur garden is unsightly. (Photo: JACOB ZINN) looked at the place.” The smell subsided once the manure was worked into the garden beds, but Quach said there were still complaints to the bylaw department that their garden is an eyesore. “Initially, (the officer) said, ‘Oh, that’s fantastic, you’re doing the neighbourhood a favour,’” she recalled. “But then a week went by and I suppose more complaints came in to bylaws and we were served with this letter that the property is not in compliance with the unsightly bylaw.” Thompson and Quach were given 22 days to remedy the infraction under the Unsightly Premises Bylaw, which outlines such criteria as accumulation of refuse, damaged landscaping and broken fencing as reasons a property can be unsightly. They said they called the officer for clarification and were told that levelling out the piles would put them in compliance with the

bylaw. “We levelled it out, we formed our beds, he came back and he was not satisfied,” she said. “They were expecting flat beds, but we’re doing a hügelkultur bed.” The garden beds resemble small, brown hills made up of bark mulch and soil. Neighbours have also complained about the height of the garden, but Thompson and Quach have noted that, given time to grow, the hills will compress in size while becoming leafy and green in colour. “The unfortunate thing is there’s no neighbourly communication,” said Quach. “We could have had a chance to explain it to them, but instead of talking to us, they called bylaws instead.” Thompson added, “They just saw material coming in and they didn’t understand what it was, but they never asked us.” Furthermore, Thompson and Quach’s

property is fenced and surrounded on most sides by trees, including large evergreens lining the front yard along 168th Street. Quach said most people would have to make an effort to see their “unsightly” garden, and Thompson noted that neighbours in support of their garden are wondering why the city isn’t targeting other dilapidated houses in the area. “There’s one down the street that’s getting hit with graffiti quite a bit,” said Thompson. “When they see an unsightly property, there’s ‘obviously unsightly’ and then there’s somebody trying to do a garden.” The couple has a petition with about 90 signatures from residents in favour of the garden, as well as verbal praise from the Ministry of Environment and a letter of support from Bob Boyd, a longtime public health inspector with Fraser Health. “The hügelkultur or raised bed/mound is ideal for urban and suburban lots,” reads Boyd’s letter, noting that the garden falls in line with the City of Surrey’s green movement by conserving water, recycling, composting and eating a 100-mile diet. “These days, when we are constantly hearing about going ‘green,’ growing food in your backyard should be encouraged.” Jas Rehal, manager of bylaw enforcement with the city, wouldn’t comment on the specifics of the infraction, but said the investigation is ongoing and that the city is working with the owners on a solution. Ultimately, Thompson and Quach picked hügelkultur gardening as their remedy for hogweed because it was cost-effective, ecofriendly and low maintenance, while also producing more than 90 per cent of their vegetables. If they’re forced to remove their garden, it will be costly and the hogweed will grow back in the area. The couple hopes to present to the agricultural advisory committee on their situation. jzinn@thenownewspaper.com

Crime

Cops search for would-be snatcher

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INTERACTIVE PRINT SURREY — Surrey Mounties are looking for a man in his late 50s who grabbed a teenage boy who was walking to school on Sept. 30, in Clayton Heights. The 14-year-old boy was walking back to Clayton Heights Secondary school after lunch when the stranger approached him near Extra Foods, in the 18700-block of Fraser Highway, followed him, and grabbed him. The boy pushed him away and otherwise wasn’t injured.

Cpl. Bert Paquet said no vehicle was involved and the incident appears to have been “isolated.” “We’ve received a few tips over the weekend and we’re following up on them.” The suspect is white, slim, had a grey beard, is about six foot one and was wearing a black hoodie, with the hood up, and light blue jeans. Meanwhile, police are also looking for a white man and a brown man who attacked a couple with a knife near

Gateway SkyTrain Station shortly after midnight Saturday. The white guy was dressed in black, and the other wore a dark puffy jacket. Police found a 23-year-old Surrey woman lying on the ground in front of 10240 City Parkway, bleeding. A 38year-old Surrey man was also injured. Both have been released from hospital. Police ask anyone with information to contact the Surrey RCMP at 604599-0502. Tom Zytaruk

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

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NEWS Elementary school

T.E. Scott addition opens Christopher Poon Now staff Twitter @questionchris

NEWTON — “I like the new beanbags.� “It’s nice and cozy and new.� “It’s better than being outside in portables.� Those were some of the statements from students at T.E. Scott Elementary during the opening ceremony of its recent $6-million upgrade and expansion. Initially started as a seismic upgrade for the school, the ministry of education was able to find some extra money to add eight new classrooms as well, eliminating the need for portables and making room for 180 more students indoors. “If you’ve got the chaos of construction you may as well do it all,� said school board trustee Laurae McNally. Having opened in November 1957, the school has seen much change in the oncequiet area. Now, with recent residential development having taken over much of the nearby area, board chair Shawn Wilson said it just made sense to keep this school as up-todate as possible. “What a dramatic change, it looks like a brand new school in this community,� said Wilson during the opening.

Wilson acknowledged that the upgrades were long coming for the 56-year-old school, and thanked the community for their understanding during the three-year construction process. “The patience of the T.E. Scott community for this is remarkable. Of all the school communities we have in Surrey, the T.E. Scott community is probably the benchmark, you’ve really set the bar high,� he said. “This project has been on the minds of your school trustees longer than you can imagine and once the project starts there’s a lot of patience required to work through noise and construction, so thank you for your patience during this period.� Education Minister Peter Fassbender was also present during the opening. “We’re delighted to see these projects come online in a school like this and seeing how the contractor was able to keep the school running when we were doing the upgrade was amazing,� said Fassbender. T.E. Scott principal David Dekerf said it was really the community that made the school what it is. “This school is much more than a building, it’s really about the people and there’s really an amazing community here,� he said.

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

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NEWS

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Surrey

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‹ from page 1

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Fedoruk made her promise after seeing one of the school’s teachers have his head shaved last year. “They did really well last year and so afterwards I said to him, ‘I could do it, I’ll do it next year.’” And while some may be somewhat vain when it comes to losing their hair, Fedoruk said she had all the motivation in the world going into it. “My mother passed away from leukemia years ago and I’ve always had it in my heart to do something, but I don’t have a lot of money so I wondered what I could do to help find a cure,” she said. “I’ve lost a lot of friends as well and this past year I’ve been supporting a little fella who’s been battling leukemia so this opportunity came about and I just came through those doors and went with it. I was honoured to do it and would do it again in a heartbeat.” Following her shearing, Fedoruk will continue her presence at the school, where she’s been volunteering for the past eight years when her first

granddaughter began kindergarten. With two more grandchildren at the school, Fedoruk said she doesn’t expect to be leaving anytime soon. “I love the kids there, they’re great there,” she said. “It’s an inner-city school and they all call me ‘Grandma Sheila.’” As for the amount raised, which ended up at almost five times her initial goal, Fedoruk said she never imagined her fundraising would bring in nearly $2,500. “I was absolutely floored. A lot of my friends donated and I think some of their motivation was to see me bald,”

she said with a laugh. Fedoruk added that she hoped others would follow her example and get involved in fundraising or volunteering, one way or another. “All I can think is to support wherever you can. Do what you can and eventually I think there’s going to be a cure for cancer,” she said. “I would encourage everyone to do whatever they can to help find that because it’s so rampant and it’s hard to watch people die from it, it’s hard to watch people battle it and, in the grand scheme of things, what’s a haircut?” cpoon@thenownewspaper.com

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Mathew Zadvorny shaves Sheila Fedoruk as her granddaughter Ariel Nerada watches. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

AN07

NEWS Environment

Resident furious about hydro substation in ALR FLEETWOOD — BC Hydro is set to build a substation in Fleetwood and a resident who lives steps away is furious, saying the project will eliminate habitats for a number of animals. The substation will be located at 156th Street at about 76th Avenue, behind Surrey Lake Park, and is in the Agricultural Land Reserve. BC Hydro has received permission from the Agricultural Land Commission to construct the station. BC Hydro says prep work will begin in October and construction is scheduled to start in November. Penny Beck lives directly across the street from the site, and her family has been on the property for 40 years. “I don’t have an issue with the substation itself per se, because I do realize it is needed. My biggest issue is where they want to put it,” Beck said. “They are not little trees,” she said of the forested area set to be cut down. She says the habitats of a number of creatures will be impacted by the construction, including red tail hawks,

bald eagles, coyotes, black squirrels, hummingbirds, screech owls and more. “I’m not an emotional person, but I know this property like the back of my hand,” Beck said, adding that she will be devastated if the substation is built where it’s currently set to go. “It will kill me,” Beck said. Judy Bobrowolski, spokesperson for BC Hydro, said the project is needed in order to accommodate the electricity requirements Surrey will have as it grows over the next 30 years. The site was identified as a preferred site due to many factors, Bobrowolski said. She said the substation couldn’t be moved back farther on the property because it would then be in the Serpentine River floodplain. “We need to stay out of the floodplain and as well, we need to be as close to the transmission line as possible in order to meet our technical requirements.” When it comes to building on ALR land, Bobrowolski said there is “basically no space” outside of it due to density.

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

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VIEWPOINT

Address: The Surrey Now, #201 7889 132nd St., Surrey, B.C. V3W 4N2

Publisher: Alvin Brouwer

B.C. politics

Ethnic vote critical to both parties InTheHouse Keith Baldrey

T

he sensitive and sometimes murky world of so-called “ethnic politics” continues to engulf both of B.C.’s major political parties. It’s been that way for more than a couple of years now, ever since both parties found themselves plunged into leadership races that involved mass membership sign-ups in ethnic communities. The NDP, about to search for another leader, may be headed into another controversy involving those same mass sign-ups. The B.C. Liberal government, meanwhile, finds itself dogged by a controversy involving ethnic communities it thought had disappeared once and for all. The so-called “ethnic memo” controversy was big news before the May election. This involved government political staff doing party work (making contacts in ethnic communities, compiling information such as membership lists, etc.) while

on the taxpayer dime. Now the RCMP is investigating the matter after NDP leader Adrian Dix went to the police with information that he says may indicate some aspects of the Election Act had been violated through these activities. Now, as someone who was part of a giant media groupthink that saw the ethnic memo scandal as being a much bigger deal than the voters ultimately considered it to be at election time, I’m reluctant to predict the RCMP investigation will lead to anything substantial. In fact, anything short of implicating an elected official (as opposed to nowdeparted political staffers) in illegal activities is unlikely to inflict much political damage on the B.C. Liberals. Still, no government likes to have the RCMP rummaging around its dirty laundry. Nevertheless, the whole thing is yet another reminder of just how beholden our two parties are to the interests of ethnic communities, and how courting their votes has become of paramount importance to them. In the last election campaign, for example, the B.C. Liberals strove to have a

major presence in ChineseCanadian media through heavy advertising. That strategy appeared to pay off, as the party held at least two seats (Burnaby North and Vancouver-Fraserview) with a heavy Chinese-Canadian population it might otherwise have lost. But while the B.C. Liberals watch that RCMP investigation with some nervousness (which is unlikely to disappear anytime soon, as these types of probes tend to be lengthy ones) the NDP is about to revisit the sensitivities wrapped around that party’s relationship with ethnic communities. The reform-minded Forward B.C. NDP faction wants to limit membership sign-ups for the leadership race to 10 people a week per person, according to the Georgia Straight newspaper.

This would prevent what happened in the last leadership races for both parties. At that time, candidates or their representatives went into places like Surrey, Delta and south Vancouver and engaged in mass sign-ups in places like religious temples and churches. The result is that a relatively small geographic region dictated the outcome of both races, and that both Adrian Dix and Christy Clark owed their leadership victories to this practice. Candidates from outside the Lower Mainland – notably John Horgan of the NDP and George Abbott of the B.C. Liberals – were penalized by the mass signups and were effectively frozen out of the selection process. There will be a predictable push-back from various

ethnic communities to Forward B.C. NDP’s proposal. They will argue, with some justification, that the members of their communities should not be limited in their potential participation in a democratic process. Both sides in this debate have meritorious arguments. Nevertheless, it may be time for political parties to abandon the idea of giving every party member a vote in a leadership race and return to the days of convention delegates determining the winner of that race. While membership signups can inject some interest (and money) into a party leadership race, so too can a leadership convention, which carries with it several days of high drama (potentially) and often an exciting outcome. A delegated convention

Keith.Baldrey@globalnews.ca

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would also ensure no particular region or community (ethnic or otherwise) has power disproportionate to its size when determining who the major political leaders are in this province. Unfortunately, I don’t see much evidence that either the NDP or the B.C. Liberals want to go back to the days of electing delegates to a leadership convention. This means the NDP faces an interesting dilemma: put the brakes on mass membership sign-ups, or allow a relatively small geographic region play a dominant role in choosing the party’s next leader. Ethnic politics is never far away from political parties these days, and both the B.C. Liberals and the NDP are about to be reminded of that.

WATCH VIDEO ABOUT LAYAR Beau Simpson Editor

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The NOW newspaper is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. You can reach us by phone at 604-572-0064, by email at edit@thenownewspaper.com or by mail at Suite 201-7889 132 Street, Surrey, B.C. V3W 4N2 Second Class Mail Registration 7434. Delivered free every Tuesday and Thursday to 118,000 homes and businesses.

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

A09

LETTERS

Send your letters to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Marathon caused nightmare for Surrey drivers The Editor, Re: “Marathon traffic affect you? Thank you for your patience,” the Now letters, Oct 3. I am compelled to comment on Elyse Fryer’s rose-tinted letter that made very light of the inconvenience to vast swaths of the city’s northbound traffic. This marathon should not happen so close to the hospital; nor should it have forced the entire shutdown of major streets bearing north from 88th Avenue. I and many many others were forced to endure traffic that completely stopped and only crawled when it did move – for hours. Several people took the side streets only to find that all roads leading north were blocked as well. It was a nightmare for all of us. “Inconvenience” is an understatement. It took me more than 90 minutes to travel from Newton to King George SkyTrain station to pick up my stranded elderly aunt from Vancouver. Along the way, it wasn’t uncommon to see an ambulance attempting to travel on the same clogged road to an emergency. The extended minutes for emergency response vehicles stuck in the marathon traffic could have resulted in tragedy. There were miles of idling traffic that loaded far more carbon into the sky than they should have. The Surrey marathon organizers ill informed everyone as to what alternative roads were available for northbound travel. Did they even envision that perhaps there are motorists who do not have a choice but to drive on that day? The marathon people should not have planned this ill-conceived event so close to the hospital and forcing the closure of so many northbound roads.

To the delight of Elyse Fryer, it seems that the needs of the few far outweighed the needs of the many. Yes, indeed it was quite the party for you – and the rest of us. The selfish marathon has no value or place in the area of north Surrey. Edward Leigh, Surrey

Don’t blame drivers for marathon mayhem The Editor, Re: “Marathon traffic affect you? Thank you for your patience,” the Now letters, Oct 3. Mrs. Fryer, first of all, congratulations on your anniversary, and I hope you have many more. I sincerely hope you had a wonderful marathon experience. However, I take issue with your assumption that those of us upset at the traffic situation caused by the street shutdowns did not “plan for it.” My parents live in the heart of the marathon course – there was no way for them to get out of their house until 2 p.m. For my mother to teach Sunday School that day, she had to call the marathon organizers to get special permission to cross 132nd Street at 9 a.m. Upon our return, we found that roads that had been marked as “open” or “for local traffic” on the map that was sent to us were blocked off by barriers, signs and police officers. This included access to our street, which had been open when we left that day. The closures seemed arbitrary and without notice. Like previous letter writers,

it took several hours for us to get home. While I can appreciate the importance of the marathon to the City of Surrey and its participants (I hope to include myself in their number next year), I would strongly encourage the City of Surrey and marathon organizers to take the transportation needs of local homeowners and renters into account when preparing for next year’s marathon. Elexis Harrison, Surrey

Marathon volunteers deserve huge thanks

the rain and wind. One black mark for me was the minivan driver who was clearly very irate at having to wait to cross the route – and despite instructions from the flagger, raced through the line of runners. It was an incident which could have had a nasty result but didn’t. It made me realize that we all need to take a deep breath from time to time and relax. I don’t know who the flagger was at the intersection but you handled the rude driver with grace, even though I’m sure you were upset. A special thank you for keeping the runners safe. Three cheers for the marathon. Patrick Fowler, Port Coquitlam

The Editor, Re: “Marathon was ‘quite a party,’” the Now, Oct 1. I want to say a huge thank you to all of the people who made the Surrey International World Music Marathon happen on Sept. 29. Events like this are a huge undertaking and are only possible with a large number of volunteers. This was my first half marathon and I have to say thank you to everyone for their support for the runners – everyone from the people at the water stations, to the flaggers, police officers, musicians and the people in their homes waving at us as we ran. Particularly, thank you to the families, young and old, who came out in the rain to cheer for the “Random Stranger.” It was heartwarming. The music miles are such a fantastic motivator. My face hurt from smiling. The musicians were amazing keeping us going in

Easier to use hatchet to get a fingerprint The Editor, Re: “iPhone 5S fingerprint scanner already fooled,” the Now, Oct. 3. Duh! What Christopher Poon is describing is a slightly higher-tech alternative to hacking off someone’s finger in order to use their fingerprint. If what’s on the phone is sufficiently valuable to cause the desperate thief to scour everything the phone owner has touched in order to find a sufficiently clear, photographically perfect fingerprint, it is going to take them forever. More practical to use the hatchet. That’s what they do in the movies. Ken Nowlan, White Rock

Advertising Feature

Audi Langley out for a day of play with SABA Recently Audi Langley in conjunction with SABA (South Asian Business Association) sponsored the 5th annual Network Golf Tournament at Morgan Creek Golf Course. At the tournament Audi Langley helped fund an entrepreneurial scholarship for the business program at Kwantlen Polytechnic University. The hole in one contest created a lot of excitement as a brand new Audi could be won.

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Congratulations to the winners: Raj Sekhon, Avtar Badasha, Kevin Mercer, Lakuvinder Gill

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To make it even more fun staff members of Audi Langley organized a remote control car race track with the winner receiving a pair of Canucks tickets.


A10

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

THE

O U Y A T D ! S L R GI WOMEN’S EVENT

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Help us support the Tiny Bundles Program at the Surrey Food Bank Join us at the RACE FOR BABIES EVENT Date: Time: Venue: Price:

Friday, October 25, 2013 5:30pm until races end Fraser Downs Racetrack & Casino, 17755 - 60th Avenue, Surrey $50 per ticket (Includes buffet dinner, hors d’oeuvres, 2 beverages, live entertainment, live and silent auction and a Great Night at the Races!)

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Call Margot for tickets at 604-572-0064


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

A11

COMMUNITY

Send your story ideas or photo submissions to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Surrey Hospice Society

New director takes helm of hospice Surrey Hospice Society is gearing up for its annual gala on Oct. 18, its biggest event of the year Amy Reid Now staff Twitter @amyreid87

SURREY — Surrey Hospice Society welcomed Beth Kish as its new executive director this summer. Prior to joining the Surrey organization, Kish was executive director at Foothills Country Hospice Society for two-and-ahalf years, an eight-bed hospice located just outside of Calgary.

At any given time, we can have 50-plus palliative patients. Coming from a smaller town, Kish says she knows she faces a big challenge when it comes to raising funds, which is how the organization offers services for free. “It’s definitely busier and bigger and more challenging to raise funds (in Surrey),” Kish said. “It’s definitely a challenge. It’s harder to raise money here than it was (at the Foothills hospice). There, everybody knew everybody and there wasn’t as many charities competing for that same donated dollar.” Kish said the Surrey hospice does a lot more counselling than her previous post and, overall, is a larger operation. Surrey Hospice has 20 beds located at Laurel Place and 10 beds in Surrey Memorial Hospital across the street. The hospice also does home visits. “At any given time, we can have 50-plus palliative patients,” Kish said. And the volunteer base is huge. Kish said

Beth Kish is the new executive director of the Surrey Hospice Society. She said she is prepared for the challenge of fundraising for the non-profit, which has all its free services funded through donations and events such as the annual gala, One Enchanted Evening, coming up on Oct. 19 at Eaglequest Coyote Creek Golf and Country Club. (Photo: KEVIN HILL) the organization couldn’t run without its more than 150 volunteers. The hospice also has a thrift store, located at 7138 King George Blvd., which it runs in partnership with the Surrey Fire Fighters’ Charitable Society. As executive director, Kish said one of her goals is to spread awareness and educate the community on what hospice care really is. “This kind of care is so wonderful in the fact that when people are given a terminal

diagnosis, and usually will be offered hospice with three or less months to live, it really is a place that they can go that is much gentler. It’s not as hospital-like... I often hear from families of patients saying, ‘I finally just get to be his wife, or the husband, I’m not a pill pusher, I’m not having to organize and clean up.’ They get to have that very, very special time together.” The hospice is gearing up for its annual gala, set for Oct. 19 at Eaglequest Coyote

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Creek Golf & Country Club. The event is the hospice’s largest fundraising event of the year. The evening, dubbed One Enchanted Evening, will include a champagne reception, dinner and entertainment, and there are more than 100 prizes to be given away. Tickets are $95 or $690 for a table of eight. For tickets and more information, visit www.surreyhospice.com or call 604-5847006. areid@thenownewspaper.com


A12 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013 SURREY DENTURE CLINIC

THE

COMMUNITY

Unit B, 10501 King George Hwy

604-588-4333

For Denture/Partial Wearers: ❑ Are

your dentures so uncomfortable you can’t wear them? ❑ Cannot eat your favourite foods? ❑ Do they make your mouth sore? ❑ Are they loose?

Alexandra Neighbourhood House

Longhouse reno project needs helpers Tom Zillich

If yes, we can help you!

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NEWSPAPER.COM

Now staff Twitter@ tomzillich

SOUTH SURREY — Skilled volunteers and other helpers are still needed for the Longhouse Extreme Makeover project at Alexandra Neighbourhood House, or Alex House. The facility, at Crescent Beach, will be renovated over the course of 72 hours

on the weekend of Oct. 18 to 20. Volunteers with drywall and tiling experience are needed for prep work, set to start Wednesday, Oct. 9. Demolition of parts of the longhouse began this week, including work to tear apart washrooms. The goal of the renovation project is to attract more corporate and group rentals. The longhouse was built in the 1980s, and it’s showing its age.

The budget for the renovation project is around $300,000; event planners have been working to secure sponsors and volunteers since the project was announced in May. A major backer of the initiative is Investors Group, which has worked to shape the renovations and is using the project as a team-building exercise. For more details, visit www. alexhouse.net or call 604-535-0015.

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Special Payment Plans are available on approved credit with your Hudson’s Bay MasterCard or Hudson’s Bay Credit Card on the identified items. Not applicable in Quebec. If you default under your payment terms or under your Hudson’s Bay Account Agreement, then the terms and annual interest rate are set out therein. The billing period covered by each statement will be approximately 30 days. For full details, go to http://paymentplanhbc.com, call 1-800-263-2599 or see a store associate. Hudson’s Bay, Hudson’s Bay Credit, hbc.com and their associated designs are trademarks of Hudson’s Bay Company. Credit is extended by Capital One Bank (Canada Branch). Capital One® is a registered trademark of Capital One Financial Corporation. MasterCard and the MasterCard brand mark are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated. All marks used under licence. All rights reserved.


NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

COMMUNITY

A P P LY F O R A C O M M U N I T Y G R A N T

Wrestling event Friday to benefit BC SPCA WHITE ROCK — A night of wrestling Friday will benefit abused animals. All proceeds from the All Star Wrestling event, on Oct. 11 at the Elks Hall, will go to BC SPCA (British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals). South Surrey-based wrestler Bryon Walters, aka Joe Bruiser, has been working to spread word of the charity event. “Everything helps get the people out for this event,� he told the Now. “Let’s pack it so

A13

COMMUNITY

BEAUTIFICATION

we can have lots of donations to help our little furry friends that desperately depend on our support to keep them until they find a loving home.� Walters is also a backer of the Body Slams for Toys, a wrestling event that collects toys for kids in need. This year’s event is on Dec. 13 at Elks Hall, 1469 George St., White Rock. For details, visit allstar-wrestling.com or call 604-710-0872.

GRANT PROGRAM

Tom Zillich

Apply for a Community Grant

SURREY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

The City of Surrey is pleased to offer grants to support neighbourhood beautiďŹ cation and celebration.

NEW EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT NOW OPEN

Through this program, Surrey residents, groups and associations can now apply to the City for ďŹ nancial grants to support neighbourhood beautiďŹ cation projects and community celebrations. Successful applicants match grant money with contributions of volunteer labour, donated materials, and/or cash.

HOW TO GET TO EMERGENCY HAS CHANGED Surrey’s new Emergency and Pediatric Emergency are located on the west side of the Hospital on Level 1 of the new Critical Care Tower.

Who can apply? All Surrey residents, community groups and associations can apply. Small business or groups of businesses will also be considered for street beautiďŹ cation projects.

Applications are now being accepted. For more information or to apply please check out our website. 013113

THE

Use NEW King George Blvd access if driving North on King George Use NEW 94A Ave access if driving south on King George, or driving on 96 Ave 111109

THE ACCESS TO EMERGENCY OFF 96 AVE IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE

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Park at our NEW underground Tower parkade below the new Emergency

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Learn more about our new Emergency at surreyhospital.ca

WIN UP TO


A14

A 14 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

COMMUNITY Surrey

Victims Services offers support through tough times The city’s intervention programs turn 30 years old this year. Carolyn Cooke Now staff Twitter @carolyncooke1

SURREY — Even though Victims Services turns 30 this year, many people don’t know the full scope of services offered by it. Mark Elson, intervention programs manager for the City of Surrey, said they do far more than respond to traumatic incidents where they’re called in by the attending police officer. “There’s a whole other side of that too, like when it goes to the court criminal system, we do court accompaniment and we update people with their file status, provide people with referrals to other agencies if they need them, and (in cases of) domestic violence, arrange for shelters, things like that,” Elson said. Victims Services has always covered this gamut in Surrey, and includes youth intervention and restorative justice. “When we started 30 years ago, we had

Mark Elson, intervention programs manager with Surrey, started out as a volunteer victims services caseworker about 20 years ago. The program now has all paid staff who help others cope with trauma and life-changing experiences. (Photo: KEVIN HILL) two paid staff members and it was actually a unit comprised of the volunteers that would come in and do the case workload,” said Elson. “About 12 years ago that changed and

we no longer have volunteers, but we have a full complement – we have seven full-time caseworkers that respond to calls, provide service 21 hours a day, from 6 a.m. to 3 a.m.”

Elson started out as a volunteer caseworker about 20 years ago, and was an on-call firefighter for the City of Surrey for nine years as well as an auxiliary constable with the Surrey RCMP for the last 13 years. In spite of the fact his staff is called to deal with people’s trauma, Elson said he is impressed with how resilient they are. “They truly are an amazing group of people. I’ll go out on call even now with them know and they’ll come back and they will do a debrief themselves and amongst themselves,” he said. “Actually, they’ll do that on every single call and I really see now the importance of that. I will be thinking about a call the next day and they’ve just kind of moved on.” Part of it too might be down to the type of people who take up this kind of work. “I think there’s two things. I think there’s people who’ve received help in the past from different agencies, such as victims services, and they realize how much it helped them and they want to be part of that and to give back. I think that’s a big part of it,” he said. “And I think the other part of it is certain people’s nature to want to help people. It’s a very unique way of helping people.” ccooke@thenownewspaper.com

ADVERTISING FEATURE

It’s Not About The Bike, It’s Not About the Ride...

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE KIDS! Applewood Kia Donates $5000 to Cops for Cancer Charity

The Cops for Cancer is an exciting annual event that takes place each

fall with over one hundred law enforcement and emergency service personnel from across the province. Once the team is selected in the spring the next 5-6 months is spent fund raising and training. The riders brave all types of weather as they cycle through Vancouver Island, Northern BC, the coast of British Columbia and the Fraser Valley. During their ride they stop at local

schools to hand out teddy bears and cuddle quilts to children that are going through cancer treatment. There are also stops to honour children that are no longer with us. Teaching children the importance of looking after themselves and making healthy lifestyle choices is also a very important part of the ride. The riders distribute trading cards to the children, which explain 5 important

points to staying healthy. The impact of cancer on the life of a child and their family is devastating. The ride has raised over $425,000 for the Canadian Cancer Society which is used to fund life-saving research and caring support programs. If you would like to make a donation, get involved or learn more go to www.copsforcancerbc.ca and click on Tour de Valley.

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Darren Graham and Norm Isaak, owners of Applewood Kia are proud to support the Cops for Cancer, Tour de Valley, a charity that is dear to their hearts! Norm rides with the event that makes its way to over 100 locations over 9 days for more than 900 kms. They also provide vehicles for training rides and the actual Tour.


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

A15

portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2

PLANNING FOR GROWTH IN CANADIAN TRADE The Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project is a proposed new three-berth marine terminal at Roberts Bank in Delta, B.C. that would provide 2.4 million TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent unit containers) of additional container capacity. Subject to environmental approvals, the project could be fully operational by the early 2020s. Discussion Guide and Online Feedback Form available at:

www.portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2

Proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2

Existing Roberts Bank Terminals

The proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project consists of two primary components: • A new marine terminal would be located northwest of the existing Roberts Bank terminal facilities, approximately 5.5 kilometres offshore from the mainland. The terminal would be located as far offshore as practical to reduce the impact on sensitive marine habitat and limit the amount of dredging required, while still meeting seismic performance criteria. The terminal is designed to accommodate simultaneous mooring of three modern container vessels. It is anticipated that the terminal would make considerable use of electric equipment and vehicles, as well as providing berthed ships with shore power, therefore allowing them to turn off their on-board generators, reducing air emissions and noise.

• Road and rail improvements on the Roberts Bank Causeway, including additional lead tracks, a switching yard, an overpass structure and access roads, would provide access to the new terminal. To reduce potential impacts on sensitive marine habitat on the northwest side, the causeway would be widened to different widths along its length.

ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF THE PROPOSED ROBERTS BANK TERMINAL 2 PROJECT. 1

Construction period of approximately six years If constructed, the Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project would drive economic growth and increase employment, benefiting the region, the province and the country. The economic benefits to Canada from the proposed project would include direct, indirect, and induced employment growth, and gains in economic output, gross domestic product (GDP) and government revenues during construction and operations.

The project is part of Port Metro Vancouver’s Container Capacity Improvement Program, a long-term strategy to deliver projects to meet anticipated growth in demand for container capacity to 2030.

LEARN MORE AT portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2


A16

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

From October 7 to November 12, 2013, Port Metro Vancouver is conducting Pre-Design Consultation for the proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project with communities, stakeholders and the public.

! "# $

You can provide feedback and learn more by:

Pre-Design Consultation is the third round of Port Metro Vancouver-led public consultation regarding the proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project and builds on community and stakeholder input from previous rounds of consultation.

 

                  

       www.portmetrovancouver.com/RBT 2            



  !"      www.porttalk.ca/RBT 2

 #  $%&$$'())* Please provide your feedback by November 12, 2013.

AREA

EVENT

DATE

TIME

LOCATION

DELTA

Small Group Meeting

Tuesday, October 8

5:00pm–7:00pm

Coast Tsawwassen Inn,1665 56th Street, Delta

LANGLEY

Small Group Meeting

Wednesday, October 9

5:00pm–7:00pm

Coast Hotel & Convention Centre, 20393 Fraser Highway, Langley

DELTA

Small Group Meeting

Thursday, October 10

1:00pm–3:00pm

Delta Town & Country Inn, 6005 Highway 17, Delta

SURREY

Small Group Meeting

Tuesday, October 15

1:00pm–3:00pm

Surrey Arts Centre, 13750 88th Avenue, Surrey

RICHMOND

Small Group Meeting

Tuesday, October 15

5:00pm–7:00pm

UBC Boathouse, 7277 River Road, Richmond

VANCOUVER

Small Group Meeting

Wednesday, October 16

9:00am–11:00am

Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue, 580 West Hastings Street, Vancouver

RICHMOND

Open House

Wednesday, October 16

5:00pm–8:00pm

UBC Boathouse, 7277 River Road, Richmond

SURREY

Open House

Thursday, October 17

5:00pm–8:00pm

Surrey Arts Centre,13750 88th Avenue, Surrey

LANGLEY

Open House

Tuesday, October 22

5:00pm–8:00pm

Coast Hotel & Convention Centre, 20393 Fraser Highway, Langley

DELTA

Open House

Thursday, October 24

5:00pm–8:00pm

Delta Town & Country Inn, 6005 Highway 17, Delta

DELTA

Open House

Saturday, October 26

10:00am–1:00pm

Coast Tsawwassen Inn, 1665 56th Street, Delta

*To register for a Small Group Meeting, please email container.improvement@portmetrovancouver.com or call 604-665-9337. Pre-registration for open houses is not required.

Consultation Topics During Pre-Design Consultation, Port Metro Vancouver is seeking your input regarding three topics related to the Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project: 

      : Port Metro Vancouver recognizes the importance of efďŹ ciently managing container truck trafďŹ c in local communities and on local roads, and would like feedback regarding some ways in which it proposes to more effectively manage port-related truck trafďŹ c.



HABITAT MITIGATION: Studies are currently underway to determine potential project impacts to ďŹ sh and wildlife habitat. Port Metro Vancouver has developed a number of possible mitigation approaches, and is seeking your feedback on them.



    : Port Metro Vancouver is looking for feedback regarding some ideas for community legacy beneďŹ ts related to the environment, community well-being and recreation, and transportation, which would be provided as part of the Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project.

To learn more about these consultation topics and complete a feedback form, visit portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2.

LEARN MORE AT portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT The proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project will be subject to a thorough and independent environmental assessment. On September 12, 2013, Port Metro Vancouver ďŹ led a Project Description with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency and the British Columbia Environmental Assessment OfďŹ ce. A Project Description assists regulatory agencies in determining whether an environmental assessment is required for the project and, if so, it provides the information required to determine the scope and nature of the assessment. For more information regarding the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, please visit . For more information regarding the British Columbia Environmental Assessment OfďŹ ce, please visit  .


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

A17

PLANNING FOR GROWTH IN CANADIAN TRADE 68 9; TRADE IMPORTANT?

Canada’s Asia-PaciďŹ c Gateway is a network of airports, seaports, railways, roads and border crossings connecting Canada with major trading partners. The Gateway provides a means for Canadian farmers, mill workers, ďŹ shers, manufacturers and miners to export their goods to other markets, and a means for Canadians to access global goods on local store shelves. Trade is one of the primary drivers of economic growth in the nation. The economic beneďŹ ts of trade are created not just in the Asia-PaciďŹ c Gateway itself, but also across the region, the province and the country. One of the primary beneďŹ ts of international trade is in the jobs that it creates for Canadians. The location and nature of these jobs varies greatly, from logistics to manufacturing to agricultural, and all rely on the movement of goods in and out of the Asia-PaciďŹ c Gateway. Other beneďŹ ts to Canadians include increased revenue to government, community amenities, and higher purchasing power for consumers and businesses.

68 < #=>"9><; 9@!=">" "= "H<J Port Metro Vancouver handles a wide variety of cargo through the Asia-PaciďŹ c Gateway, including automobiles, breakbulk, bulk and containers. Containers are one of the most signiďŹ cant business sectors by tonnage, second only to bulk cargo. Modern shipping containers are constructed of steel, which allows for repeated use and the safe transport of of a diverse range of goods. Their standardized design means that they can be easily and quickly transferred between ship, train or truck.

Port Metro Vancouver

Busan

Container trade beneďŹ ts both Canadian consumers and producers, with almost equal volumes of imported and exported goods traveling through Port Metro Vancouver:  Import containers often contain electronics, food items, household goods, clothing, shoes, health and medical products, sporting equipment, construction materials, and manufacturing inputs such as car parts.  Export containers often contain lumber, pulp, plywood, specialty grain and local agricultural products including blueberries, tomatoes and mushrooms.

68 H= < ><<H @=< CONTAINER CAPACITY?

Tokyo Yokohama

Shanghai Kaohsiung Shenzhen Hong Kong

1,451,309 TEUs (2012 imports)

Singapore

1,261,852 TEUs (2012 exports)

In 2012, almost 3.3 million TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent unit containers) moved through terminals on the Canadian west coast, of which 2.7 million TEUs moved through terminals within Port Metro Vancouverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jurisdiction. Annual third-party forecasts show that demand for containerized trade is growing, with containerized trade on Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s west coast set to double over the next 10-15 years and nearly triple by 2030. (Ocean Shipping Consultants, July 2013)

%!               %!   &

Port Metro Vancouver has been working with all levels of government in planning and developing many initiatives that will accommodate future growth, improve cargo handling and increase the Asia-PaciďŹ c Gatewayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s competitive advantage. Some projects that Port Metro Vancouver is currently involved in include: 

232nd Street Overpass (Langley â&#x20AC;&#x201C; construction phase): Part of the Roberts Bank Rail Corridor Program, the 232nd Street Overpass Project will build a twolane overpass that will replace the current street-level crossing of the      *' 

 *$ 4      5 for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians.



Deltaport Terminal, Road and Rail Improvement Project (Roberts Bank, Delta â&#x20AC;&#x201C; construction phase): An efďŹ cient and costeffective plan to increase container capacity through improvements at the existing Deltaport Terminal. Project improvements will be implemented mostly within the existing terminal, road and rail footprint and will have a low potential for environmental impact.       marine environment.



Low Level Road Project (City of North Vancouver â&#x20AC;&#x201C; construction phase): The Low Level Road Project includes realigning and elevating the existing Low Level Road, signalized intersections and drainage enhancements to improve road safety, an overpass at Neptune-Cargill and turning lanes to reduce congestion, and provisions for completion of sections of the Spirit Trail.



South Shore Corridor Project (City of Vancouver â&#x20AC;&#x201C; construction phase): The South Shore Corridor Project includes realignment, reconďŹ guration and elevation of roadways, a pedestrian overpass at Victoria Drive, and other corridor wide improvements such as upgraded signage, installation of Intelligent Transportation Systems and ďŹ bre optic cable upgrades.

For more information regarding these and other projects, please visit portmetrovancouver.com.

LEARN MORE AT portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2


A18

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

PLANNING FOR GROWTH IN CANADIAN TRADE WHY ROBERTS BANK?

A NEW BRIDGE TO REPLACE THE

Roberts Bank port facilities are well positioned to accommodate future growth in trade activity. The area has several competitive advantages, including its proximity to major transportation corridors for both truck and rail movements, direct access to numerous off-dock facilities and one of the most efďŹ cient ship-to-rail designs of any port in North America.

george massey tunnel

On September 20, 2013, the Government of British Columbia announced that they will move ahead to replace the George Massey Tunnel, with construction of a new bridge on the existing Highway 99 corridor to begin in 2017.

Trade through Roberts Bank will also beneďŹ t from two initiatives that are currently underway to improve transportation for communities, commuters and commercial trafďŹ c. â&#x20AC;˘

sh f P  r (sfPr): a new 40-kilometre-long four-lane route along the south side of the Fraser River from Deltaport Way to 176th Street in Surrey. When complete at the end of 2013, SFPR will offer an efďŹ cient trade corridor and will divert trucks and other trafďŹ c off municipal roads in Delta and Surrey.

â&#x20AC;˘

rb B r  c  P : includes one road network improvement project and eight overpasses in Delta, Surrey, the City of Langley and the Township of Langley. Once complete in 2014, these projects will separate road and rail trafďŹ c, improving safety, easing community connections and minimizing train whistling.

The George Massey Tunnel represents a primary north/south corridor linking the United States and Metro Vancouver, and the renewal of the crossing will support beneďŹ ts to communities in the Lower Mainland by easing trafďŹ c congestion. Additional information about the George Massey Tunnel Replacement Project can be found at:

These projects will help relieve current road and rail congestion on local roads and will accommodate trafďŹ c generated by capacity increases at Roberts Bank, including the Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project.

 ..b./ 

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PORT-RELATED INFRASTRUCTURE IN THE LOWER MAINLAND

Port Metro Vancouver Container Terminal Intermodal Yard

Centerm Vanterm

Off-Dock Facilities Major Road Network

Ironworkers Memorial Bridge

Major Rail Network

Port Moody

South Fraser Perimeter Road (SFPR) Roberts Bank Rail Corridor (RBRC) 1 2

Port Mann Bridge

Vancouver Burnaby

3 4

Port Coquitlam

5

Golden Ears Bridge

New Westminster

99

Pattullo Bridge

6 7

7

8 9

41b St. Grade Separation 80th St. Rail Overpass Panorama Ridge Whistle Cessation 152nd St. Rail Overpass 192nd St. Grade Separation 196th St. Grade Separation 54th Ave. Grade Separation Mufford Cres./64th Ave. Realignment & Grade Separation 232nd St. Grade Separation

Surrey

Fraser Surrey Docks

91

Alex Fraser Bridge

Richmond

15

99

9

91

Delta

George Massey Tunnel

7

Langley

8

10 3

4

5

6

7

11

99 2

1

TFN 17

13

Tsawwassen First Nation

Deltaport Tsawwassen

We Want to Hear from you For further information, visit the project website line at portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2 If you have any other questions or comments regarding the proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project, please contact us by: Email: container.improvement@portmetrovancouver.com

Phone: 604.665.9337 Fax: 1.866.284.4271 rminal 2 Projec Attention: Roberts Bank Terminal Project Mail: Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Proje Project Port Metro Vancouver da Place 100 The Pointe, 999 Canada Vancouver, BC V6C 3T4

LEARN MORE AT portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2


A 19 NEWSPAPER.COM

COMMUNITY

BC’s #1 Seniors Entertainment Troupe Proudly presents

Delview students prep for Thanks for Giving Now staff Twitter @carolyncooke1

NORTH DELTA — Hundreds of high school students will be spreading out through the area Thursday evening to collect food for the needy. The annual food drive – the largest singleday canned food drive in the province – is called Thanks for Giving. The student-led initiative is now in its 21st year. Teacher Lindsay Bochen said she was a student back when the drive first started. “I actually used to be a student here and I remember way back in ’92 was the first year,” she said. In that first year, the idea was to collect 10,000 cans in one night, and Bochen said they have managed to collect more every year since. “Last year we had I think 18,000 cans so we’re aiming for 20,000 this year,” she said. “We’ll be collecting non-perishable items for Deltassist as well as the Surrey Food Bank.” Bochen added that it’s nice when people know about the food drive ahead of time and are prepared for the knock on the door on collection night. But this year it’s been

th

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Annual Bursary Benefit Concert

Annual food drive

Carolyn Cooke

10

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

tough for students to get the word out. For some reason, many businesses have not let students put up posters around the community to let everyone know about Thanks for Giving. “This year I think we’re going to canvass some grocery stores this weekend (Oct. 5 and 6) and hand out some flyers to let people know we’re coming,” Bochen said. Nearly everyone in the school body takes part, along with staff and parents, making for a group of 600 to 800 people who take to the streets to pitch in. What the food collectors are looking for in terms of collections include high-protein items, such as meat, chicken, fish, peanut butter as well as other canned goods. The area they expect to cover on Thursday evening will be from 96th Avenue south to 72nd Avenue, and east to the Surrey border on Scott Road. If more groups sign up, more than 90 – and they have 77 so far – they will also canvass south of 72nd Avenue, added Bochen. “It is just huge how much students do for this event,” said Bochen. “It really is a student-driven campaign.”

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

THE

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White Rock Mayor Wayne Baldwin speaks to the crowd gathered at a flag raising ceremony at city hall with the White Rock chapter of seniors group CARP in celebration of National Seniors Day on Tuesday, Oct. 1. (Photo: KEVIN HILL)

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SURREY — Terry Lee’s 36-year run as leader of Simon Fraser University Pipe Band has ended. The Surrey-raised musician is retiring as the band’s pipe major. Lee, who started the band with brother Jack Lee, pipe sergeant, will remain involved with the band, continuing to pipe at concerts and SFU convocation ceremonies and teach young pipers through the band’s junior Robert Malcolm Memorial (RMM) Pipe Band. He’ll also remain active with tuning, music construction and band administration. The acclaimed band rehearses on Jack Lee’s property in the Clayton area of Surrey. “There shouldn’t be changes to that, we’re just passing the torch to a new leader, a longtime friend and longtime member of the band, Alan Bevan, who lives in Abbotsford,” Jack Lee told the Now. Terry Lee, who lives in Coquitlam, said it “feels like the right time” to retire as the band’s pipe major. “I also want to leave the post at the right time to make sure we are in a position of strength, going forward. It’s my hope the band will not miss a beat and continue to be strong.” The SFU band has been one of the world’s leading pipe bands since its inception, finishing in the top three at the World Pipe Band Championships 20 times, including six firsts and nine seconds. Jack Lee said he has no plans to retire as the band’s pipe sergeant. “I’m staying on as pipe sergeant, for sure,” he said. “My three sons are in the band, along with my nephew and niece, so we’re all planning to stick around.

Surrey-raised Terry Lee is retiring as pipe major of the celebrated SFU Pipe Band, which rehearses at the Clayton area property of his brother, Jack Lee. We’re very fortunate that it’s gone so well for us, as a family.” Under Terry Lee’s direction, the band has performed at some of the world’s great concert halls, including Carnegie Hall, the Lincoln Centre, the Sydney Opera House and Mormon Tabernacle. The band has also recorded a dozen CDs and a pair of videos. “The band has been and continues to be in great hands,” Jack Lee noted. “The veteran players are very enthusiastic in their support for Alan. It’s not very often that a retiring pipe major has the good fortune to pass the torch to a great piper and double gold medalist like Alan. He takes over running the band with a very solid corps of players including an excellent group of young talented players, a vibrant junior band program and a solid organization.” The band is currently on a two-month break following a hectic summer of concerts and competitions overseas. “Our first concert back (in the fall) is Remembrance Day – always an important day for us,” said Jack Lee. “We’ve played at the Port Moody Legion for over 30 years.” tzillich@ thenownewspaper.com


A 21Forever Young NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

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grandmother. For many people, it is not the layout of the building, but rather the impression they have of the residence atmosphere or culture that helps them to make a decision. Other family members can take on the role of exploring the amenity spaces in advance and share that information with your grandmother, but for her introduction you may want to ask the marketing director to coordinate a visit with a few welcoming residents over tea. Ask that this be planned during a quieter time in the residence so she is not overwhelmed with the activity during a larger event. We suggest you limit this to just the social visit, and make a follow up appointment to view the suites and building with your grandma on another day. – the Residents

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NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

Delta Police Board Appointment

COMMUNITY

Part-time volunteers are being sought to serve on the Delta Police Board.

Surrey

Candidates must: • Reside in the Municipality of Delta; • Undergo a criminal record check and personal suitability panel interview; • Be expected to commit up to 15 hours a month to fulfil board duties.

Event series celebrates food, talk and cultures

A police board establishes goals, priorities, objectives and develops the police budget for the department. The board is also responsible for service and policy complaints related to its police department.

Tom Zillich Now staff Twitter @tomzillich

Since selection of board members is based on merit, you should have an understanding of governance boards as well as experience in business, financial management, administration, and community development. Please submit your expression of interest by 4:30 pm on Friday, October 18, 2013 to: Chair, Delta Police Board 4500 Clarence Taylor Crescent Delta, BC V4K 3E2 or by email: mayor@delta.ca Chefs Julia Kim (left), Caesar Rendon and Wen Li are among those who will cook for people who attend a series of “Dialogues Inspired by Cooking & Food” evening events at Guildford Park Secondary in Surrey, starting on Thursday, Oct. 10. Kim will cook Korean food during the first session, while Rendon does Filipino dishes Nov. 5 and Li helps make Chinese on Nov. 25. (Photo: TOM ZILLICH)

For further information, please visit www.deltapolice.ca The Corporation of Delta 4500 ClarenceTaylor Crescent Delta BC V4K 3E2 delta.ca www.corp.delta.bc.ca

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GUILDFORD — Free food serves as a hook for a new series of events in Surrey – but it’s really the conversation that counts. Starting Thursday, Oct. 10, the kitchen classroom at Guildford Park Secondary plays host to six sessions that will offer food from different cultures around the world. During these “Dialogues Inspired by Cooking & Food” events, chefs will demonstrate how to cook traditional food from their homeland, while participants are encouraged to “explore your role in making Surrey a welcoming and inclusive community.” The series is a project of Surrey Welcoming Communities Committee. Six Surrey-based organizations are involved, starting with a Koreanthemed event Oct. 10 hosted by Options Community Services Society, from 6 to 9 p.m. Other events in the series feature the food of India (Oct. 28), Philippines (Nov. 5), China (Nov. 25), Africa (Jan. 28) and Middle East (Feb. 12). There is room for approximately 30 people at each event. To register, an application form can be found online at www. surveymonkey.com/s/ DialoguesFoodCooking. For details, visit wicsurrey.org.

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

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THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

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SPORTS

Send your team’s highlights to Sports editor, Michael Booth at mbooth@thenownewspaper.com or call 604-572-0064

Premier soccer

United returns to nationals for 10th time Michael Booth Now staff Twitter @boothnow

Nicole Stewart and her Surrey United teammates will represent B.C. at nationals for the 10th consecutive year. (File photo)

for

ENTER

SURREY — Don’t ask Kate Qually for any tips on how to prepare your Thanksgiving dinner. It’s not that she doesn’t want to help, it’s just that, well, the whole concept of a Thanksgiving celebration is kind of an alien concept to Qually and her Surrey United teammates. “Gosh, it’s been at least 10 years since I had Thanksgiving with my family,” the Surrey captain said. “It might even be longer because I might have been away before that too when I was at school. I guess my last Thanksgiving must have been when I was a teenager.” For the 10th consecutive year, Surrey United will be winging their way eastward for the holiday, heading to the annual Jubilee Trophy national tournament where they will once again represent British Columbia. This year’s event is in Halifax beginning Oct. 9 and for the second year in a row, the Surrey women will have company in their quest for national gold. Joining the Surrey women’s soccer dynasty is Halifax will be their club stable mates, the Surrey United Firefighters, who will be representing B.C. in the men’s national tourney. Qually said the tournament

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has become a fixture on team members’ vacation requests from work, but the repeat trips to nationals never get old for the players. The Surrey women have performed well on the national stage, winning medals in each of their nine previous appearances. That bauble collection includes two national titles, the last of which came in 2011. With so many trips to nationals behind them, Surrey has become a target for teams wanting to make a statement in the tournament. “We’ve been there so many times now that other teams there know who we are,” Qually said. “There’s probably some kind of small intimidation factor for some teams when they play us, but at the same time, every team that we play against treats the game like it’s their gold medal match. We have to go up against that kind of passion in every game.” The Surrey United Firefighters will also be able to draw upon past experiences as they make their second consecutive trip to club soccer’s big dance. “The team was there last year and I’m sure some of the other provinces will be represented by the same clubs again this year,” said Surrey coach Rob Reed. “So some of the teams will look familiar to us, the tournament format will be

familiar and we definitely know what the task at hand is. “Having been there before is a definite advantage. You need to devise a specific strategy for this tournament because you play so many games over a short period of time. It’s like nothing else we do in our season. It’s a much different animal than league games.” The Firemen have already caught one break from the schedule makers: they have a bye on day one of tournament play. That means that not only to they have an extra day to adjust to the time zone changes, Surrey will also be able to scout their first round opponent — Manitoba — in their opening game. Reed said the early bye could be an advantage, but nothing about the tournament will be easy. “We’re expecting a lot of tough competition,” Reed said. “We’re going up against a bunch of teams that have just finished their seasons and are at the top of their games. They’ll be in peak form while we’re just gearing up and getting going again with our season. We know every game is going to be tough and we’re going to need a disciplined approach to get through it.” The national tournaments run from Oct. 9 to 14 with the championship finals taking place on Thanksgiving Monday.


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THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

SPORTS Junior A hockey

Eagles come up empty with three losses to rivals Michael Booth Now staff Twitter @boothnow

It was a lost weekend for the Surrey Eagles as the Birds dropped all three games on the schedule to B.C. Hockey League Mainland Division rivals. The Eagles best showing was their first outing where the visiting Langley Rivermen squeaked out a 4-3 win at South Surrey Arena

Friday night. Leading 1-0 after the first period, Langley pulled away with three goals in a four-minute span of the middle frame to build a 4-1 lead. Surrey tried to battle back in the third period with goals from Danton Heinen and Brett Mulcahy, but the Birds were unable to complete the comeback. Nicolas Pierog scored the other

Surrey goal. Things went downhill from there for Surrey as they were outscored 10-2 in their next two games. On Saturday night the Eagles travelled to Langley for a return date with the Rivermen. Surrey outshot Langley 25-24 in the contest but could only muster one goal in a 5-1 loss. Langley led 2-0 after one period

and 3-0 after two before Michael Roberts finally scored for Surrey. Langley answered with two more goals to close out the win. The Eagles returned to their nest on Sunday afternoon and cranked up their attack against the visiting Coquitlam Express. Surrey outshot the Express by a 43-32 margin, but were unable to come up with an answer for Coquitlam goalie Gordie Defiel, who backstopped

ATTENTION

his team to a 5-1 win. Pierog scored the lone Surrey goal shorthanded at the end of the second period. The Eagles are back on the ice Friday (Oct. 11) when they host the Powell River Kings at 7 p.m. at South Surrey Arena. Surrey then closes out the week’s schedule by taking another crack at the Rivermen in Langley Saturday.

CHRONIC PAIN MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP

Business Owners

Based on the Arthritis Self-Management Program, this workshop introduces particpants to self-management skills and the principles of pain management.

DATE: Thursday, October 17th , 2013 TIME: 1:00 pm – 3:30 pm LOCATION: Centre for Active Living

COMPLIMENTARY DIGITAL MARKETING PRESENTATION

1475 Anderson Street, White Rock

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We acknowledge the financial assistance of the province of British Columbia

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OCTOBER 19 8:00PM First United Church 15385 Semiahmoo Ave. Tickets:

WHEN

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Drop off or mail or fax: The Now Newspaper Suite 201- 7889 - 132nd St., Surrey, BC V3W 4N2 Fax: 604-572-6439 Contest deadline is noon Mon., Oct. 14, 2013 Winners will be contacted by phone after 3pm on Monday, Oct. 14, 2013

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SOUTH SURREY - WHITE ROCK EDITION

Community

Inside Viewpoint Letters Sports Classifieds

Surrey

8 9 25 27

Surrey Hospice Society’s new boss Beth Kish gears up for fundraising gala

11

Surrey

‘Grandma Sheila’ sheared Sheila Fedoruk makes good on her cancer pledge after students come up big

Marathon closures will be reassessed Amy Reid Now staff Twitter @amyreid87

CITY CENTRE – Organizers of the Surrey International World Music Marathon will be re-evaluating their traffic strategy in the face of harsh criticism about the extent of road closures – especially those around Surrey Memorial Hospital. Elizabeth Model, marathon chair, said the society received about nine complaints about the closures, but had much more positive feedback. She said with any large event, traffic is going to be impacted. See also LETTERS › page 9

Christopher Poon Now staff Twitter @questionchris VIEW VIDEO, NEWTON — It was a promise made more PHOTOS than a year ago, and on Sept. 27, Sheila Fedoruk

made good on her pledge to shave her head if the students at W.E. Kinvig Elementary could raise

$500 for cancer research. With more than $2,324 raised, Fedoruk, whose granddaughter and grandson attend the school, shed her locks in the school’s packed gymnasium. “My ears are a little cold but that’s about it.” see HEAD SHAVE › page 6

areid@thenownewspaper.com

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Sheila Fedoruk hugs her granddaughter Ariel Nerada after having her head shaved at W.E. Kinvig Elementary. (Photo: GORD GOBLE)

“The marathon is a very big event and the citizens are used to a different type of neighbourhood. As we move forward, they just have to go out and realize that people will be impacted for three to five hours on marathon morning,” she said. When asked if the road closures around the hospital will be reassessed for next year’s event, Model said “absolutely.” “If you look at cities like Vancouver, and the New York City marathon, Boston, everybody’s impacted with the traffic. If it’s institutions like the hospital, Fraser Health, we have to work out something with them to ensure that employees get to work on time and doctors see patients. Those are the fine details we have to work out – it’s only the second year,” she said. Model said Surrey is “a city that’s in transition” that is going to get a lot busier, with all the new development in City Centre, such as 3 Civic Plaza. “I’m sorry that is the case,” she said about those heavily affected by the closures. “Particularly if they had to get to work, and were late, etc.” She urged residents to plan their route ahead of time if they need to go out during marathon day next year. “Preplan, phone ahead, check the website and give yourself extra time.”


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

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NEWS

Send your story ideas or photo submissions to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Surrey

Raised bed garden causes bylaw stink Jacob Zinn Now contributor Twitter @jacobzinn

FLEETWOOD — The City of Surrey wants Jess Thompson and Cindy Quach’s “unsightly” garden to be removed, despite the garden’s health benefits to their family and environmental perks to their community. In the summer, Thompson and Quach started a hügelkultur garden on their rented one-acre property in the 8300-block of 168th Street. Hügelkultur is a European farming technique that has proven to be a popular method sustainable food gardening. “You bury biomass at the base before you warm the bed – you would take things such as branches, leaves, tree trunks, and then put your growing medium over top,” said Quach. “Over time, the biomass decomposes and releases heat and nutrients.” The garden provides fresh fruits and vegetables for them and their two children while also preventing the growth of hogweed, an invasive plant with sap that can cause long-lasting blisters, scars and even blindness. Following hügelkultur methods, the couple mowed down the hogweed, suppressed it with recycled coconut husk, put woodchips on top and created raised bed gardens around their house. But despite the prevention of hogweed growth, neighbours have complained to the city’s bylaw and licensing department about the garden. Nearby residents initially raised a stink over, well, the stink of the manure when it was first brought in. “When the woodchips and the manure were freshly delivered onto the property – before the beds were actually built – that was when the complaints started coming in to bylaws,” said Quach. “Before we even had a chance to level out the piles to form the garden beds, the bylaw officer came and

Cindy Quach and Jess Thompson – with their children, Nikola, 2, and four-monthold Roial – are disputing a bylaw infraction from the City of Surrey stating that their hügelkultur garden is unsightly. (Photo: JACOB ZINN) looked at the place.” The smell subsided once the manure was worked into the garden beds, but Quach said there were still complaints to the bylaw department that their garden is an eyesore. “Initially, (the officer) said, ‘Oh, that’s fantastic, you’re doing the neighbourhood a favour,’” she recalled. “But then a week went by and I suppose more complaints came in to bylaws and we were served with this letter that the property is not in compliance with the unsightly bylaw.” Thompson and Quach were given 22 days to remedy the infraction under the Unsightly Premises Bylaw, which outlines such criteria as accumulation of refuse, damaged landscaping and broken fencing as reasons a property can be unsightly. They said they called the officer for clarification and were told that levelling out the piles would put them in compliance with the

bylaw. “We levelled it out, we formed our beds, he came back and he was not satisfied,” she said. “They were expecting flat beds, but we’re doing a hügelkultur bed.” The garden beds resemble small, brown hills made up of bark mulch and soil. Neighbours have also complained about the height of the garden, but Thompson and Quach have noted that, given time to grow, the hills will compress in size while becoming leafy and green in colour. “The unfortunate thing is there’s no neighbourly communication,” said Quach. “We could have had a chance to explain it to them, but instead of talking to us, they called bylaws instead.” Thompson added, “They just saw material coming in and they didn’t understand what it was, but they never asked us.” Furthermore, Thompson and Quach’s

property is fenced and surrounded on most sides by trees, including large evergreens lining the front yard along 168th Street. Quach said most people would have to make an effort to see their “unsightly” garden, and Thompson noted that neighbours in support of their garden are wondering why the city isn’t targeting other dilapidated houses in the area. “There’s one down the street that’s getting hit with graffiti quite a bit,” said Thompson. “When they see an unsightly property, there’s ‘obviously unsightly’ and then there’s somebody trying to do a garden.” The couple has a petition with about 90 signatures from residents in favour of the garden, as well as verbal praise from the Ministry of Environment and a letter of support from Bob Boyd, a longtime public health inspector with Fraser Health. “The hügelkultur or raised bed/mound is ideal for urban and suburban lots,” reads Boyd’s letter, noting that the garden falls in line with the City of Surrey’s green movement by conserving water, recycling, composting and eating a 100-mile diet. “These days, when we are constantly hearing about going ‘green,’ growing food in your backyard should be encouraged.” Jas Rehal, manager of bylaw enforcement with the city, wouldn’t comment on the specifics of the infraction, but said the investigation is ongoing and that the city is working with the owners on a solution. Ultimately, Thompson and Quach picked hügelkultur gardening as their remedy for hogweed because it was cost-effective, ecofriendly and low maintenance, while also producing more than 90 per cent of their vegetables. If they’re forced to remove their garden, it will be costly and the hogweed will grow back in the area. The couple hopes to present to the agricultural advisory committee on their situation. jzinn@thenownewspaper.com

Crime

Cops search for would-be snatcher

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INTERACTIVE PRINT SURREY — Surrey Mounties are looking for a man in his late 50s who grabbed a teenage boy who was walking to school on Sept. 30, in Clayton Heights. The 14-year-old boy was walking back to Clayton Heights Secondary school after lunch when the stranger approached him near Extra Foods, in the 18700-block of Fraser Highway, followed him, and grabbed him. The boy pushed him away and otherwise wasn’t injured.

Cpl. Bert Paquet said no vehicle was involved and the incident appears to have been “isolated.” “We’ve received a few tips over the weekend and we’re following up on them.” The suspect is white, slim, had a grey beard, is about six foot one and was wearing a black hoodie, with the hood up, and light blue jeans. Meanwhile, police are also looking for a white man and a brown man who attacked a couple with a knife near

Gateway SkyTrain Station shortly after midnight Saturday. The white guy was dressed in black, and the other wore a dark puffy jacket. Police found a 23-year-old Surrey woman lying on the ground in front of 10240 City Parkway, bleeding. A 38year-old Surrey man was also injured. Both have been released from hospital. Police ask anyone with information to contact the Surrey RCMP at 604599-0502. Tom Zytaruk

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

AS05

NEWS White Rock

BIA to cut tourism funds Christopher Poon Now staff Twitter @questionchris

WHITE ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A recent decision by the White Rock Business Improvement Association to cut funding to Tourism White Rock is putting future tourismrelated initiatives in question, according to Mayor Wayne Baldwin. Last Monday the BIA held its annual general meeting, where it was decided that cuts would be made to website maintenance and the rental of a billboard on Highway 99, among other tourism-related initiatives. The cuts are estimated to save the BIA around $20,000 per year, but Baldwin is wondering why the organization would cut funding to something that is supposed to be the BIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main priority. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just seems to be a strange decision to make despite the fact that the two entities are linked,â&#x20AC;? said Baldwin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;White Rock tourism was given birth as a result of the need on the part of the BIA and the city to do business promotion and to bring tourists into White Rock and it just seems to me to be a bit shortsighted to take away funding from that entity, which exists solely to enhance businesses, not the general population.â&#x20AC;?

As such, Baldwin said it would be inappropriate for the city to commit more funding to tourism in lieu of the BIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cuts, as money derived from taxation should not go to something benefiting just the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s businesses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have to take a look at that. In the long run weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find ways to get around that, but in the short run, it does cause a bit of concern,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The BIA was formed as something to do a benefit for the businesses, so we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really.â&#x20AC;? As for the billboard advertising White Rock to those driving by the Douglas border crossing, Baldwin said he isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sure what will happen. Currently the cost of the billboard, estimated to be around $40,000, is split between the BIA and the city. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was put there for their benefit only. So if thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what they want to do and is the decision of the businesses and they take their funding away, I guess we would have to go along with that,â&#x20AC;? said Baldwin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Council is going to have to take this whole thing into consideration. This took us by surprise and we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really had a chance do anything about this, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get there.â&#x20AC;? cpoon@thenownewspaper.com

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

THE

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‹ from page 1

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Fedoruk made her promise after seeing one of the school’s teachers have his head shaved last year. “They did really well last year and so afterwards I said to him, ‘I could do it, I’ll do it next year.’” And while some may be somewhat vain when it comes to losing their hair, Fedoruk said she had all the motivation in the world going into it. “My mother passed away from leukemia years ago and I’ve always had it in my heart to do something, but I don’t have a lot of money so I wondered what I could do to help find a cure,” she said. “I’ve lost a lot of friends as well and this past year I’ve been supporting a little fella who’s been battling leukemia so this opportunity came about and I just came through those doors and went with it. I was honoured to do it and would do it again in a heartbeat.” Following her shearing, Fedoruk will continue her presence at the school, where she’s been volunteering for the past eight years when her first

granddaughter began kindergarten. With two more grandchildren at the school, Fedoruk said she doesn’t expect to be leaving anytime soon. “I love the kids there, they’re great there,” she said. “It’s an inner-city school and they all call me ‘Grandma Sheila.’” As for the amount raised, which ended up at almost five times her initial goal, Fedoruk said she never imagined her fundraising would bring in nearly $2,500. “I was absolutely floored. A lot of my friends donated and I think some of their motivation was to see me bald,”

she said with a laugh. Fedoruk added that she hoped others would follow her example and get involved in fundraising or volunteering, one way or another. “All I can think is to support wherever you can. Do what you can and eventually I think there’s going to be a cure for cancer,” she said. “I would encourage everyone to do whatever they can to help find that because it’s so rampant and it’s hard to watch people die from it, it’s hard to watch people battle it and, in the grand scheme of things, what’s a haircut?” cpoon@thenownewspaper.com

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

AS07

NEWS White Rock

Council rejects subdividing lots, adding basements Christopher Poon Now staff Twitter @questionchris

WHITE ROCK — An applicant whose development proposal was recommended to be rejected by council appeared at the Sept. 23 council meeting in a pre-emptive bid to save her development before it was voted on. Balwant Bala appeared as delegation in order to plea for approval to subdivide her two lots on Marine Drive into three for single-family dwellings with second basements. Staff recommended council deny the application after it was discussed by the land use and planning committee. Recalling the response she’d received by members of council and city staff, Bala wondered why the proposal was set to be rejected. Asserting that they had been “misguided” by the city, Bala said she and her partners were shocked to hear the committee recommended denying their application, given that staff and some council members seemed to have had positive things to say during their application process.

“With all due respect... two of the councillors, Alan Campbell and Bill Lawrence, came to a public information meeting and sat and listened and asked questions,” said Bala. “(City manager) Dan Bottrill supported it also, according to his comments, this was a good project and he didn’t see anything wrong.” According to Bala, she and her partners had put about $22,000 into the development proposal and noted that nearby lots were already zoned for the type of development they were seeking for the site. In response, Campbell said that while he did compliment her on her proposal earlier in the year, it was merely for the detailed presentation, not necessarily an endorsement of the project. Following council’s rejection, Coun. Larry Robinson said while they did not have to explain their actions when voting on an issue, in this case, it was simply that the proposal did not seem to fall in line with the rest of the neighbourhood. Bala said they may be hesitant to invest in any future White Rock projects as a result.

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

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VIEWPOINT

Address: The Surrey Now, #201 7889 132nd St., Surrey, B.C. V3W 4N2

Publisher: Alvin Brouwer

B.C. politics

Ethnic vote critical to both parties InTheHouse Keith Baldrey

T

he sensitive and sometimes murky world of so-called “ethnic politics” continues to engulf both of B.C.’s major political parties. It’s been that way for more than a couple of years now, ever since both parties found themselves plunged into leadership races that involved mass membership sign-ups in ethnic communities. The NDP, about to search for another leader, may be headed into another controversy involving those same mass sign-ups. The B.C. Liberal government, meanwhile, finds itself dogged by a controversy involving ethnic communities it thought had disappeared once and for all. The so-called “ethnic memo” controversy was big news before the May election. This involved government political staff doing party work (making contacts in ethnic communities, compiling information such as membership lists, etc.) while

on the taxpayer dime. Now the RCMP is investigating the matter after NDP leader Adrian Dix went to the police with information that he says may indicate some aspects of the Election Act had been violated through these activities. Now, as someone who was part of a giant media groupthink that saw the ethnic memo scandal as being a much bigger deal than the voters ultimately considered it to be at election time, I’m reluctant to predict the RCMP investigation will lead to anything substantial. In fact, anything short of implicating an elected official (as opposed to nowdeparted political staffers) in illegal activities is unlikely to inflict much political damage on the B.C. Liberals. Still, no government likes to have the RCMP rummaging around its dirty laundry. Nevertheless, the whole thing is yet another reminder of just how beholden our two parties are to the interests of ethnic communities, and how courting their votes has become of paramount importance to them. In the last election campaign, for example, the B.C. Liberals strove to have a

major presence in ChineseCanadian media through heavy advertising. That strategy appeared to pay off, as the party held at least two seats (Burnaby North and Vancouver-Fraserview) with a heavy Chinese-Canadian population it might otherwise have lost. But while the B.C. Liberals watch that RCMP investigation with some nervousness (which is unlikely to disappear anytime soon, as these types of probes tend to be lengthy ones) the NDP is about to revisit the sensitivities wrapped around that party’s relationship with ethnic communities. The reform-minded Forward B.C. NDP faction wants to limit membership sign-ups for the leadership race to 10 people a week per person, according to the Georgia Straight newspaper.

This would prevent what happened in the last leadership races for both parties. At that time, candidates or their representatives went into places like Surrey, Delta and south Vancouver and engaged in mass sign-ups in places like religious temples and churches. The result is that a relatively small geographic region dictated the outcome of both races, and that both Adrian Dix and Christy Clark owed their leadership victories to this practice. Candidates from outside the Lower Mainland – notably John Horgan of the NDP and George Abbott of the B.C. Liberals – were penalized by the mass signups and were effectively frozen out of the selection process. There will be a predictable push-back from various

ethnic communities to Forward B.C. NDP’s proposal. They will argue, with some justification, that the members of their communities should not be limited in their potential participation in a democratic process. Both sides in this debate have meritorious arguments. Nevertheless, it may be time for political parties to abandon the idea of giving every party member a vote in a leadership race and return to the days of convention delegates determining the winner of that race. While membership signups can inject some interest (and money) into a party leadership race, so too can a leadership convention, which carries with it several days of high drama (potentially) and often an exciting outcome. A delegated convention

Keith.Baldrey@globalnews.ca

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would also ensure no particular region or community (ethnic or otherwise) has power disproportionate to its size when determining who the major political leaders are in this province. Unfortunately, I don’t see much evidence that either the NDP or the B.C. Liberals want to go back to the days of electing delegates to a leadership convention. This means the NDP faces an interesting dilemma: put the brakes on mass membership sign-ups, or allow a relatively small geographic region play a dominant role in choosing the party’s next leader. Ethnic politics is never far away from political parties these days, and both the B.C. Liberals and the NDP are about to be reminded of that.

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The NOW newspaper is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. You can reach us by phone at 604-572-0064, by email at edit@thenownewspaper.com or by mail at Suite 201-7889 132 Street, Surrey, B.C. V3W 4N2 Second Class Mail Registration 7434. Delivered free every Tuesday and Thursday to 118,000 homes and businesses.

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THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

A09

LETTERS

Send your letters to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Marathon caused nightmare for Surrey drivers The Editor, Re: “Marathon traffic affect you? Thank you for your patience,” the Now letters, Oct 3. I am compelled to comment on Elyse Fryer’s rose-tinted letter that made very light of the inconvenience to vast swaths of the city’s northbound traffic. This marathon should not happen so close to the hospital; nor should it have forced the entire shutdown of major streets bearing north from 88th Avenue. I and many many others were forced to endure traffic that completely stopped and only crawled when it did move – for hours. Several people took the side streets only to find that all roads leading north were blocked as well. It was a nightmare for all of us. “Inconvenience” is an understatement. It took me more than 90 minutes to travel from Newton to King George SkyTrain station to pick up my stranded elderly aunt from Vancouver. Along the way, it wasn’t uncommon to see an ambulance attempting to travel on the same clogged road to an emergency. The extended minutes for emergency response vehicles stuck in the marathon traffic could have resulted in tragedy. There were miles of idling traffic that loaded far more carbon into the sky than they should have. The Surrey marathon organizers ill informed everyone as to what alternative roads were available for northbound travel. Did they even envision that perhaps there are motorists who do not have a choice but to drive on that day? The marathon people should not have planned this ill-conceived event so close to the hospital and forcing the closure of so many northbound roads.

To the delight of Elyse Fryer, it seems that the needs of the few far outweighed the needs of the many. Yes, indeed it was quite the party for you – and the rest of us. The selfish marathon has no value or place in the area of north Surrey. Edward Leigh, Surrey

Don’t blame drivers for marathon mayhem The Editor, Re: “Marathon traffic affect you? Thank you for your patience,” the Now letters, Oct 3. Mrs. Fryer, first of all, congratulations on your anniversary, and I hope you have many more. I sincerely hope you had a wonderful marathon experience. However, I take issue with your assumption that those of us upset at the traffic situation caused by the street shutdowns did not “plan for it.” My parents live in the heart of the marathon course – there was no way for them to get out of their house until 2 p.m. For my mother to teach Sunday School that day, she had to call the marathon organizers to get special permission to cross 132nd Street at 9 a.m. Upon our return, we found that roads that had been marked as “open” or “for local traffic” on the map that was sent to us were blocked off by barriers, signs and police officers. This included access to our street, which had been open when we left that day. The closures seemed arbitrary and without notice. Like previous letter writers,

it took several hours for us to get home. While I can appreciate the importance of the marathon to the City of Surrey and its participants (I hope to include myself in their number next year), I would strongly encourage the City of Surrey and marathon organizers to take the transportation needs of local homeowners and renters into account when preparing for next year’s marathon. Elexis Harrison, Surrey

Marathon volunteers deserve huge thanks

the rain and wind. One black mark for me was the minivan driver who was clearly very irate at having to wait to cross the route – and despite instructions from the flagger, raced through the line of runners. It was an incident which could have had a nasty result but didn’t. It made me realize that we all need to take a deep breath from time to time and relax. I don’t know who the flagger was at the intersection but you handled the rude driver with grace, even though I’m sure you were upset. A special thank you for keeping the runners safe. Three cheers for the marathon. Patrick Fowler, Port Coquitlam

The Editor, Re: “Marathon was ‘quite a party,’” the Now, Oct 1. I want to say a huge thank you to all of the people who made the Surrey International World Music Marathon happen on Sept. 29. Events like this are a huge undertaking and are only possible with a large number of volunteers. This was my first half marathon and I have to say thank you to everyone for their support for the runners – everyone from the people at the water stations, to the flaggers, police officers, musicians and the people in their homes waving at us as we ran. Particularly, thank you to the families, young and old, who came out in the rain to cheer for the “Random Stranger.” It was heartwarming. The music miles are such a fantastic motivator. My face hurt from smiling. The musicians were amazing keeping us going in

Easier to use hatchet to get a fingerprint The Editor, Re: “iPhone 5S fingerprint scanner already fooled,” the Now, Oct. 3. Duh! What Christopher Poon is describing is a slightly higher-tech alternative to hacking off someone’s finger in order to use their fingerprint. If what’s on the phone is sufficiently valuable to cause the desperate thief to scour everything the phone owner has touched in order to find a sufficiently clear, photographically perfect fingerprint, it is going to take them forever. More practical to use the hatchet. That’s what they do in the movies. Ken Nowlan, White Rock

Advertising Feature

Audi Langley out for a day of play with SABA Recently Audi Langley in conjunction with SABA (South Asian Business Association) sponsored the 5th annual Network Golf Tournament at Morgan Creek Golf Course. At the tournament Audi Langley helped fund an entrepreneurial scholarship for the business program at Kwantlen Polytechnic University. The hole in one contest created a lot of excitement as a brand new Audi could be won.

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Congratulations to the winners: Raj Sekhon, Avtar Badasha, Kevin Mercer, Lakuvinder Gill

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To make it even more fun staff members of Audi Langley organized a remote control car race track with the winner receiving a pair of Canucks tickets.


A10

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

THE

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Help us support the Tiny Bundles Program at the Surrey Food Bank Join us at the RACE FOR BABIES EVENT Date: Time: Venue: Price:

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Call Margot for tickets at 604-572-0064


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

A11

COMMUNITY

Send your story ideas or photo submissions to ‘Now’ editor Beau Simpson at edit@thenownewspaper.com

Surrey Hospice Society

New director takes helm of hospice Surrey Hospice Society is gearing up for its annual gala on Oct. 18, its biggest event of the year Amy Reid Now staff Twitter @amyreid87

SURREY — Surrey Hospice Society welcomed Beth Kish as its new executive director this summer. Prior to joining the Surrey organization, Kish was executive director at Foothills Country Hospice Society for two-and-ahalf years, an eight-bed hospice located just outside of Calgary.

At any given time, we can have 50-plus palliative patients. Coming from a smaller town, Kish says she knows she faces a big challenge when it comes to raising funds, which is how the organization offers services for free. “It’s definitely busier and bigger and more challenging to raise funds (in Surrey),” Kish said. “It’s definitely a challenge. It’s harder to raise money here than it was (at the Foothills hospice). There, everybody knew everybody and there wasn’t as many charities competing for that same donated dollar.” Kish said the Surrey hospice does a lot more counselling than her previous post and, overall, is a larger operation. Surrey Hospice has 20 beds located at Laurel Place and 10 beds in Surrey Memorial Hospital across the street. The hospice also does home visits. “At any given time, we can have 50-plus palliative patients,” Kish said. And the volunteer base is huge. Kish said

Beth Kish is the new executive director of the Surrey Hospice Society. She said she is prepared for the challenge of fundraising for the non-profit, which has all its free services funded through donations and events such as the annual gala, One Enchanted Evening, coming up on Oct. 19 at Eaglequest Coyote Creek Golf and Country Club. (Photo: KEVIN HILL) the organization couldn’t run without its more than 150 volunteers. The hospice also has a thrift store, located at 7138 King George Blvd., which it runs in partnership with the Surrey Fire Fighters’ Charitable Society. As executive director, Kish said one of her goals is to spread awareness and educate the community on what hospice care really is. “This kind of care is so wonderful in the fact that when people are given a terminal

diagnosis, and usually will be offered hospice with three or less months to live, it really is a place that they can go that is much gentler. It’s not as hospital-like... I often hear from families of patients saying, ‘I finally just get to be his wife, or the husband, I’m not a pill pusher, I’m not having to organize and clean up.’ They get to have that very, very special time together.” The hospice is gearing up for its annual gala, set for Oct. 19 at Eaglequest Coyote

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Creek Golf & Country Club. The event is the hospice’s largest fundraising event of the year. The evening, dubbed One Enchanted Evening, will include a champagne reception, dinner and entertainment, and there are more than 100 prizes to be given away. Tickets are $95 or $690 for a table of eight. For tickets and more information, visit www.surreyhospice.com or call 604-5847006. areid@thenownewspaper.com


A12 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013 SURREY DENTURE CLINIC

THE

COMMUNITY

Unit B, 10501 King George Hwy

604-588-4333

For Denture/Partial Wearers: ❑ Are

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SOUTH SURREY — Skilled volunteers and other helpers are still needed for the Longhouse Extreme Makeover project at Alexandra Neighbourhood House, or Alex House. The facility, at Crescent Beach, will be renovated over the course of 72 hours

on the weekend of Oct. 18 to 20. Volunteers with drywall and tiling experience are needed for prep work, set to start Wednesday, Oct. 9. Demolition of parts of the longhouse began this week, including work to tear apart washrooms. The goal of the renovation project is to attract more corporate and group rentals. The longhouse was built in the 1980s, and it’s showing its age.

The budget for the renovation project is around $300,000; event planners have been working to secure sponsors and volunteers since the project was announced in May. A major backer of the initiative is Investors Group, which has worked to shape the renovations and is using the project as a team-building exercise. For more details, visit www. alexhouse.net or call 604-535-0015.

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NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

COMMUNITY

A P P LY F O R A C O M M U N I T Y G R A N T

Wrestling event Friday to benefit BC SPCA WHITE ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A night of wrestling Friday will benefit abused animals. All proceeds from the All Star Wrestling event, on Oct. 11 at the Elks Hall, will go to BC SPCA (British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals). South Surrey-based wrestler Bryon Walters, aka Joe Bruiser, has been working to spread word of the charity event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything helps get the people out for this event,â&#x20AC;? he told the Now. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pack it so

A13

COMMUNITY

BEAUTIFICATION

we can have lots of donations to help our little furry friends that desperately depend on our support to keep them until they find a loving home.â&#x20AC;? Walters is also a backer of the Body Slams for Toys, a wrestling event that collects toys for kids in need. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event is on Dec. 13 at Elks Hall, 1469 George St., White Rock. For details, visit allstar-wrestling.com or call 604-710-0872.

GRANT PROGRAM

Tom Zillich

Apply for a Community Grant

SURREY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

The City of Surrey is pleased to offer grants to support neighbourhood beautiďŹ cation and celebration.

NEW EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT NOW OPEN

Through this program, Surrey residents, groups and associations can now apply to the City for ďŹ nancial grants to support neighbourhood beautiďŹ cation projects and community celebrations. Successful applicants match grant money with contributions of volunteer labour, donated materials, and/or cash.

HOW TO GET TO EMERGENCY HAS CHANGED Surreyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new Emergency and Pediatric Emergency are located on the west side of the Hospital on Level 1 of the new Critical Care Tower.

Who can apply? All Surrey residents, community groups and associations can apply. Small business or groups of businesses will also be considered for street beautiďŹ cation projects.

Applications are now being accepted. For more information or to apply please check out our website. 013113

THE

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A14

A 14 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

COMMUNITY Surrey

Victims Services offers support through tough times The city’s intervention programs turn 30 years old this year. Carolyn Cooke Now staff Twitter @carolyncooke1

SURREY — Even though Victims Services turns 30 this year, many people don’t know the full scope of services offered by it. Mark Elson, intervention programs manager for the City of Surrey, said they do far more than respond to traumatic incidents where they’re called in by the attending police officer. “There’s a whole other side of that too, like when it goes to the court criminal system, we do court accompaniment and we update people with their file status, provide people with referrals to other agencies if they need them, and (in cases of) domestic violence, arrange for shelters, things like that,” Elson said. Victims Services has always covered this gamut in Surrey, and includes youth intervention and restorative justice. “When we started 30 years ago, we had

Mark Elson, intervention programs manager with Surrey, started out as a volunteer victims services caseworker about 20 years ago. The program now has all paid staff who help others cope with trauma and life-changing experiences. (Photo: KEVIN HILL) two paid staff members and it was actually a unit comprised of the volunteers that would come in and do the case workload,” said Elson. “About 12 years ago that changed and

we no longer have volunteers, but we have a full complement – we have seven full-time caseworkers that respond to calls, provide service 21 hours a day, from 6 a.m. to 3 a.m.”

Elson started out as a volunteer caseworker about 20 years ago, and was an on-call firefighter for the City of Surrey for nine years as well as an auxiliary constable with the Surrey RCMP for the last 13 years. In spite of the fact his staff is called to deal with people’s trauma, Elson said he is impressed with how resilient they are. “They truly are an amazing group of people. I’ll go out on call even now with them know and they’ll come back and they will do a debrief themselves and amongst themselves,” he said. “Actually, they’ll do that on every single call and I really see now the importance of that. I will be thinking about a call the next day and they’ve just kind of moved on.” Part of it too might be down to the type of people who take up this kind of work. “I think there’s two things. I think there’s people who’ve received help in the past from different agencies, such as victims services, and they realize how much it helped them and they want to be part of that and to give back. I think that’s a big part of it,” he said. “And I think the other part of it is certain people’s nature to want to help people. It’s a very unique way of helping people.” ccooke@thenownewspaper.com

ADVERTISING FEATURE

It’s Not About The Bike, It’s Not About the Ride...

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE KIDS! Applewood Kia Donates $5000 to Cops for Cancer Charity

The Cops for Cancer is an exciting annual event that takes place each

fall with over one hundred law enforcement and emergency service personnel from across the province. Once the team is selected in the spring the next 5-6 months is spent fund raising and training. The riders brave all types of weather as they cycle through Vancouver Island, Northern BC, the coast of British Columbia and the Fraser Valley. During their ride they stop at local

schools to hand out teddy bears and cuddle quilts to children that are going through cancer treatment. There are also stops to honour children that are no longer with us. Teaching children the importance of looking after themselves and making healthy lifestyle choices is also a very important part of the ride. The riders distribute trading cards to the children, which explain 5 important

points to staying healthy. The impact of cancer on the life of a child and their family is devastating. The ride has raised over $425,000 for the Canadian Cancer Society which is used to fund life-saving research and caring support programs. If you would like to make a donation, get involved or learn more go to www.copsforcancerbc.ca and click on Tour de Valley.

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Darren Graham and Norm Isaak, owners of Applewood Kia are proud to support the Cops for Cancer, Tour de Valley, a charity that is dear to their hearts! Norm rides with the event that makes its way to over 100 locations over 9 days for more than 900 kms. They also provide vehicles for training rides and the actual Tour.


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

A15

portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2

PLANNING FOR GROWTH IN CANADIAN TRADE The Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project is a proposed new three-berth marine terminal at Roberts Bank in Delta, B.C. that would provide 2.4 million TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent unit containers) of additional container capacity. Subject to environmental approvals, the project could be fully operational by the early 2020s. Discussion Guide and Online Feedback Form available at:

www.portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2

Proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2

Existing Roberts Bank Terminals

The proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project consists of two primary components: • A new marine terminal would be located northwest of the existing Roberts Bank terminal facilities, approximately 5.5 kilometres offshore from the mainland. The terminal would be located as far offshore as practical to reduce the impact on sensitive marine habitat and limit the amount of dredging required, while still meeting seismic performance criteria. The terminal is designed to accommodate simultaneous mooring of three modern container vessels. It is anticipated that the terminal would make considerable use of electric equipment and vehicles, as well as providing berthed ships with shore power, therefore allowing them to turn off their on-board generators, reducing air emissions and noise.

• Road and rail improvements on the Roberts Bank Causeway, including additional lead tracks, a switching yard, an overpass structure and access roads, would provide access to the new terminal. To reduce potential impacts on sensitive marine habitat on the northwest side, the causeway would be widened to different widths along its length.

ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF THE PROPOSED ROBERTS BANK TERMINAL 2 PROJECT. 1

Construction period of approximately six years If constructed, the Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project would drive economic growth and increase employment, benefiting the region, the province and the country. The economic benefits to Canada from the proposed project would include direct, indirect, and induced employment growth, and gains in economic output, gross domestic product (GDP) and government revenues during construction and operations.

The project is part of Port Metro Vancouver’s Container Capacity Improvement Program, a long-term strategy to deliver projects to meet anticipated growth in demand for container capacity to 2030.

LEARN MORE AT portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2


A16

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

From October 7 to November 12, 2013, Port Metro Vancouver is conducting Pre-Design Consultation for the proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project with communities, stakeholders and the public.

! "# $

You can provide feedback and learn more by:

Pre-Design Consultation is the third round of Port Metro Vancouver-led public consultation regarding the proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project and builds on community and stakeholder input from previous rounds of consultation.

 

                  

       www.portmetrovancouver.com/RBT 2            



  !"      www.porttalk.ca/RBT 2

 #  $%&$$'())* Please provide your feedback by November 12, 2013.

AREA

EVENT

DATE

TIME

LOCATION

DELTA

Small Group Meeting

Tuesday, October 8

5:00pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7:00pm

Coast Tsawwassen Inn,1665 56th Street, Delta

LANGLEY

Small Group Meeting

Wednesday, October 9

5:00pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7:00pm

Coast Hotel & Convention Centre, 20393 Fraser Highway, Langley

DELTA

Small Group Meeting

Thursday, October 10

1:00pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3:00pm

Delta Town & Country Inn, 6005 Highway 17, Delta

SURREY

Small Group Meeting

Tuesday, October 15

1:00pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3:00pm

Surrey Arts Centre, 13750 88th Avenue, Surrey

RICHMOND

Small Group Meeting

Tuesday, October 15

5:00pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7:00pm

UBC Boathouse, 7277 River Road, Richmond

VANCOUVER

Small Group Meeting

Wednesday, October 16

9:00amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:00am

Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue, 580 West Hastings Street, Vancouver

RICHMOND

Open House

Wednesday, October 16

5:00pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:00pm

UBC Boathouse, 7277 River Road, Richmond

SURREY

Open House

Thursday, October 17

5:00pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:00pm

Surrey Arts Centre,13750 88th Avenue, Surrey

LANGLEY

Open House

Tuesday, October 22

5:00pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:00pm

Coast Hotel & Convention Centre, 20393 Fraser Highway, Langley

DELTA

Open House

Thursday, October 24

5:00pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:00pm

Delta Town & Country Inn, 6005 Highway 17, Delta

DELTA

Open House

Saturday, October 26

10:00amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1:00pm

Coast Tsawwassen Inn, 1665 56th Street, Delta

*To register for a Small Group Meeting, please email container.improvement@portmetrovancouver.com or call 604-665-9337. Pre-registration for open houses is not required.

Consultation Topics During Pre-Design Consultation, Port Metro Vancouver is seeking your input regarding three topics related to the Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project: 

      : Port Metro Vancouver recognizes the importance of efďŹ ciently managing container truck trafďŹ c in local communities and on local roads, and would like feedback regarding some ways in which it proposes to more effectively manage port-related truck trafďŹ c.



HABITAT MITIGATION: Studies are currently underway to determine potential project impacts to ďŹ sh and wildlife habitat. Port Metro Vancouver has developed a number of possible mitigation approaches, and is seeking your feedback on them.



    : Port Metro Vancouver is looking for feedback regarding some ideas for community legacy beneďŹ ts related to the environment, community well-being and recreation, and transportation, which would be provided as part of the Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project.

To learn more about these consultation topics and complete a feedback form, visit portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2.

LEARN MORE AT portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT The proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project will be subject to a thorough and independent environmental assessment. On September 12, 2013, Port Metro Vancouver ďŹ led a Project Description with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency and the British Columbia Environmental Assessment OfďŹ ce. A Project Description assists regulatory agencies in determining whether an environmental assessment is required for the project and, if so, it provides the information required to determine the scope and nature of the assessment. For more information regarding the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, please visit . For more information regarding the British Columbia Environmental Assessment OfďŹ ce, please visit  .


THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

A17

PLANNING FOR GROWTH IN CANADIAN TRADE 68 9; TRADE IMPORTANT?

Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Asia-PaciďŹ c Gateway is a network of airports, seaports, railways, roads and border crossings connecting Canada with major trading partners. The Gateway provides a means for Canadian farmers, mill workers, ďŹ shers, manufacturers and miners to export their goods to other markets, and a means for Canadians to access global goods on local store shelves. Trade is one of the primary drivers of economic growth in the nation. The economic beneďŹ ts of trade are created not just in the Asia-PaciďŹ c Gateway itself, but also across the region, the province and the country. One of the primary beneďŹ ts of international trade is in the jobs that it creates for Canadians. The location and nature of these jobs varies greatly, from logistics to manufacturing to agricultural, and all rely on the movement of goods in and out of the Asia-PaciďŹ c Gateway. Other beneďŹ ts to Canadians include increased revenue to government, community amenities, and higher purchasing power for consumers and businesses.

68 < #=>"9><; 9@!=">" "= "H<J Port Metro Vancouver handles a wide variety of cargo through the Asia-PaciďŹ c Gateway, including automobiles, breakbulk, bulk and containers. Containers are one of the most signiďŹ cant business sectors by tonnage, second only to bulk cargo. Modern shipping containers are constructed of steel, which allows for repeated use and the safe transport of of a diverse range of goods. Their standardized design means that they can be easily and quickly transferred between ship, train or truck.

Port Metro Vancouver

Busan

Container trade beneďŹ ts both Canadian consumers and producers, with almost equal volumes of imported and exported goods traveling through Port Metro Vancouver:  Import containers often contain electronics, food items, household goods, clothing, shoes, health and medical products, sporting equipment, construction materials, and manufacturing inputs such as car parts.  Export containers often contain lumber, pulp, plywood, specialty grain and local agricultural products including blueberries, tomatoes and mushrooms.

68 H= < ><<H @=< CONTAINER CAPACITY?

Tokyo Yokohama

Shanghai Kaohsiung Shenzhen Hong Kong

1,451,309 TEUs (2012 imports)

Singapore

1,261,852 TEUs (2012 exports)

In 2012, almost 3.3 million TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent unit containers) moved through terminals on the Canadian west coast, of which 2.7 million TEUs moved through terminals within Port Metro Vancouverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jurisdiction. Annual third-party forecasts show that demand for containerized trade is growing, with containerized trade on Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s west coast set to double over the next 10-15 years and nearly triple by 2030. (Ocean Shipping Consultants, July 2013)

%!               %!   &

Port Metro Vancouver has been working with all levels of government in planning and developing many initiatives that will accommodate future growth, improve cargo handling and increase the Asia-PaciďŹ c Gatewayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s competitive advantage. Some projects that Port Metro Vancouver is currently involved in include: 

232nd Street Overpass (Langley â&#x20AC;&#x201C; construction phase): Part of the Roberts Bank Rail Corridor Program, the 232nd Street Overpass Project will build a twolane overpass that will replace the current street-level crossing of the      *' 

 *$ 4      5 for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians.



Deltaport Terminal, Road and Rail Improvement Project (Roberts Bank, Delta â&#x20AC;&#x201C; construction phase): An efďŹ cient and costeffective plan to increase container capacity through improvements at the existing Deltaport Terminal. Project improvements will be implemented mostly within the existing terminal, road and rail footprint and will have a low potential for environmental impact.       marine environment.



Low Level Road Project (City of North Vancouver â&#x20AC;&#x201C; construction phase): The Low Level Road Project includes realigning and elevating the existing Low Level Road, signalized intersections and drainage enhancements to improve road safety, an overpass at Neptune-Cargill and turning lanes to reduce congestion, and provisions for completion of sections of the Spirit Trail.



South Shore Corridor Project (City of Vancouver â&#x20AC;&#x201C; construction phase): The South Shore Corridor Project includes realignment, reconďŹ guration and elevation of roadways, a pedestrian overpass at Victoria Drive, and other corridor wide improvements such as upgraded signage, installation of Intelligent Transportation Systems and ďŹ bre optic cable upgrades.

For more information regarding these and other projects, please visit portmetrovancouver.com.

LEARN MORE AT portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2


A18

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

THE

NEWSPAPER.COM

PLANNING FOR GROWTH IN CANADIAN TRADE WHY ROBERTS BANK?

A NEW BRIDGE TO REPLACE THE

Roberts Bank port facilities are well positioned to accommodate future growth in trade activity. The area has several competitive advantages, including its proximity to major transportation corridors for both truck and rail movements, direct access to numerous off-dock facilities and one of the most efďŹ cient ship-to-rail designs of any port in North America.

george massey tunnel

On September 20, 2013, the Government of British Columbia announced that they will move ahead to replace the George Massey Tunnel, with construction of a new bridge on the existing Highway 99 corridor to begin in 2017.

Trade through Roberts Bank will also beneďŹ t from two initiatives that are currently underway to improve transportation for communities, commuters and commercial trafďŹ c. â&#x20AC;˘

sh f P  r (sfPr): a new 40-kilometre-long four-lane route along the south side of the Fraser River from Deltaport Way to 176th Street in Surrey. When complete at the end of 2013, SFPR will offer an efďŹ cient trade corridor and will divert trucks and other trafďŹ c off municipal roads in Delta and Surrey.

â&#x20AC;˘

rb B r  c  P : includes one road network improvement project and eight overpasses in Delta, Surrey, the City of Langley and the Township of Langley. Once complete in 2014, these projects will separate road and rail trafďŹ c, improving safety, easing community connections and minimizing train whistling.

The George Massey Tunnel represents a primary north/south corridor linking the United States and Metro Vancouver, and the renewal of the crossing will support beneďŹ ts to communities in the Lower Mainland by easing trafďŹ c congestion. Additional information about the George Massey Tunnel Replacement Project can be found at:

These projects will help relieve current road and rail congestion on local roads and will accommodate trafďŹ c generated by capacity increases at Roberts Bank, including the Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project.

 ..b./ 

l

PORT-RELATED INFRASTRUCTURE IN THE LOWER MAINLAND

Port Metro Vancouver Container Terminal Intermodal Yard

Centerm Vanterm

Off-Dock Facilities Major Road Network

Ironworkers Memorial Bridge

Major Rail Network

Port Moody

South Fraser Perimeter Road (SFPR) Roberts Bank Rail Corridor (RBRC) 1 2

Port Mann Bridge

Vancouver Burnaby

3 4

Port Coquitlam

5

Golden Ears Bridge

New Westminster

99

Pattullo Bridge

6 7

7

8 9

41b St. Grade Separation 80th St. Rail Overpass Panorama Ridge Whistle Cessation 152nd St. Rail Overpass 192nd St. Grade Separation 196th St. Grade Separation 54th Ave. Grade Separation Mufford Cres./64th Ave. Realignment & Grade Separation 232nd St. Grade Separation

Surrey

Fraser Surrey Docks

91

Alex Fraser Bridge

Richmond

15

99

9

91

Delta

George Massey Tunnel

7

Langley

8

10 3

4

5

6

7

11

99 2

1

TFN 17

13

Tsawwassen First Nation

Deltaport Tsawwassen

We Want to Hear from you For further information, visit the project website line at portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2 If you have any other questions or comments regarding the proposed Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project, please contact us by: Email: container.improvement@portmetrovancouver.com

Phone: 604.665.9337 Fax: 1.866.284.4271 rminal 2 Projec Attention: Roberts Bank Terminal Project Mail: Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Proje Project Port Metro Vancouver da Place 100 The Pointe, 999 Canada Vancouver, BC V6C 3T4

LEARN MORE AT portmetrovancouver.com/RBT2


A 19 NEWSPAPER.COM

COMMUNITY

BC’s #1 Seniors Entertainment Troupe Proudly presents

Delview students prep for Thanks for Giving Now staff Twitter @carolyncooke1

NORTH DELTA — Hundreds of high school students will be spreading out through the area Thursday evening to collect food for the needy. The annual food drive – the largest singleday canned food drive in the province – is called Thanks for Giving. The student-led initiative is now in its 21st year. Teacher Lindsay Bochen said she was a student back when the drive first started. “I actually used to be a student here and I remember way back in ’92 was the first year,” she said. In that first year, the idea was to collect 10,000 cans in one night, and Bochen said they have managed to collect more every year since. “Last year we had I think 18,000 cans so we’re aiming for 20,000 this year,” she said. “We’ll be collecting non-perishable items for Deltassist as well as the Surrey Food Bank.” Bochen added that it’s nice when people know about the food drive ahead of time and are prepared for the knock on the door on collection night. But this year it’s been

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A19

Annual Bursary Benefit Concert

Annual food drive

Carolyn Cooke

10

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

tough for students to get the word out. For some reason, many businesses have not let students put up posters around the community to let everyone know about Thanks for Giving. “This year I think we’re going to canvass some grocery stores this weekend (Oct. 5 and 6) and hand out some flyers to let people know we’re coming,” Bochen said. Nearly everyone in the school body takes part, along with staff and parents, making for a group of 600 to 800 people who take to the streets to pitch in. What the food collectors are looking for in terms of collections include high-protein items, such as meat, chicken, fish, peanut butter as well as other canned goods. The area they expect to cover on Thursday evening will be from 96th Avenue south to 72nd Avenue, and east to the Surrey border on Scott Road. If more groups sign up, more than 90 – and they have 77 so far – they will also canvass south of 72nd Avenue, added Bochen. “It is just huge how much students do for this event,” said Bochen. “It really is a student-driven campaign.”

Vaudeville Proceeds to the Society for the Preservation of Vaudeville Performing Arts Bursary at Douglas College Artistic Director: Marilyn Remus Musical Director: Alice McAuley Choreographer: Marilyn Remus, Dan Minor Stage Manager: Bob Jacques

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A20

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

THE

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Terry Lee retires as leader of SFU Pipe Band

White Rock Mayor Wayne Baldwin speaks to the crowd gathered at a flag raising ceremony at city hall with the White Rock chapter of seniors group CARP in celebration of National Seniors Day on Tuesday, Oct. 1. (Photo: KEVIN HILL)

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SURREY — Terry Lee’s 36-year run as leader of Simon Fraser University Pipe Band has ended. The Surrey-raised musician is retiring as the band’s pipe major. Lee, who started the band with brother Jack Lee, pipe sergeant, will remain involved with the band, continuing to pipe at concerts and SFU convocation ceremonies and teach young pipers through the band’s junior Robert Malcolm Memorial (RMM) Pipe Band. He’ll also remain active with tuning, music construction and band administration. The acclaimed band rehearses on Jack Lee’s property in the Clayton area of Surrey. “There shouldn’t be changes to that, we’re just passing the torch to a new leader, a longtime friend and longtime member of the band, Alan Bevan, who lives in Abbotsford,” Jack Lee told the Now. Terry Lee, who lives in Coquitlam, said it “feels like the right time” to retire as the band’s pipe major. “I also want to leave the post at the right time to make sure we are in a position of strength, going forward. It’s my hope the band will not miss a beat and continue to be strong.” The SFU band has been one of the world’s leading pipe bands since its inception, finishing in the top three at the World Pipe Band Championships 20 times, including six firsts and nine seconds. Jack Lee said he has no plans to retire as the band’s pipe sergeant. “I’m staying on as pipe sergeant, for sure,” he said. “My three sons are in the band, along with my nephew and niece, so we’re all planning to stick around.

Surrey-raised Terry Lee is retiring as pipe major of the celebrated SFU Pipe Band, which rehearses at the Clayton area property of his brother, Jack Lee. We’re very fortunate that it’s gone so well for us, as a family.” Under Terry Lee’s direction, the band has performed at some of the world’s great concert halls, including Carnegie Hall, the Lincoln Centre, the Sydney Opera House and Mormon Tabernacle. The band has also recorded a dozen CDs and a pair of videos. “The band has been and continues to be in great hands,” Jack Lee noted. “The veteran players are very enthusiastic in their support for Alan. It’s not very often that a retiring pipe major has the good fortune to pass the torch to a great piper and double gold medalist like Alan. He takes over running the band with a very solid corps of players including an excellent group of young talented players, a vibrant junior band program and a solid organization.” The band is currently on a two-month break following a hectic summer of concerts and competitions overseas. “Our first concert back (in the fall) is Remembrance Day – always an important day for us,” said Jack Lee. “We’ve played at the Port Moody Legion for over 30 years.” tzillich@ thenownewspaper.com


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

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complex aging related illnesses. That will be in addition to 50 other beds at Evergreen. Some highlights of the planned new building include “neighbourhoods,” community accessible hair salon, physiotherapy/rehab studio and cafe, landscaped gardens and walking loops. The Now

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grandmother. For many people, it is not the layout of the building, but rather the impression they have of the residence atmosphere or culture that helps them to make a decision. Other family members can take on the role of exploring the amenity spaces in advance and share that information with your grandmother, but for her introduction you may want to ask the marketing director to coordinate a visit with a few welcoming residents over tea. Ask that this be planned during a quieter time in the residence so she is not overwhelmed with the activity during a larger event. We suggest you limit this to just the social visit, and make a follow up appointment to view the suites and building with your grandma on another day. – the Residents

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Jordan Armstrong, assistant manager of Choices Markets at Alder Crossing Shopping Mall, and Dr. Caleb Ng, ND of the Mountainview Wellness Centre, present a cheque to Leno Zecchel and Larry Shaw, co-chair and board member respectively, of the Prostate Cancer Canada Network Surrey. The donation of $2,810 was raised in a fundraiser at the store and will go toward enabling the local Prostate Cancer Canada support group to continue its work in providing resources and information for men with prostate cancer. The group is open to the public and meets at 10 a.m. on the last Saturday of the month in the cafeteria of Surrey Memorial Hospital.

Reading

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THE

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

AS23

COMMUNITY Wellbeing guide Email all Wellbeing listings to edit@thenownewspaper.com. Publication is not guaranteed.

VOLUNTEERING READ Surrey/White Rock Society is looking for individuals who are interested in being trained to become volunteer tutors. Applicants must have excellent English skills. Training is provided by a certified teacher/trainer. For details, call 778-871-5319 or email safullam1@gmail.com. White Rock Blues Society: “We are always looking for people to join us in our efforts to promote roots music in our community. There are a number of areas of expertise we are looking to add to our team.” To get involved, contact Rod Dranfield via e-mail rodneyd@ shaw.ca or call 604-723-3905.

ACTIVITIES Hockey for seniors: Greater Vancouver Oldtimers’ Hockey Association operates competitive leagues for men age 60 and over, in four divisions, weekday mornings at Great Pacific Forum (Planet Ice), North Delta. “We are starting a new program this year for 75’s and older, on Wednesday mornings.” For information on dates and times, contact Ralph Haugland, ralph@norquip.com, 604 830-0295. Toastmasters By The Sea meets every Sunday at White Rock Library at 1:30 p.m. Info: 604-5362175.

CLUBS/GROUPS Laughter Yoga Club in White Rock: Club hosts events on the last Tuesday of each month at White Rock Library, from 7 to 8 p.m., starting for the fall on Sept. 24. Info: www.lafunnygirl.com. South Surrey Garden Club: Club meets at 7:30 p.m. every fourth Wednesday (except August and December) at St. Mark’s Anglican Church, 12953 20th Avenue. “We have a very active and full program

with great speakers, field trips and workshops.” For info, contact Kathy at 604-250-1745. Visitor fee is $3, credited toward annual membership fee of $20. Mixed Singles over Sixty in White Rock/South Surrey: Social active group offering theatre, dinners out, golf, dancing, walking and much more. For more info, contact Colin at 604-538-7799. On the web: seniorsoversixtyclub.weebly.com. Newcomers Club of White Rock and South Surrey is a club for women who are new to the area. The club meets the first Tuesday of the month (September to May) from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Mount Olive Lutheran Church, 2350 148 St., Surrey. First visit is free. Membership is $35 per year. Info: www.wrssnewcomers.com. WAV (Widows at Victory): Social events for widows to meet other widows and have a social outing. Group meets on second Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m., at Victory Memorial Park, 14831 28th Ave., Surrey. Colleen Bujak, 604-536-6522. South Surrey Soul Sisters, a Gogo group under auspices of Stephen Lewis Foundation, supporting African grandmothers raising 14 million orphaned children, holds monthly meetings. All are welcome (you do not need to be a grandmother). Contact Thelma Newbury, 604-541-4688, thelmanewbury@saw.ca. Oneness Gogos of White Rock/Surrey: Group that works under auspices of Stephen Lewis Foundation meets on fourth Monday of every month, 1-3 p.m. upstairs at White Rock library, 15342 Buena Vista Ave., White Rock. Info: onenessgogos@gmail. com. Crescent Beach Photography Club meets on the first, third and fourth Wednesday of every month, 7:30 p.m. start at Alexandra Neighbourhood House, 2916 McBride Ave., Crescent Beach, Surrey. Doors open at 7:30, all welcome (free). Info: cbpc.ca. Soroptimist International of White Rock group meets every second and fourth Tuesday of month, 7 p.m. at local restaurant. All business and professional women are invited to attend. For more info, call Liz, 604-538-3505.

Surrey

Free events celebrate food, talk and cultures from around world Tom Zillich Now staff Twitter @tomzillich

SURREY — Free food serves as a hook for a new series of events here – but it’s really the conversation that counts most. Starting Thursday, Oct. 10, the kitchen classroom at Guildford Park Secondary plays host to six sessions that will offer food from different cultures around the world. During these “Dialogues Inspired by Cooking & Food” events, chefs will demonstrate how to cook traditional food from their homeland, while participants are encouraged to “explore your role in making Surrey a welcoming and inclusive community.” Six Surrey-based organizations are involved, starting with a Koreanthemed event Oct. 10 hosted by Options Community Services Society, from 6 to 9 p.m. The series is a project of Surrey Welcoming Communities Committee. “The idea is to have people experience culture through food, and to have them learn about different cultures through food,” said Jessica Danyk, with the City of Surrey’s Healthy Communities project team. “A moderator will lead discussion about all kinds of things relating to different cultures and the experiences people have had – what it’s like for

Chefs Julia Kim (left), Caesar Rendon and Wen Li are among those who will cook for people who attend a series of “Dialogues Inspired by Cooking & Food” events at Guildford Park Secondary in Surrey, starting on Thursday, Oct. 10. Kim will cook Korean food during the first session, while Rendon does Filipino dishes Nov. 5 and Li helps make Chinese food Nov. 25. (Photo: TOM ZILLICH)

immigrants when they first come here, what it’s like for them to go shopping, what makes them feel like they have a sense of belonging in this community, those kinds of things.” Other events in the series feature the food of India (Oct. 28), Philippines (Nov. 5), China (Nov. 25), Africa (Jan. 28) and the Middle East (Feb. 12).

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There is room for approximately 30 people at each of the three-hour events. To register, an application form can be found online at www.surveymonkey.com/s/ DialoguesFoodCooking. For details, visit wicsurrey.org. Guildford Park Secondary is located at 10707 146th St., Surrey.

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A24

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

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13237

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Half Marathon ‡ Relay ‡ Mayor’s 5K ‡ Kids Fun Run


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2013

A25

SPORTS

Send your team’s highlights to Sports editor, Michael Booth at mbooth@thenownewspaper.com or call 604-572-0064

Premier soccer

United returns to nationals for 10th time Michael Booth Now staff Twitter @boothnow

Nicole Stewart and her Surrey United teammates will represent B.C. at nationals for the 10th consecutive year. (File photo)

for

ENTER

SURREY — Don’t ask Kate Qually for any tips on how to prepare your Thanksgiving dinner. It’s not that she doesn’t want to help, it’s just that, well, the whole concept of a Thanksgiving celebration is kind of an alien concept to Qually and her Surrey United teammates. “Gosh, it’s been at least 10 years since I had Thanksgiving with my family,” the Surrey captain said. “It might even be longer because I might have been away before that too when I was at school. I guess my last Thanksgiving must have been when I was a teenager.” For the 10th consecutive year, Surrey United will be winging their way eastward for the holiday, heading to the annual Jubilee Trophy national tournament where they will once again represent British Columbia. This year’s event is in Halifax beginning Oct. 9 and for the second year in a row, the Surrey women will have company in their quest for national gold. Joining the Surrey women’s soccer dynasty is Halifax will be their club stable mates, the Surrey United Firefighters, who will be representing B.C. in the men’s national tourney. Qually said the tournament

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has become a fixture on team members’ vacation requests from work, but the repeat trips to nationals never get old for the players. The Surrey women have performed well on the national stage, winning medals in each of their nine previous appearances. That bauble collection includes two national titles, the last of which came in 2011. With so many trips to nationals behind them, Surrey has become a target for teams wanting to make a statement in the tournament. “We’ve been there so many times now that other teams there know who we are,” Qually said. “There’s probably some kind of small intimidation factor for some teams when they play us, but at the same time, every team that we play against treats the game like it’s their gold medal match. We have to go up against that kind of passion in every game.” The Surrey United Firefighters will also be able to draw upon past experiences as they make their second consecutive trip to club soccer’s big dance. “The team was there last year and I’m sure some of the other provinces will be represented by the same clubs again this year,” said Surrey coach Rob Reed. “So some of the teams will look familiar to us, the tournament format will be

familiar and we definitely know what the task at hand is. “Having been there before is a definite advantage. You need to devise a specific strategy for this tournament because you play so many games over a short period of time. It’s like nothing else we do in our season. It’s a much different animal than league games.” The Firemen have already caught one break from the schedule makers: they have a bye on day one of tournament play. That means that not only to they have an extra day to adjust to the time zone changes, Surrey will also be able to scout their first round opponent — Manitoba — in their opening game. Reed said the early bye could be an advantage, but nothing about the tournament will be easy. “We’re expecting a lot of tough competition,” Reed said. “We’re going up against a bunch of teams that have just finished their seasons and are at the top of their games. They’ll be in peak form while we’re just gearing up and getting going again with our season. We know every game is going to be tough and we’re going to need a disciplined approach to get through it.” The national tournaments run from Oct. 9 to 14 with the championship finals taking place on Thanksgiving Monday.


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SPORTS Junior A hockey

Eagles come up empty with three losses to rivals Michael Booth Now staff Twitter @boothnow

It was a lost weekend for the Surrey Eagles as the Birds dropped all three games on the schedule to B.C. Hockey League Mainland Division rivals. The Eagles best showing was their first outing where the visiting Langley Rivermen squeaked out a 4-3 win at South Surrey Arena

Friday night. Leading 1-0 after the first period, Langley pulled away with three goals in a four-minute span of the middle frame to build a 4-1 lead. Surrey tried to battle back in the third period with goals from Danton Heinen and Brett Mulcahy, but the Birds were unable to complete the comeback. Nicolas Pierog scored the other

Surrey goal. Things went downhill from there for Surrey as they were outscored 10-2 in their next two games. On Saturday night the Eagles travelled to Langley for a return date with the Rivermen. Surrey outshot Langley 25-24 in the contest but could only muster one goal in a 5-1 loss. Langley led 2-0 after one period

and 3-0 after two before Michael Roberts finally scored for Surrey. Langley answered with two more goals to close out the win. The Eagles returned to their nest on Sunday afternoon and cranked up their attack against the visiting Coquitlam Express. Surrey outshot the Express by a 43-32 margin, but were unable to come up with an answer for Coquitlam goalie Gordie Defiel, who backstopped

ATTENTION

his team to a 5-1 win. Pierog scored the lone Surrey goal shorthanded at the end of the second period. The Eagles are back on the ice Friday (Oct. 11) when they host the Powell River Kings at 7 p.m. at South Surrey Arena. Surrey then closes out the week’s schedule by taking another crack at the Rivermen in Langley Saturday.

CHRONIC PAIN MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP

Business Owners

Based on the Arthritis Self-Management Program, this workshop introduces particpants to self-management skills and the principles of pain management.

DATE: Thursday, October 17th , 2013 TIME: 1:00 pm – 3:30 pm LOCATION: Centre for Active Living

COMPLIMENTARY DIGITAL MARKETING PRESENTATION

1475 Anderson Street, White Rock

COST:

presented by

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We acknowledge the financial assistance of the province of British Columbia

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Shelly Wilson, Vice-President, Integrated Media, Glacier Media Group, will be sharing industry knowledge on marketing your business online and in the mobile space. You’ll learn about media trends and ways you can position your business to capitalize on the ever changing media consumption habits of your customer. Shelly’s diverse background in media covers newspapers, magazines, flyers, commercial print, online, mobile, media buying and consumer analytics. Her media knowledge and business intelligence provides a compelling perspective relevant to your daily challenges and opportunities.

OCTOBER 19 8:00PM First United Church 15385 Semiahmoo Ave. Tickets:

WHEN

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Banquet Room 15611 Marine Drive, White Rock

Available at www.peninsulaproductions.org & Tapestry Music

HOW Reserve your seat(s) today: To register

$25.00 advance $30.00 at door

email: csteele@thenownewspaper.com or call : 604-572-0064

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Drop off or mail or fax: The Now Newspaper Suite 201- 7889 - 132nd St., Surrey, BC V3W 4N2 Fax: 604-572-6439 Contest deadline is noon Mon., Oct. 14, 2013 Winners will be contacted by phone after 3pm on Monday, Oct. 14, 2013

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Surrey NOW October 8 2013