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Suquamish News

suquamish.nsn.us

August 2019 | 1

Suquamish News Volume 20

August 2019

No. 8

It’s happening!

#Paddle 2 Suquamish 2024

In this issue ... Chiefstick remembered - p4 Overdose Awareness Day - p5 Housing initiative launches - p12

Canoe—Journey hosting — p3 Life savers p5

Dive boat dedication set — p3

Chief Seattle Days! — p7-10


2 | August 2019

Community Calendar Events & Meetings Suquamish Tribal Council Suquamish Tribal Council meetings are Aug. 12, Aug. 26, Sept. 16, Sept. 30, Oct. 15, Nov. 4, Nov. 18, Dec. 2 @ 8:30am. For information, contact suquamish_admin@ suquamish.nsn.us Suquamish Warriors Meeting Aug. 6 @ 5:30pm Veterans and guests are welcome at the Suquamish Warrior Veterans Center, 6353 Middle St. Open Mondays 9am3pm for veteran visiting and Thursdays 9am-3pm for service officer work. (360) 626-1080 Back to School BBQ Aug. 7 @ noon to 5pm at Chief Kitsap Academy. For enrolled Tribal members and decendents.

Suquamish News

Elders Lodge open for Chief Seattle Days, Aug. 16, 17 & 18

Angela Brainerd at (360) 394-8652 Suquamish Seafood Board Aug. 19 @ 1pm Meetings are open to Suquamish Tribal members. For information contact Suquamish Seafoods at (360) 394-8512

Elders Council - No meeting in August

Overdose Awareness Day BBQ Aug. 29 at the House of Awakened Culture, noon – 4pm, sponsored by Wellness Narcan training and rock painting with messages of hope and remembrances of lost loved ones.

Suquamish Elders Events Elders Pre-Lunch Exercise Mondays and Wednesdays at 10:30am in the Elder’s Lunchroom: Laughter, Strength, Mobility, Cardio and Balance. Raffle drawing every Wednesday! Bring a friend and get an additional raffle ticket.

PME Board of Directors Aug. 7 @ 9am Open to Suquamish Tribal members and invited guests. For information on agen- Elders Casino Lodge Staycation das and locations, contact Brenda George Aug.1 - check-in; Aug. 5 - check-out at (360) 621-0047 or brendageorge@ Elders Picnic @ Lake Leland clearwater­casino.com Aug. 3, 10am-4:30pm, Bus leaves Casino Dive Boat Dedication @ 9:30am Aug. 8 @ 10am at the House of Awakened Culture. Evening Loom Weavers Aug. 14, Suquamish Tribal Gaming Commission 4:30pm-8:30pm, at Elders Lodge Aug. 8 & 22 @ 9am Social Weaving, Crafts & Laughter, Aug. Meetings are held at the Suquamish Museum Conference Room and are open 15 and 22 @ 10am-3pm Elders Lodge. Cedar rose making, Aug. 15. 10-noon. to Suquamish Tribal members. Contact

Toenail Tuesday Aug. 20 @ 7-11:00am at Elders Lodge Makah Days Trip Aug. 24, 7am - 3pm, bus leaves Clearwater Casino @ 7am For Elders information, contact Human Services at (360) 394-8465 SPECIAL NOTE: Tribal elder Willie Pratt would love visitors, says his sister Aggie. Willie Pratt lives at Stafford Healthcare nursing home in Bremerton. “Before or after lunch is usually the best time, but any time would be great!”

Coming Up Elders Trip to Washington, DC Sept. 10-14 Chief Seattle Days, August 15-18 (see pages 7, 8, 9, 10).

On the Cover

Journey to Suquamish 2024 is happening! Read about plans and tidbits from this year’s Journey on page 3. For more photos and videos check out the Tribal Facebook page and website.

Suquamish News

Suquamish Tribal Council

Published monthly by the Suquamish Tribe: 18490 Suquamish Way, Suquamish, WA 98392

Leonard Forsman

Chairman

Email us at: communications@suquamish.nsn.us

Wayne George

Vice-Chair

Send letters to: Suquamish News Editor, PO Box 498, Suquamish, Washington 98392-0498

Nigel Lawrence

Secretary

Letters should include the writer’s full name, address, and home telephone and may be edited for clarity and space.

Robin Sigo

Treasurer

All photo submissions must be made in JPG or PDF form, with resolution of 300 dpi or more.

suquamish.nsn.us

Rich Purser

Member

Sammy Mabe

Member

Luther Mills, Jr

Member

Reproduction of Suquamish News, whole or in part, without written permission from the Suquamish Tribe is strictly prohibited.

Production Staff Shyla Spicer Leonard Forsman Sarah van Gelder Jon Anderson JoAnn Joe

Editorial Policy

Editor-in-Chief Contributing Editor Managing Editor News Editor Photography/Design

Publishers of the Suquamish Newsletter reserve the right to refuse publication of letters to the editor and guest editorials. Submission of editorials and letters is encouraged. However, they represent the opinion of the author and not necessarily that of the Suquamish Tribe. As such, we reserve the right to refuse to print any letter, for any reason.


suquamish.nsn.us

Suquamish News

August 2019 | 3

News & Events

Canoe Journey 2019: 30th anniversary starts countdown for Paddle to Suquamish

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anoe Journey hosting at Port Madison Indian Reservation came with a surprise splash when Chairman Leonard Forsman announced Suquamish Tribe would host in 2024. The big announcement came on the eve of the 30th anniversary of the Paddle to Seattle, which marked a resurgence of canoe culture among Salish Sea Tribes.

To mark the anniversary, those who participated in the historic event were wrapped with commemorative blankets (lower right photo.) Thirty years later, what has become an annual, multi-stop movable feast and month-long festival of Coastal Salish pride and canoe-going culture, continues to grow year after year.

Joined by participants from as far as away as Alaska, Hawaii, New Zealand, and New England, more than 60 canoe families gathered on the shores of Suquamish July 19-21 to rest, relax, and retell the stories and songs of their people. The youngest traveler: a two-month-old boy named Journey. On the morning of July 21, Suquamish

canoe families joined the flotilla making its way to Lummi Nation, the final host of this year’s journey. Now, the countdown is on with planning already underway to accomodate the thousands of paddlers and support crews expected to converge on Suquamish in just five years. Story and photos by Jon Anderson

New dive boat set for Aug. 8 dedication

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uquamish Seafood Enterprises will dedicate a new custom-built 49’ Geoduck Dive Boat on Aug 8. Leaders will unveil the name of the ship during dedication cermonies slated to be held at the House of Awakened Culture at 10 am. The boat will replace one of the current dive boats which is more than 50 years old and needs to be retired. “This boat will assure that we will continue to conduct safe and efficient Tribal geoduck harvests into the next generation of Tribal geoduck divers” said SSE General Manager Tony Forsman. “This will increase our efficiency and safety record, which is already one of the top programs in Washington State,”

added Forsman. The boat was constructed by Lee Shore Boats of Port Angeles. Funding was provided by the Keepseagle settlement fund and funds provided by the Suquamish Tribal Council. The Boat will operated and maintained by Suquamish Seafood Enterprises and will support the Tribal geoduck fishery. Suquamish Seafoods Enterprises is a business entity of the Suquamish Tribe. The business harvests and markets approximately 420,000 lbs. of wild geoduck each year. SSE contracts with 25 Tribal member divers to harvest geoduck, and employs 19 additional workers to run the seafood plant operation.

Can you guess the name of Suquamish Seafood’s new dive boat? The ship’s name will be unveiled during dedication ceremonies at the House of Awakened Culture Aug. 8, starting at 10 am. (Photo by Jon Anderson)


4 | August 2019

Suquamish News

suquamish.nsn.us

News & Education

Suquamish community mourns Stonechild Chiefstick, seeks change

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t was to be another July 3 fireworks display like any other at the waterfront in Poulsbo. But then things went terribly wrong. Stonechild Chiefstick, an enrolled member of the Chippewa Cree Tribe in Montana and a member of the Suquamish community, was confronted by Poulsbo police in the crowded park, and then shot. He died a short time later. Family and friends reacted with grief and shock. Family members set up a memorial at the park, with flowers and candles and a sign reading “Justice for Stonechild Chiefstick, 11-29-79 to 7-3-19.” A candlelight vigil on July 6 brought a large crowd of mourners to the park. Sacred Water opened and closed the event, and one person after another spoke of their love for Stonechild and their grief. A criminal investigation was launched soon after. Under the terms of Washington State’s new “De-Escalation” law, the investigation is being conducted by a multi-agency Kitsap County Incident Response Team, which includes the Washington State Patrol and local law enforcement agencies. The Poulsbo Police Department is not involved in the investigation. Because there were so many witnesses to the events, they have many people to interview. At the Poulsbo City Council meeting on July 10, just one week after the shooting, community members packed the meeting looking for answers. During the public comment period at the beginning of the meeting, Suquamish Tribal members Cassy Fowler and Robert “Gus” Purser were among those who spoke up about the shooting, along with residents of Poulsbo and other parts of Kitsap County. “There’s an ignorance about our culture and our people,” said Purser. “We’ve been next door to you since before you were even a town. In fact, this was our village and you know literally nothing about us.” At the July 10 City Council meeting and again a week later, speakers asked for accountability and transparency, for a fully independent investigation, for de-escalation and anti-bias training for police.

Some called on city officials to be leaders, to educate the community about the long history of Tribal peoples and make a pledge that nothing of this sort will happen again. Pam Keeley, a registered nurse, said “why didn’t someone reach out to Stonechild before even calling the police: ‘How are you?’ ‘Can I help you with something?’ I think de-escalation needs to apply to everybody, including the police.” Compounding the grief, the memorial altar created at the site of Stonechild’s killing was desecrated July 20. A suspect was identified, and most of the items removed from the site were recovered. An investigation by Poulsbo Police is underway. The memorial has been rebuilt by fami- Family, friends, and supporters of Stonechild Chiefstick gather in an impromptu vigil at Poulsbo’s Waterfront Park after Chiefstick was killed by police on July 3. ly and loved ones. “The death of Stonechild Chiefstick has been a shock to his family, the Suquamish Tribe and the greater tribal community,” said Suquamish Tribe Chairman Leonard Forsman in a statement to the media. “The recent desecration of his memorial in Poulsbo’s Waterfront Park is also of great concern.” Forsman added the desecration is a symptom of a wider tolerance of racism among segments of the local population. “This is not the first time we have faced this — recall the vandalism of Chief Seattle’s grave in 2000. “We hope the City of Poulsbo will take the difficult steps necessary to thoroughly address these issues as we all seek to make the death of Mr. Chiefstick the catalyst for change needed to make the North Kitsap community safe for all of its residents.” In a funeral service on July 25, at the House of Awakened Culture, Chiefstick was remembered as a beloved friend, father, brother, and son. There were tears, prayers, songs, and stories of Chiefstick’s life. He was a “kindhearted person” who “wouldn’t hesitate to help anyone whether it be a helping hand or to help comfort,” the family said. Stonechild is survived by his mother, Diane; siblings, Laverna, Chris, Celina, Vincea; and his children and stepchildren, Kierra, Ohitika, Stoney Jr., Alana, Kane, Silas, and Lily.


Suquamish News

suquamish.nsn.us

August 2019 | 5

Health & Wellness

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Suquamish Lushootseed

August Word of the Month ____________

pe(d)Taqa Time of Salal berries pronounced pŭ-Tŏ-qŏ

Taqa?ec Salal Plant or Bush pronounced Tŏ-qŏ-?ŭts

____________

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alal berries are ripe in August. They vary from delicious to bland and boring. Taste the berries before gathering, and if you don’t like them, try a different bush further away. Salal can be eaten fresh, cooked or preserved. They are high in vitamin C, antioxidants, fiber, protein and omega fatty acids. Ethics of Harvesting (Excerpted with permission from the book: Feeding 7 Generations by Elise Krohn and Valerie Segrest) 1. Build Plant Identification Skills. Never eat something if you are identifying it for the first time. If possible,

learn from an experienced harvester so you feel confident that you have the right plant. 2. Harvest from clean land and waters. Wild foods can pick up toxins from the environment. If you are harvesting from the waters, make sure the area is clean and far away from runoff from a town or industrial site. Avoid harvesting plants along roadsides, in industrial areas, or in agricultural areas. 3. Gather in the right season. Learn the best time to harvest wild foods. For example, spawning chum salmon are not preferred for baking because their meat is soft, but they make good smoked salmon. Dandelion greens are tasty in spring, but become bitter in summer.

Wellness Center to host Overdose Awareness Day BBQ International Overdose Awareness Day is coming up, and the Suquamish Tribe Wellness Center will be hosting a community event Aug. 29 from noon to 4:00pm. “We will host a free barbeque lunch at the House of Awakened Culture,” says organizer Dr. Lisa Pratt, psychiatric nurse practitioner for the Tribe. “Attendees can be trained in the use of naloxone to reverse an opioid overdose and take home a naloxone kit. There will also be activities such as rock painting to commemorate a loved one lost to addiction.” The goal of Overdose Awareness Day is to bring attention to overdose dangers and reduce the stigma of an overdose-related death. Globally, there is an estimated 200,000 premature deaths caused by drugs per year. North America con-

tinues to experience the highest drug-related mortality rate in the world, accounting for 1-in-4 drug-related deaths globally. The Centers for Disease Control estimates there were 67,744 overdose deaths in 2018 alone. Organizers say International Overdose Awareness Day also provides an opportunity to stimulate discussion about evidence-based overdose prevention and drug policy. The day also provides a chance to acknowledge the grief felt by families and friends remembering those who have died or suffered permanent injury due to drug overdose. “International Overdose Awareness Day spreads the message about the tragedy of drug overdose death and that drug overdose is preventable,” according to OverdoseDay.com website.

4. Processing and preparation techniques are important. How a food is processed, stored and prepared can make the difference between someone being nourished or getting sick. 5. Take only what the land can give. Wise gatherers, hunters and fishers remind us to take only what the land can handle and leave enough so that plant or animal communities continue to thrive. Likewise, it is essential to give back to the land so it will not become depleted. For example we can return shells to beaches and compost food scraps. 6. Honor your commitment. Sometimes harvesting is the easy part. The real work comes when you process your food. Evergreen huckleberry branches are easy to cut, but picking the tiny berries off the stems and cleaning them can take hours. Honor the foods you harvest by using them all. Quote by Suquamish Tribal member Rob Purser in Feeding 7 Generations: “In gathering food, people have to work together. No one person can do this by themselves. Nowadays people are trying to be so independent. People need each other to be healthy. Emotionally, they need each other. When you work together, it’s another way of feeding your soul. You learn to work with people despite your differences to accomplish basic needs. That’s one of the positives I see about the food gathering, preparing and preserving process.”

ELDER’S PRE-LUNCH EXERCISE When: Mon &Wed @ 10:30 am Where: Elder’s Lunchroom Why: For Fun, Strength, Mobility, Cardio and Balance! Raffle drawing every Wed! Bring a friend Group is growing Come join the FUN.


Suquamish News

6 | August 2019

suquamish.nsn.us

Government

Chairman’s Report

forward to working with the new leadership in Central Kitsap. Tribal Council had the pleasure of having lunch with retiring Tribal engineer Bob Gatz. We reflected on the many accomplishments that he oversaw in his time with the Tribe including the Suquamish Dock and the House of Awakened Culture and many projects for Port Madison Enterprises.

The Suquamish Tribal Council is working on a new housing initiative. We recently joined our Department of Community Development on a tour of a cohousing project on Bainbridge Island. Suquamish Tribe Chairman Leonard Forsman was the first Native American to chair a We are seeking ideas on a housing mix gathering of The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation in Washington, DC in July. in our future developments to address our housing shortage.

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his summer is the time for intertribal organizations to hold their mid-year conferences. The National Congress of American Indians Mid-Year Conference was held in Reno, Nevada. This was the first conference held since the hiring of NCAI’s new Executive Director Kevin Allis (Forest County Potawatomi Community). He previously worked in government relations where he worked with key congressional offices, federal agencies, and advocacy organizations mostly in Washington, DC on behalf of Indian Country priorities. The National Park Service (NPS) held a hearing on proposed amendments to the National Register of Historic Places regulations during the conference. These proposed amendments would seriously weaken protections for sacred places and archaeological sites of great cultural importance to the tribes. I joined several other tribal leaders in protesting these amendments, which were written to favor developers. I also sat on a Cannabis in Indian Country panel, organized by our lobbyist Josh Clause, that was well attended. The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation held their summer meet-

ing at the Smithsonian Castle in Washington DC. I chaired the meeting for outgoing Chairman Wayne Donaldson, who could not attend, and for incoming Chairman Aimee Jorjani, who was not yet processed after her Senate confirmation. I had the honor of giving a historic preservation award to the City of Webster, Texas, and other people involved in the restoration of NASA’s mission control center on the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.

The Washington State Parks Commission had a meeting in Kitsap County and, at the urging of former State Representative Pat Lantz, made a visit to Old Man House Park to reflect on events that led to its transfer to the Suquamish Tribe in 2005. Sarah van Gelder, who was instrumental in organizing the community support for the transfer, spoke to her experience during our meeting with the staff and commission members who were present during that historic time.

I joined Dennis Lewarch in giving a lecture on Tribal culture and history to our young people at the Suquamish Summer Sessions at the Fitness Center. I focused on the Tribe’s traditional leaders. The Suquamish Tribe hosted a two-day layover on the 2019 Tribal Journey to Lummi. We welcomed 53 canoes to our shores on Friday, and even more over the weekend. Thanks to our royalty, our singers (Joey, Ty, Nick, Kate and many others) and the Sailors and Marines of Naval Base Kitsap canoe packing squad for making the landing a success. Thanks to Jay Mills for organizing the meal for 4000 on Friday and 3000 on Saturday. Thanks to all salmon and clam cooks as well. Thanks to the Upper Skagit Tribe for donating salmon for our hosting. Thanks to all of the volunteers too, including Cherrie May and the Suquamish Warriors and other shuttle drivers. And thanks to Ty Purser, Joey Holmes, Kate Ahvakana, Sammy Mabe and everyone who helped with protocol. Thanks to our Maintenance crew, too, for all of their work, the police for keeping us safe, and to Tina Jackson for organizing all of it. Another great hosting enjoyed by all. Leonard Forsman, Suquamish Tribe

Tribal Council members Robin Sigo and Sammy Mabe joined Kate Ahvakana, Dennis Lewarch, Tom Ostrom and me in a meeting with Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan. We discussed the Tribe’s concerns with the health of Puget Sound and the city’s impacts on water quality, the cultural elements of the waterfront re­ design, and the need for a more formalized working relationship. We continue to work with local school districts to improve the performance of our native students and also educate the greater school population about the history of the Suquamish Tribe. Central Kitsap School District has a new Superintendent named Erin Prince. She is originally from Oregon and has some experience working with Tribes. We look

Suquamish Tribe canoe families prepare to join the 2019 Tribal Journey after hosting July 19-21.


suquamish.nsn.us

Suquamish News

August 2019 | 7

Chief Seattle Days 2019


Suquamish News

8 | August 2019

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Chief Seattle Days 2019

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Suquamish News

August 2019 | 9

Sports & Recreation

Chief Seattle Days 2019


Suquamish News

10 | August 2019

MON

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suquamish.nsn.us

WED

THU

1

Youth Center Summer Hours

FRI

2

Swimming @ BI Pool 2:30-4:30pm

Mon–Fri 10am–6pm Sat & Sun Dependent Upon Activity

5

Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th 12pm @ Fitness Center

12

Local Waters Week On Technology Bus

Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th 12pm @ Fitness Center

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Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th 12pm @ Fitness Center

Chief Seattle Days 2019

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Native Horsemanship Youth Program 12-2pm

Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th 12pm @ Fitness Center

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Native Horsemanship Youth Program 12-2pm

Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th 12pm @ Fitness Center

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Native Horsemanship Youth Program 12-2pm

Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th .12pm @ FitnessCenter

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7 Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th 12pm @ Fitness Center

14 Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th 12pm @ Fitness Center

21 Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th 12pm @ Fitness Center

28 Native Horsemanship Youth Program 12-2pm

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Native Horsemanship Youth Program 12-2pm

Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th 12pm @ Fitness Center

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Native Horsemanship Youth Program 12-2pm

Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th 12pm @ Fitness Center

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Native Horsemanship Youth Program 12-2pm

Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th .12pm @ FitnessCenter

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9

Swimming @ BI Pool 2:30-4:30pm

Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th 12pm @ Fitness Center

16 Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th 12pm @ Fitness Center

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Swimming @ BI Pool 2:30-4:30pm

Suquamish Youth Summer Fitness Open to youth between grades 6th-12th 12pm @ Fitness Center

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Suquamish News

suquamish.nsn.us

August 2019 | 11

Elders LunchRoom MON

TUE

Elders Kitchen (360)394-8407 Please call to inform the kitchen if you would like to cancel home delivery for the day 5

WED Beverages Served Daily: 1% milk, or LactoseFree Milk, Coffee & Tea Substitutions are some​times necessary.

THU

FRI

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Chicken Apple Crunch Salad on a bed of Lettuce Quinoa Salad Wheat Roll SF Jell-O w/Peaches

Elk Vegetable Stew Chef Salad w/ sunflower seeds, ham, cheese & dried cranberries Buttermilk Biscuit Fresh Fruit

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Calico Bean & Spinach Soup Turkey Sandwich w/ Cheese & Lettuce Carrot-Apple Salad Frozen Fudge Bar

Lentil Rice Salad with lettuce & tomato Tossed Salad Wheat Roll Yogurt & Fruit Parfait

Tamale Pie (ground beef, veggies, cornmeal crust) Coleslaw Fresh Fruit

Salmon Boiled Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Tossed Salad Pachado Bread Fresh Fruit

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Goulash (hamburger, Green beans, tomatoes) Brown Rice Broccoli Salad Oat Bran Raisin Muffin Fresh Fruit

Minestrone Soup w/ Oyster Crackers Tuna Fish Sandwich Fresh Vegetable Platter Waldorf Salad Italian Ice

Meatloaf Mashed Potatoes w/ Gravy California Blend Vegetables Tossed Salad Fresh Fruit

Pasta Salad w/ Roasted Vegetables & Ham Carrot-Apple Salad Blueberry Bran Muffin SF Pudding

Ham Hocks w/Beans Brown or White Rice Steamed Kala Tossed Salad Pachado Bread Cottage Cheese & Peaches

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Breakfast for lunch Egg Frittata w/ veggies & cheese (served with salsa) Oven Roasted Potatoes Applesauce Raisin Muffin Fresh Fruit

Chicken Rice Salad (chicken, rice, lettuce, tomatoes & cucumber) Coleslaw Corn Bread Yogurt & Fruit Parfait

Pork Stir Fry w/ Asian Veggies Brown Rice Tossed Salad Oat Bran Raisin Muffin Applesauce

BBQ Chicken Baked Beans Germany Veggie Blend Kale Salad Wheat Roll Fresh Fruit

Indian Tacos w/meat, beans, lettuce, tomatoes, cheese & salsa Fresh Veggie Platter Fresh Fruit

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Macaroni & Cheese w/ Stewed Tomatoes Fresh Steamed Spinach Tossed Salad Corn Bread Fresh Fruit

Steak & Green Bean Casserole Brown Rice Spinach Salad with berries & walnuts Italian Ice

Baked Chicken Quinoa Salad Capri Blend Veggies Broccoli Salad Fresh Fruit

Sweet & Sour Pork Brown Rice Asian Blend Veggies Tossed Salad Peach & Berry Cobbler

Geoduck Chowder Chef Salad(w/HB egg,cheese & sunflower seeds) Applesauce Muffin Cottage Cheese & Pears

Birthday Celebration! Chicken Adobo Brown Rice Asian Blend Vegetables Tossed Salad Birthday Cake & Ice Cream


12 | August 2019

Suquamish News

suquamish.nsn.us

News

From Shyla~

New housing initiative gets underway J uly was a busy month for the Tribal Council and government staff as we kicked off the new housing initiative. As staff, we have been tasked with researching and then addressing the housing needs for Suquamish families. So, our work began by looking at how others have designed ways to get after similar challenges. We kicked off our exploration by traveling north to meet with the Lummi Housing Authority. There we shared our experiences and accomplishments. The Lummi housing department took us on a tour of their Sche’lang’en (Way of Life) Village, a gated housing community of four-plexes.

Lummi designed this community to integrate wraparound services with a live-in psychologist, elders at the entrance to share and uphold the community rules and cultural values, and a strong commitment to sober living. We will continue to think through how this might work in our community. It intersects with our priority on mental health and one of our navigating pillars to Heal our Community. The next stop on our housing exploration was Bainbridge Island’s Winslow Cohousing community. This community has a village feel with an intergenerational living environment and communal dinners, along with shared courtyards, gardens, and work spaces. Private living areas range from studio apartments to three-bedroom units, but because of the shared resources, the homes are smaller and closer together. We learned how layout can enhance the overall community with doors and windows facing a common courtyard allowing for everyone to look after one anoth-

Public comment sought on anti-harassment code The Suquamish Tribal Council is seeking comments on a proposed new chapter of the Suquamish Tribal Code 5.11 – Anti-Harassment Protection Orders. Please submit written comments by September 15, 2019. Contact the Office of the Tribal Attorney for a copy of the proposed chapter. The new chapter is intended to provide victims with a speedy and inexpensive method of obtaining a civil anti-harassment protection order preventing further unwanted contact between the victim and the perpetrator. The new chapter will: (1) Describe the process for securing an Anti-Harassment Protection Order (2) Allow any person who receives a credible threat of violence or experiences a knowing and willful course of conduct that seriously alarms or annoys that person to secure an Anti-Harassment Protection Order.

The draft provides for an emergency protection order that is valid for up to 21 days and for a hearing to determine if a longer protection order is necessary and appropriate. The Court will have broad discretion to grant relief, including an order that restrains the perpetrator from making any attempts to contact the victim or make any attempt to keep the victim surveillance, and require the perpetrator to stay a stated distance from the victim’s residence and workplace. Submit comments to: Office of the Tribal Attorney, STC Chapter 5.11 Comments, PO Box 498, Suquamish, WA 98392 or by email with the subject line “Chapter 5.11 Comments” to lwells@suquamish.nsn.us.

Public comment sought on garnishment policy The Suquamish Tribal Council is seeking written comments for proposed amendments to Suquamish Tribal Code Chapter 5.10 Garnishment. Please submit all written comments by August 14, 2019. The proposed amendments to the Chapter 5.10 attempt to accomplish three goals: (1) Place Suquamish Government Garnishments at second garnishment priority; behind child support and before other creditors. (2) Clarify that the Suquamish Tribe and its entities will honor Suquamish Tribal Court garnishment orders, including foreign orders domesticated in Suquamish Tribal Court.

(3) Create an Tribal Government administrative process for garnishing wages, disbursements, and contract payments from anyone owing money to the Tribe and its entities while maintaining due process. These goals are intended to protect the assets of the Tribe while ensuring the streamlined administration of the Tribal government. Please contact the Office of the Tribal Attorney for a copy of the proposed amendments. Please submit written comments by August 14, 2019 to: Office of the Tribal Attorney, Chapter 5.10 Amendments, P.O. Box 498, Suquamish, WA 98392 or by email, with the subject line “Chapter 5.10 Amendments” to: twoolsey@suquamish.nsn.us

er. The parking is intentionally offset to the side of the homes to allow kids to ride their bikes and play without worry of traffic. Our team is made up of builders, planners, housing board members, community representatives, and Tribal Council members. One of our goals is to listen, learn, and share as we explore. Our mission is to design and build the next wave of housing. I am driving design methodology mixed with project management to supply the team with tools that will help this process. Additionally, we are layering data analytics and projections to determine the right mix of housing to make available to our Tribal members and families. The next steps will be to pull together a deep dive with our team to reflect, examine the data, and start to gather input from the community. Then we’ll put out some design ideas and get input from the public. As our designs evolve, we’ll throw some things out and find new ways to approach old problems. By Shyla Spicer


Suquamish News

suquamish.nsn.us

August 2019 | 13

Clearwater Casino SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

AUGUST 2019

For a complete list of promotions & detailed information, visit ClearwaterCasino.com

Delicious dining options are waiting for you in The Salish Kitchen Food Hall & Refreshments! Dine with us today! The Salish Kitchen Sun- Thurs 11am-9pm | Friday and Saturday 11am-10pm Corner Counter Sun- Thurs 11am-9pm | Friday and Saturday 11am-11pm Visit clearwatercasino.com/dining for more information

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Month-end Drawings Saturday August 31 4pm-8pm

Swipe to Win - Daily Drawing Entries into the Reel it In month-end drawing.

Drawing winners choose 1 of 5 fishing poles to reel in up to $6,000 CASH! Drawing entries must be activated by 8pm on Saturday, August 31, 2019

1 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Party Night 8pm-Midnight • FREE LAWN CONCERT 7 pm Elton Joel

2 • TGIF $1,000 Drawings 1pm-9pm • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Free live music 9pm-1am: Mr. Pink, Dance Club Hits • Barstool Bingo 7pm Beach Rock Music and Sports

3 • Military Appreciation Day Drawings 4pm-8pm • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Keno Tourney 1pm $45 • Free live music 9pm-1am: New Jack City, R&B

4 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Emerald Point Pursuit

5 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Senior Appr’n Day 2X Points, 9am-5pm • Golden Slot Tournaments 10am-3pm

6 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Mobile App Tuesday • $10.00 Burger Shot & Beer Beach Rock Music and Sports 5pm-11pm

7 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Diamond & Ruby Point Pursuit • Bingo 10:15am, 6:15pm Beach Rock Music and Sports

8 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Party Night 8pm-Midnight • FREE LAWN CONCERT 7 pm Borrowed Time

9 • TGIF $1,000 Drawings 1pm-9pm • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Barstool Bingo 7pm Beach Rock Music and Sports • Free live music 9pm-1am: Groove City, Dance

10 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Captain Rich’s Treasure Hunt Drawings 2pm-7pm & 9pm • Keno Tourney 1pm $45 • Free live music 9pm-1am: Groove City, Dance

11 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Emerald Point Pursuit

12 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Senior Appr’n Day 2X Points, 9am-5pm • Golden Slot Tournaments 10am-3pm

13 • • • •

14 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Diamond & Ruby Point Pursuit • Bingo 10:15am, 6:15pm Beach Rock Music and Sports

15 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Birthday Club Drawings 4pm-8pm • Party Night 8pm-Midnight • FREE LAWN CONCERT 7 pm Bee Gees Gold

16 • TGIF $1,000 Drawings 1pm-9pm • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Barstool Bingo 7pm Beach Rock Music and Sports • Free live music 9pm-1am: Radioactive; Dance

17 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Keno Tourney 1pm $45 • Free live music 9pm-1am: Radio 80; 80s Rock

18 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Emerald Point Pursuit

19 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Senior Appr’n Day 2X Points, 9am-5pm • Golden Slot Tournaments 10am-3pm

20 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Mobile App Tuesday • $10.00 Burger Shot & Beer Beach Rock Music and Sports 5pm-11pm

21 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Diamond & Ruby Point Pursuit • Bingo 10:15am, 6:15pm Beach Rock Music and Sports

22 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Party Night 8pm-Midnight • FREE LAWN CONCERT 7 pm ABBAFAB

23 • TGIF $1,000 Drawings 1pm-9pm • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Barstool Bingo 7pm Beach Rock Music and Sports • Free live music 9pm-1am: Spazmatics, ’80s

24 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Captain Rich’s Treasure Hunt Drawings 2pm-7pm & 9pm • Keno Tourney 1pm $45 • Free live music 9pm-1am: Afrodisiacs, Disco

25 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Emerald Point Pursuit

26 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Senior Appr’n Day 2X Points, 9am-5pm • Golden Slot Tournaments 10am-3pm

27 • • • •

28 • Reel It In Daily Swipe Diamond & Ruby Point Pursuit • Bingo 10:15am, 6:15pm Beach Rock Music and Sports

29 • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Party Night 8pm-Midnight • FREE LAWN CONCERT 7 pm Infinity Project

30 • TGIF $1,000 Drawings 1pm-9pm • Reel It In Daily Swipe • Barstool Bingo 7pm Beach Rock Music and Sports • Free live music 9pm-1am: Harmonious Funks, R&B

31 • • • •

31

Reel It In Daily Swipe Mobile App Tuesday Free Comedy Night 7pm $10.00 Burger Shot & Beer Beach Rock Music and Sports 5pm-11pm

Reel It In Daily Swipe Mobile App Tuesday Free Comedy Night 7pm $10.00 Burger Shot & Beer Beach Rock Music and Sports 5pm-11pm

Reel It In Daily Swipe Reel It In Drawing 4pm-8pm Keno Tourney 1pm $45 Free live music 9pm-1am: New Edition Experience, R&B


14 | August 2019

Suquamish News

suquamish.nsn.us

Community Notices

Be Prepared for the Big One (..and we don’t mean Sasquatch)

W

e’ve been warned. We’re overdue for a major earthquake. What should we do to prepare? Each household should have a disaster supplies kit ready just in case there is an earthquake or other major disaster. To assemble your kit, store items in airtight plastic bags and put your entire disaster supplies kit in one or two easyto-carry containers such as plastic bins or a duffel bag. Basic Emergency Supplies A basic emergency supply kit could include the following: • Water - one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation • Food - at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food • Radio - battery-powered or hand cranked plus a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert • Flashlight • First aid kit • Extra batteries • Whistle to signal for help • Dust mask to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities • Manual can opener for food • Local maps • Cell phone with chargers and a backup battery Additional Emergency Supplies Consider adding the following items to your emergency supply kit based on your individual needs: • Prescription medications • Non-prescription medications such as pain relievers, anti-diarrhea medication, antacids or laxatives • Glasses and contact lense solution • Infant formula, bottles, diapers, wipes, diaper rash cream • Pet food and extra water for your pet

Dive Boat Dedication

• Cash or traveler’s checks • Important family documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account records saved electronically or in a waterproof, portable container • Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person • Complete change of clothing appropriate for your climate and • Sturdy shoes • Household chlorine bleach and medicine dropper to disinfect water • Fire extinguisher • Matches in a waterproof container • Personal hygiene items • Mess kits, paper cups, plates, paper towels and plastic utensils • Paper and pencil • Books, games, puzzles or other activities for children Maintaining Your Kit After assembling your kit remember to maintain it so it’s ready when needed: • Store canned food in a cool, dry place • Store boxed food in tightly closed plastic or metal containers • Replace expired items as needed • Re-think your needs every year and update your kit as your family’s needs change. Kit Storage Locations Since you do not know where you will be when an emergency occurs, prepare supplies for home, work and vehicles. Home: Keep your home kit in a designated place and have it ready in case you have to leave home quickly. Make sure all family members know where the kit is kept. Work: Be prepared to shelter at work for at least 24 hours. Your work kit should include food, water and other necessities like medicines, as well as comfortable walking shoes, stored in a “grab and go” case. Vehicle: In case you are stranded, keep a kit of emergency supplies in your car.

Thursday, August 8, 2019 10:00 am

sgʷədᶻadad qəł ʔaltxʷ House of Awakened Culture 7235 NE Parkway Suquamish WA 98392 Contact: Suquamish Seafoods 360-394-8512

Traditional Heritage Specialist News

D

ear Suquamish Tribal Members; I am working very hard to record the history of hunting, gathering, sacred sites, fishing, food preservation methods, and anything else you folks feel needs to be preserved for future generations of the Suquamish Tribe. I will gladly record you on video or digital recorder and transcribe your information for future use. Please contact me for an appointment at my desk telephone (360) 394–8526, by cell phone (360) 340–0206, or by email at mjones@ suquamish.nsn.us. This is an important project that will educate your grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Our elders shared important cultural and historic information during the Suquamish Oral History Project in the 1970s and 1980s. We learned so much about Suquamish culture that had never been recorded before.

We need the same information from Tribal members today. What was Suquamish like for you as a child and growing up? What changes have you witnessed? What kind of things can we teach the next generation about how we grew up and what each of us experienced in our lives? Suquamish has changed so much in the past few years and we have experienced so many new technologies that we never thought would be part of our lives, only in science fiction, right? Please be a part of teaching future generations about their Suquamish heritage. Every Tribal member has important stories to share. So, come by and let us talk about your experiences and viewpoints of Suquamish culture. These are valuable lessons for the next generations of Suquamish people. By Marilyn G. Jones


Suquamish News

suquamish.nsn.us

t s gu

u A

August 1 Olivia Chiquiti August 2 Jackson Sherman-Dunn Joseph MacDonald Kevin Alexander Lyle George Madeleine Welch Wa-La-Chud Chiquiti August 3 Jackie Oakman Jr. Kali Hess August 4 Carlos Alegria-Sigo Carol Henry Marion Ives Michelle Brown Popeh Chiquiti Vincent Adams Weylyn Haynes VI William Gemmell

August 11 August 5 Cisse Trawally Dionicio Lawrence Dallas Hill August 6 Larry Jones Amelia Barnes August 12 Chrystal Parsons Hailee Hess August 7 Napesis Williams Georgia George Robert Alexander IV Lenaya Pondelick August 13 Samantha Johnson Cassondra Shelby August 8 Nicolas Purser Alyssa Mabe Nicole Holt Annabel Riggins August 14 John Mabe Janet Leonard Victor Sanchez Judith McConnell August 9 Justin Purser Bennie Armstrong Jr. Yah-will-ah Ives James Bradwell August 15 Ka-lene Williams Dawn Forsman Kaitlyn Mills Dustin Nichols Raymond George Everett Power III August 10 Kal’el Jones Amy Sterling Michael Rogers Jr. Arlene McElroy Rylee Hommel Robert Rubeck Jr.

August 2019 | 15

Birthdays

August 21 August 15 Bryan Gladstone Dawn Forsman August 25 Timothy Beckwith Dustin Nichol Bobby Pondelick William Nellenbach Jr. Everett Power III Ethan Alexander August 22 Kal’el Jones Kahli Oakman Alyssa Napoleon Michael Rogers Jr. Mariya Neal Anthony Rose Rylee Hommel August 26 Jasmine Keller August 16 Jacob Adams Julia Widen Leloni Boultier August 27 Loretta Ives August 17 Jaylene Ogle Orlene Lamont Bardow Lewis Teylor Ives August 23 Ivy Berry August 28 Cassandra McManamon Lea McMiIlan Sr. Daniel Covarrubias Olivia George Willard Williams Mable Anderson Shenowah Purser August 18 Tatiana Fontes-Lawrence August 24 Andrew Joe Vernon Vollenweider John Neeley Joanne Collins August 30 August 25 August 19 Patricia Johnson Bobby Pondelick Alexandria Boyd Shaylene Jefferson Ethan Alexander James Forsman August 31 Kahli Oakman August 20 Annette West Mariya Neal Anthony Adams Taylor Napoleon Lawson Dumford William George Mary Widen Ronald Purser Sr.


16 | August 2019

Suquamish News

suquamish.nsn.us PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID Kent, WA Permit No. 71

Profile for Suquamish Tribe

Suquamish News - August 2019  

Suquamish News - August 2019  

Profile for suquamish