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features 46

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Considering the Alternatives: Trisha Hassler by Sarah Margolis-Pineo

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Shawne Major: Colossal Collage by Nick Stillman

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Folk Art & Formalism by Joyce Beckenstein

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Brenda Mallory: Reiterations and Rifts by Richard Speer

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Evolving the Cloth: Rachel Meginnes by Kathryn Gremley

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Andi Arnovitz: Migrant Media by Sarah Lehat

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threeASFOUR: Sacred Geometries by Joyce Beckenstein

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Beyond the Surface by Michael Milano

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Surface Design Journal

Winter 2014 Volume 38 Number 2

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In Review Quilt National 2013 Athens, Ohio Heather Clark Hilliard: Finding the Fire Tulsa, Oklahoma Neck Plus Ultra: Henrik Vibskov Copenhagen, Denmark An Errant Line: Ann Hamilton & Cynthia Schira Lawrence, Kansas

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In Print Digital Visions for Fashion + Textiles: Made in Code

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Legacy Arturo Alonzo Sandoval

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56 Emerging Voices Joy O. Ude

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Informed Source Jane Waggoner Deschner

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Exposure A gallery of recent work by SDA members

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2013 SDA Creative Promise Awards for Student Excellence Corinna Fielden, BFA Tamryn McDermott, MFA

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A Letter from Jane Dunnewold SDA President

Winter2014

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w h o ’ s

w h o

Surface Design Association

P.O. Box 20430 Albuquerque, NM 87154 info@surfacedesign.org surfacedesign.org Executive Director

Diane Sandlin 512.394.5477 executivedirector@surfacedesign.org Assistant Executive Director

Susannah Fedorowich 707.829.3110 administration@surfacedesign.org Advertising Manager

Muffy Clark Gill 239.253.8827 advertising@surfacedesign.org Surface Design Journal Editor

Marci Rae McDade 503.477.7015 journaleditor@surfacedesign.org SDA Digital Publications Editor (Website, NewsBlog, eNews)

Leesa Hubbell newslettereditor@surfacedesign.org Surface Design Journal Art Director

Dale E. Moyer dale@moyerdesign.com Web Site Manager

LM Wood lmnopwood@gmail.com Printed in Hanover, Pennsylvania

The Sheridan Press www.sheridan.com Executive Board:

President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jane Dunnewold Vice President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeanne Raffer Beck Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ann Graham Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Melinda Lowy Board:

Representative of Representatives . . . . . Astrid Bennett Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Susan Taber Avila Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Karen Hampton Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Deborah Kruger Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Vivian Mahlab Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeanette Thompson President Emeritus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jason Pollen

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Surface Design Journal is a quarterly publication

of the Surface Design Association, a non-profit educational organization. SURFACE DESIGN ASSOCIATION Our Vision: To inspire creativity, encourage innovation,

and advocate for artistic excellence as the global leader in textile-inspired art and design. Our Mission: To promote awareness and appreciation of

textile-inspired art and design through member-supported benefits, including publications, exhibitions and conferences. Our Objectives:

• To provide opportunities for learning, collaboration and meaningful affiliations • To mentor and support emerging artists, designers, and students • To inform members about the latest developments and innovations in the field • To recognize the accomplishments of our members • To encourage critical dialogue about our field • To inspire new directions in fiber and textiles • To raise the visibility of textiles in the contemporary art world SUBSCRIPTION / MEMBERSHIP

The Surface Design Association membership: $60 a year ($35 for student with ID); $30 ($20 student) of each member’s dues shall be for a year’s subscription to Surface Design Journal. Subscriptions are available only to members. Outside USA: add $12 for Canada and $20 for all other countries. US funds only. Send Subscription/Membership correspondence to:

Surface Design Association, P.O. Box 20430 Albuquerque, NM 87154. Visa/Mastercard accepted. To Subscribe Online, visit: surfacedesign.org/membership. ©2014 Surface Design Association, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Surface Design Journal (ISSN: 0197-4483) is published quarterly by the Surface Design Association, Inc., a non-profit educational organization. Publications Office: 2127 Vermont Street NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110. Periodicals postage paid at Albuquerque, NM, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Surface Design Journal:

Subscriptions, P.O. Box 20430 Albuquerque, NM 87154.

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Last year’s SDA Member survey revealed that 60 percent of Journal readers rank mixed media among their favorite forms of fiber art. The ever-expanding nature of this genre made navigating the Textiles + theme all the more exciting. My story choices ultimately coalesced to focus on provocative combinations of textiles with unexpected materials and disciplines. In each case, the complexity of artistic vision reflects cultural, formal, and political concerns unique to life in the present age. To gain clarity and fresh insights, I took a research trip to New York City last fall to study a wide range of recent examples on display. Highlights included the threeASFOUR: MER KA BA exhibit at The Jewish Museum, which includes a collection of 3D-printed and laser-cut gowns inspired by ancient mysticism and geometry. Tucked inside the sci-fi star structure (pictured on the cover), I discovered a glowing meditation chamber (shown left). Marci inside the star I was also captivated by the alt_quilts exhibition structure at threeASFOUR: MER KA BA at The Jewish at the American Folk Art Museum, Out of Hand: Materializing the Postdigital at the Museum of Arts and Museum of New York, Design, and Cross Pollination at New York Institute of November 2013. Technology’s Gallery 61. The latter featured a stellar Photo: Eric Wert. selection of mixed-media works by Larry Schulte and Patricia Malarcher, our former Journal editor. The increase in studio time since Patricia’s 2012 retirement has clearly been productive and rewarding. Via email, I learned more about her material explorations. Marci Rae McDade: How do you define “mixed media”? Patricia Malarcher: Generally, it means artwork made with more than one medium. Sometimes it refers to subtle differences between mark-making tools or to large differences such as those between fabric and steel. Or it can refer to collage or assemblage with all sorts of things applied to a background. For me, mixed media might include dyed or printed fabric, plastic, paper, paint, or wax, with sewing as the unifying process. Why do you prefer making mixed-media creations? I love the limitless forms and surfaces that can be produced with fibrous materials and processes. I like being able to make large things that are light enough to handle. And the meditative pace of working in fiber is pleasing to me.

PATRICIA MALARCHER Cloth of Honor Mylar, fabric, dye, thread, transfer prints, hand and machine stitching, 59" x 54", 2007. Detail BELOW. Photos: D. James Dee.

Is there symbolic meaning in your materials choices? Mylar, a material that I’ve used for many years, speaks of the present time no matter what you do with it. I often use painted canvas because I like the surface quality. I’ve also used found or purchased textile items for their referential value. In Cloth of Honor, transfer prints of New York graffiti are appliquéd onto patches of shiny brocade to offset elegance with raw energy. Whatever form of mixed media you enjoy, I hope this issue illustrates a breadth of possibilities!

Marci Rae McDade journaleditor@surfacedesign.org

COVER CREDIT: Installation view of threeASFOUR: MER KA BA at The Jewish Museum, New York, NY. Exhibition designed by STUDIO CHRISTIAN WASSMANN. Clothing © 2013 THREEASFOUR. Photograph by David Heald © 2013 The Jewish Museum and Art Production Fund. Winter2014

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threeASFOUR Sacred Geometries b y

J o y c e

B e c k e n s t e i n

A warm late summer breeze, thick with the American dream, wafts through the old Chinatown studio loft of threeASFOUR. All is abuzz as the avant-garde fashion design trio of Gabriel (Gabi) Asfour, Angela Donhauser, and Adi Gil—born in Lebanon, Tajikistan, and Israel, respectively—prepare for both their spring/summer 2014 collection and the opening of their solo exhibition threeASFOUR: MER KA BA at the Jewish Museum in New York.1 “The lucky part is that we met,”2 says Asfour, who describes how three families from sparring cultures lived through the traumas of fighting among Christians, Muslims, and Jews. That history left an indelible imprint on their art—an eclectic mix of haute couture, sacred geometries, technology, and multi-media installations. Asfour studied engineering and architecture before working for Marc Jacobs, Donna Karen, Ralph Lauren, and Kate Spade and then starting his own collection. Donhauser and Gil met in Germany as students. They moved to New York with a couple of suitcases and little cash in hand, and worked as stylists, doing photo-shoots and videos, and designing on the side. They met Asfour through the downtown art scene in 1997. Realizing how much alike they were, the three bonded as family despite their disparate backgrounds. They began designing together, driven to celebrate cultural diversity as wearable form. It sounds like a utopian ideal tale until you connect with the surround of their collective interest in Merkaba, an ancient form of mysticism. Jewish and Sufi mystics embraced the elusive essence known as Merkaba. The ancient Egyptians believed it to consist of an energy field, a vehicle of spiritual transcendence. It is said that Merkaba surrounds every individual as invisible light in the form of sacred geometry; sacred because its shapes, beginning with nature’s ubiquitous spirals, are found in everything from swirling galaxies to cell structure. Known as the five Platonic solids of Euclidean geometry (the tetrahedron, hexahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron), their patterns are universally associated with the mysteries of creation. ThreeASFOUR inscribes their fashions with these symbolic forms. The traditional fashion runway is a metaphoric line that they freely cross, both ethnically and aesthetically. The environment in which they exhibit their work is inseparable from their message. They avoid traditional venues, such as New York Fashion Week’s celebrity-lined Bryant Park ramp, choosing instead museums, galleries, and parks where they create site-specific installations for their collections. The exhibition at the Jewish Museum summons the mystical. It consists of a sanctuary in the form of a Merkaba tetrahedron star, designed by architect Christian Wassmann. Alex Czetwertynski’s animated projections of the Platonic solids enliven the star’s surface. This tetra-temple, aglow in the darkened museum space, contains an interior sanctum, a room made of kaleidoscopic mirrored fragments, ricocheting 40

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ABOVE: THREEASFOUR Spring / Summer 2014 Collection 3D hex fractal weave development made in collaboration with architect Bradley Rothenberg. Render in Rhino courtesy of Bradley Rothenberg studio. RIGHT: THREEASFOUR Spring / Summer 2014 Collection Dress 3D-printed in white laser-sintered nylon. Hex fractal interlocking weave developed in collaboration with architect Bradley Rothenberg. Shown at The Jewish Museum during New York Fashion Week September 2013. LEFT: THREEASFOUR Spring / Summer 2014 Collection Dress made with layers of laser-cut black silk organza in Islamic tile patterns. Shown at The Jewish Museum during New York Fashion Week September 2013. All model photos by Billy Farrell. FAR LEFT: THREEASFOUR MER KA BA exhibition at The Jewish Museum, 2013. Star tetrahedron architectural structure made in collaboration with Studio Christian Wassmann. Photo courtesy of The Jewish Museum, New York. Winter2014

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“The charm of threeASFOUR is their commitment to the possible rather than the practical.”

LEFT: THREEASFOUR Spring / Summer 2014 Collection Dress made with layers of laser-cut white silk organza in Islamic, Jewish and Christian tile patterns. Shown at The Jewish Museum during New York Fashion Week September 2013. CENTER: THREEASFOUR Spring / Summer 2014 Collection Dress made with folded origami patchwork of white silk organza in Islamic tile patterns. Shown at The Jewish Museum during New York Fashion Week September 2013. RIGHT: THREEASFOUR Spring / Summer 2014 Collection Dress 3D-printed in white laser-sintered nylon, 3D mesh consisting of 3Dinterlocking weave developed in collaboration with architect Bradley Rothenberg. Shown at The Jewish Museum during New York Fashion Week September 2013. FAR RIGHT: THREEASFOUR Computer rendering of the 3D-printed dress design.

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reflections of light that embrace visitors who enter the Merkaba space. Suspended from the ceiling outside the temple are black and white dresses patterned with sacred geometries, afloat in an ascending spiral. They suggest spirits in transcendent flight to another dimension. With almost eerie congruence between mystical vision and computer technology, they are conceived and often fabricated with processes that are rapidly transforming the look and shape of what we wear. This breakthrough exhibition includes dresses made using 3D computer printing technology that pushes the boundaries of wearable form. Launched in the 1980s, it is used today for the manufacture of everything from car parts to surgical implants. Like threeASFOUR, contemporary designers such as Iris van Herpen have made similar splashes

with this high-tech fashion. Wearability remains an issue, but that matters little to threeASFOUR. As coolhunting critic Maya Singer noted in her review of a 2012 exhibition, “The charm of threeASFOUR is their commitment to the possible rather than the practical.”3 Donhauser confirms this, saying, “There are enough dresses in the world; we’re drowning in stuff. To make something different, there must be meaning behind it.” For Asfour, Donhauser, and Gil, “meaningful” evolves as a creative process embracing new technologies, something best understood from the perspective of their earlier collections. They unfold a consistent vision. A systematic arc from their 2006 designs to present reveals a systematic progression of geometric form as metaphor that blurs the distinctions between fashion and fine art. A caftanWinter2014

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ABOVE: THREEASFOUR Spring / Summer 2012 Collection (From left to right) Dresses 1 and 2 in natural and blue talit wool fabric, blue cotton bedouin rug, metal hamsas and blue glass eye amulets; dresses 3 and 4 are a mixture of THREEASFOUR Insalaam Inshallom prints in black and white, and red and white silk de chine and silk chiffon; dress 5 in black neoprene base embroidered with silver metal hamsas. Shown at Beit Hai'r Museum, Tel Aviv, Israel, November 2011. Photo: Neta Alonim. RIGHT: THREEASFOUR Fall 2012 Collection Dress of laser-cut fractal patterns.

sleeved dress from 2006, for example, like a white lace dress in the current collection, follows the lines of a central mandala. The geometric design of a diaphanous 2009 gown repeats in that year’s fall collection as a skin-baring tessellated bodice worn by a model in a minimal hijab (Muslim head scarf ). Other examples include outsized coats suggesting abaya cloaks and get-ups with origami-folded sleeves that hang between traditional kimonos and Issey Miyake furniture. When geometric form cuts loose from traditional costume, it playfully bends the underlying logic of a mathematical universe to artistic intuition. Thus does a 2011 red dress tease the circle into a parachute hemline, held in place by strings tied about the neck. A smashing 2012 laser-cut body garment winds humorous spirals about the breasts, then descends towards the ankles like fractals gone amok. Worn over a black body suit, it makes an artful study of positive and negative space. ThreeASFOUR’s spirited comingling of design and culture played out most dramatically in 2011, when they were invited to curate a group exhibition Insalaam Inshalom at the Beit Ha’Ir Museum in Tel Aviv. Yoko Ono, Joseph Dadone, and Jessica Mitrani were among the artists whose installations, video works, and photography choreographed the message that Arabs and Jews can live side by side. 44

ThreeASFOUR’s fashions, inspired by traditional ethnic dress, include embellishments derived from the star of David, the hamsa (depicting the open right hand), the shofar (ram's-horn trumpet), patterns from keffiyehs (Arabic head scarves), and the talit (Jewish prayer shawl). These geometric designs are based on tessellations— the interlocking repeat of a pattern on a flat plane—that are found in religious architecture all over the world, in floor and ceiling tiles in mosques and synagogues, and in the tracery of medieval cathedrals. For a number of years, threeASFOUR has sought to transform these 2D designs into 3D fabric. Examples in the current exhibition include a dress with hand-folded origami-like patterns, and others with sculptural layered lace laser-cut from a blend of cotton and silk. In collaboration with architect Bradley Rothenberg and Joris Debo, creative director of Materialise, a New York 3D printing company for art fashion, threeASFOUR have now produced their first truly three-dimensional works. “Things like flowers and trees have fractal logic,” explains Rothenberg. “You can generate those systems by hand or computer.”4 He illustrates the concept with his digital drawing of a snowflake. The design, composed as a layered interlocking system of geometric shapes, can be printed as a three-dimensional fabric. Surface Design Journal

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Scanning a schematic image of the body… enables the technology to mold the fabric design to the contours of the human figure.

Debo explains how: “Imagine feeding a drawing of a flat circle into a computer, then printing it 1000 times. The stacked circles become a cylinder. A 3D printer will similarly produce a 3D interlocking weave as sheets of fabric or as a fully formed object—a shoe, for example. Instead of paper, the printer uses powder or liquid that hardens when exposed to a laser beam to produce a plastic 'fabric.' Scanning a schematic image of the body into the computer further enables the technology to mold the fabric design to the contours of the human figure. The result is a fabric that stretches in as many as six different directions instead of the usual two.” 5 He notes, however, that the two 3D-generated dresses included in the MER KA BA exhibit are more conceptual than they are wearable. Hardly dry-clean friendly, the fabric does not yet drape, but rather forms a nylon-plastic enclosure over the wearer. Finding a way to print in three dimensions on actual cloth, or finding a 3D-friendly synthetic material that behaves like cotton or silk, is the next step for this nascent technology. The laser-cut dresses and hand-folded garments, viewed alongside the 3D prototypes, provide some clue as to where threeASFOUR is headed. There will be a sea change in the look and feel of these garments when their flat two-dimensional patterns assume sculptural dimension, when they conform to and move in sync with the body’s natural rhythms. When such fabric becomes available—and the technology is close—every less-than-runway-ready figure may be able to scan itself into the computer, click a style and color, and hit print for instant haute couture! It gives new meaning to the term “ready-to-wear.” In recent years, fashion has entered the global art world as a fine-art form and as a cultural index charting attitudes, gender, class, and politics. Consider the spate of recent exhibits at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York: Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity (2013); Punk: Chaos to Couture (2013); and Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty (2011). Like the artists showcased in these blockbuster exhibitions, threeASFOUR take fashion as their medium and use it to express an idea. Woven within the fabric of all they do is their faith in human potential, something they see exponentially expanding, like sacred geometry. “We’re connected to the universe…to birds, plants…” says Asfour. “If only we could get along…we’re all made of the same stuff. You have to start somewhere.” 1The

exhibition threeASFOUR: MER KA BA was presented at the Jewish Museum, New York, NY (October 1, 2013–February 2, 2014). 2All quotes by threeASFOUR designers were recorded during an interview on September 27, 2013. 3Singer, Maya, Style.com, February 15, 2012. 4Bradley Rothenberg interview, September 4, 2013. 5Joris Debo interview, September 6, 2013. The exhibition threeASFOUR: MER KA BA is at The Jewish Museum of New York through February 2, 2014, www.thejewishmuseum.org. Work by threeASFOUR will be included in Folk Couture: Fashion and Folk Art (January 2–April 23, 2014) at the American Folk Art Museum, New York, www.folkartmuseum.org. www.threeasfour.com

—Joyce Beckenstein is an art critic and art historian living in New York.

Winter2014

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i nr eview Tulsa, Oklahoma Reviewed by Barbara Shapiro

Heather Clark Hilliard: Finding the Fire 108 Contemporary The burgeoning Brady Arts District in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is home to 108 Contemporary, a sleek nonprofit art gallery that featured the mixedmedia work of Heather Clark Hilliard last summer. Memory Ring was the showpiece of her monthlong artist residency (July 2013). This site-specific installation, which included hundreds of cascading indigo-dyed wood slices, explored the history of Oklahoma's changing landscape through the only native evergreen, the juniper tree. Issues of recent local drought and the larger global environmental picture were inherent. Hilliard’s working presence in the gallery led to important conversations. Hilliard is totally committed to the essence of her craft and the study of natural dyes, combined meaningfully with less malleable manmade or natural objects. The elegant

collection of works on display afforded rare double access to artistic process and refined conceptual art. Indeed, Hilliard’s work is much about process. She travels the country to gather her materials, and the well-documented plant dye sources themselves become part of the work. On one such trip from Oklahoma to Maine, pre-mordanted cottons were added to quart canning jars along with the plants she collected, turning the back of her van into a traveling dye studio. Her crisp photos of 36 jars with dyestuff and cloth formed one installation in the gallery. Nearby, an assemblage of 36 individually framed cloth samples from those same jars maps a travelogue of tone and saturation in Collected Color VII. Building on her time as a student at the Rhode Island School of Design, and intent on perfecting her craft, Hilliard has sought out the best dye teachers available. This proactive approach gives her a broad education that translates into artistic confidence. Wood Triptych and Haunted Blues combine reclaimed cedar siding, earth pigments, and plant-dyed silk patches. Walnut ink “stitches” painted onto some 30 layers of color and cloth gives new life to the weathered wood, making these works a quilted commentary on surface.

ABOVE: HEATHER CLARK HILLIARD Gallery view of the Ring of Fire exhibit before construction of Memory Ring began. INSET: HEATHER CLARK HILLIARD Ocean Bones Detail, 170 Pacific Ocean driftwood pieces, titanium earth pigment, soy milk, Lincoln Log, wool, waxed linen, aluminum wire, 129" x 40" x 2", 2013. Photos: Steven Michael's Photography.

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Hilliard’s robust handspun madderdyed wool forms Bloodlines/Lovelines. Knotted lengths connect two walls of the gallery in a web that speaks with tactile honesty of the maker’s hand and the “physical expression of private and public stories.” In the suspended large-scale sculpture Anatomy, naturally-dyed handspun yarns wrap wire cages that once protected young trees. About this work, she writes “Animal, vegetable, and mineral elements of the physical world process fuse together to investigate, contrast, alter, repel, influence, and transform into new hybrid objects.” Ocean Bones offers a trail of 170 titanium pigment-coated and wool-wrapped Pacific Ocean driftwood sticks, manifesting how the health of ocean and land are bound together. Can You Hear Me Now is a large wall sculpture incorporating hundreds of slices of weathered PVC pipe. There is a personal backstory here, but what we read in the crocheted handspun wools that bind these elements together is a dialogue between hard and soft, natural and manmade. Seen by one viewer as a map of Oklahoma, resistance to the forces of change seems to punctuate the work.

HEATHER CLARK HILLIARD Memory Ring Installation detail, Juniper wood, indigo vat, tannin, ferrous, handknit waxed lined, 10' x 6' diameter, 2013. Photo by the artist.

Traditional process is important to Hilliard. She draws from a deep well of expertise and artistic integrity to create nontraditional works that have much to say. www.108contemporary.org; www.heatherclarkhilliard.com —Barbara Shapiro is a San Francisco Bay Area weaver, dyer, basket maker, and textile-arts educator who is frequently exhibited and published. www.barbara-shapiro.com

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E POSURE CELITA ULATE SÁNCHEZ San José, Costa Rica To Wrap Up Granny Best (Para Abrigarte Mejor Abuelita) Mixed media, fused glass, ribbon, handweaving, 30" x 30", 2010. Photo: Rodrigo Rubi fotografia. www.lumiesencia.com

ANDREA VAIL Richmond, Virginia Island Strips of polyester fabric, reticulated plates, hand knotting, 38" x 35" x 5", 2013. Photos by the artist. www.andreavail.com

CONSTANCE CHAPMAN Sechelt, British Columbia, Canada Outside Myself Raw silk, weathered copper, tea bags, thread, paper, acrylic paint, acrylic medium, blue glaze, rusting, machine stitching, 12" x12" x .5", 2013. Photo by the artist. 68 68

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MARY KROETSCH Guelph, Ontario, Canada Sirens Cotton mounted on canvas, thread, paint, archival inkjet printing, hand embroidery, 16" x 16" framed, 2013. Talisman Fibre Arts Studio Inc. www.mary-kroetsch-textile-mixedmedia-artist.com

ROZ RITTER Berkeley, California Archie’s Girl Vintage 1950s letterman jacket, vintage crinoline petticoat, vintage Archie/Betty & Veronica comics, vintage 1950s accessories, tea-dyed felt, fabric, vintage pearls, collage, stitching, 63" x 38" x 22", 2012. www.rozritart.com

MICHAEL RADYK Kutztown, Pennsylvania Big Sur Recycled vinyl-coated polyester, plastic tape, linen, jute, handwoven, cut, manipulated, 30" x 34" x 6", 2012. Photo: John Sterling Ruth. www.michaelradyk.com mradyktextiles.blogspot.com Artists represented on the “Exposure” pages are members of the Surface Design Association (SDA). This issue features the work of members who have populated their SDA profile pages with images and information about themselves and their work. This free and easy online service adds to the SDA Image Library and Member Directory; both are valuable research tools for curators, writers, collectors, and artists from all over the world. To learn more, log into your member account and follow the prompts, or visit the gallery at surfacedesign.org. Winter2014

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A Letter from Jane Dunnewold, SDA President Once a month I cook dinner with women I’ve known 20 years. The meal is always fabulous, but the chopping and chatting usually trumps the food. We save our best thoughts for each other, and sharing is a delight. An unexpected bonus? The introduction to cool kitchen tools that weren’t on my radar. Graters that shred parmesan in seconds. Carafes, colanders, and tiny thingies that whip cream. You get the idea. It’s fun to share good tools with friends. It’s true in the studio, too. No matter the medium, we love it when someone turns us on to new tools. I felt the earth shift the year I got a Rowenta steam chamber iron for Christmas and it was exactly what I wanted. Now all my friends want one. Ditto the day I bought a reciprocating saw based on advice from a suite mate, and after one use I couldn’t figure out how I’d lived without it. Not to mention Misty Fuse, silicone ice cube trays, and the grout spreader repurposed as a squeegee! How is all this talk of new gadgets related to the magazine in your hands? Same basic principle. Surface Design Journal is one of the finest publications on the planet. Yet, it is also a tool. Every issue is filled with a mix of inspiration, dedication, and explanation—all designed to inform and delight readers. Like any good practice (and any great tool), read it long enough and it could change your life. So don’t keep it to yourself! Gift the Journal to friends for birthdays. Know a student who would love the magazine but can’t afford a subscription? Gift time! Send a subscription to a former art teacher. Send another to someone who just likes good design. Or buy a friend one issue on a targeted topic: single issues are now sold online in our new SDA Marketplace. Great tools are meant to be shared. Your friends will thank you. Sincerely,

Jane Dunnewold president@surfacedesign.org www.artclothstudios.com To purchase single copies of the current and back issues of Surface Design Journal, visit surfacedesign.org/marketplace. To give the gift of an SDA Membership, visit surfacedesign.org/membership.

BACKGROUND: JANE DUNNEWOLD Lyrical Thread #21 Detail, spackling, sand, pencil, thread, 12" x 36", 2013.

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Surface Design Association History Founded in 1977, the Surface Design Association is an international not-for-profit organization with an office in Sebastopol, California. SDA seeks to raise the level of excellence in textile surface design by inspiring creativity and encouraging innovation through all its undertakings. Our current membership of nearly 4000 national and international members includes independent artists, designers, educators, curators and gallery directors, scientists, industrial technicians, entrepreneurs, and students.

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Surface Design Journal - Winter 2014 - Sample Issue  

Check out a sample of our Winter 2014 Journal!