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INSIDER

IOWA

LIVESTOCK

Spring 2021


STAFF BRIAN WADDINGHAM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

PARTNERS

KENT MOWRER

SENIOR FIELD COORDINATOR

GABBY GLENISTER

ASSISTANT FIELD SPECIALIST

IOWA BEEF INDUSTRY COUNCIL

TAYLOR LEKIN

IOWA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

COMMUNICATIONS INTERN

IOWA CORN GROWER’S ASSOCIATION

HELLO

IOWA FARM BUREAU FEDERATION IOWA PORK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION IOWA POULTRY ASSOCIATION IOWA SOYBEAN ASSOCIATION IOWA TURKEY FEDERATION MIDWEST DAIRY

IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER

Spring 2021

5400 UNIVERSITY AVE. WEST DES MOINES, IOWA 50266 800.932.2436 SUPPORTFARMERS.COM 1


CSIF TEAM BRIAN WADDINGHAM Executive Director

BWADDINGHAM@SUPPORTFARMERS.COM 515.225.5531

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Waddingham directs the Coalition’s work in helping farmers follow all rules and regulations, choose good locations for new farms, strengthen neighbor relations and safeguard air and water quality.

KENT MOWRER

Senior Field Coordinator KMOWRER@SUPPORTFARMERS.COM 515.225.5422 Mowrer assists livestock and poultry farmers in following all rules and regulations, choosing good locations for new livestock barns and feedlots, enhancing relations with neighbors and implementing best management practices that improve air, soil and water quality.

GABRIELLE GLENISTER

Assistant Field Specialist GGLENISTER@SUPPORTFARMERS.COM 515.225.5526 Glenister communicates the Coalition’s mission and services by sharing the success stories of Iowa’s farm families who have grown their livestock farms successfully and responsibly using on-farm best management practices.

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Prior to his work with the Coalition, Waddingham served 9 years with the Iowa Beef Industry Council as the Director of Industry Relations. He worked in the areas of producer communication, checkoff collection and compliance, coordination of research projects and the development and execution of the Beef Quality Assurance program. He also served as the Agriculture and FFA instructor at Baxter High School located in central Iowa. He is a native of Klemme, Iowa, with a degree in agriculture education from Iowa State University.

Prior to his work with the Coalition, Mowrer served as an ag account representative for Alliant Energy where he was responsible for managing relationships with ag customers for the successful delivery of Alliant Energy programs and advising and assisting farmer customers constructing new facilities. He also acted as the primary contact between the company and customers regarding questions and inquiries. Mowrer also has experience as a site development manager for an Iowa hog company, a research assistant for Monsanto and research associate for Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.

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Mowrer grew up on a diversified crop and livestock farm near Perry and has a bachelor’s degree in animal science from Iowa State University.

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A native of New York state, Glenister grew up on her family’s diversified livestock farm in Pulaski. She graduated from the State University of New York at Cobleskill with an associate of science degree in animal science: dairy production and management. Following her time in New York, Glenister attended Iowa State University and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural communications. Prior to her work with the Coalition, Glenister worked with Sullivan Supply Inc., as the assistant dean of Stock Show University and most recently the content coordinator for The Pulse.

Spring 2021 IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER


IOWA

INSIDER

LIVESTOCK

Spring 2021

CONTENTS 5

LIVESTOCK 101

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IOWA FARM BUREAU

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IOWA SOYBEAN ASSOCIATION

CSIF Derecho Windbreak Grant Update

highlights the importance of addressing stress + available resources

New interactive tool helps farmers see costs + opportunities related to cover crops

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IOWA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

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MIDWEST DAIRY

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IOWA CORN GROWERS ASSOCIATION

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IOWA BEEF INDUSTRY COUNCIL

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IOWA TURKEY FEDERATION

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NEW CSIF INTERN

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IOWA PORK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

On-farm Beefmeet events focus on climate + environmental sustainability

Midwest Dairy elects leadership

Soil health partnership research shows the economic advantages of conservation practices

Bambino’s named Iowa’s Best Burger

Italian Turkey Frittata

Coalition welcomes Lekin as 2021 communications intern

Nominations open for 2021 Iowa’s Best Breaded Pork Tenderloin


PHOTO + COVER PHOTO: GABBY GLENISTER, COALITION TO SUPPORT IOWA’S FARMERS


LIVESTOCK 101

CSIF DERECHO WINDBREAK GRANT

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The Coalition to Support Iowa’s Farmers (CSIF), launched the CSIF Derecho Windbreak Grant Program on December 16, 2020, to help livestock + poultry farmers repair or replace windbreaks around their livestock buildings + open feedlots damaged by the derecho. CSIF became involved after seeing firsthand the devastation the derecho caused on farms. The CSIF Derecho Windbreak Grant Program was a natural fit for CSIF through its Green Farmstead Partner (GFP) Program.

The GFP Program was created in 2009 to provide livestock farmers with help to establish tree + shrub plantings specifically designed for livestock farms. Through a unique partnership with the Iowa Nursery + Landscape Association + Trees Forever, the program offers the expertise of 30 nursery professionals around the state. Since the program’s inception, more than 77,000 trees + shrubs have been planted on livestock farms in Iowa. Research shows planting rows of shrubs + trees on livestock farms serve as a natural filtration system for odors, helps conserve energy, provides additional shade in the summer + protection from snow + improves neighbor relations.

CSIF received 40 grant applications from livestock farmers that covered 45 farms. The 40 applications lost a total of 1,668 trees + had damage estimates on their windbreaks of $205,660.00.

Due to the generous support from companies, organizations and individuals, CSIF was able to award all 40 livestock farmers with grant dollars.

IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER

Spring 2021

SPONSORS

ADM AGRI-MANAGEMENT SERVICES AL + KAREN HERMANSON ASMUS FARM SUPPLY ARBOR CARE, LLC. BENTON COUNTY FARM BUREAU BUTLER COUNTY FARM BUREAU DIAMOND V DICKINSON COUNTY CATTLEMEN HOWARD COUNTY FARM BUREAU IOWA BEEF INDUSTRY COUNCIL IOWA FARM BUREAU FEDERATION IOWA PORK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION KENT NUTRITION GROUP LARRY COFER LYON COUNTY FARM BUREAU MAHASKA COUNTY FARM BUREAU POCAHONTAS COUNTY FARM BUREAU PSI REICKS VIEW FARMS ZOETIS

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Photo: Gabby Glenister, Coalition to Support Iowa’s Farmers

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Spring 2021 IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER


STRESS IN LIFE IS NORMAL especially in the agricultural community where farmers are up against factors out of their control such as the weather, markets and local and federal policies impacting their bottom lines. While stress can move people toward positive change and action, when it crosses the line of impacting decision-making, relationships and physical health, it needs to be addressed. During May Mental Health Month, Iowa Farm Bureau Federation (IFBF) wants farmers to know help is available.

“As a grain and livestock farmer, I understand the mindset of wanting to push through, get the job done and suppress how we’re feeling to not concern others,” says Craig Hill, IFBF president. “But if we’re not taking care of ourselves, we will be unable to take care of the things we hold dear—like our families, farms, land and livestock.” IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER

Spring 2021

HEA MENTAL

Photo: Iowa Farm Bureau Federation

Contact: Caitlyn Lamm, public relations specialist, Iowa Farm Burea

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IOWA FARM BUREAU HIGHLIGHTS IMPORTANCE OF ADDRESSING STRESS + AVAILABLE RESOURCES “When stress crosses over into critical levels, it can lead to anxiety, depression and hopelessness,” said Dr. Larry Tranel, an Iowa State University (ISU) Extension dairy specialist and pastoral psychologist, during an IFBF Spokesman Speaks podcast episode. “When we look at chronic farm stress, we realize it can dampen a person’s spirit, their appetite and their physical stamina. And dealing with stress and build resiliency is a learned skill.” To assist farmers in strengthening these skills and caring for their mental health, IFBF has aggregated mental health resources from counseling services and crisis hotlines to podcasts and webinars on coping with stress and how to effectively talk about it with loved ones. These resources can be found at https://www.iowafarmbureau.com/ Stress-Mental-Health-Resources.

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Additionally, ISU Extension has partnered with Farm Foundation to form the Iowa Farm Family Wellness Alliance to bring farmers pre-paid, ongoing wellness coaching and counseling through Personal Assistance Services which can be accessed via phone, text, live chat or video. More information can be found at https:// farmfamilywellness.com.

au Federation, clamm@ifbf.org

“It can be hard to slow down in the midst of all that needs to get done on the farm,” says Hill. “But I would encourage family members to check in with each other, make time to do something that brings you peace—even if it’s a quick tailgate lunch together—and seek additional assistance when it gets really tough. While our bodies take wear and tear from farming, our minds can, too, and in times of stress we need to keep those healthy as well.”

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Spring 2021 IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER


NEW INTERACTIVE

TOOL HELPS FARMERS SEE COSTS AND OPPORTUNITIES RELATED TO COVER CROPS The Iowa Soybean Association (ISA), as part of an Iowa Natural Resources Conservation Services (NRCS) Conservation Innovation Grant, developed an online tool to show various management strategies that can make cover crops profitable. The Cover Crop Economic Simulator also helps farmers and landowners see the cost and income opportunities available by adding cover crops. Cover crops have the potential to be a financial asset for farmers when managed well, but not everyone has the time to sift through information to find real-world values and come to a bottom-line conclusion. This tool provides an easy starting point for those unfamiliar with cover crop management, as well as a useful platform for long-time cover crop beneficiaries.

The simulator tool is just one piece of a larger soil health test interpretation portal, which ISA’s analytics team is in the process of creating. Have additional questions? Contact ISA Analyst Suzanne Fey. This story was originally published in the Spring 2021 issue of the Iowa Soybean Review. CONTACT: BETHANY BARATTA SENIOR WRITER BBARATTA@IASOYBEANS.COM 515.334.1020

Access the Cover Crop Economic Simulator from the ISA website. There, you’ll find a “how to” video to assist you in using the tool and a simulator for you to adjust the default values to more closely match your own farm operation. IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER

Spring 2021

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ISA HAS DEVELOPED AN ONLINE TOOL TO SHOW VARIOUS MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES THAT CAN MAKE COVER CROPS PROFITABLE. (PHOTO: IOWA SOYBEAN ASSOCIATION)

VIEW THE COMPLETE STORY IN THE SPRING 2021 ISSUE OF THE IOWA SOYBEAN REVIEW

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Spring 2021 IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER


ON-FARM BEEFMEET EVENTS FOCUS ON CLIMATE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY The Iowa Cattlemen’s Association is excited to host four educational, on-farm events in June. BeefMeets feature educational sessions on policy and production, industry updates, a farm tour, trade show and meal. This year’s focus is climate and environmental sustainability. Well-respected professionals will share how beef cattle producers can further enhance their reputation as the original stewards of the land and natural resources at the dates/locations listed below: Wednesday, June 9: Southeast Region BeefMeet Bryan & Lisa Sievers, Glenora Feedyard LLC. 26618 20th Ave. Stockton, IA 52769 “Making Sense of Methane” presented by Dr. Jason Sawyer, associate professor and research scientist, King Ranch Institute Much of the confusion on this topic is based on complexity in how methane emissions are counted, and how these values are interpreted. In this session, we will look at methane emissions, and what this means for environmental sustainability of beef systems. Thursday, June 10: Southwest Region BeefMeet Euken-Myers Farm 67242 610th St. Lewis, IA 51544 “Beef Sustainability - A Paradigm Shift” presented by Ashley McDonald, NCBA senior director of sustainability There is more and more going on around beef sustainability, but the good news is the world is beginning to see U.S. beef production as part of the solution to their environmental challenges. Find out what the landscape of goals, commitments and initiatives looks like and how the cattle industry can further enhance its reputation as the planet’s original stewards, driving demand for our product.

Tuesday, June 15: Northwest Region BeefMeet Rus Ranch 2804 Eagle Ave. Rock Valley, IA 51247 “What’s the Beef on Carbon?” presented by Dr. Lisa Schulte Moore, professor, Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management - Iowa State University A discussion on how the livestock industry can create climate-smart agriculture for the Midwest. Thursday, June 17: Northeast Region BeefMeet Dave & Dylan Klaes Farm 2747 Hwy 9 Osage, IA 50461 “Environmental Regulation in 2021: The Cattle Industry and the Biden Administration” presented by Scott Yager, NCBA chief environmental counsel Straight from Washington, D.C., hear from NCBA’s chief environmental counsel, Scott Yager, as he talks about navigating a new administration and NCBA’s work to protect producers from increased environmental regulation. In addition to the educational sessions, a full trade show and networking opportunities, cattlemen will have the opportunity to share policy and industry concerns with ICA leaders. “Our objective as an organization is to be at the table voicing the concerns of our stakeholders,” Matt Deppe, ICA CEO says. “Grassroots policy breakout sessions provide dedicated time for leaders to sit down with producers to really identify the topics and issues keeping folks up at night.” The evening will conclude with a tour of the hosting beef operation.

The regional BeefMeets will take place from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Registration is encouraged, but walk-ins are always welcome. The price is $25 for members, $35 for non-members and free for students. Come see how the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association is working for you at the 2021 BeefMeets! Register today at https://www.iacattlemen.org/events-meetings/ beefmeets-regional-conventions or call 515-296-2266. Payment will be taken at the door, the day of the event. About the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association: The Iowa Cattlemen’s Association represents nearly 9,000 beef-producing families and associated companies dedicated to the future of Iowa’s beef industry. ICA’s mission is “Grow Iowa’s beef business through advocacy,Spring leadership 2021 and education.” www.iacattlemen.org. IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER

IOWA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

CONTACT ANNA HASTERT

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS 515.296.2266, ANNA@IACATTLEMEN.ORG

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MIDWEST DAIRY ELECTS LEADERSHIP SAINT PAUL, Minn. – Allen Merrill from Parker, South Dakota, was re-elected chairman of Midwest Dairy during the organization’s annual meeting held last week in Des Moines, Iowa. Elections for the Corporate board officer team also were held. Charles Krause, Buffalo, Minnesota, was re-elected first vice chairman; Dan Hotvedt, Decorah, Iowa, was re-elected second vice chairman; Lowell Mueller, Hooper, Nebraska, was re-elected secretary and Barb Liebenstein, Dundas, Minnesota, was re-elected treasurer.

NEW MEMBERS ELECTED BY THEIR DIVISIONS TO THE MIDWEST DAIRY CORPORATE BOARD INCLUDE:

Brent Mueller, Garden Prairie, Illinois Pam Bolin, Clarksville, Iowa

Megan Herberg, St. Peter, Minnesota Kate McAndrews, Sauk Centre, Minnesota

DIVISION BOARD OFFICERS + NEW MEMBERS ARE AS FOLLOWS ILLINOIS DIVISION

IOWA DIVISION

Chairman – Bill Deutsch, Sycamore Vice chairman – David Jarden, Staunton Secretary – Amy Hildebrandt, South Beloit Treasurer – Glen Meier, Ridott Steve Obert, Orangeville; Bryan Henrichs, Breese; and Craig Meng, Freeburg; were seated as new members of the Illinois Division board.

Chairman – Dan Hotvedt, Decorah Vice chairman – Lee Maassen, Maurice Secretary – Jonna Schutte, Monona Treasurer – Larry Shover, Delhi Jolene Duitscher, Rolfe, was seated as a new member of the Iowa Division board.

MINNESOTA DIVISION Chairwoman – Barb Liebenstein, Dundas Vice chairwoman – Kristine Spadgenske, Menahga Secretary – Rita Young, Plainview Treasurer – Suzanne Vold, Glenwood Joe Engelmeyer, Melrose and Shirley Hulinsky, Burtrum, were seated as new members of the Minnesota Division board.

The Minnesota Dairy Promotion Council, a quasigovernmental group with the same board members, elected the following: Chairman – Charles Krause, Buffalo Vice chairwoman – Rita Young, Plainview Secretary – Karen Kasper, Owatonna Treasurer – Margaret Johnson, Fountain Executive member-at-large – Sarah Kuechle, Eden Valley

MO-KAN DIVISION

NEBRASKA DIVISION

Chairman – Byron Lehman, Newton, Kansas Vice chairman – Alex Peterson, Trenton, Missouri Secretary – Donna Telle, Uniontown, Missouri Treasurer – Curtis Steenbock, Longford, Kansas

Chairwoman – Mary Temme, Wayne Vice chairwoman – Joyce Racicky, Mason City Secretary/Treasurer – Jodi Cast, Beaver Crossing

NORTH DAKOTA DIVISION

OZARKS DIVISION

Chairman – Rita Mosset, Linton Vice chairman – Terry Entzminger, Jamestown Secretary – Sue Kleingartner, Gackle Treasurer – Lilah Krebs, Gladstone

Chairman – Nathan Roth, Mountain Grove, Missouri Vice chairwoman – Marilyn Calvin, Mt. Vernon, Missouri Secretary – Jack Dill, Conway, Missouri Treasurer – Mark Fellwock, Monett, Missouri Craig Westfall, Halfway, Missouri, was seated as a new member of the Ozarks Division board.

SOUTH DAKOTA DIVISION Chairman – Jim Neugebauer, Dimock Vice chairwoman – Annelies Seffrood, Summit Secretary – Chris Fieber, Goodwin Treasurer – Gary Jarding, Alexandria Tim Den Dulk, Beresford, was seated as a new member 12 of the South Dakota Division board.

CONTACT MIDWEST DAIRY INFO@MIDWESTDAIRY.COM 800.642.3895 Spring 2021 IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER


SOIL HEALTH PARTNERSHIP RESEARCH SHOWS THE ECONOMIC ADVANTAGES OF CONSERVATION PRACTICES The Clean Water in Iowa Starts Here tour checks in with the Soil Health Partnership (SHP) today for an in-depth look into farm finances and the advantages of using conservation practices. The SHP is a sustainability program of the National Corn Growers Association and Iowa Corn, and it collects on-farm agronomic and economic data to evaluate the impacts of conservation practices on the soil, environment and farmer’s bottom line. The SHP recently released a report, “Conservation’s Impact on the Farm Bottom Line,” which studied how conservation practices affect farm finances at the production level. By examining several different growers across a range of geographies and farm sizes, SHP studied the agronomic and economic impacts of adopting soil health practices, like cover crops and reduced tillage.

“ALL FARMERS AND LANDOWNERS SHOULD BE INVESTING IN CONSERVATION PRACTICES THAT IMPROVE SOIL HEALTH AND WATER QUALITY AND THOSE DECISIONS HAVE TO ALIGN WITH THE FARM’S FINANCES,” SAID IOWA SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE MIKE NAIG. “I AM GRATEFUL THE SOIL HEALTH PARTNERSHIP HAS DONE THE RESEARCH AND THE MATH TO HELP FARMERS INCORPORATE THE CONSERVATION PRACTICES THAT ARE RIGHT FOR THEIR FIELDS AND THEIR BOTTOM LINES.” While outcomes varied between growers, the research demonstrated economic advantages to using conservation tillage, including no-till, strip till or reduced tillage, relative to conventional tillage. Farmers who participated in the study averaged a net return of $377/acre of corn when using conservation tillage, and $324/acre of corn on conventionally-tilled fields. Soybean farmers reported average net returns of $251/acre when using conservation tillage and $216/acre on conventionally-tilled fields.

CLEAN WA IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER

Spring 2021

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CONTACT

Keely Coppess Iowa Department of Agriculture + Land Stewardship kcoppess@iowaagriculture.gov, 515.325.1616 Along with a smart conservation tillage program, introducing cover crops in a targeted, stepwise approach with clear goals in mind can yield benefits to the grower. Plus, the economic benefits of cover crop adoption can increase as the farmer’s experience grows. Experienced cover crop adopters show substantially higher net revenue ($251/acre) than recent adopters ($123/acre). This week’s Clean Water in Iowa Starts Here stop features several farmers who participated in the study. Southwestern Iowa farmer Chris Gaesser is making soil health a priority on each acre of his operation. Gaesser’s goal is to make the cover crop program cost-effective and realistic for a large acreage operation. Central Iowa farmer Roger Zylstra will also be on The Big Show speaking about his operation and how economics play a major factor in designing a soil health program on his farm. Eastern Iowa farmer Mark Mueller will talk about the importance of soil health for the long-term sustainability of his operation and how making the right economic decisions help drive long-term success. The report, “Conservation’s Impact on the Farm Bottom Line,” was produced in collaboration with the Environmental Defense Fund and ag accounting firm K•Coe Isom. To learn more about the SHP, visit soilhealthpartnership.org. About the Clean Water in Iowa Starts Here Campaign The campaign, created by the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, Iowa Soybean Association and Newsradio 1040 WHO aims to raise awareness about the conservation work underway all across Iowa. It also highlights opportunities for both rural and urban residents to use soil health and water quality best practices, and play an active role in conservation projects happening in their communities. During the Clean Water in Iowa Starts Here campaign, The Big Show will visit locations throughout the state showcasing the people and practices that are having a positive and measurable impact on water quality. The conversations with farmers, landowners, agribusinesses and community leaders will be broadcast on Wednesdays during The Big Show airing from 11 a.m.–1 p.m. on WHO and 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m. on WMT. The Clean Water in Iowa Starts Here campaign is a collaborative effort between a dozen public and private partners, including Agri-Drain, Hagie Manufacturing, Hands on Excavating, Heartland Co-op, Iowa Agriculture Water Alliance, Iowa Corn Growers Association, Iowa Department of Natural Resources, Iowa Pork Producers Association, Iowa Soybean Association, Montag Manufacturing, Practical Farmers of Iowa, The Nature Conservancy and TruTerra.

ATER

The Clean Water in Iowa Starts Here campaign began in August 2020 and highlighted 16 conservation projects throughout the harvest season. For more information about the campaign, upcoming stops, and rural and urban soil health and water quality practices, visit CleanWaterIowa.org/CleanWaterStartsHere. For assistance implementing conservation practices or to get involved in a community-based project, visit a nearby USDA Service Center or Soil and Water Conservation District office.

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Spring 2021 IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER


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s ’ o n i amb NAMED Burger IOWA’S BEST

Contact Kylie Peterson Director of Marketing + Communications 515.296.2305, kylie@iabeef.org

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t first glance, Bambino’s appears to be a hole-in-the-wall, nestled between Decorah and West Union. Customers having visited the quaint Ossian establishment, before or after it had ranked among Iowa’s Best Burgers, would concur—there is more than meets the eye.

Ron Lienau, of Fredericksburg, IA, purchased the bar in 1982. He and his girlfriend, Sue, decided to embark on this journey together, but “for a little while; not too long.” One year later, Ron and Sue wed. Soon after, the couple started their family, having four boys in five and a half years. “We were hoping to sell when our youngest was in Kindergarten,” Sue recalls. “Thirty-nine years later, and we’re still here.” The Lienau’s raised all four boys, while managing the bar and growing their business. Sue’s bar shift offered flexible hours, allowing her to attend the boys’ sporting events. As they grew older, all four boys worked for the family-owned business. Sue is proud of her boys, as they gained both cooking and social skills from their food service experience. She is now teaching her grandsons how to wash glasses and assist customers. Photo: Iowa Beef Industry Council

IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER

Spring 2021

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Bambino’s most requested burger is the “veggie burger,” which features a juicy, all-beef burger patty topped with lettuce, tomato, pickle, and onion. Customers can customize their burgers anyway they’d like. Popular toppings include: bacon, egg, onion rings, and hash browns. Overall, Bambino’s customers “just like beef,” Sue says. “They’re beef eaters.” Sue enjoys unleashing her creative side, when building a burger. Not only does she create flavor, but fun. Regular customers and special guests may find a creative design made out of ketchup on their burgers during special occasions, such as birthdays and holidays. In her spare time, Sue continues to chip away at her children book series, which her customers helped inspire. Photo: Iowa Beef Industry Council

Bambino’s, which mimics Ron’s college nickname, was “truly a bar,” at first. However, Sue says “food became a bigger demand over time.” When the restaurant in town closed, it left townsfolk without a place to dine. Bambino’s, which did not feature a service kitchen at the time, found a way to open early and serve breakfast. Sue cooked at home, then brought her breakfast items to the bar to serve. Eventually, a new restaurant opened and Bambino’s stopped its breakfast service, but continued with its noontime meal. “Throughout it all, we have had a good noon meal,” Sue says. “My meals are always made from scratch.” To date, Bambino’s has continued offering noon specials, including: hamburger steak on Monday, roast beef meal on Thursday, and chef’s pick on Friday. “We do more food business than bar business,” Sue shares. “Beef, all around, is our biggest seller. It’s in our goulash, meatloaf, and soups.” Aside from the daily lunch specials, “cheeseburgers and fries have been customers’ go-to.” Bambino’s keeps busy with burgers “all day and all night,” as farmers call in for a no hassle, utensil-free lunch, bowlers seek out a quick meal on their drive back from league night, and softball players round out a long evening. Bambino’s burgers are highly sought after, and “you can get them anytime.” Bino (Ron) will serve burgers from 9 a.m. to 2 a.m., attracting customers all throughout the day. Bambino’s burgers feature fresh, never frozen, 80/20 fine ground beef. Ron and Sue patty the 7-ounce burgers as orders come in. The burgers are then cooked to 160 degrees, placed on a fresh KwikStar bun, and customized.

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The Lienau’s enjoy their customers, and the hospitality shown by Sue and Ron make Bambino’s a special place to dine. “Meeting new people and welcoming new visitors’’ has been the highlight of their Best Burger Contest experience. Unfamiliar guests become part of the Bambino’s family well before they step foot outside. The Lienau’s know no stranger. The flavor, creativity, and hospitality, which abounds at Bambino’s, have helped this small-town establishment secure Iowa’s 2021 Best Burger award. The designation as Iowa’s Best Burger comes after a two-phase competition, sponsored by the Iowa Beef Industry Council through the Iowa State Beef Checkoff and the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association. The first phase is based on votes from the public. For a month, burger lovers went online and voted for their favorite Iowa burger joint. At the end of the month, the 10 restaurants with the most votes were declared the “Top 10”. From there, three anonymous judges visited each of the restaurants, scoring the burger patties based on taste, doneness, and presentation. Bambino’s, located at 102 N Lydia Street, Ossian, IA, 52161, is open from 9 a.m. to 2 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 3 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Sunday. The establishment is 10 miles south of the Decorah Municipal Airport or six miles east of Calmar, right off Highway 52 on N Lydia St. ### Editor’s note: High resolution photos of the winner and burger can be downloaded here: https://bit.ly/2RiudP8. About Iowa’s Best Burger: The Iowa’s Best Burger contest is sponsored by the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association and funded in-part by the Iowa Beef Industry Council through the Iowa State Beef Checkoff Program. About the Iowa Beef Industry Council: The Iowa Beef Industry Council is funded by the $1-perhead National Beef Checkoff Program and the $0.50-per-head Iowa State Beef Checkoff. Checkoff dollars are invested in beef promotion, consumer information, research, industry information and foreign market development, all with the purpose of strengthening beef demand. For more information, visit www.iabeef.org. About the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association: The Iowa Cattlemen’s Association represents nearly 8,000 beef-producing families and associated companies dedicated to the future of Iowa’s beef industry. ICA’s mission is “Grow Iowa’s beef business through advocacy, leadership and education.”

Spring 2021 IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER


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ITALIAN TURKEY FRITTATA Shopping List Eggs Milk Fresh Basil Asiago cheese Parmesan cheese

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Leek Turkey sausage Carrot Zucchini Marinara sauce

Directions 1. Preheat oven to 350° F 2. In a large bowl, beat together the eggs + milk. 10 large eggs 3 Tbsp. skim milk 3. Stir in: 1/4 cups chopped fresh basil ¾ cups of the Asiago cheese ¼ cups of the Parmesan cheese 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. pepper 4. In a large 12-inch non-stick oven proof skillet, sauté the leeks with butter for approximately 2 minutes. 1 fresh leek, well cleaned + thinly sliced 2 Tbsp. butter Add + sauté for 2 minutes, or until heated. 1 cups cooked turkey sausage 1 large carrot, coarsely grated 1 medium zucchini, coarsely grated 5. Add the eggs to the vegetables + stir to begin cooking. Let the eggs mixture begin to cook for a few minutes, running a rubber spatula around the edge of the frittata. Transfer the skillet to the oven for about 20-25 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Photo: Iowa Turkey Federation

6. Bring to the table + serve from the skillet; cut into 6 pie wedges. Serve with shredded fresh basil + 1 cup warmed marinara sauce over the top of each slice, if desired.

Contact: Morgan Minnehan Director of Communications + Membership Services morgan@iowaturkey.org 515.232.7492

IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER

Spring 2021

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COALITION WELCOMES

LEKIN AS 2021

COMMUNICATIONS INTERN The Coalition to Support Iowa’s Farmers (CSIF) is excited to welcome Taylor Lekin to the team as their 2021 communication intern.

Lekin will help advance CSIF’s mission of supporting farmers as they raise livestock responsibly and successfully through assisting with content creation, event planning, and maintaining strong industry relations. Lekin will be a junior at Iowa State University this fall studying agriculture and society with a minor in journalism and mass communications. In addition to her studies, Lekin is also active in many organizations on campus including Alpha Gamma Delta Women’s Fraternity, Alpha Zeta Agriculture Honors Fraternity, the Agriculture and Society Club, and the Salt Company. Before attending Iowa State, Lekin grew up in the beef and livestock marketing industries. She is the fourth generation to work at her family’s business, Tama Livestock Auction, and was actively involved in a variety of different youth organizations.

The agriculture industry has come to mean so much to me and I have become very passionate about advocating for the hardworking producers, especially here in Iowa, that keep this industry moving forward. I am excited for a summer of sharpening my skills and supporting Iowa’s farmers as the 2021 CSIF communications intern.

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Spring 2021 IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER


NOMINATIONS OPEN

FOR 2021 IOWA’S BEST BREADED PORK TENDERLOIN

The breaded pork tenderloin is a sense of pride for many Iowans, and their appetite for perfection is once again needed to find the state’s juiciest, most flavorful sandwich. Today, the Iowa Pork Producers Association (IPPA) began accepting nominations for its 19th annual Best Breaded Pork Tenderloin Contest. The winner will be named during National Pork Month in October. Through June 4, the public can submit a nomination online for the restaurant that serves their favorite tenderloin. “After nearly 20 years of this competition, past titleholders continue to tell us how lifechanging the experience has been,” said Kelsey Sutter, IPPA marketing and programs director. “Please share where to find the best of the best by submitting a nomination, and help put those mouth-watering tenderloins on the map!” The Best Breaded Pork Tenderloin Contest recognizes Iowa dining establishments that offer hand-breaded or battered pork tenderloins as a regular menu item. Nominated tenderloins must be from a restaurant that is typically open year-round with regular hours. The effects of COVID-19 on establishment hours of operation do not impact eligibility. Food trucks, concession stands, seasonal establishments, and catering businesses are not eligible. This first round of the contest is a chance for tenderloin fans everywhere to get their top choice on IPPA’s radar. Plus, those who nominate the winning restaurant will be entered into a drawing for a $100 prize. Nominations are limited to one per person. Following the nomination round, IPPA’s restaurant and foodservice committee will select 40 restaurants for review; that list includes the five restaurants with the most nominations from each of IPPA’s eight districts. It’s those reviews that determine which restaurants are turned over to a panel of undercover judges, who visit the contenders and score their tenderloins on the quality of the pork, taste, physical characteristics, and eating experience. Five finalists will be named in October, with the winning restaurant receiving $500, a plaque to display in their business, and statewide publicity that will bring in new business. The runner-up is awarded $250 and a plaque from IPPA. Winners from the past five years (past winners are not eligible for the competition): 2020 — PrairieMoon On Main, Prairieburg; 2019 — The Pub at the Pinicon, New Hampton; 2018 — Three C’s Diner, Corning; 2017 — Grid Iron Grill, Webster City; 2016 — Nick’s, Des Moines. See the full list of past winners, dating back to 2003. Nominations in 2020: IPPA received 4,501 nominations for 390 different establishments.

CONTACT IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER

Spring 2021

IOWA PORK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION INFO@IOWAPORK.ORG 800.372.7675

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Spring 2021 IOWA LIVESTOCK INSIDER


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