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P R O M O T I N G T H E VA L U E , E F F E C T I V E N E S S A N D S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y O F P R I N T

MARKETING MIX: WHAT ROLE DOES PRINT PLAY? A CARD … A CONNECTION EGG-CEPTIONAL LIFESTYLE (MAGAZINE) PRINT IS NOT DEAD HOW PAPER HELPS LIFE UNFOLD A PACKAGER OF DREAMS


“ NPTA is our trade association, and is focused on the supply chain and the overall paper trade process. Merchants and mills all need to be involved in finding new and creative ways to improve the supply chain and improve our industry. Collectively, we have to realize that profits in the future will come from collaboration, not competition.

TRAVIS MLAKAR | PRESIDENT, THE MILLCRAFT PAPER COMPANY

Advocacy Across the Paper Supply Chain Today’s paper merchant faces challenges as a result of both the current economic and political climate and consumer perceptions of print and paper in the face of emerging communications channels. NPTA has joined forces with more than 100 other national trade associations to support the National Association of Wholesale Distributors (NAW) to bring education, research, and resources to NPTA member firms, and advocate for their interests on national public policy issues. NPTA also proudly supports Two Sides North America, an initiative by companies from the graphics communication value chain (including representatives from forestry, pulp, paper, inks and chemicals, prepress, press finishing, publishing and printing) to promote the responsible production and use of print and paper, and dispel common environmental misconceptions. NPTA members receive dues discounts and educational resources from both of these organizations.

Visit www.goNPTA.com to learn more and become an NPTA member.

NPTA www.goNPTA.com | 330 North Wabash Avenue, Suite 2000 | Chicago, IL 60611 Toll-free: 800.355.NPTA | Fax: 312.673.6736 | NPTA@goNPTA.com


PRIN SPEAKS

N P TA O F F I C E R S CHAIRMAN

A M E S S AG E F R O M T H E C H A I R M A N O F T H E N AT I O N A L PA P E R T R A D E A S S O C I AT I O N

Tom Wernoch Glatfelter

Paper Merchants Make Customers Look Good

FIRST VICE CHAIR

Bill Meany

The National Paper Trade Association (NPTA), founded 115 years ago, is the industry trade association representing printing paper merchants/ distributors within the paper supply chain. Our merchant members serve printers, publishers, graphic designers, marketing professionals and corporations throughout North America. We provide a variety of value-added services, including delivering the latest and greatest printing papers when and where you need them. Printing paper merchants make their customers look good by exceeding the expectations of the end user. We also provide value in the supply chain by aggregating product requirements for a broad, diverse customer base. This enables merchants to maintain a pipeline of inventory to support their customers, absorb unexpected spikes in demand and make manufacturers’ lead times transparent to the customer. Merchants are also an excellent source of education for customers because they can speak to a broad portfolio of products and specifically how they compare to each other. Merchants have a much larger base of product knowledge to draw from and share than anyone else in the paper supply chain. We are confident that you will find the articles and case studies in this issue of Print Works! valuable and encourage you to learn more about what NPTA and merchants can do for you. A couple of initiatives that I’d like to highlight are: NPTA’S PAPER EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS AT INDUSTRY EVENTS: NPTA participates at the HOW Design Live Conference, GraphExpo and the AdobeMax conferences. At each of these events, we collaborate with subject matter experts to deliver educational and entertaining presentations that will broaden your paper knowledge. If you’re attending future shows, make sure you check us out.

Central National Gottesman Inc. SECOND VICE CHAIR

Bill Garvey Athens Paper Company TREASURER

Bob Forsberg Sappi Fine Paper IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIRMAN

Bayard Tynes Strickland Companies N P TA D I R E C T O R S

Jan Gottesman Kelly Paper and Spicers Paper

Brooke Lee Anchor Paper

Ted O’Connor Mohawk

Greg Gibson International Paper

Tom Groves WCP Solutions

Scott Hider Clampitt Paper

Jeff Harris Mac Papers

PAPER AND PACKAGING – HOW LIFE UNFOLDS: We are very proud of the national campaign promoting the positive aspects of paper and packaging. We fully support this initiative and encourage you to check out the article about P+PB in this issue and check out the commercials and advertisements.

N P TA S TA F F NPTA EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Bryan White bwhite@gonpta.com

TWO SIDES NORTH AMERICA: If you are looking for science-based information about paper, Two Sides is the place to go. This is an excellent resource for separating facts from the hype about any issue related to paper. NPTA’S MERCHANT MAP: If you are looking for a paper merchant who services your area, check

MEMBERSHIP SERVICES COORDINATOR

Tia Crowley tcrowley@gonpta.com MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR

Addie Drillock adrillock@gonpta.com

out NPTA’s interactive online map at gonpta.com/?page=MerchantMap. You can search by state and find merchants who can reach you with the paper you need by the next day. I hope you enjoy this issue of Print Works! B.T. Tynes

• N P TA I M M E D I AT E PA S T C H A I R M A N

330 N. Wabash Ave., Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60611 PHONE:

312.321.4092 • TOLL FREE: 800.355.NPTA (6782) FAX:

312.673.6736 • E-MAIL: NPTA@goNPTA.com

NPTA’S NEW INTERACTIVE MERCHANT MAP CAN HELP YOU FIND A PAPER MERCHANT IN YOUR AREA. WWW.GONPTA.COM

PRINT WORKS! 2017

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CON EN S 2 0 1 7

6

20 P U B L I S H I N G S TA F F

T H E O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E N AT I O N A L PA P E R T R A D E A S S O C I AT I O N

PUBLISHER

John Aufderhaar Bedford Falls Communications

john@bedfordfallsmedia.com EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Scott W. Angus Bedford Falls Communications

scottangus47@gmail.com AD SALES

Ryan Wagner Bedford Falls Communications

rwagner@bedfordfallsmedia.com GRAPHIC DESIGN

Karen Leno/ KML Design, Inc.

kmldesign@mchsi.com CONTRIBUTORS

Scott Angus • Jim Bowyer • Roger Dooley • Barbara Goldman • Jim Leute • Nancy Marshall • Phil Riebel • Leah Wheeler C OV E R I M AG E © I S T O C K P H O T O . C O M / B O R C H E E

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3

From the Chairman  B.T. Tynes, NPTA’s immediate past chairman, shares his insights on the industry.

6

Marketing Mix: What Role Does Print Play?  Targeted high-quality messages seen as path to continued success.

4 1

A Card ... A Connection  Hallmark cards have been creating connections for more than a century.

20

EGG-ceptional LifeStyle  Big Green Egg’s magazine promotes popular cooker, accessories, way of life.

24

Print is NOT Dead  Three reasons why you should invest in print advertising and public relations.

28

How Paper Helps Life Unfold  In July, the Paper and Packaging Board’s first campaign will celebrate two years in the market.

32

The Imprint Paper Has Made On Me  The differences between reading on various screens and reading on paper may be nuanced, but those differences do matter.

34

Renewable Paper Carton  Spring water company JUST Beverages selects a hybrid package with the environmental benefits of a paper carton along with the functionality of a plastic bottle.

36

A Packager Of Dreams  Stoughton Printing and its record jackets thrive as vinyl continues its resurgence.

42

NPTA Member Directory  A listing of businesses by category.

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Paper Beats Digital In Many Ways  According to neuroscience research, paper-based content and ads offer special advantages in connecting with our brains.

47

Going Paperless Does Not ‘Save’ Trees  Study commissioned by Two Sides explains why the popular ‘go paperless – save trees’ slogans are misleading.

50

From the Editor  Bedford Falls Communications’ editorial director discusses the value of print.

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Print Works! is published on behalf of NPTA, the National Paper Trade Association, headquartered at 330 N. Wabash Ave., Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60611. Toll-free: 800.355.NPTA (6782) or 312.321.4092, Fax: 312.673.6736, e-mail: NPTA@goNPTA.com. © 2017 Bedford Falls Communications, Inc. 302 N. 3rd St., Watertown, WI 53094 PH: 920-261-1947.


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PRINT WORKS!

Marketing Mix:

What role does print play?

BY SCOTT W. ANGUS

Targeted High-Quality Messages Seen as Path to Continued Success

I TH E NATI O NAL PAPER TR AD E A S S O CIATI O N

If you’re among the people who think print has forever given way to digital, you should chat with Andrew Davis. Davis not only believes print has a future. He believes print is the future of digital.

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ANDREW DAVIS, FOUNDER, MONUMENTAL SHIFT

BETSY BROWN, GENERAL MANAGER & EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, CRAMER-KRASSELT

www.gonpta.com

“I believe the best ad and marketing campaigns are leveraging what they learn in the digital world to enhance what they market in the print world,” he said. Davis knows marketing. He is a bestselling author and in-demand keynote speaker. He co-founded, grew and sold a thriving digital marketing agency, and he has marketed for tiny start-ups and Fortune 500 brands. In 2016, Davis founded Monumental Shift, the world’s first talent agency for marketing thought leaders. Print is typically more expensive than other marketing, Davis noted, so it’s important to ensure that it is effective. Digital information can help marketers do that. For example? “If I’m running a digital campaign and have five or six different types of messages on different platforms – display ads or pre-rolls, for example – I can see which of those is performing best in the online world very rapidly.” That information can then be used to develop a high-quality print campaign, including direct mail, Davis explained.


For Johnsonville Sausage and Spice Islands, CramerKrasselt developed what Brown called “beautiful print that is very food focused, recipe focused.”

“I can then send that message, one that I know works in the online world, to people in the offline world and have much better success,” he said. Then, the dynamic can turn as offline inspiration leads to online action. In other words, a potential customer sees something he or she likes in print and goes online to research and make a purchase, Davis said. “In general, I think print plays a really good role in inspiring the right audience to dive deeper into your digital assets or digital world.” Davis is far from alone in his enthusiasm for print. Betsy Brown, general manager and executive vice president at marketing powerhouse Cramer-Krasselt’s Milwaukee office, said half of her firm’s clients use print to some degree. Much depends on the type of client, Brown noted, explaining that companies that sell food, hardware and home merchandise are among those that rely on print to convey their messages. C O N T I N U E D O N PAG E

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PRINT WORKS! 2017

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TH E NATI O NAL PAPER TR AD E A S S O CIATI O N

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PAG E

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“When we have new models we’re introducing, they want to know. They want facts and figures. They want to get a good look at the product. Print is a beautiful vehicle for being able to deliver that type of content.”

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“When you think about products like that, people want to interact, and they want to spend time with the material that you are presenting in front of them,” she said. For Johnsonville Sausage and Spice Islands, Cramer-Krasselt developed what Brown called “beautiful print that is very food focused, recipe focused.” “The target audience really wants to spend time with the information. They want to rip out those ads. They want to spend time understanding what that product is all about,” she said. “We are very much romancing the product and the food.” More so than many forms of marketing, print can be targeted to potential customers, Brown stressed. Ads for the American Osteopathic Association, for example, were included only in health content publications. “For those kinds of clients, where we know we have a very specific target we’re trying to reach, print is so valuable. It allows us not to have any waste with delivering the message – something you might not get for TV and outdoor.” Davis stressed the importance of tailoring the message to the medium and the print product, whether it’s newspaper, magazine or direct mail, so that it resonates with the audience. Brown is especially keen on direct mail for higher-ticket items. Cramer-Krasselt client Bombardier Recreational Products sells Ski-Doo snowmobiles and Sea-Doo personal watercraft, and potential buyers appreciate the chance to spend time with quality marketing material. “You don’t just decide on a whim you’re going to buy a snowmobile or personal watercraft,” Brown said. “When we have new models we’re introducing, they want to know. They want facts and figures. They want to get a good look at the product. “Print is a beautiful vehicle for being able to deliver that type of content.” Davis believes direct mail, done right, is the best kind of print advertising, and it’s underutilized. He’s not referring to cheap flyers, though. He recommends longer form, highly targeted and “extremely beautiful” pieces. Many catalogs are morphing into “magalogs,” which combine lifestyle content with product placements and other forms of marketing. Davis cited Red Bull as one company that prints “a great magazine” and leverages digital insights to determine what to include. “It’s a great time to invest in print marketing that stands out … something of high quality that gets people’s attention and actually owns not 30 seconds but maybe three minutes or 30 minutes of their time in the form of a magazine,” Davis said. Joe Pulizzi, founder of Content Marketing Institute, a leading education and training organization for content marketing, also is a big believer in custom magazines targeted to customers and prospects. C O N T I N U E D O N PAG E10


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“It’s a great time to invest in print marketing that stands out … something of high quality that gets people’s attention and actually owns not 30 seconds but maybe three minutes or 30 minutes of their time in the form of a magazine.” C O N T I N U E D F R O M PAG E

TH E NATI O NAL PAPER TR AD E A S S O CIATI O N

RED BULL PRINTS “A GREAT MAGAZINE” AND LEVERAGES DIGITAL INSIGHTS TO DETERMINE WHAT TO INCLUDE.

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JOE PULIZZI, “If there is a growth area FOUNDER OF CONTENT in the print industry right now, MARKETING INSTITUTE that’s it,” Pulizzi said. Those who choose print should dedicate themselves to it, he said, adding that one or two ads aren’t enough. Companies need to get their messages in front of their target audiences consistently, and Pulizzi especially favors print for trying to reach small, valuable audiences. Targeted print, he said, is a great way to cut through the clutter away from the highly competitive digital space. “It’s almost like a trade show where all of your customers attend but none of your competitors. That’s print in 2017.” Brown argues that print offers some of the highest quality impressions for marketers today. “When people are reading print, they are highly engaged. It’s like reading a book. They hunker down and make an appointment with those pages,” she said. “You are spending quality time. You’re not watching TV at the same time or on your iPhone or your laptop at the same time.” Pulizzi is confident that print will always have a role. ‘If I’ve learned anything from the past, it’s that nothing ever dies – print, radio, television. They all evolve and change but never die,” he said, adding that he believes print will grow in new markets but struggle in mature markets. Davis predicted a slow decline in the amount of print, but he reiterated that quality will be the common element and digital insights will help companies focus their messages. Brown, too, acknowledged that the number of publications likely will shrink, but those that remain will be especially relevant and allow for high engagement for consumers. “Many people want something to touch and feel and look at and think about and put down and come back to an hour later and say, ‘Maybe I want to consider that again.’” That theme of “coming back” to print is consistent among marketing experts. Its role has been refined, but print done well – often in combination with or as the future of digital – continues to sell products, and it will for years to come. PW!


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PRINT WORKS!

A CARD ...

a connection

Hallmark cards have been creating connections for more than a century BY LEAH WHEELER

TH E NATI O NAL PAPER TR AD E A S S O CIATI O N

H 14

allmark greeting cards have helped people laugh, love, heal, express gratitude and reach out to others for 107 years. Hallmark cards give voice to caring thoughts and emotions and are tangible reminders of joy, appreciation, celebration, belonging and love. For over a century, Hallmark has used the medium of print and paper to enable people to connect with each other. Even in today’s digitally saturated world, greeting cards help fulfill an enduring need. “These days, many people have large, expansive digital networks,” said Orlanda Lacy, engineering manager for Hallmark’s Greetings Division. “They may not even know all of their Facebook friends and Twitter followers in real life. But a greeting card is something personal. It is an

www.gonpta.com

intimate exchange that touches both the person giving the card as well as the person receiving it. “It’s not meant to go viral or be seen by the rest of world. It’s a unique, private, shared experience between two people. In today’s world, that’s something quite special.”

how to weave the visual and the editorial together effectively. It’s a complex process, often quite subjective, and we engage in a lot of dialogue to determine if an idea is working before moving on to consideration of all the production aspects, such as the paper, the artwork and the copy.” Sometimes, the design comes first;

HALLMARK’S CREATIVE PROCESS

other times, the words come first, said

Many hands touch every Hallmark card as part of the creative process, said Lainie Bassett, innovation visual strategist for the company’s Greetings Division. “Our creative team begins with an idea or a concept, and then we brainstorm about

Lauren Benson, creative director, editorial, for Hallmark’s Greetings Division. “Someone may be inspired by a funny photo or a beautiful scene,” Benson said. “We take inspiration from the world around us, our own personal relationships and of


“One thing we’ve noticed is that millennials are returning to using stationery and greeting cards. I think they appreciate the tactile nature of paper and the connection that comes with seeing someone’s handwriting.” KRISTI ERNSTING, PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER FOR HALLMARK

course feedback from consumers, which often comes by way of social media.” “A card needs to be relevant emotionally, relevant to the relationship, relevant to the occasion and the season,” Bassett added. “What are people looking for? How are they feeling when they choose a card? Is the sentiment meant to be humorous,

sympathetic, celebratory or romantic? Is it a day brightener, a gesture of support in a difficult time, or is it prompted by a holiday or special occasion? “All of these factors influence the card’s tone, voice, messaging, design, lettering, copy, paper stock, accessories and even the envelope. In addition to that, we look

at what’s hot and trending in the culture.” Hallmark sometimes works as much as a year ahead of an occasion or season, so it’s tricky to know what will be hot and trending, but the company strives to make its products as relevant to as many people as possible, Bassett said. C O N T I N U E D O N PAG E

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PRINT WORKS! 2017

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“We maintain an intense focus on conceptual innovation, quality and on the haptic experience each card delivers. We employ very high quality paper stock for both the card and envelope so that it is soft to the touch yet sturdy enough to hold up to intricate laser cuts and designs.” ANGIE APPLEMAN, STUDIO ART DIRECTOR FOR HALLMARK’S SIGNATURE COLLECTION

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PAG E

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TH E NATI O NAL PAPER TR AD E A S S O CIATI O N

WHAT’S TRENDING

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Christmas remains the biggest holiday for paper greeting cards, followed by Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day. Other important occasions for card exchanges are birthdays, graduations and situations that warrant sympathy cards, get-well cards or expressions of support. “One thing we’ve noticed is that millennials are returning to using stationery and greeting cards,” noted Kristi Ernsting, public relations manager. “I think they appreciate the tactile nature of paper and the connection that comes with seeing someone’s handwriting.” Hallmark is also seeing that consumers

prefer cards with shorter messages that serve as starting points for expressing their own thoughts, Ernsting said. “The mantra ‘mode of expression’ is very popular,” Benson said. “A card with a memorable quote or a succinct phrase expressing optimism or encouragement extends the experience of the card. It makes it keepsakable, displayable and sharable.” Formats are hot, too, Bassett said. “Cards that are artfully crafted with fabric or glitter, pop-ups, a sound mechanism or an accessory such as a wearable takeaway – these things enhance the overall card experience,” Bassett said. “They

give the card a whimsical aspect and also provide a second use so that it’s not just something to be opened and put aside. Instead, the person can continue to look at it, play with it, enjoy it and re-experience the emotion of receiving it.” “Since the feel of a card reflects the feelings of the card, we spend a lot of time choosing the paper stock. A sympathy expression feels different than a celebratory expression, so we take into consideration the purpose as well as the design and style of the card when selecting the stock,” Benson said. Paper is the foundation for every greeting card that Hallmark creates, Bassett added, noting that color, texture, weight and printability are all factors in the decision-making. “We ask ourselves: ‘Is the color right for the occasion? Does the texture and feel of the stock reflect the specialness of the occasion?’ These types of questions ensure the consumer has the best greeting card experience when they receive a Hallmark card,” Bassett said. The Hallmark Signature Collection is a line of premium greeting cards that features unique, handcrafted, sophisticated designs. “We maintain an intense focus on conceptual innovation, quality and on the haptic experience each card delivers,” said Angie Appleman, studio art director for Hallmark’s Signature Collection. “We employ very high quality paper stock for both the card and envelope so that it is soft to the touch yet sturdy enough to hold up to intricate laser cuts and designs.” Signature cards are embellished with fabric, attachments and second-use items such as hair pins, necklaces and puzzles, Appleman said. C O N T I N U E D O N PAG E

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THE STUDENT LANDSCAPE...

Know Your Market!

40 45 OF HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS AND

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COURTESY OF THE HALLMARK ARCHIVES, HALLMARK CARDS, INC.

FINDING JUST THE RIGHT CARD

According to the Greeting Card Association, Americans buy 6.5 billion greeting cards each year. More than half of those cards are produced by Hallmark. Hallmark greeting cards are designed by a creative staff of more than 500 artists, designers, writers, illustrators, researchers, stylists, editors, animators, photographers and engineers. The company offers a year-round greeting card selection of more than 18,000 designs, publishes cards in more than 30 languages and distributes them in more than 100 countries. Most Hallmark greeting cards and envelopes sold in North America are produced in the company’s Lawrence, Kansas, production facility. People often say there’s something special about finding just the right card. The very act of sitting down to write a card, to express thoughts and feelings with pen and paper is a special moment. And the card itself creates a connection that is simply not replicated with a phone call or an online posting or through some other medium. “The basic human need for human connection will never go away,” Benson said. “A paper greeting card is a keepsake, a tangible manifestation that addresses that very human fundamental need.” PW!

History of Hallmark, Greeting Cards

H

allmark was founded more than a century ago in Kansas City, Missouri, by a teenage entrepreneur.

Today’s Hallmark is a $3.8 billion business with greeting cards and other products sold in more than 30,000 retail stores across the U.S., including its network of Hallmark Gold Crown stores. The brand also reaches people online and through cable TV’s Hallmark Channels and Hallmark Hall of Fame. Worldwide, Hallmark offers products in more than 30 languages available in 100 countries. The greeting card story began in England during the reign of Queen Victoria (1837-1901), when factors including a growing literacy rate, increasing levels of discretionary income, advanced printing technologies and postal reform combined to create a new consumerism. The Penny Postage Act, a British law passed in

1840, fostered the custom of exchanging Christmas cards more TH E NATI O NAL PAPER TR AD E A S S O CIATI O N

than any other single event. The law allowed anyone in England to

18

send something in the mail for just one penny. The Hallmark Archives hold two copies of the world’s first printed Christmas card, which was commissioned by Sir Henry Cole and illustrated by John Callcott Horsley in 1843. Of the 1,000 copies originally printed, only 12 are known to exist today. Louis Prang, a German immigrant, is credited with bringing the idea of Christmas cards to America. In 1875, he printed a card that showed Killarney roses and the words “Merry Christmas.” n

www.gonpta.com


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PRINT WORKS!

EGG-ceptional LifeStyle Big Green Egg’s Magazine Promotes Popular Cooker, Accessories, Way of Life

TH E NATI O NAL PAPER TR AD E A S S O CIATI O N

BY JIM LEUTE

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Phil Norman knows he better be in or near his office twice a year when the latest issue of Big Green Egg LifeStyle arrives. That’s because Norman’s personal inventory of the magazines disappears if he’s not around. Norman isn’t one of the 4,500 dealers around the world who rely on the magazine to help sell the Big Green Egg or any of the hundreds of accessories that help make it what the company calls “the ultimate cooking experience.” Instead, Norman is the sales guy who handles the annual printing of 650,000 LifeStyle magazines. He’s been involved since the first volume rolled off the press in 2011. “People in our office just love the magazine,” Norman said of his colleagues in the Atlanta office of RR Donnelley, the world’s largest commercial printer. “If I’m not here to control it, they’re gone in a flash.” While Ed Fisher founded Big Green Egg in 1974, the popularity of the ceramic, egg-shaped cooker has exploded in the last 15 years. So, too, has the number of Big Green Egg branded “EGGcessories” that range from lump charcoal to seasonings, cooking tools to cookware and temperature control to tables. www.gonpta.com

Big Green Egg LifeStyle is the magazine that pulls together the complete EGG experience for both potential customers and seasoned “EGGheads,” those who already own one or more of the seven different-sized EGGs. “There’s so much you can cook on an EGG,” said Jodi Burson, the company’s director of brand enhancement. “The EGG truly represents a lifestyle change. “It’s so versatile, so different than any other grill, and the magazine allows us to showcase that.” LifeStyle is well written, beautifully photographed and attractively designed. It generally features profiles of chefs and celebrities who use the EGG to grill, bake, smoke or roast a variety of edibles. Each issue also includes recipes and techniques for getting the most out of the EGG and its accessories. In one issue, Rob Mondavi Jr. discussed food and wine pairings and noted that his famous wine family collectively owns 10 EGGs. Cheryl Forberg, the chef and nutritionist for the TV show “The Biggest Loser,” talked about flavors imparted by natural lump charcoal without added oils or other fats. Chef Jeff Shapiro outlined how the Big Green Egg is an integral ingredient for his successful Real Urban Barbecue restaurants in Chicago.


Burson said the magazine is designed to showcase the EGG and its growing accessory line. “It’s our primary sales piece,” Burson said, noting that independent dealers get the lion’s share of each press run. The rest find their way to culinary events, food and wine festivals and barbecue competitions. “We do it all in house, except for the printing. I have a very talented team.” Perhaps nobody appreciates that team and its magazine more than Jerry Stone, the company’s business development manager. “We think the magazine is an incredible silent salesman for both Big Green Egg and the dealer,” Stone said. “It’s a nice, wellrounded magazine that’s not all about the product. It ties together the many components that make up the EGG culture, and it’s a magazine you’d have no problem leaving on your counter or table.” Big Green Eggs retail from about $400 for the smallest to nearly $4,000 for the massive XXLarge. The company does not sell them or their accessories to big-box or discount retailers. They aren’t available online, either. “It’s been the philosophy since Ed Fisher started this company that the consumer of this product needed more one-to-one attention,” Stone said. “In general, the independent business owner is more invested in taking the time to talk about the product and represent it well.” Stone said LifeStyle is a valuable sales tool for the company’s authorized dealers, which typically tend to be hardware and garden stores. “It’s not so much in your face, although the message is there with the products in the last 10 pages,” he said. Do print in general and the magazine in particular work? Both Stone and Burson answer in the affirmative. “It’s tough to measure, as most marketing things are,” Stone said. “But we’ve found that when a dealer runs out, they call pretty quickly for more.” Burson said Big Green Egg doesn’t offer coupons, so quantifying the relationship between LifeStyle and overall sales is difficult. “Many of our dealers are going through a lot of these magazines,”

she said. “They don’t get points for handing them out. They truly value them as a sales tool.” Big Green Egg complements LifeStyle magazine – also available online – with extensive video, digital and social media efforts. All are designed to fully capture the EGG culture. The company routinely advertises in print publications that range from Family Handyman to Saveur, and it plans to launch a series of mini print publications tied to EGG accessories. “We really like print because when someone’s doing the research, they ultimately go see a dealer,” Burson said. “That dealer can direct them to a website, but they may or not go to it. “When they leave with the LifeStyle publication, it’s got lasting value, and maybe something will catch their eye and get in their head that ultimately manifests itself in the form of an EGG. “You read the magazine … the profiles, the techniques, the recipes … and before you’re halfway through it, you realize that you’ve really fallen in love with the EGG.” The magazine has a high pass-along value, said Norman, who has been in the printing business for 27 years. “We always hear that print is dying, and while it’s true that quantities are down, there is still something very valuable in walking into a dealer and taking home a quality magazine like Lifestyle that you’ll look through and leave on your coffee table,” he said. “It’s not something digital that you look at once and delete. Print, especially print done well, is always going to be around. There is just something much more valuable about putting a printed product in someone’s hands or mailbox than there is doing it electronically.” PW! FOR MORE INFORMATION

To learn more about Big Green Egg, visit biggreenegg.com. To find a list of authorized dealers that carry LifeStyle magazine, visit biggreenegg.com/locator. To see LifeStyle and other BGE publications online, visit biggreenegg.com/publications.

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PRINT WORKS!

Print is NOT Dead Three Reasons Why You Should Invest in Print Advertising and Public Relations BY NANCY MARSHALL | THE PR MAVEN

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ontrary to popular belief, the internet hasn’t actually murdered the print industry. New media has simply altered the way society interacts with print. First, I’ll do my best to clarify exactly what “went wrong” in the print industry over the last several years. Second, I’ll explain to you why it is in your best interest, now more than ever, to get your name back in print.

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So, what the heck happened? Print media is supported in two ways: advertising dollars and subscriptions. It is a known fact that subscription numbers have decreased across the industry as the internet has become more accessible. As a direct correlation, advertising revenue decreased (fewer eyeballs = less incentive). However, unlike the typical laws of supply and demand, when the demand (circulation numbers) decreased, the price of advertising increased. The reasoning behind this is logical: To support a publication with fewer advertisers, the rates have to go up. Advertisers began pulling their ads, forcing some publications to shrink, merge or close their doors. It was a dark time for the print industry. Thousands of jobs across the country were lost. It took time, but eventually the industry made adjustments, lowered rates, and everything evened out. To place a positive spin on this controversy, the majority of publications that survived have proved themselves, both to their advertisers and their readers, to be valuable and well read. C O N T I N U E D O N PAG E

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Want to make your magazine digital? We also offer E-editions so you can flip through pages with the click of your mouse. If you would like to learn more about Schumann Printers, Inc., visit us at www.spiweb.com or give us a call today at 920-484-3348.


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Why should I re-include print and public relations as part of my marketing strategy? There are many great answers to this question, but for the sake of context, I’ll just give you my top three in no particular order. 1.  MARKET SEGMENTATION

Quality impressions are targeted impressions. Consumers who are interested in boats read boating magazines. Consumers who are interested in hunting and fishing read publications about hunting and fishing. Whether they read these publications in print or on a screen depends on demographics and preferences. But if there is an article about you in a targeted publication, regardless of format, they’re still reading about you. In regard to print advertising, the ball is now in the advertiser’s court. Many publications have become more flexible with their advertising rates and are willing to negotiate.

TH E NATI O NAL PAPER TR AD E A S S O CIATI O N

2. CREDIBILITY

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Most subscribers have developed a relationship with their favorite magazines and newspapers. They know what to expect from them. They trust them. When a subscriber opens their latest issue and sees an article about your company or your latest print ad, they will begin to associate you with their trusted publication. To take this one step further (this nugget applies specifically to advertising), compare an online pop-up or display ad to an ad in your favorite monthly magazine. It is much more difficult to convey trust online; there are viruses, identity thieves, credit card scammers, etc. In short, there are more boundaries between you and your viewer. In print, you don’t have to worry about that. The perception is, if you’re in print, you’re real. You’ve got credibility. People aren’t afraid of print ads.

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3. MULTI-CHANNEL RECOGNITION

When you do an online search for “(name of something that you sell or a service that you provide)” hundreds of sites show up in your results. You’ll find results from organic search, paid search and even social networking sites, but which sites can be trusted? One of the best ways to increase your credibility online is through multi-channel marketing to increase top-of-mind awareness. Frequency and consistency are very important if you want your customers to think of you first. Ever seen a commercial that was really great? Great enough that you tell someone else about it but then halfway through your description you realize that you have no idea what company it was promoting? It’s like that. Seeing one commercial isn’t enough. But if you hear it on the radio, too, and then see it in your favorite magazine or newspaper, all within a relatively short time period — BINGO! When your customer tells their friend about the commercial, it’s not going to be, “Have you seen that commercial?” It’s going to be, “Have you seen (your business here)’s new commercial?” Now you’ve got people talking about you at the water cooler. That’s a two-for-one impression, and that helps to increase your ROI and your bottom line. Print is powerful. Print should absolutely be part of your multi-channel marketing strategy. (Please also read that as, “You need a multi-channel marketing strategy”). If they’ve read an article about you (online or in print) and have seen your print ad in their favorite magazine, you have the advantage. Radio, television, mobile, social, web, print, etc. — they all work together. The key is to make them work for you. PW! To learn more about Nancy Marshall Communications, go to www.marshallpr.com.


Singing from the Same Sheet of Music • Know and understand the industry we serve. • Know what our customers sell and how they bring their products to market.

• Know and understand the role of distribution. • Know and understand the importance of educating everyone in the channel.

These are Bedford Falls Communications’ operating principles. We employ them in the development of each custom publication we produce on behalf of the clients we are privileged to serve. When we do our job properly, everyone will be singing from the same sheet of music and delivering the message you want delivered. Interested in a custom publication? Call us today. John Aufderhaar /

Bedford Falls Communications produces high quality association, trade and custom publications for corporate clients. If you are interested in a custom publication, please call us today.

PR E S I D E NT

Bedford Falls Communications www.bedfordfallsmedia.com 920-206-1766


PRINT WORKS!

‘HOW LIFE UNFOLDS’ HAS USED MANY CHANNELS, BUT TV AND VIDEO HAVE BEEN AMONG THE MOST PROMINENT. AS PART OF THE ORIGINAL CAMPAIGN, THREE ADS PLAYED ON NETWORK AND CABLE BUT ALSO GOT HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF VIEWS ON STREAMING CHANNELS SUCH AS YOUTUBE AND HULU. IN THIS AD, PAPER PLAYS AN IMPORANT ROLE AND ENGENDERS A MEMORABLE CONNECTION AS A MAN AND HIS GRANDDAUGHTER KEEP SCORE AT A BALLGAME.

BY SCOTT W. ANGUS

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Industry Campaign Marks Two Years in Market in July

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verybody uses paper, and that’s a good thing for the paper industry. Everybody, however, is a tough target for a marketing campaign. That’s why the Paper & Packaging Board commissioned a study to decide whom to target with a program that is spending $20 million a year promoting paper and paper-based packaging. The conclusion: an audience the board refers to as the Expressives – an empowered and influential group ages 18 to 49 totaling about 38 million people. With a decline on the printing and writing side and flat packaging sales, however, the marketing program – funded by manufacturers and importers of paper and paper-based packaging – had to be memorable. In July, the board’s first campaign, Paper & Packaging – How Life Unfolds, will celebrate two years in the market. Uniting paper and packaging, including corrugated and folding or paperboard boxes, under one marketing umbrella was a daunting task. Would consumers understand and accept this brand category? Every indication is yes. Targeting Expressives has been a key to the campaign’s success. “This is a group that is very open to using more paper and packaging,” said Mary Anne Hansan, president of the Paper and Packaging Board. “Paper helps them accomplish


things that are very important to them both personally and professionally.” The 12-member Paper and Packaging Board was established in 2014 after the industry approved a checkoff program through the United States Department of Agriculture that levies assessments on bigger companies, with the money used for research, promotion and education. It’s the same program that brought you the milk processors’ “Got Milk” and cotton’s “The Fabric of Our Lives” campaigns. The timing was good, if not overdue. The industry was working to regain its balance after seismic shifts in consumer relationships with paper and paper packaging. It remains a $130 billion industry with more than 375,000 jobs and 5,000 products nationwide, but annual paper consumption has fallen 46 percent since 2000. The seven-year program’s goal is to reduce the decline in paper use and increase consumption of paper packaging. That recognizes the realities of falling paper use for communication in a digital world and the growing need for paper packaging to deliver products bought online. In fact, the use of paper for packaging had stabilized before the checkoff program. “The industry went into this with its eyes wide open,” Hansan said. “There was a realization that the goal of the campaign could never be to bring paper back to where it once was. But the board recognized that paper continues to play a very important role in the lives of consumers. And we need to be sure we’re part of that discussion going forward.” Paper & Packaging – How Life Unfolds highlights the relevance of paper in daily achievements and shows off packaging as the hero in delivering peace of mind to consumers. Now, with almost two years in the market – across prime time and late night TV, digital video and cable, print and social media – the campaign has racked up more than 30 million video views, and social media followers exceed 100,000. Advertising and public relations efforts have garnered more than 4 billion impressions among the target audience. More important, engagement with the campaign exceeds industry benchmarks on Facebook and for YouTube viewing length, which means consumers share and interact with the brand and the content it shares. Because the category of paper and packaging had not been promoted before, those behind the campaign decided it was important to establish what the brand stands for. In its research, the board found that people – especially Expressives – were looking for authentic ways to communicate. The average age of Expressives is 35. Fifty-five percent are male. Half are married. Half of those who are married have children. Half have college degrees. Eighty percent are employed full time, which gives them a higher-than-average household income. C O N T I N U E D O N PAG E

“This group is really looking for authenticity and relationships. There are people that while they are sharing on Facebook, they are also going to send a card because a card says something different than a Facebook post.” MARY ANN HANSAN, PRESIDENT OF THE PAPER AND PACKAGING BOARD

THE PAPER AND PACKAGING BOARD OPENED WITH A CAMPAIGN THAT FEATURED “STORIES THAT RESONATED ON AN EMOTIONAL LEVEL.”

THE SOCIAL MEDIA EFFORT HAD AN AMBITIOUS BACK-TO-SCHOOL INITIATIVE, STRESSING PAPER’S STRONG CONNECTION TO LEARNING, AND THE CAMPAIGN ALSO INCLUDED A 12-MONTH SERIES OF TIMELY, CALENDAR-DRIVEN MESSAGES.

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IN THE ORIGINAL CAMPAIGN, A HALF-DOZEN PRINT ADS EACH FOCUSED ON A PARTICULAR RELATIONSHIP CATEGORY THAT A CONSUMER MIGHT HAVE WITH PAPER AND PACKAGING, SUCH AS A BUSINESS TRIP, A PARTY OR A LEARNING ENVIRONMENT. OUTREACH EFFORTS SENT PAPER ANNIVERSARY PACKAGES TO PEOPLE MARRIED FOR A YEAR AND CHRISTMAS PACKAGES TO PEOPLE AROUND THE HOLIDAYS THROUGH A PROGRAM COBRANDED WITH MACY’S.

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Expressives have e-readers and access to information digitally, but they like books and magazines and make buying decisions based on catalogs, even though they make purchases online. Technology makes life easier, but it also overwhelms people, Hansan noted, adding that paper is “a nice antidote.” “This group is really looking for authenticity and relationships. There are people that while they are sharing on Facebook, they are also going to send a card because a card says something different than a Facebook post,” Hansan said. “They consider themselves old school but not old fashioned.” While the Paper and Packaging Board opened with a campaign that featured “stories that resonated on an emotional level,” nearly two years later, it is looking at how to tell its story through the product, Hansan said. “New creative is planned for release later in 2017, and I hope the industry will be pleased to see the hero uses of the products that will help build affinity for all of the products we make. While we can’t feature all of the hundreds of thousands of products our members make, we’ve conducted values-based research that has helped us identify uses that consumers relate to and will appreciate.” Print ads, originally developed to tell personal stories with a variety of the industry’s products, are now rolling out with a focus on the value that paper-based packaging materials deliver. In April’s ad – available in Parents, Sky, Hemispheres, Forbes, Men’s Journal, Bloomberg Businessweek and US Weekly – packaging is the hero.

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THE PAPER AND PACKAGING BOARD IS ALSO RAMPING UP OUTREACH WITH RECENT ATTENDANCE AT THE POP CULTURE TRADE SHOW SOUTH BY SOUTHWEST (SXSW) IN AUSTIN, TEXAS, WHERE TECHNOLOGY, MUSIC AND CREATIVITY MEET.

This ad follows the successful Letters of Peace campaign, which began in late 2016 and continued into January 2017. It focused on how paper connects people in irreplaceable ways. The campaign, which showed messengers of peace writing personal letters to the world, was seen in seven magazine titles over three months and the Wall Street Journal, and it was featured in a video series viewed more than 9.5 million times and shared widely across social media. The Paper and Packaging Board is also ramping up outreach with recent attendance at the pop culture trade show South by Southwest (SXSW) in Austin, Texas, where technology, music and creativity meet. The board’s booth highlighted the unique properties of paper, a material essential to creativity, productivity and even peace of mind, securing information and protecting the things that people buy. Featuring entrepreneurial innovations made with paper and paper-based materials, the #PoweredByPaper booth at SXSW aimed to disrupt the technology-focused space with what the paper industry considers the original technology, paper. Marketing and tech influencers welcomed paper’s unique ability to help creators create, thought-leaders ideate and engineers design. The online gallery at www.howlifeunfolds.com/sxsw showcases innovations from the paper industry. In new research that led to the recently launched “hero” campaign, consumers noted the importance of showing their work. They value paper’s role in helping them learn and be productive and identify that paper helps them feel confident and competent and know they are doing things right. “Consumers feel a sense of accomplishment when they use and choose the paper industry’s products,” Hansan said. “Nurturing this feeling among consumers, and even customers, is the Paper and Packaging Board’s role as we help our industry make the case that paper material continues to be unique, valuable and relevant. PW!

“This is a group that is very open to using more paper and packaging. Paper helps them accomplish things that are very important to them both personally and professionally.” MARY ANN HANSAN, PRESIDENT OF THE PAPER AND PACKAGING BOARD

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PRINT WORKS!

Imprint

The Paper Has Made on Me BY BARBARA GOLDMAN

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he question of paper’s falsely prophesied demise rests on a strawman argument. Reasonable analysis, limited to the printed word, would conclude that the differences between reading on various screens and reading on paper may be nuanced, but those differences do matter. Twenty years ago, I entered the electronic age and became enamored. That entry accounts for the indispensable mode by which I read newspapers, periodicals and websites, which bring me news and commentary. But my original love affair with paper is unalterable. Electrons are efficient; paper is elemental. Owning a “Captain Marvel” comic book was then, and would be now, about the “feel” of the pages and how they stacked by my bedside table. Buying a book at the corner candy store was an interaction that cannot be duplicated with Amazon Prime. What comes easily now with iPages makes me almost giddy.  Staring at an empty sheet of yellow notepaper then, sharpened pencil in hand, could be an arduous exercise. Even the Underwood typewriter’s keyboard as I hunted and pecked for words to stamp on white paper made me pay attention. How I learned to write, physically learned to write on precious paper, one sheet at a time, shaped the way I think about writing this 75 years later. A toolbox has room for a hammer as well as a Dewalt drill. In the late 1940s, paperbacks, those small, soft-covered products we assume were always on the market, became a new phenomenon. Critics decried their existence, arguing that the “book” was threatened. A new generation of critics, somewhat tempered now by reality, still argue that the issue of “paper books” is in doubt. I doubted their jeremiads then; I doubt their lamentations now. When two good ways of reading exist, there is a healthy market for both. Without the filled bookcases in the modest tenement apartment that was my home, I might not have become the kid who read under the covers with a flashlight. It is short-sighted to miss

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the obvious – paper made it possible to become educated. Without the paper industry, I might have spent more hours listening to the radio. Not the same as reading “Black Beauty” between the green covers of a Grosset & Dunlap 1942 edition of a “feminine classic.” These days, my first impulse when searching for a recipe is to touch the iPad and narrow down the overwhelming choices. Not a bad way to go. Why then do I cherish the Herald Tribune Cookbook that will eventually be given to my daughter? Every now and then, a copy is available on eBay. But mine has notes scribbled on favorite pages, mending tape on the spine and vestiges of chiffon cake batter. The paper has memories that no Food Network site contains. I have a habit of writing notes in the margins of books I own. It tells me years later what I had on my mind when I first held the pages. Technically, I could do that with electronic text, but as aforementioned, it would not be the same. Hurrah for the differences. When my daughter was 4 or so, we had a discussion on where milk came from. She told me that milk came from bottles. “Doesn’t it come from cows?” I asked. “No,” she said. “They give milk because that’s what the bottles are for.” Well, paper is there, thank goodness, and we fill up the pages. With this line of reasoning, we should keep growing trees, keep making paper and keep filling up the pages. Note: These comments are electronically written, transmitted and read. No calamity is in the offing. I shall forthwith print out a copy for my paper files. Yes, they are being kept on paper as well as in digital form. Two formats are better than one. PW! Barbara Goldman was a senior adjunct professor for 30 years. She was an elected member of a local library board. In her 80s now, she swims laps, writes poetry and enjoys being a great-grandmother. This article was originally published as a blog at twosidesna.org.


Experience an inside trip through the round-the-clock joys, pitfalls, and perils of the creative process. Learn how using the right paper can stop you from losing sleep at night, and help your dreams become reality. Experience it for yourself at the International Paper booth, #213.

what keeps you up at night internationalpaper.com Š2017 International Paper Company. All rights reserved.


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Renewable Paper Carton

Gives Consumers Packaged Water That ‘Feels As Good As It Tastes’ Spring water company JUST Beverages selects a hybrid package that offers the environmental benefits of a paper carton along with the functionality of a plastic bottle. BY TWO SIDES

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hile JUST Beverages’ product may be “JUST Water,” packaging is not just a typical water bottle. Instead, the Glens Falls, N.Y., startup opted to be the first in the U.S. to use Tetra Pak’s Tetra Top paper-based “carton bottle.” The package comprises a square carton body made from 53 percent paper, a bottle top constructed of high-density polyethylene and an HDPE cap supplied by Tetra Pak (Novembal). JUST Water is a 100 percent spring water product that JUST Beverages refers to as “ethically traded,” meaning it uses just a small percentage of Glens Falls’ excess water – less than 2.5 percent of 1.7 billion gallons – while ensuring the Adirondack watershed is protected. JUST Beverages is equally committed to reducing the impact of its packaging, as well. On its website, justbetter.com, the company emphasizes the environmental benefits of its bottle: It is made primarily from a renewable resource that is sourced from sustainably managed forests; it is 100 percent recyclable, and it reduces CO2 emissions by 52 percent versus a standard-size, middle-weight PET (plastic) bottle. “With a focus on environmental and social stewardship, JUST Water offers consumers a different type of packaged water that feels as good as it tastes,” said Grace Jeon, CEO of JUST Beverages. “Tetra Top aligns with our brand ethos. The carton delivers a sleek, sustainable package that not only protects our great water but is also compelling to our consumers.” JUST Water comes in a 16.9-ounce bottle decorated simply

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with a blue background and white logo; the shoulder and cap are white. The bottle is flexo-printed. The body of the package is a six-layer lamination made of paper, thin layers of low-density polyethylene, and a layer of aluminum, which acts as a barrier to light and air. The HDPE screw cap is a one-step open-style closure, whereby the consumer breaks the safety seal with a turn of the cap. The bottle is 100 percent recyclable in those communities that accept food and beverage cartons. A link on JUST Beverages’ website leads consumers to the Carton Councils site, where they can determine if carton recycling is available in their area. JUST Water was introduced in Whole Foods Market stores and through airport retail and management company OTG in August 2015, for a retail price of 99 cents per bottle. In 2016, JUST Beverages LLC and Saratoga Eagle Sales and Service announced an agreement under which Saratoga Eagle distributes JUST Water from the Canadian border to the Capital District of New York State. “We’re very excited to add JUST Water to our lineup of America’s best-selling brands,” said Jeff Vukelic, president and CEO of Saratoga Eagle, at the time. “JUST Water is locally sourced, affordable and all about supporting the community – and that fits perfectly with our way of doing business. “It’s really an innovative product that appeals to growing interest among consumers in supporting brands that are sustainable, responsible and community-oriented,” Vukelic said. PW!


Turner Falls Papers is a leader in specialty papermaking because of innovation and product development. We combine the high standards of our heritage with a papermaking vision, and our goal is not to become “another option” but “the only option” for designer and custom-made papers. We are not a commodity paper mill but a specialty mill that will cater to small volumes, custom colors and technical grades. Our nimbleness allows us to react to the changing needs of different paper markets. It is why we have prospered for 178 years. Our new name replaces Paperlogic as we embark on an exciting endeavor with breakthrough technology. The rapidly evolving “paper for everything” marketplace requires innovation, and Turner Falls delivers.

We take pride in being a custom paper manufacturer, but our customers tell the final story. Through innovation in look, feel or performance, the end user must be satisfied. Each paper has a story – how it was developed from idea to fruition. You have a concept; we have the means to create. A thought is a “what if,” but to touch and see gives that paper a story.

PRODUCT STORY:

Our proof of performance is rooted in the portfolio of papers that we provide, including artist papers for water color, charcoal, mixed media and drawing; engineering papers of 100 percent cotton vellums, blended vellums and translucent bond; and mat and mounting papers in custom colors and lot sizes to meet our customers’ specialized needs.

PROOF OF PERFORMANCE :

We run a wide array of fibers – 100 percent or blended, cotton, wood based, PCW and natural or synthetic inclusions blended for visual or functional need.

FIBER CONTENT & INCLUSIONS:

are specialty fibers used as a functional additive in papermaking to improve formation, strength and color retention. Our manufacturing capabilities surpass our needs and allow us to offer this product to the marketplace. Research is ongoing to incorporate these fibrils into laminating resins to improve scratch resistance and gloss.

CNF OR CELLULOSE NANO FIBRILS

What determines a value-added service? Is it customer service? Advantageous pricing or discounts? At Turners Falls Paper, we consider everything we do as value added. All of our papers are customer specific, not off the shelf. Each color is custom matched and designed exclusively. Each order reflects our commitment to providing the best paper quality and functionality. We look at each new order as an opportunity. We look at each re-order as confirmation of a partnership created through our value-added tradition. VALUE-ADDED SERVICES:

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413 . 863 .4326

info @ turner sfallspaper.com


PRINT WORKS!

A packager OF

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STOUGHTON PRINTING AND ITS RECORD JACKETS THRIVE AS VINYL CONTINUES ITS RESURGENCE

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BY LEAH WHEELER

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f you bought a fan belt for your car, you probably would not preserve the box and add it to your special collection or hang it on the wall of your home. But a record jacket is a unique packaging product that is synonymous with the music contained within it. “There is no other product out there where the package is an essential part of the product like a vinyl record jacket,” said Jack Stoughton Jr., president of Stoughton Printing of Industry, California. “Every record jacket we produce is unique and uniquely representative of the music, the artist, the genre, the essence of the music it surrounds.” Vinyl record jackets are an art form that is visual, tactile and auditory. They invoke not only the music, stories, harmonies and lyrics of the record, but they often also evoke a special time, place or feeling in the life of the listener. Alex Steinweiss popularized album artwork for Columbia Records back in 1938, and jackets have become increasingly complex and unique ever since. The art form has evolved from 45 RPM singles to direct-to-board jackets and gatefolds to Stoughton’s own brand of “Old Style” jackets combining old world craftsmanship with modern-day printing techniques.


FACING PAGE: THIS ALBUM BY FATHER JOHN MISTY WAS A NOMINEE FOR THE BEST BOXED OR SPECIAL LIMITED EDITION PACKAGE FOR THE 2016 GRAMMY AWARDS. MANY OF STOUGHTON’S PROJECTS HAVE BEEN NOMINATED OVER THE YEARS FOR THIS PRESTIGIOUS AWARD. BELOW: STOUGHTON PRINTING COMPANY PRESIDENT JACK STOUGHTON JR.

According to Nielsen, 2015 marked the 10th straight year of vinyl record sales growth, and the resurgence shows no signs of slowing. “It’s driven mainly by the purity of the sound,” Stoughton said. “The quality of the sound that can be achieved on vinyl is unmatched. It’s even better than it was years ago because of better production techniques and cleaner processes, and it’s certainly much better than a CD, MP3 or digital download. “Add to that the fact that vinyl is cool and trendy. Millennials, who did not grow up with vinyl, are largely driving the trend. For some, it’s a nostalgic thing; for others, it’s the coolness of a vintage form from a time in the past when music essentially defined the culture.” AHEAD OF ITS TIME EVEN BACK IN THE DAY

Stoughton Printing began life in 1964 making record labels for the nascent recording industry. Under the leadership of founder Jack Stoughton Sr., the company thrived and established a reputation for top quality. As vinyl records became increasingly important in American culture, the company expanded its space, increased capacity and added new equipment. In 1985, Stoughton installed the first dedicated Heidelberg Tower Coater 4/C 40” press outside of Europe. This brought the era of aqueous coatings to the printing industry and opened new markets to Stoughton. Later, the company added 5/C and 6/C presses, and in 2014, Stoughton added the first Heidelberg Next-Generation CD 102 6/C installed outside of Germany. With direct pre-press interface and closed loop inking, this brought the latest technology to the age-old art of record jacket production. These technological advancements together with environmentally astute processes in the pressroom helped the company expand its markets, become greener and venture into niche areas of the printing industry. “We refer to our pressroom as ‘Pressroom 2020’ because we are always looking at ways to stay competitive with new technology and new methods,” Stoughton said.

BELOW: JACK

STOUGHTON SR., FOUNDER OF STOUGHTON PRINTING CO., USED TO DESCRIBE HIS COMPANY AS A “PACKAGER OF DREAMS.” LOWER RIGHT: STOUGHTON SPECIALIZES IN MAKING OLD STYLE TIP-ON JACKETS AND OLD STYLE GATEFOLD JACKETS USING RECONSTRUCTED CLASSIC EQUIPMENT AND EMPLOYING TRADITIONAL FINISHING TECHNIQUES.

BACK TO THE FUTURE

The Stoughton finishing room is a different story entirely. “We refer to our finishing area as ‘Finishing 1920,’” Stoughton said. To understand why, consider this statistic. In 2014, about 14.9 million vinyl records were manufactured in the United States. Stoughton Printing produced the lion’s share of the jackets. And, Stoughton said, 60 to 70 percent of the company’s production is for evergreen titles -- re-releases of classic jazz musicians, oldschool rock bands and iconic vocal stars such as Elvis Presley, Willie Nelson, Eric Clapton, Led Zeppelin and Robert Plant, to name just a few. Stoughton specializes in making Old Style Tip-On Jackets and Old Style Gatefold Jackets using reconstructed classic equipment and employing traditional finishing techniques. The Stoughton finishing facility precisely replicates the finishing processes used in the early to mid-20th century. For Old Style Jackets, the image is printed on paper, which is then mounted on board. That’s how jackets were made in the 1950s and ’60s. With direct-to-board jackets, the image is printed directly on the surface of the packaging. “Because you cannot reproduce these finishes on modern equipment, we employ finishing techniques as they were done in their day. They cannot be reproduced but must be re-created. To C O N T I N U E D O N PAG E

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PRINT WORKS! 2017

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“Because you cannot reproduce these finishes on modern equipment, we employ finishing techniques as they were done in their day. They cannot be reproduced but must be re-created. To do this, we have rebuilt classic old machines for our shop, updating electronics and safeties to today’s standards.” JACK STOUGHTON JR.

Stoughton has been GREEN for decades

The color green took on special meaning at Stoughton Printing Co. as far back as 1985. Even before Prop 65 and the clean water and air quality regulations took effect in California, Stoughton switched from solventbased press chemistry to water based (aqueous) chemistry. Subsequently, the company changed over to aqueous printing plates, water soluble plate chemistry, low V.O.C. Pantone inks and soy-based process inks. Stoughton uses no alcohol in its plant, and its inks contain no heavy metals. The company reuses or recycles its leftover inks and waste paper. Board stock scrap and aluminum printing plates are sold to scrap recyclers. Working closely with its paper merchants and select converters, Stoughton uses well-chosen raw materials, including topquality solid bleached sulfate (SBS) virgin paperboard, SBS sheet that contains up to 25 percent recycled content and many types of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)-certified or recycled grades of paper and paper board materials. n

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do this, we have rebuilt classic old machines for our shop, updating electronics and safeties to today’s standards,” Stoughton said. “We reinvented this market for our Old Style brand, and we own this space.” THE BEAT GOES ON

Even while honoring the venerated traditional practices of the recording industry, Stoughton Printing continues to innovate and look to the future. Today, Stoughton works with virtually all of the top U.S. record labels, including Warner Music Group, Universal Music Group, Light in the Attic, Sub-Pop and Jack White’s Third Man Records, as well as many smaller independent labels such as Acoustic Sounds, Music Direct and Music Matters, producing exciting artwork and creative concepts. The critically acclaimed “I Love You, Honeybear” release by Father John Misty contains a chip that plays music and pop-ups that appear when the gatefold jacket is opened, two multi-colored 45 RPM vinyl disks in specially designed pockets and amazingly audacious artwork. This album was a nominee for the Best Boxed or Special Limited Edition Package for the 2016 Grammy Awards. Many of Stoughton’s projects have been nominated over the years for this prestigious award. Jack Stoughton Sr., founder of Stoughton Printing Co., used to describe his company as a “packager of dreams.” “Artists often put their hearts, hopes, dreams, talents and every bit of money they have into making an album,” Jack Stoughton Jr. said. “I remember a guy who sold his car to finance the jackets and production for his record. He had to take the bus to pick up the jackets to have the pressing plant stuff them for his concert venue. We loaded him, his jackets and his bike in one of our trucks and hauled him around. That night, he sold 60 albums for $10 apiece, and he was absolutely ecstatic. He had fulfilled his dream.” PW! S E E JAC K ' S FAVO R I T E A LB U M C OV E R S O N PAG E

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JACK STOUGHTON JR.’S

All-time Favorites

Jack Stoughton Jr. shared some of his all-time favorite record jackets along with his comments:

“THE LONDON HOWLIN’ WOLF SESSIONS”

“I LOVE YOU HONEYBEAR” FATHER JOHN MISTY

“L.A. WOMAN”

• THE DOORS

A seminal recording that defined a generation. Special die cut direct-to-board jacket with embossing and printed windowing.

This record jacket received a PIA/SC (Printing Industries Of America, Southern California) Best of Category award for the outstanding package design in the 2015 Print Excellence Awards, as well as a 2015 Premier Print Award from PIA National. Direct-to-board gatefold with pop-ups inside and sound module that plays when the jacket is opened.

Old Style Gatefold Jacket with clear foil stamping.

“PEARL”

• JANIS JOPLIN

Old Style Gatefold Jacket; possibly her finest collection.

“BLEACH”

• NIRVANA

Old Style Gatefold Jacket; defined a genre.

“THE MAGNIFICENT THAD JONES”

Old Style Gatefold Jacket with film lamination; better than the original jacket.

“RIDE THE LIGHTNING” METALLICA

Direct-to-board single.

“THE HATEFUL EIGHT” MOVIE SOUNDTRACK

“PET SOUNDS”

TH E NATI O NAL PAPER TR AD E A S S O CIATI O N

Direct-to-board reversible tri-fold gatefold with soft touch coating and spot UV.

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• BEACH BOYS

Old Style Tip-On Jacket with film lamination. Come on, it’s the Beach Boys.

“LAZARATTO”

• JACK WHITE

Old Style Tip-On Jacket with soft-touch coating; top selling vinyl in 2014.

“THE SONICS 50”

LP Slipcase that houses six jackets.

“THE PINK PANTHER” MOVIE SOUNDTRACK

Old Style Gatefold Jacket. “LIGHTNING BOLT”

• PEARL JAM

Old Style Gatefold Jacket with soft-touch coating and die cut cover; Grammy winner for Packaging in 2015.

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American Paper Corporation Emma St. #26, Amelia Industrial Park Guaynabo, PR 00968-8007 United States www.americanpapercorp.com 787.999.0900 Anchor Paper Company 480 Broadway/PO Box 65648 Saint Paul, MN 55165-0648 United States www.anchorpaper.com 800.652.9755 ARC Paper, LLC 6320 S. Sandhill Rd. Suite 2 Las Vegas, NV 89120-3249 United States www.arcpaper.com 702.399.3803

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Athens Paper Company 1898 Elm Tree Dr Nashville, TN 37210-3727 United States www.athenspaper.com 800.888.7901 B.W. Wilson Paper Company, Inc. 2501 Brittons Hill Rd/PO Box 11248 Richmond, VA 23230-1248 United States www.bwwilson.com 804.358.6715 Butler Dearden Paper Service, Inc. 80 Shrewsbury St/PO Box 1069 Boylston, MA 01505-1701 United States www.butlerdearden.com 800.634.7070

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Central Paper Co., Inc. 400 Glenwood Ave/PO Box 1701 Pawtucket, RI 02860-5910 United States www.centralpaper.biz 800.333.5770

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Millcraft 6800 Grant Ave Cleveland, OH 44105-5628 United States www.millcraft.com 800.860.2482 Newell Paper Co. 1212 Grande Ave./PO Box 361 Meridian, MS 39301 United States www.newellpaper.com 800.844.8894 Olmsted-Kirk Paper Company 1601 Valley View Lane Dallas, TX 75234 United States www.okpaper.com 800.367.6526

J. P. Gasway Company, Inc. 1460 Sherman Road Hiawatha, IA 52233 United States www.jpgasway.com 800.255.5885

Omaha Paper Company 6936 L St Omaha, NE 68117-1027 United States www.omahapaper.com 402.331.3243

Jackson Paper Co. 4400C Mangum Dr Flowood, MS 39232-2113 United States www.jacksonpaper.com 601.360.9620

Paterson Papers 730 Madison Ave/PO Box 2286 Paterson, NJ 07501-2407 United States www.patersonpapers.com 973.278.2410

Keldon Paper Co. 5960 Boxford Avenue Commerce, CA 90040-3006 United States www.keldonpaper.com 323.584.7777

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Knox and Schneider, Inc. 914 W Superior Street Chicago, IL 60642 United States www.knoxandschneider.com 866.476.2600 Lewis Paper International, Inc. 1400 S. Wolf Rd. Wheeling, IL 60090 United States www.lewispaper.com 847.520.3386

Printing Papers, Inc. 6101 Patterson Rd Little Rock, AR 72209 United States www.printingpapersinc.com 800.627.7774 Proveedora Papelera Kino, S.A. de C.V. Calle Arizona No. 85, San Benito 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora Mexico 52.662.210.4600


M E M B E R

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Sandia Paper Company 5801 Jefferson St NE Albuquerque, NM 87109-3411 United States www.sandiapaper.com 505.884.0900

Appvion 825 E Wisconsin Ave/PO Box 359 Appleton, WI 54912 United States www.appvion.com 920.734.9841

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Rolland Enterprises Inc. 256 JB Rolland Blvd West St-Jérôme, QC J7Y 0L6 Canada www.rollandinc.com 450.436.4140

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Monadnock Paper Mills, Inc. 117 Antrim Rd Bennington, NH 03442-4205 United States www.mpm.com 603.588.3311

WCP Solutions 6703 S 234th St Ste 120 Kent, WA 98032-2903 United States www.wcpc.com 253.850.3560 West World Paper Inc. 101-1680 Broadway Street Port Coquitlam, BC V3C 2M8 Canada www.westworldpaper.com 604.942.1722

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Domtar Inc. 395 de Maisonneuve Blvd West Montreal, QC H3A 1L6 Canada www.domtar.com 514.848.5555

Moorim USA 4600 S Ulster St Ste 220 Denver, CO 80237-2870 United States www.moorim.co.kr 303.770.8809

Finch Paper, LLC One Glen Street Glens Falls, NY 12801 United States www.finchpaper.com 800.833.9983

Neenah Paper Inc. 3460 Preston Ridge Rd Ste 600 Alpharetta, GA 30005-2061 United States www.neenahpaper.com 678.566.6500

French Paper Company 100 French St Niles, MI 49120-2854 United States www.frenchpaper.com 269.683.1100

Portucel Soporcel NA Inc. 40 Richards Ave, 5th Floor Norwalk, CT 06854-2319 United States www.portucelsoporcel.com 410.703.3626

Georgia-Pacific Corporation 133 Peachtree St NE Atlanta, GA 30303-1804 United States www.gp.com 404.652.4000

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Twin Rivers Paper Company 82 Bridge Avenue Madawaska, ME 04756 United States www.twinriverspaper.com 855.542.2852 Verso Paper Corp 6775 Lenox Center Ct Ste 400 Memphis, TN 38115-4431 United States www.versopaper.com 877.837.7606 West Linn Paper Co. 4800 Mill St West Linn, OR 97068-3357 United States www.wlinpco.com 503.557.6500 West Rock 501 South 5th Street Richmond, VA 23219 United States www.westrock.com 804.444.1000

Becky Lindsey Recruiting PO Box 625 Bend, OR 97709 United States www.beckylindsey.com 541.383.2331 Lost & Found Inc. 558 Williamson Rd. Mooresville, NC 28117 United States www.lostandfoundcorp.com 704.662.0074 PRINT WORKS! 2017

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FORBES

PAPER BEATS DIGITAL

IN MANY WAYS,

According To

Neuroscience BY ROGER DOOLEY

T

TH E NATI O NAL PAPER TR AD E A S S O CIATI O N

here’s good news for printers and paper companies. Despite the enormous migration to electronic media, neuroscience research shows that paper-based content and ads offer special advantages in connecting with our brains. In the last decade, every marketer as been engaged in some kind of “print to digital” transformation. Glossy brochures, direct mail pieces, bulky manuals, and many other printed items have been replaced by a combination of web content, email, and on-demand electronic files. This transformation is driven by how all of us consume media. We increasingly get our news, entertainment, and information via computers, tablets, and phones. Print-based media outlets have seen a decline in use and in some cases have disappeared completely. We certainly aren’t going to see a massive switch back to paper content. But, those marketers who have been looking forward to the day when print content is gone entirely may be surprised by the latest neuroscience research. Rather than an all-digital world, it appears that a multi-channel approach that leverages the unique benefits of paper with the convenience and accessibility of digital will perform best.

44

THE LATEST DATA

The most recent work supporting paper-based marketing is a study sponsored by Canada Post and performed by Canadian neuromarketing firm TrueImpact. The study compared the effects of paper marketing (direct mail pieces, in this case) with digital media (email and display ads). The technologies used in this study were eye-tracking and high resolution EEG brain wave measurement. Conventional questionnaires were also used. The three key metrics evaluated in the study were cognitive load (ease of understanding), motivation (persuasiveness), and attention (how long subjects looked at the content). Direct mail was easier to process mentally and tested better for brand recall. According to the report ... “Direct mail requires www.gonpta.com

21% less cognitive effort to process than digital media (5.15 vs. 6.37), suggesting that it is both easier to understand and more memorable. Post-exposure memory tests validated what the cognitive load test revealed about direct mail’s memory encoding capabilities. When asked to cite the brand (company name) of an advertisement they had just seen, recall was 70% higher among participants who were exposed to a direct mail piece (75%) than a digital ad (44%).

As a measure of overall effectiveness, the authors of the report calculate what they call the “motivation-to-cognitive load ratio,” and say values greater than 1.0 are “most predictive of in-market success.” By their calculation, direct mail scored 1.31 compared to 0.87 for digital media. Here’s how the individual formats fared:


While these measurements and metrics don’t rise to the level of universal scientific standards, they seem to fit with other research in the paper vs. digital space. TEMPLE UNIVERSITY STUDY

PAPER’S EMOTIONAL IMPACT

A 2009 study conducted by Bangor University and branding agency Millward Brown also used fMRI to study the different effects of of paper and digital media.

Last summer, in Print vs. Digital: Another Emotional Win for Paper, I described a study published by Temple University researchers. This study used fMRI brain scans to compare digital and paper. Their findings are summarized in this table: Table 2: Outcomes by Media Type Summary ATTRIBUTE

DEFINITION

Attention

A customer's focused attention for a sustained period of time on key components of the ad

PHYSICAL DIGITAL

Review Time

The amount of time a customer spends with an ad

Engagement

The amount of information the customer processes or absorbs from an ad

• •

Stimulation

An emotional reaction to an ad

Memory Retrieval & Accuracy

Accurately remembering the advertising source and content

• •

Memory Speed & Confidence

Quickly and confidently remember advertising source and content

• SOME OF THEIR KEY CONCLUSIONS WERE:

Purchase & Whether and how much the customer is Willingness to Pay willing to pay for a product

• •

Desirability

A subconscious desire for the product or service

Valuation

The subconscious value a participant places on the product or service

Source: OIG analysis of study results.

Perhaps the most significant finding from the Temple study was that paper advertising activated the ventral striatum area of the brain more than digital media. A previous study of successful ad campaigns found that the ventral striatum was an indicator of desire and valuation. While not quite the mythical “buy button,” activity in this small brain structure had the highest correlation with advertising effectiveness. The study showed that ventral striatum activity was a better predictor than self-reporting by the subjects. The fMRI approach used by the Temple scientists is the technique most widely used by academic researchers. While costly, fMRI studies can produce 3D images of brain activity. While their time resolution is lower than EEG, their ability to show activity in specific brain structures is valued by researchers. For more on the previous Temple study, see Neuromarketing: Pseudoscience No More here at Forbes and my conversation with the scientists, Scientists Get Closer to The “Buy Button” in The Brain with Angelika Dimoka, Paul Pavlou and Vinod Venkatraman.

• Physical material is more “real” to the brain. It has a meaning, and a place. It is better connected to memory because it engages with its spatial memory networks.

• Physical material involves more emotional processing, which is important for memory and brand associations.

• Physical materials produced more brain responses connected with internal feelings, suggesting greater “internalization” of the ads. MEMORY-CHANGING POWER

A 2011 study showed that realistic print ads could actually change how subjects remembered an experience. In Vivid Print Ads Change Your Memory, I describe how incorporating vivid images in ads actually caused subjects to remember consuming a brand of popcorn they had not actually tried. In addition, their attitude toward the product was more favorable. In that study, the comparison was with print ads that had less imagery. But it seems likely that the same effect would occur if the study had compared large, vividly-illustrated print ads to ads viewed on a small screen like a smartphone or a tablet. C O N T I N U E D O N PAG E

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browsing and scanning, keyword spotting, one-time reading, non-linear reading, and reading more selectively, while less time is spent on in-depth reading, and concentrated reading. Decreasing sustained attention is also noted. THE MESSAGE FOR MARKETERS

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READING, COMPREHENSION AND RECALL

TH E NATI O NAL PAPER TR AD E A S S O CIATI O N

While the studies I describe above all compare the effects of print and digital advertising, quite a few scientists have looked at information or entertainment content. There’s quite a body of work suggesting that our brains process a book differently if we read it in paper format vs. on an e-reader. For example, a study in Norway concluded that, “students who read texts in print scored significantly better on the reading comprehension test than students who read the texts digitally.” Another study at San Jose State University found that screenbased reading behavior is characterized by more time spent on

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Roger Dooley is the author of Brainfluence: 100 Ways to Persuade and Convince Consumers with Neuromarketing (Wiley, 2011). Find Roger on Twitter as @rogerdooley and at his website, Neuromarketing. www.gonpta.com

©ISTOCKPHOTO.COM/BOWIE 15

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PAG E

Science clearly shows paper can be more impactful and memorable than digital. Digital, meanwhile, offers its own huge advantages, including instantaneous access, localization, powerful personalization and targeting, audio and video, and more. Marketers should take advantage of the unique properties of both paper and digital. In particular, print advertising can maximize sensory appeal. Print offers the ability to deliver rich, vivid images along with tactile stimuli. In some cases, scent can be used to further increase print’s impact. In addition to exploiting the customer’s senses, paper may also be more effective for communicating detailed information. While most ads are designed to avoid any hint of information overload, sometimes a B2B sales effort may involve important documentation to ensure the customer needs are met. Providing this information in paper format may increase the customer’s comprehension and recall. Personally, if I’m presenting someone with a copy of my book, I always give them a hardcover copy. Not only can I inscribe it, but I know that it will have a physical presence in that person’s world instead of disappearing in a Kindle library with hundreds of other little icons. PW!


T WO S I D E S

CONTRARY

Going Paperless Does NOT ‘Save’ Trees

TO POPULAR

TH I N K I N G

Study commissioned by Two Sides explains why the popular ‘go paperless – save trees’ slogans are misleading.

© H O L LYS I M S

B Y P H I L R I E B E L , PRESIDENT, TWO SIDES NORTH AMERICA J I M B O W Y E R , DIRECTOR, RESPONSIBLE MATERIALS PROGRAM, DOVETAIL PARTNERS

T Even in a declining market for printing and writing paper, similar or rising volumes of wood and trees are being harvested in key forest regions of North America for other uses including lumber, fuel pellets and pulp for use in production of packaging, tissues and textiles.

he concept of avoiding use of paper to save trees may seem logical and has been adopted by many. However, the reality is that avoiding use of paper may well result in significant loss of forest land in North America. Below are key points from a study commissioned by Two Sides and conducted by Dovetail Partners, an environmental think-tank specializing in forestry research and analysis. North American forests are a global resource, providing critical, renewable raw materials for a variety of societal needs. Large areas of these forests, including those in the southern region, are managed by millions of individual landowners, many of whom rely on their forests for periodic income. Without a market for wood from pulp and paper manufacturers, significant numbers of landowners will turn to different markets or perhaps reduce investments in tree planting. Should markets for wood simply dry up, then there is a very real likelihood of land conversion to other uses such as urban development or agriculture. A common and simplistic view is that using less paper will lead to more trees across the landscape. But just as eating fewer apples will result in fewer rather than more apple trees, consuming lesser volumes of wood products will not result in more trees and forests, but predictably less of both. The risk of forest loss in the absence of wood markets is reflected in trends for the world as a whole, which show that regions with the highest levels of industrial timber harvest and forest products output also tend to be the regions with the lowest rates of deforestation. The reality is that the greatest incentive for continued investment and retention of our nation’s forests is a stable market for paper and other wood products. C O N T I N U E D O N PAG E

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PRINT WORKS! 2017

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ADVER ISER

PAGE

APPVION

39 A FEW INTERESTING FACTS FROM THE DOVETAIL REPORT:

• Each year, forests of the U.S. grow more than twice as much wood as is harvested or otherwise removed.

www.appvion.com B E D F O R D FA L L S C O M M U N I C AT I O N S 27

www.bedfordfallsmedia.com D O M TA R

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www.domtar.com G L AT F E LT E R

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www.glatfelter.com I N T E R N AT I O N A L PA P E R

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www.internationalpaper.com K ALLIMA

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www.kallima.com N E E N A H PA P E R

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www.neenahpaper.com NETPRINT

• In Minnesota, the closure of several paper and oriented strand board mills has led to divestiture of large blocks of forest land long held by the Potlatch Corp. Several thousand acres of that land were recently cleared of trees and converted to intensive agriculture, including potato production.

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47

It is also important to understand that forest resources are used for many different products in addition to paper. For example, in the U.S. South, forest landowners have embraced the emergence of a growing bioenergy industry that produces fuel pellets from wood. The new bioenergy industry is currently consuming a quantity of wood equivalent to about 16 percent of that going into pulp and paper production, up from 0 percent in 2008. In New Brunswick, Canada, there has been a major decline in paper production and use of pulpwood for papermaking due to mill closures over the past decade. However, harvesting rates on Crown Land have remained the same or increased due to the acceptance by sawmills of smaller diameter logs that would have typically gone into pulp and the emergence of new markets for sulfite pulp used in making textiles and for pulpwood-sized logs used to manufacture energy pellets. Even in the face of generally declining paper consumption, harvesting of trees for forest products is stable or increasing in key paper producing regions. These facts show that the “save paper – save trees” slogan is misleading and should be avoided. PW!

www.netprintonline.com 41

© H O L LYS I M S

P O R T H A W K E S B U RY PA P E R

www.porthawkesburypaper.com

TH E NATI O NAL PAPER TR AD E A S S O CIATI O N

SAPPI

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www.sappi.com S C H U M A N P R I N T E R S I N C .

2 5 /4 9

www.spiweb.com T U R N E R S FA L L S

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www.turnersfallspaper.com W E S T L I N N PA P E R

www.westlinnpaper.com www.gonpta.com

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ABOUT TWO SIDES

Two Sides is a global initiative by companies from the Graphic Communications Industry including forestry, pulp, paper, inks and chemicals, pre-press, press, finishing, publishing, printing, envelopes and postal operators. Our common goal is to promote the sustainability and attractiveness of the Graphic Communications Industry and dispel common environmental misconceptions by providing users with verifiable information on why print and paper is an attractive, practical and sustainable communications medium. For more information about Two Sides North America, go to www.twosidesna.org.


Family

Is Where Our Story Begins In 1963, Jack Schumann, founder of Schumann Printers, Inc., acted on his passion for print and began sheetfed printing in the basement of his small, family duplex in Fall River, WI. His sons grew up with an admiration of their father’s business and spent every opportunity working hard by his side for its success. Over the next fifty years, Schumann Printers Inc. would grow into a family-owned business with cutting-edge printing technology, over one hundred and seventy employees, and significantly more space to house such exponential expansion.

Top left: Jack Schumann running one of the first presses he ever purchased. Top right: Dan Schumann standing next to an early Heidelberg Press. Bottom Left: Mark Schumann pretends to fill out paperwork at father’s desk. Bottom right: Dan and Mark hang letters on side of building.

Dan and Mark Schumann, sons of Jack, currently serve as the President and Vice President of the company. Dan and Mark continue the company’s commitment to innovation by producing the highest quality product to surpass expectations on all fronts. Still located in Fall River, WI, Schumann Printers, Inc. provides every customer with the capabilities of a large printer, but maintains their tradition of giving individual attention to ensure satisfaction. With consistent sales growth, Schumann Printers, Inc. continues to prosper and welcomes the opportunity to provide their superior services. Top: Current plant for Schumann Printer, Inc. Left: Mark measuring a form off the press. Right: Dan, Jack, and Mark in the pressroom.

“Surpassing Expectations” 701 South Main Street, Fall River, Wisconsin 53932 | 920-484-3348 | www.spiweb.com


PRIN ENDURES © I S T O C K P H O T O . C O M / WA B E N O

A ME SSAGE FROM THE E DITORIAL DIRECTOR FOR BE DFORD FALL S COMMUNICATIONS

Print makes it happen “Promoting the value, effectiveness and sustainability of print.” That’s the mission of Print Works! , as defined in our tagline on the cover, and it’s my job to ensure that we do just that in every issue. I think we’ve succeeded in previous issues, but we might have topped ourselves in this 2017 edition. The “value” of print is emphasized in several stories, but nowhere is it stressed more strongly than in the article titled “Marketing Mix: What Role Does Print Play?” starting on page 6. For that story, I interviewed three experts in marketing, and all emphasized that, done right, print remains an efficient way to reach a targeted audience. Betsy Brown of the ad agency Cramer-Krasselt talks up the value of being able to reach a specific audience through publications featuring content tailored to that group. “For those types of clients … print is so valuable,” she said. “It allows you to not have any waste with delivering the message – something you might not get for TV and outdoor.” The creative folks behind the Big Green Egg cooking system also attest to the value of print in an article by Jim Leute about the Big Green Egg LifeStyle magazine that begins on page 20. Jodi Burson, the company’s director of brand enhancement, discusses the publication’s value to dealers and their customers. “When they leave with the LifeStyle publication, it’s got lasting value, and maybe something will catch their eye and get in their head that ultimately manifests itself in the form of an EGG,” Burson says. “You read the magazine … the profiles, the techniques, the recipes … and before you’re halfway through it, you realize that you’ve really fallen in love with the EGG.” As for “effectiveness,” the experts in the “Marketing Mix” story all referred to print’s ability to reach people and prompt them to take action. In many cases, that action is visiting a company’s website to do more research and make a purchase. That’s OK. Andrew Davis, the marketing guru who founded Monumental Shift, calls it “offline inspiration prompting online action.” Print makes it happen. All three of the sources referred to the need for quality in print marketing today. The cheap flyers of old don’t cut it. “The higher quality the product is, the more likely it will stick around and make an impact longer,” Davis told me. “This is definitely the case with magazines and catalogs, and I think it’s the case with other direct mail.” At Big Green Egg, Burson and others know that print in the form of their LifeStyle magazine is effective. “It’s our primary sales piece,” Burson says. As for “sustainability,” a study commissioned by Two Sides shows why the popular “go paperless – save trees” slogans are misleading and false. In his column on page 47, Two Sides’ Phil Riebell, along with Jim Bowyer of Dovetail Partners, details how using paper actually is good for trees and forestation because it helps ensure a continuing market for wood products. That means that more trees will be planted than harvested and land devoted to productive forests will not be developed for other uses. “Just as eating fewer apples will result in fewer rather than more apple trees, consuming lesser volumes of wood products will not result in more trees and forests, but predictably less of both,” the column states. So that covers the essentials for this Print Works! , but the edition contains so much more, including fun features on Hallmark’s strong connection to paper, starting on page 14, and a company in California that makes album jackets and is benefitting from the vinyl record resurgence, beginning on page 36. And I must mention the deep dive into the Paper and Packaging Board’s innovative program to promote its products, funded by the industry’s first check-off initiative, starting on page 28. Settle in, and enjoy all that paper can do for you – and millions of others Scott W. Angus scottangus47@gmail.com E D ITORIAL D IRECTOR FOR BE DFOR D FALL S COMMUNICATIONS

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www.gonpta.com


“ NPTA provides a great foundation to interact

with our most strategic partners. It provides the opportunity to network and to learn from leaders in our industry and leaders in other industries that are facing similar challenges. Also, NPTA provides educational opportunities in areas that impact all of us, such as supply chain efficiencies, environmental platforms and global industry dynamics.

JULIE SCHERTELL | PRESIDENT, FINE PAPER, NEENAH PAPER, INC.

Resources to Grow your Business Through interaction with distribution and paper industry thought leaders and peers, you will discover new ideas and solutions for your most pressing challenges. By connecting with current and potential trading partners, you can grow sales. NPTA facilitates all of these relationships through exclusive, in-person networking and learning events. NPTA also delivers opportunities to streamline your operations and grow your business by developing your management team. Warehouse management, sales, marketing, and human resources professionals can all benefit from one or more of NPTA’s educational partnerships.

And, to help you stay ahead of trends throughout the year, NPTA also delivers informational resources to inform your future strategic decisions. These include Employee Compensation and Benefits Report, quarterly Economic Outlook Reports, and the Paper Merchant Weekly e-newsletter.

Visit www.goNPTA.com to learn more and become an NPTA member.

NPTA www.goNPTA.com | 330 North Wabash Avenue, Suite 2000 | Chicago, IL 60611 Toll-free: 800.355.NPTA | Fax: 312.673.6736 | NPTA@goNPTA.com


“ Whether you’re a mill or distributor, being a member

of NPTA is going to be an integral part of your future. This is an opportunity for us to sit down with the senior management of our key suppliers and go through all of the challenges we have, and try to figure out the best way to provide the highest level of service to our mutual customers.

ANDREW WALLACH | PRESIDENT, CENTRAL NATIONAL GOTTESMAN INC

Why NPTA? NPTA is the only association dedicated to the health and vitality of the paper distribution channel. For executives at paper merchant, mill, converter and service provider firms, NPTA is your best resource for accessing peer insight and experience, along with best practices and industry trends from leading resources.

Join NPTA today to: • Gain competitive advantage

You will gain insights and establish relationships that help you grow sales, drive cost savings and efficiencies, enhance staff performance, and improve your decision making.

• Address the unique challenges of paper distribution

Your NPTA membership also supports advocacy on behalf of wholesale distributors in the supply chain, and reinforces the value of paper and print in today’s multimedia world.

• Support the distribution channel

• Develop a community of trusted advisors

Visit www.goNPTA.com to learn more and become an NPTA member.

NPTA www.goNPTA.com | 330 North Wabash Avenue, Suite 2000 | Chicago, IL 60611 Toll-free: 800.355.NPTA | Fax: 312.673.6736 | NPTA@goNPTA.com

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