Page 1

LOOKS BEAUTIFUL WHEN YOU’RE AT HOME. WORKS BEAUTIFULLY WHEN YOU AREN’T. To truly appreciate the sophistication of ShutterGuard®, close them up and leave home. Not only do their stylish, rustproof design finish off any window or door, their innovative construction provides high-end security. You can use them internally or externally; they’re available in custom colours* and have a 10-year warranty. *Ts and Cs apply.

SHUTTERGUARD® ALUMINIUM SECURITY SHUTTERS

0861-1-TAYLOR (829567) www.taylorblinds.co.za


R52,17

OTHER COUNTRIES

SA R60

PRIZES VALUED AT R60 000

TAMBOERSKLOOF HOUSE STAIRWELL

trast

EXCLUDING TAX

FRESH NEW LOOK INSIDE

S A ’ S M O S T B E AU T I F U L M AGA Z I N E

BLACK & WHITE & LIGHT IN TAMBOERSKLOOF ■ MONOCHROME IN THE BO-KAAP PRETORIA’S MID-CENTURY MODERN GEM ■ TWO NEW-STYLE CITY HOTELS


IMAGINE BEING ONE WITH NATURE LAID BACK SUMMER LOOKS Weave a bit of nature in to your home this season with textured woven wicker, cane and rattan furniture complemented by beautiful basketry and a touch of greenery for a laid back, lazy summer at home. Imagine more, in-store or online.


SHOP IN-STORE OR ONLINE WWW.HOME.CO.ZA


blu-line.co.za

new johannesburg showroom | coachmans park peter place bryanston cape town showroom opening soon | visit new website for more details


NEW JOHANNESBURG SHOWROOM NOW OPEN

kitchen architecture


Luxaflex® Duette® Shades Feature a unique honeycomb construction that makes these shades soft, durable and highly energy efficient.

The Art of Window Styling

luxaflex.co.za




           

           


Wall Coverings That Inspire www.carasaven.com


Visit one of our showrooms Johannesburg 227 Jan Smuts Avenue Parktown North 011 447 3149 Centurion 15 Coachmen’s Park, 26 Jakaranda Street Hennopspark 012 653 6808 Cape Town Eagle Park, Computer Road, Montague Gardens 021 555 1034

“Raw becomes refined.”

Natalie Maier Style-a-Space

Manufacturers of Distinctive Decorative Coatings www.cemcrete.co.za

0860 CEMCRETE

enquiry@cemcrete.co.za

R


| |

|


SI

138

ts FEATURES

UP FRONT

TAMBOERSKLOOF HOME p70 SAXONWOLD ARTIST’S STUDIO p82 ROSEBANK HOTEL p94 BO-KAAP LOFT p106 CAPE TOWN HOTEL p116 PRETORIA HOME p126 KENYAN VILLA p138

ED’S LETTER p26 CONTRIBUTORS p30 VISI.CO.ZA p34

VISION OUTDOOR FURNITURE p40 COLOUR FOCUS p46 COOL SPACES p48 THE CURATOR Q&A p50 TRAVEL DIARY p54

16 8

1. 2. 3.

4. 5. 6.

40

7. 8.

VOICES

9.

MOGAU SESHOENE p59 DEBBIE LOOTS p60 NTHABI TAUKOBONG p62

10. 11.

WIN p64

82

12.

184 STOCKISTS p188 SMART IDEA p192

13. 14. 15. 16.

REASONS

A round-up of some of our favourites from the recent 100% Design South Africa p154 Artist and designer Morongwe Mokone wowed New Yorkers with her handmade PVC range p160 Meghan Ho-Tong and Jaekan Coetzee collaborated on the Hyraxhotong Chair One, an exploration of geometry and imagination p162 James Lennard and Luke Pedersen of Pedersen + Lennard take us through their design journey p164 Abstract installation artist Lisa Swanepoel’s latest project is making (light)waves internationally p166 For her bold illustrations, artist Kgabo Mametja aka Saint Rose says she's inspired by women p168 Chommies is creating hig-end handcrafted accessories for dog owners and their besties p170 Striking wallpaper by Cara Saven is setting the scene at The Onyx Hotel in Cape Town p172 Garden Day is on 20 October and there are some healthy side effects to growing plants p174 Featuring homegrown design and crafts, KAMERS/ Makers is happening in Stellenbosch and Irene p175 Iconic British brand AGA just got a little more colourful and a lot more compact p176 Kitchen design company blu_line has a new state-ofthe-art showroom in Joburg p178 The new Range Rover Evoque is repeating its predecessor’s accomplishments p180 New wearable tech from Bose combines premium sunglasses with personal speakers p182 Mixologist Jody Rahme shares five classic cocktails recipes made with South African spirits p184 Our books this issue feature fascinating people, buildings and histories p186

visi.co.za

| 023


NOT just TILES TAPS · BATHS · SHOWERS · TOILETS & MORE

Find everything you need to create the perfect bathroom space, at Tile Africa. With a wide range of quality taps, baths, showers, toilets and accessories, we bring your ideal bathroom home. From modern metro to vintage romance, find the latest style ideas at your nearest store or go to www.tileafrica.co.za.

® www.tileafrica.co.za


Bowling Avenue, Kramerville Sandton Entrance 35 Commerce Crescent


Ed’s

letter H

Revered artist, Hannatjie van der Wat’s Saxonwold studio - the first in our “spaces with soul” series.

ERE’S THE THING: With our esteemed

Editor-in-Chief, Sumien Brink, on sabbatical, who wouldn’t jump at the chance to edit South Africa’s pre-eminent architecture, design and décor mag, right? But then again, VISI is a bona fide print icon, revered by its readers – and most of that is thanks to Sumien’s vision and impeccable taste. It’s a big mag and those are some big, big shoes. I said yes, obviously … but that what-have-I-saidyes-to moment followed hot on its heels. Luckily it was one soon eased by the combined knowledge and expertise of the VISI team – one that represents an amazing mix of editorial excellence, deep experience, contemporary insights, and a finger on the pulse of local and international design. It also coincided with a fresh hand on the iMac’s mouse and our new creative director has brought a subtle elegance and detail to VISI’s design DNA that both enhances the copy and allows the images to sing. I call it cool design. He calls it “a deconstructed motif that’s a mix of modern-meets-traditional”. As part of that new look and feel, we’ve also added a weightier opening section called “VISIon” that will be all about the objects, people, spaces and places that inspire us (and, we hope, you). Plus, as part of our featured houses/ hotels/lodges, we’ve also included what we’ve taken to calling a “space with soul.” It may belong to an artist – as our first one on page 82 does – or it may be a wonderful example of a particular architectural style, but they will all be quirky, original and, most importantly, have that unique provenance of a space that’s been lived in. So … In your hands is 104, a new-look VISI. And, yes, it may have some changes, but also much that remains untouched. Our commitment to showcasing the finest South African and African architecture, design and décor continues, as does an unwavering approach to the best photography and writing. We’ve genuinely had a great time putting together this summer-flavoured issue and I hope that shines through. Let me know what you think.

STEVE SMITH, EDITOR info@visi.co.za

026 |

visi.co.za


ADÈLE DE LANGE, ARCHITECT Your summer drink of choice? I’m currently brewing my very first batch of kombucha. It’s Saturday afternoon, the sun is setting. Where are you? Out for a paddle on the Orange River, watching the sun turn blood red, as it can do in the dusty Northern Cape. What’s your favourite app? Kindle to escape; Pinterest for inspiration. Pantone comes up with a new colour: describe the hue and what you would call it. “Pickled Popsicle” – the fresh yellow-green of newly sprouted leaves in early spring. Adèle wrote about the award-winning family home located in Pretoria on page 126.

LUTENDO MALATJI, PHOTOGRAPHER Your summer drink of choice? A Long Summer. It’s like a Long Island Iced Tea, but with some deadly spiked ice. It’s Saturday afternoon, the sun is setting. Where are you? Home, sitting on the couch, sipping on good wine, watching “Grand Designs” or something on Netflix. What’s your favourite app? Pinterest. It's addictive. Pantone comes up with a new colour: describe the hue and what you would call it. “Choc o’ Block” – a fusion of vanilla and chocolate brown. Lutendo is the first photographer to collaborate on our Curators series on page 50.

UYAPO KETOGETSWE, TRAVEL WRITER, PHOTOGRAPHER AND BESPOKE TOUR CREATOR Your summer drink of choice? A classic G&T garnished with strawberries and rosemary. It’s Saturday afternoon, the sun is setting. Where are you? A sky bar in the middle of a city featuring picturesque views of the skyline. What’s your favourite app? Instagram. Pantone comes up with a new colour: describe the hue and what you would call it. “Napalm Skies” – a blend of turmeric, burnt red and orange inspired by African sunsets. As part of our VISIon section, Uyapo shares his African Travel Diary on page 54.

EDITORIAL

Editor-in-Chief Sumien Brink Editor Steve Smith Deputy Editor Annemarie Meintjes Creative Director Mark Serra Designer Marcus Viljoen Managing Editor Samantha Charles Features Editor Amelia Brown Online Editor Lindi Brownell Meiring Content Producer Michaela Stehr

ADVERTISING & MARKETING

Key Account Manager Diane Lubbe 083 391 1651 Key Account Manager Eva Cookson 076 662 0785 Key Account Manager Hannelie Stemmet 083 448 2074 Key Account Manager Elna Coetzer (Cape Town) 021 417 5151 / 082 971 9715

PUBLISHING

Group Account Director Raiël le Roux Production Manager Shirley Quinlan

MANAGEMENT

Managing Director Aileen Lamb Commercial Director Maria Tiganis Brand Strategy Director Andrew Nunneley Chief Financial Officer Venette Malone Head of HR Camillah West CEO: Media24 Ishmet Davidson

DISTRIBUTION & SUBSCRIPTIONS Distribution RNA Distribution Print and digital subscriptions 087 405 2005 (local) +27 21 045 1809 (international) subs@magsathome.co.za

Reproduction New Media, a division of Media24 (Pty) Ltd Printing CTP Printers Cape Town Published by New Media, a division of Media24 (Pty) Ltd, New Media House, 19 Bree Street, Cape Town, 8001 PO Box 440, Green Point, Cape Town, 8051 021 417 1111 / newmedia.co.za / visi@visi.co.za

All rights reserved. Whereas precautions have been taken to ensure the accuracy of information, neither the editor, publisher nor New Media can be held liable for any inaccuracies, injury or damages that may arise. The opinions expressed in the articles may not reflect those of the publisher.

CTPprinters

CAPE TOWN

030 |

visi.co.za

16 295 (Q2 2019)


C

E B R AT I N

27 YEARS

OF QUALITY SERVICE

STYLISH SOPHISTICATION. TIMELESS ELEGANCE. We do more than kitchens. At Easylife Kitchens we pride ourselves in designing, manufacturing and installing bespoke living spaces for your home. From bedrooms and bathrooms, to studies and kitchens. Speak to our expert designers at one of our 31 showrooms across the country. 2 year kitchen guarantee. Easylife Kitchens, making life easier since 1992. Proudly featuring Jo-Ann Strauss, Easylife Kitchens Brand Ambassador. 0861 327 9543 | 0861 EASYLIFE | www.easylifekitchens.co.za

G

EL


EFFICIENT & STYLISH HEATING SOLUTIONS WITH MINIMAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT Visit www.infinitifires.co.za to view our extensive range


BRAAI & EXTRACTION SYSTEMS FOR THE HOME ENTERTAINER Visit www.firefox.co.za to view our extensive range


visi.co.za Can’t wait for the next issue of VISI? Here’s where to get your daily dose. CLICK ON THIS ■ Get to know portrait photographer Lutendo Malatji (@luu_artphotography) in our online Q&A ■ Our top 5 picks from around the world are online every Tuesday ■ In our online interview, ceramic artist Chuma Maweni (@chumamaweni) chats about his current projects and dream collab

WE ASKED YOU ONLINE

WIN WITH MULTIPLY FURNITURE One lucky reader will win a set of three porthole mirrors in various sizes from Cape Town-based brand Multiply Furniture, valued at R3 200. Made from fine-grain birch ply, each mattefinish mirror comes with a leather strap. Go to VISI.co.za/win.

IF YOU COULD INVEST IN ONE ITEM FOR YOUR HOME, WHAT WOULD YOU CHOOSE TO BUY? More than 1 500 of you took our recent online poll to let us know:

#READERLOVE Savouring the latest VISI? We’d love you to tag us in your pics of the new issue on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter.

54% A custom-made furniture design

5% Ludwig van Beethoven New @visi_mag English tea - @melviniverson

Winter was good @visi_mag beautiful cover and great read – @Bongani_Cel

A handcrafted wallhanging or tapestry

10% A locally crafted sculpture

31%

A painting or illustration by a local artist

INSTANT INSPIRATION Follow @visi_mag on Instagram, where we share some of the best and most beautiful designs from around the globe.

034 |

visi.co.za


BASIN MIXERS IN UNIQUE COLOURS

Select from a variety of colour options to customize and personalize your bathroom, because you are one of a kind.


Mariam Kamara

Global LafargeHolcim Awards winner. Architect & computer scientist, Niger.

“ Winning the LafargeHolcim Awards creates an impact on people’s minds”

Design competitions boost projects, careers, and networking opportunities. Be part of the 6th International LafargeHolcim Awards for exemplary projects and visionary concepts in sustainable construction. Prize money totals USD 2 million. Independent expert juries evaluate submissions from architecture, engineering, urban planning, materials science, construction technology, and related fields using the “target issues” for sustainable construction of the LafargeHolcim Foundation. www.lafargeholcim-awards.org An initiative of LafargeHolcim, represented in South Africa by


s

International directions and local inspirations

Haldane Martin's Polka table and Hula chairs. Turn over to find out more.

visi.co.za

| 039


s A SEAT OUTSIDE

Hula, HALDANE MARTIN'S outdoor furniture range, echoes his desire to design meaningful objects that create a sense of belonging in time and place. He describes the inspiration for his new pieces. PHOTOS HENRIQUE WILDING WORDS CELESTE JACOBS

hile designing a restaurant in Botswana, Haldane saw the need for contemporary outdoor furniture and Hula was his first outdoor range. Named after the dining chair’s hula hoop shape, it was inspired by the garden furniture found in many South African homes and will, Haldane hopes, remind people of childhood moments spent outside. The rest of the playful, nostalgic collection emerged organically and his favourite piece, The Hula Love Seat (pictured above), is a metropolitan outdoor bench. Haldane tried to capture the essence of each design in its name: Plat-O is a play on the word plateau. The tables are slick with sleek ‘o’ shapes – round or flat-oval table tops on geometric flat-bar bases. The Cha Cha occasional tables (pictured above) actually look like they’re dancing when you move around them because of the line moiré patterns that Haldane created by spacing the wire bars so close together. Polka is a feminine outdoor table collection (pictured right) with polka-dot swirling patterns on the tabletop. It lets rain through, which makes it functional for outdoor use, but it’s a great beautifying feature, too. Papa Sun is Haldane's latest outdoor sofa collection. It is named after the round cane Malaysian Papasan chairs that were popular in Western culture in the ’50s. Designed to suit the South African lifestyle, the furniture is made in Cape Town from stainless steel tubing with solid rods forming the curved ribs. It’s a luxe urban-chic lounger that handles African outdoor environments with ease. There’s a Papa Sun day bed coming soon, a Hula lounger to add to the Hula family, and another outdoor sofa collection on the horizon. With worldwide shipping you can shop the collections on the design studio’s website or by sending the team an email. haldanemartin.co.za | info@haldanemartin.co.za | @haldanemartin

W

040 |

visi.co.za


The HULA COLLECTION was inspired by the GARDEN FURNITURE found in many SOUTH AFRICAN HOMES.


s

METALLICA

Minimalist metal furniture is getting its time in the sun and these trend-defying classics are as comfortable to sit in as they are beautiful to gaze upon.

CIRCUS INSPIRED German designer Sebastian Herkner found inspiration for his Circo furniture series in the traditional travelling circuses of Colombia: The frame is reminiscent of the pedestals that circus elephants rest their feet on. The handcrafted designs, which feature powder-coated steel tubular frames and colourful recycled plastic wicker, are produced by Colombian artisans in a small factory for Ames. As a result, all of the items in the collection reflect the spirit and traditional craftsmanship of Colombia. amesliving.de

042 |

visi.co.za

42

PHOTOS SUPPLIED

W O R D S A N N E M A R I E M E I N TJ E S


ICONIC ACAPULCO Named after the coastal town of Acapulco in Mexico, the hot destination for the jet set in the ’50s and ‘60s, the Acapulco chair has a slightly pear-shaped tubular frame and brightly coloured vinyl cord body. First produced in the 1950s, it is an icon of Mexican design and has given rise to a plenitude of replicas. acapulcodesign.eu

THINKING MAN’S CHAIR An eloquent name for a product that invites contemplation. For the Thinking Man’s Chair, Jasper Morrison envisioned a design in which all the elements are functional contributions that ensure comfort for prolonged periods of relaxation and pondering. Produced by Cappellini, Italy, the areas that support the body are made of flat bars and the main structure is tubular. The armrests are equipped with integrated drink rests. cappellini.com

PARISIAN CLASSIC The Luxembourg range of outdoor furniture, originally created in the workshops of the Paris parks department in 1923 for the Jardin du Luxembourg in Paris, has become a legend in its own right and is still manufactured for the city’s public gardens. The entire Fermob Luxembourg Collection range has the same distinctive lines and forms, combining the lightness and resistance of aluminium with the comfort of curved seat slats. fermob.com


PHOTOS SUPPLIED

044 |

visi.co.za


ALUMINIUM MESH Buit (that’s not a typo) is a new line of outdoor furniture in aluminium mesh designed by Mayice Studio for the family-owned Spanish design brand Gandia Blasco. The Madrid-based Mayice Studio, founded by architects Marta Alonso Yebra and Imanol Calderón Elósegui, works with local craftsmen and women to execute their designs. gandiablasco.com

HOT GALVANISED The Palissade Hot Galvinised bench, designed by the French brothers Rohan and Erwan Bouroullec for the Danish design company HAY, is made with standard tubes of steel – round for the frame and rectangular for the seat slats. The hot-dip galvanised steel range was developed to supplement their existing Palissade collection of outdoor furniture. hay.dk


s GREEN PIECE

Sitting in the middle of the visible spectrum, green is about balance, harmony and imparting a soothing influence. In these anxious and volatile times, this colour of nature and earth is a key hue in our current zeitgeist and it’s one that’s been picked up in the colour of objects and the source of materials.

“Best Furniture Design” WINNER at

100% Design

South Africa 2019. 1

046 |

visi.co.za


1. PRESERVATION BENCH Admired for their re-imagining of Scandinavian folk spindle furniture, Phillip Hollander and Stephen Wilson of Houtlander were awarded the 100% Design South Africa 2019’s “Best Furniture Design” for their otherworldly piece, Preservation Bench. Pushing the boundaries of timber’s capabilities and in partnership with the American Hardwood Export Council, the piece shows the versatility of thermallymodified American red oak. houtlander.co.za 2. THE BOOK OF TREES Beautifully and humorously illustrated, this encyclopaedic book by awardwinning author Piotr Socha chronicles trees from the time of the dinosaurs to the current day. Answering questions like “what’s the tallest tree in the world?” and “where can you stay in a treehouse hotel?” with a light, witty touch, he looks at the role trees have played in history and legend. R459, exclusivebooks.co.za 3. ORNITHOLOGICAL ARCHITECTURE Just in time for spring, a charming new collection of bird boxes inspired by architecture has been released by Studio Stirling. One of our favourites is a take on an eco-estate complete with roof garden, lap pool and rim flow. They are made out of Scandinavian birch ply and ideal for outdoor use in your garden or on a porch. R1 670, studiostirling.co.za 4. M’AFRIQUE OUTDOOR COLLECTION M’Afrique is a project by Patrizia Moroso of Italian brand Moroso and this blend of international design and local manufacturing offers a series of furniture and accessories out of its M’Afrique Atelier in Dakar, Senegal. This Husk series, designed by Marc Thorpe, is inspired by the outer shell of corn. POA, truedesign.co.za

4


Cool Spaces LA BOQUERIA’S BAR

This restaurant and bar space in Johannesburg caught our eye. PHOTO MARIJKE WILLEMS WORDS BIDDI RORKE

he Hispanic street market-style dishes at this Parktown North restaurant are reason enough to visit, but before you start eating, have a seat at the bar and take in the eclectic décor in front of you. Apart from the wonderfully warm lighting (this place really is a masterclass on how to light a restaurant), you’re looking at a bar made of repurposed SA Post Office box doors topped with a huge slab of white marble. Behind that is a double-volume wall adorned with refurbished mid-century display cabinets. Former owners Ryan Stroebel and Gary Hollywood did the decor and the pair scoured everywhere from salvage yards to furniture boutiques for materials to create this unique display-slash-storage solution for the bar’s liquor bottles. “It was all about thinking locally – and laterally,” says Ryan. “Gary and I trawled places like Re-Trend and Modernist for these one-of-a-kind units. We then chopped off the legs, arranged them on the back wall, backlit them for extra impact and stocked them with liquor, greenery and artefacts.” Plastic sports stadium seats, reframed with slick steel and upholstered in oxblood leather, flank this generous space. And the lateral thinking doesn’t stop there. Lights on the bar counter resemble the headlights of Royal Indian Enfield motorcycles, while the overhead lights are repurposed from truck radiator air filters. The result is an area that succeeds in making a large space both quirky and warmly inviting. laboqueria.co.za

T

048 |

visi.co.za


THE CURATOR Q&A We caught up with award-winning designers MPHO VACKIER of TheUrbanative and THABISA MJO of Mash T. Design Studio who recently won the 100% Design South Africa Designer of the Year award.

MPHO VACKIER

@theurbanative @mashtdesignstudio

PHOTOS LUTENDO MALATJI

INTERVIEW AMELIA BROWN

050 |

visi.co.za


THABISA MJO

“I JUST WANTED TO TELL STORIES and I stumbled upon design. I didn’t even know I HAD THIS GIFT.” – Thabisa Mjo


s

DID YOU ALWAYS KNOW DESIGN WAS IN YOUR FUTURE? n MV I’d always dreamt of pursuing a creative career and 10 years ago I made the leap of faith to quit my job as a metallurgist [metal engineer] to study interior design. The ability to connect people through design has always been a goal and being able to create amazing products/spaces that make people’s lives better is wonderful.

people’s kids – and a way for me to honour and relay stories from all our wonderful cultures. n TM The potjie pot. When we’d visit my gran as kids, she’d bring out that pot to prepare a feast. It represents family, togetherness, serving. It was the inspiration for my Potjie Server design.

n TM I just wanted to tell stories and I stumbled upon design. When I won the Nando’s Hot Young Designer competition [for the Tutu 2.0 pendant light], I didn’t even know I had this gift. That’s been the best thing that came out of that experience.

IS THERE AN OBJECT OF SIGNIFICANCE THAT YOU DON’T HAVE ANY MORE THAT YOU WISH YOU DID? n TM I had a pink Disney Princess TV. It was my favourite thing ever. I just threw it out recently and I already regret it!

CAN YOU DESCRIBE SOMETHING THAT YOU GREW UP WITH THAT MEANS A LOT TO YOU AND HAD A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON YOU AS A DESIGNER? n MV My grandmother’s coffee set. It’s really not the cutest ceramic set, but I love it because my grandmother did. It’s an heirloom, which reminds me that the work I do may one day be an heirloom – for my son and, hopefully, other

052 |

visi.co.za

WHAT DRIVES YOU? n MV When I started TheUrbanative, I identified that one of the guiding core values of what I was trying to achieve is that “we believe in authentic design”. There’s always a personal opinion or standpoint with my work, be it Ndebele graphics or the magic and politics of African hair. We all have a valid point of view and we can add to the conversation. Everyone I have collaborated with comes


s with their own unique way of looking at the world and when we add all these viewpoints together, we create work that is truly unique. WHERE DO YOU TURN FOR INSPIRATION? n MV Before I start a collection, I have to listen, tap in, explore, research, read, investigate and meditate. I’m inspired by how people live, history, heritage, culture, travel, societies, art, design, technology, engineering, nature... I’m inspired by how culture defines where we place our value and by the possibility of connecting differing people/societies/culture through the stories we tell with our products and furniture.

n TM A recent discovery is the Phansi Museum in Durban. It’s a gem, a treasure; everyone should visit. DESCRIBE YOUR DESIGN AESTHETIC IN THREE WORDS.

n MV Functionality. Craft. Story. n TM A pure delight!

Other all-time favourites are Kelly Wearstler – I love how multifaceted she is as a designer – and Jaime Hayon, who designs with humour and emotion and draws from his Spanish heritage. In addition to Thabisa, locally I love Atang Tshikare, the Ninevites, Peter Mabeo, Monique Vee, Ditiro Mashigo, Renee Roussow, Rich Mnisi, Thebe Magugu... Their work is constantly pushing the boundaries of what African design is and the stories behind their designs are resonating with people, which is the important bit. That connection is why most of us do what we do. IS THERE AN ARTWORK OR PIECE OF DESIGN THAT YOU COVET?

n MV More art by Anastasia Pather and Sakhile Cebekhulu. n TM A Serge Mouille 6-Arm Rotating Ceiling Lamp, a David Krynauw Haywire Chandelier, a Dokter and Misses Kassena Town cabinet, oh, and a Hermès Birkin bag for good measure.

“I’M PROUD THAT AT 30-SOMETHING I dared to start TheUrbanative. The fact that our work continues to CONNECT INSPIRE AND MAKE PEOPLE HAPPY ’ rewarding.” – Mpho Vackier is very YOUR GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT TO DATE? n MV This has been a year of growth. Having our Nenzima desk nominated for the Design Indaba Most Beautiful Object of the Year award by Donald Nxumalo was the most amazing feeling. Winning – again really unexpected – the 100% Design SA Designer of the Year award was the coolest moment and it has energised us as a team. More than anything, I’m proud that at 30-something I dared to start TheUrbanative with no previous knowledge of design or the industry, coming from an engineering background to a totally different career. The fact that our work continues to connect, inspire and make people happy is very rewarding. n TM I’m just getting started! In addition to the recent recognition with the 100% Design SA award, we got to showcase our collaboration with Weylandts at the show. I was invited by the retailer to work with fellow female designers Mpho and Monique Vee on The Theatre of Sleep. For the collab we created pieces related to the act of sleeping and dreaming. It demonstrates that handcrafted furniture can be scalable and mass produced. WHICH DESIGNERS DO YOU ADMIRE? n MV Right now, I’m in love with Malene Barnett’s textile and ceramics and Marie Burgos furniture and lighting. Their work is bold, sophisticated and intended to connect.

IS THERE A BUILDING THAT STANDS OUT FOR YOU? n MV Syddansk Universitet communications and design building in Kolding, Denmark, by Henning Larsen Architects. It’s fitted with climate-responsive kinetic facade that regulates interior temperatures. I love it because I believe that as designers we should always endeavour to create products that are multifaceted and solve the ever-evolving problems of the user. n TM The High Line in New York. WHAT ARE THE ITEMS YOU’D SAVE IN A FIRE? n MV My dogs, my sneakers, a rug from the Ninevites, an artwork called Haberdashery Warrior by Anastasia Pather, the TheUrbanative’s first-ever Thandekile server, my laptop, and my collection of crown hair accessories. n TM I’m a bit of a fashion girl, so my sneakers and my Tongoro snakeskin bag handmade in Senegal. WORDS OF WISDOM FOR YOUR YOUNGER SELF… n MV Relax, it’s all gonna work out... n TM ... and it’s not that serious. (I still need to hear it!)

Mpho and Thabisa where photographed by portrait photographer Lutendo Malatji. Find him on Instagram (@luu_artphotography) and read his interview at visi.co.za.


s Travel Diary

UYAPO KETOGETSWE

A visual curator and travel writer, Uyapo shares some of his favourite spots in Africa P H O T O S A N D W O R D S U YA P O K E T O G E T S W E

1

1. LAMU, KENYA Get lost in the narrow passages of this tropical island paradise where donkeys are your Uber, talk to the locals to give you a sense of home, and immerse yourself in Swahili culture with the architecture, heritage and way of life. Eat here Umalila restaurant located on Old Lamu Town seafront offers affordable local dishes such as fish curry with coconut rice. Do this Sail a traditional dhow to Manda Island and watch the incredible sun set behind Lamu ssland. 2. GRAND-POPO, BENIN Grand-Popo offers tranquil moments rich in natural abundance. This is a sleepy beach town that, save for some local fishermen, offers an uncrowded coastline lined with coconut trees and salty sea breeze that comes off the Atlantic ocean.

054 |

visi.co.za

Stay here The Hôtel Awalé Plage has a serene private beach with a bar that has an overlooking rooftop. Visit this The small gallery of Villa Karo offers guests a chance to view great exhibitions by local artists. 3. OSU, GHANA If you’re looking for the coolest neighbourhood in Accra with a vibrant community of locals and expats, a diverse array of things to do, and proximity to just about everything, Osu is for you. Shop here Be sure to visit Makola Market for Africa print fabric shopping and souvenir bargaining. Eat this Coco Lounge’s Accra Chicken Pizza uses the thick tomato sauce traditionally used to make Jollof rice. Party here After sundown, have pre-drinks at Bloom Bar, before an unforgettable club experience at Ace Tantra.


4. BAZARUTO ARCHIPELAGOS, MOZAMBIQUE There is no shortage of great beaches and archipelagos that make Mozambique one of Africa’s leading destinations. The most charming part of Bazaruto is its astoundingly beautiful yet bizarre combination of landscapes – from pristine blue waters, to island vegetation swaying to the rhythm of the day, and the orange rusted sand dunes the serve as a striking backdrop. Stay here Anantara Bazaruto Island located on the paradise private island of Bazaruto. Try this Snorkel around Two Reef Mile or sand board the dunes of the island.

4

2 3

U YA P O K E T O G E T S W E

5 THINGS I NEVER TRAVEL WITHOUT Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 L IS II USM Lens n Giorgio Armani Code Absolu n Nivea SPF 50 lotion n Tread+Miller Arthur Jack sneakers n TravelBlue neck pillow


Fourways : 011-691 7700

Silver Lakes : 012-809 3519

Umhlanga : 031-566 6777

CAPE TOWN : 021-003 8477


V I S I

/

VO I C E S

Discovering Africa

At the age of 25, NTHABI TAUKOBONG was the lead interior designer on the project to redesign the Blue Train, an experience that would transform her notions of interior design. y job was to help with the selection of fabric schemes and to come up with a new carpet design, forever conscious of our South African inspiration and the link to our then changing times. I was working with my colleague, Nessa, most of the time at the office and at the train, which was parked in Pretoria. And when it came to sourcing accessories, it was often with my colleague Karen. We visited art galleries, went to local markets, met forgotten South African artists and After all the years, selected suitable pieces in alignment with the mobile gallery it we were now designing for. as if I had Our search for African artefacts and accessories led us to Amatuli. This was the late 1990s and their warehouse was in a rundown house in Corlett Drive, Johannesburg.We quickly learnt that during these out-of-office days, we would have to in design. tone down our cream suits and pearl jewellery. Amatuli was like walking through the dusty streets and jungles of Africa. It felt as though we had stepped back in time. The house was crammed to capacity with different African wares, all with a story of their original location. I was a bit nervous at first, not sure if I would find anything in such a mishmash of items. There were different rooms with fabrics, baskets, sculptures, wood carvings, beadwork and furniture. I walked around in silent awe … I was in love. The high-end luxury design world I had been exposed to slowly began to dissolve and soon I was finding every excuse to visit this creative hub. I loved the smell of Africa in those rooms; I loved touching and holding the artefacts and getting to know the inspiration and story behind each of the designs. Having grown up in Durban, I used to spend my weekends walking along the beach and talking to the mamas and aunties who had small stalls showcasing their baskets, colourful beadwork and hand-carved wooden items and other Zulu artefacts. At Amatuli there were metres and metres of beautiful textured fabrics, all made in Africa, far from the mills I had visited with the designers at our office. I felt like I was finally home. I found a place that I could relate to, creatively. Until that moment, I had not yet been exposed to the greater magnificence of African designs from the rest of the continent and Amatuli, along with other markets in Johannesburg, allowed my perfectly groomed designer mind to run free. With all of the luxuriously styled interiors I had become used to designing, the markets made me understand that I had a responsibility to thread this love for all I was seeing into my own world of design. After all the years, it finally felt as though I had found my soul in design. I didn’t recognise how deep that finding was at the time, but those initial days of sourcing all things proudly African were definitely when my love for being “an interior designer in Africa” began.

M

FINALLY FELT

PORTRAIT SARAH DE PINA

FOUND MY SOUL

NTHABI is an interior designer who specialises in hotels, lodges, villas and spas. In her book The Real Interior (Tracey McDonald Publishers, 2019), she writes about her upbringing and how she landed her dream job at an interior design company. nthabitaukobong.com


V I S I

/

VO I C E S

The Sense of Things It’s on the sunny side of a place where the magic lies, says DEBBIE LOOTS.

y grandfather was a mine captain on Randfontein Estates Mines. According to my mother, he had a short temper and a gruff manner, and made his co-workers tremble in their boots. But it’s not how I remember him. To me he was simply my grandpa who liked to collect strange-looking succulent plants. Lots of them. He spent hours teaching me their names, and I loved how his eyes would widen in mock surprise when I managed to recall one. I remember rows of prickly plants in plastic containers and glass jars stacked on shelves along the edges of my grandparents’ veranda. The veranda was enclosed with fine wire mesh that had seen better days. In certain parts, it sagged so far down it formed odd shapes through which I could look across the garden. The veranda was the best place for his plants, and for us. It was on the sunny side of the house. The other side was The always in the shadow of a bridge over the railway line that linked the suburbs to the town.The walls was the best place on that side were cold and damp to the touch. I used to lie on an old sofa on the veranda and for his listen to the low hum of my grandparents’ voices. and What stays with me after all these years is their presence, and the warmth of the sun lying there, more than a sense of the house itself, which with its large rooms and wooden floors must have been cold and draughty. Today, I have my own collection of things, my own enclosed veranda and my own grandchildren. My flat is near the sea, and the air leaves sticky droplets on my windows that remind me of the mesh across my grandparents’ veranda. If I want a clear view, I have to slide open the window on the veranda.When I stick out my head I can see a sliver of ocean on the right; across the road is a row of high-rise apartment blocks; on the left is a section of Lion’s Head.The veranda is my grandson’s favourite place. When he visits, he sits on a chair in the sun and watches the seagulls squawking their way across the sky. He asks me about the helicopter flying up and down above the clouds and the spikes on the roofs of the apartment blocks that scare away the pigeons. We also talk about my collection of animal objects congregating in one area of the living room.Among many others there’s a fluffy head of a swan mounted on the wall, a blue plastic dinosaur with a succulent (my only plant) sprouting from its back, a pink Tyrannosaurus rex lamp, a tiny vintage glass owl, and a plastic Japanese cat with a waving arm. On the days they visit, he teaches his little sister the names of his grandmother’s strange-looking animals before she takes her afternoon nap on my bed and he takes his place on the chair in a sunny spot on the veranda. I hope they remember me one day by their sense of these things.

M

VERANDA

DEBBIE is an editor, award-winning novelist and artist who lives in Sea Point because, she says, it feels like a foreign country in a familiar city. Her second novel, Die Boek van Gelukkige Eindes (Queillerie), was published in July this year. You’ll find her on Instagram and Twitter @debbieloots.

060 |

visi.co.za

PORTRAIT RETHA FERGUSON

PLANTS FOR US.


V I S I

/

VO I C E S

Home Decorations

In addition to the warmth and love she associates with her grandmother’s house, MOGAU SESHOENE also remembers the age-old decorating tradition of go kgopha. ome of my fondest childhood memories are from time spent at my grandmother’s house in rural Ga-Mphahlele, Limpopo. The house actually consisted of four separate structures: the main house with a kitchen, living area, bathroom, main bedroom, and the bedrooms where my cousins and I used to sleep every December holiday. Then there was a two-roomed structure that two of my youngest uncles used as bedrooms, a double garage, and the “kitchen” where I first learnt to make bread.The best way to describe this space is as a kitchen, although it was basically just a roofed structure with a floor and four mud walls plastered with cow dung.Yes, cow dung. It used to be us cousins’ chore to go and collect it in the afternoon – cow dung for plastering and decorating the floors, and goat dung to use as fuel to bake the bread. Although my grandmother had electricity and a stove with an oven, she still preferred to bake her bread the old-fashioned way – on the fire in a cast-iron pot.And that bread is probably still the most delicious I’ve ever tasted. So, why cow dung? I bet you didn’t know cow dung has antibacterial properties. It also helps to ward off snakes, scorpions and centipedes, which wouldn’t come close to a place coated with it. I think perhaps the main reasons she used the dung though, is that it’s a natural mosquito repellent and it keeps the house warm in winter and cool in summer. Surprisingly, once the dung is dry there is no smell whatsoever. I hated the task of collecting the dung, but I liked to sit and watch as my grandmother mixed it with water and used her Although my hands to plaster it onto the floor and walls. She would then use her finger to draw beautiful intricate patterns as she sang. That is how most had electricity and a stove, women decorated their homes; a tradition passed she still preferred to down many generations, creating lovely patterns that I later learnt served a bigger purpose outside of just aesthetics. I would discover that many the OLD-FASHIONED way. other peoples around the world use dung in the same manner. The smearing of cow dung and soil mixed with water, known as go kgopha in Sepedi, is an age-old practice to preserve and beautify homes not only in rural communities in South Africa but also in Kenya and India, among others. Done mostly by women, go kgopha is applied every two months or so depending on how much foot traffic there is in the home. A thin layer of the dung mixture is spread on the floor and walls, and then, using a stick or fingers, the artist draws lovely patterns in the dung. Every house would have a different pattern, every village artist secretly competing to draw the most elaborate and impressive designs. The other reason I was so fond of this outside kitchen, known as moraleng in Sepedi, was because on a cold winter’s day that was where we would all congregate as a family – my grandparents and all my cousins – to sit by the fire and listen to my uncle tell us a long animated tale, a really long and hilarious one that would have us rolling on the floor with laughter. All in all, that was the best thing about my grandmother’s house: the warmth and love that radiated from that home.

S

GRANDMOTHER

MOGAU is an entrepreneur, TV cooking show presenter and cookbook author who lives in Centurion, Pretoria. She left the corporate world to focus on her love of food and started The Lazy Makoti (“makoti” means daughter-in-law) to offer cooking classes. Her book The Lazy Makoti’s Guide to the Kitchen is a bestseller. Follow @thelazymakoti on Twitter and Instagram.

PORTRAIT KATLEGO MOKUBJAYE

BAKE BREAD


AS UPMARKE

FURNITURE AND INCREASE IN VALUE

over 5000 ANTIQUE, FRENCH, VINTAGE & CONTEMPORARY FURNITURE & ACCESSORIES

Mirrors | Tables | Chairs | Settees | Sofas Chandeliers | Lanterns | Armoires | Chests Cabinets | Bookcases | Linen Presses Gilded Furniture | Candlesticks Candelabras | Crystal | Silver

0114636060 | info@thecrowncollection.co.za www.thecrowncollection.co.za thecrowncollectionstore 20 Ballyclare Drive, Bryanston, Sandton, Johannesburg


V I S I

/

B I G

W I N

WIN!

One lucky reader will win two Hampshire lowback tub chairs and one Hampshire lowback two-seater from Woodbender valued at over R34 000. They feature a Harvard cherry stain and are covered in Hertex Lincoln Magnet and Hertex Lincoln Ecru, both of which retail for R800/m. Woodbender’s solid wood furniture is meticulously handcrafted in the traditional technique of bentwood that the family business has been perfecting since its inception in 1988. The wide range of seating, upholstered in your choice of fabric, and tables are available in 15 standard timber finishes. Skillful manufacturing ensures that Woodbender’s elegant designs don’t sacrifice strength and durability. Every piece is backed by a six-year structural guarantee. woodbender.co.za

MORE AMAZING GIVEAWAYS IN THIS ISSUE… n Three Multiply Furniture porthole mirrors. R3 200 | page 34 n A polyresin dog designed by Mervyn Dragsund of Composite Decor in the breed and colour of your choice. R4 300 | page 153 n A Chommies standard leash and adjustable collar with edge stain in the size and colour of your choice. R1 450 | page 153

VISI COMPETITION RULES

• This competition closes at midnight on 17 November 2019. • The winner will be the first correct entry drawn after the closing date. • If the selected winner cannot be reached at the contact details supplied, an alternative winner will be selected. • The prize will be delivered to the winner, unless otherwise specified. • The winner will be required to provide their ID number as per the new Consumer Protection Act guidelines. • The winner is required to accept the prize as described in the magazine.

• • •

n Two Pedersen + Lennard Bucket Stools. R3 630 | page 164 n A Chommies Boulders beach bag. R1 800 | page 170 n Cara Saven seamless wallpaper* in Dark Peony Design. R11 000 | page 172 n A books hamper featuring Colour: A Visual History, Cécile, and Between Dreams and Realities. R1 367 | page 186

No correspondence will be entered into relating to the terms on which the prize is offered.  The winner will not be eligible for other prizes for three months after winning the competition. The prize may not be transferred to another person or converted into cash.  VISI competitions are open to all South African residents. Employees of New Media and the prize-sponsoring companies, their family members, advertising and promotion agencies and any other parties associated with the competition may not enter. Entrants must be 18 years or older. 

• Neither New Media nor any of its partners can be held responsible for disputes in connection with prizes or for any loss, damage or injury that may be suffered or incurred by prize winners.  • Entrants will be deemed to have accepted these rules and agree to be bound by them when entering VISI competitions.  • Data collected may be shared with the prize-sponsoring companies, but will not be sold or passed on to third parties. • New Media reserves the right to cancel, modify or amend competitions at any time if deemed necessary. • Visit VISI.co.za/terms-and-conditions.

WIN! Go to VISI.co.za/win to enter this competition, which closes on 17 November 2019.

064 |

visi.co.za

*WALLPAPER SIZE IS FIXED: 280 CM HIGH X 600 CM WIDE. PRIZE INCLUDES COURIERING BUT EXCLUDES INSTALLATION.

WITH WOODBENDER


“Fashion fades, only style remains the same.” Coco Chanel French Fashion Designer

MONOCIBEC ONE- Gris 1200mm x 600mm. Natural Surface.

STILES - Cape Town

STILES - George

STILES - Mossel Bay

STILES - Knysna 17 Nelson Street Knysna, 6571 T: +27 44 382 2090 F: +27 44 382 7436 info@stiles.co.za


FUNNY COW SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER

“Maxine Peake equally loveable and loathable in excruciating, inspiring drama” - EVENING STANDARD


OAK REDEFINED AHEC and award-winning South African furniture makers, Houtlander, collaborated on the 'Preservation Bench' for 100% Design South Africa 2019. Known for their modern take on spindle furniture, Houtlander re-worked their signature style to celebrate the sapling growing from the forest oor, seeking the light and reaching up towards the canopy. By using thermally-modiďŹ ed American red oak, which is stable in the presence of moisture, the designers were able to create three grounded benches that curve into one gravity-defying twisted form that seemingly disappears into the air. So vast is the U.S. hardwood forest that all of the red oak lumber used to create the installation would be replaced through natural regeneration in less than 1 second.


VISI

| Tamboerskloof Home

WORDS AMELIA BROWN

PHOTOS NEIL VOSLOO AND JAN RAS

curves

Light is the consummate sculptor in this contemporary city sanctuary.


The stairway that leads up to the entrance. The steel frame supports the zinc roof to achieve the contemporary A-frame barn without the need for struts or beams. OPPOSITE "We wanted to have a form that would deviate from the linearity of the building, something very sculptural," explains architect Renato Graca. The staircase's steel frame was created in Johannesburg and delivered to site, where it was pumped with concrete and then plastered pouring-cream smooth.

visi.co.za

| 071


Light

VISI

| Tamboerskloof Home

is a free building material.

It’s a phrase that’s stuck with architect Renato Graca of GSquared Architects ever since university. “The correct and clever use of openings has the potential to give you endless joy,” he says as we stand in the kitchen, reverently looking up at Table Mountain.This view was something of a surprise to owner Bradley van den Berg, not because he didn’t know it was there, but because it had been concealed behind an unbroken wall in the original property. It was only when the walls came down that he could fully appreciate the position of the plot. And in the end, to make way for the two double-volume barn-shaped buildings connected by a double-storey box, the original property had to be razed, barring the front and back boundary walls. Building above the garages on what is essentially the first floor was something of a challenge, but it is this perch that affords a prized elevated view down into the city and across the bay. Beyond letting in an abundance of light, the smart positioning of the home’s apertures performs something of a miracle in dense city living:They reveal the view and glimpses of greenery, and direct the gaze so that the neighbouring properties are all but forgotten and privacy is maximised. You enter through the west barn – the “living” wing – which contains the kitchen and dining area and opens onto the back courtyard. On the opposite side, the east barn holds the three bedrooms, each with en-suites, and downstairs guest bathroom. The living and sleeping quarters are separated by the central entertaining “box”, which opens up onto the veranda, pool and garden in front, and courtyard in the back, and is punctuated by the wonderful soft-serve spiral staircase. While the exterior is sharp and linear, the internal structure features unexpected curves. Evolving light throughout the day and a monochrome palette help to emphasise the interior architecture, and create an amazing canvas for Bradley’s collection of art and design. He did the interior design himself, choosing all of the finishes and even getting involved in their execution. In addition to natural light, he paid careful attention to the artificial lighting, ensuring layered illumination and fittings that add to the overall aesthetic. Influenced by a creative family, Bradley has been immersed in design professionally for close to two decades, having been involved in broadcasting and creating a myriad of successful productions. His astuteness at spotting opportunity and talent has been an asset not just in his career, but in his savvy property history and his discerning investment pieces – he’s been a long-time supporter of James Mudge, Gregor Jenkin, Laurie Wiid van Heerden and Tonic Design. This passion for real estate started young – this is his seventh property – but more than shrewd investments, he emphasises that these have all been homes first and foremost, each one allowing him to experience a new part of the city, and express and hone his design personality. As an executive producer juggling multiple projects, Bradley travels frequently so it's essential for his home to be a sanctuary for him and his partner and their family of beloved cats and dogs. He has amassed his collection over decades, across continents, attending design shows, hunting down sales and forgoing clothes to lug back pieces in his luggage. Every piece holds a story. And just as the changing light affects the home’s structure, turning the stairs into a sculpture, so Bradley takes great pleasure in rotating his much-loved collections. “With a mostly monochrome interior, the colour comes from the things that I can change,” he explains. And the other source of colour is from the profusion of plants, another passion of Bradley’s, also amassed over years. They thrive in this greenhouse atmosphere helping to reinforce that sense of healing refuge and inviting a connection to the garden that those cleverly positioned windows and doors allow in. gsquared.co.za


Owner Bradley van den Berg worked with Establishment on the lighting to find fittings that worked with his existing pieces, like the Flos 265 wall lamp, and within the space. He chose Modular Lighting for the kitchen and dining room. The "Pick up Sticks" sideboard is by James Mudge; the table by Gregor Jenkin; the dining chairs by Vogel; and the candlestick holders by Tom Dixon. OPPOSITE Owners Trevor Sumner, left, and Bradley with Bob, Bastion and Bella.

visi.co.za

| 073


The aircon and ducting are cleverly concealed behind the timber louvres – curved intentionally, says Renato, to have a dialogue with the stairs. Running in parallel to the kitchen, it also contains the scullery and laundry. Exposed concrete helped maximise the ceiling height, with the bulkheads concealing wiring.


VISI

| Tamboerskloof Home

While the exterior is

SHARP AND LINEAR,

the internal structure features

UNEXPECTED CURVES.


CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT The drinks cabinet is an early piece by Tonic Design. On it rests a Vitra Eames House Bird and a JieldĂŠ Signal SI433 lamp. The artwork is by Bradley's uncle, Clive van den Berg, painted when he was a student. | Framed above the James Mudge Pick Up Sticks sideboard are photographs by Romina Ressia. Next to the collection of ceramic vessels, including the red piece by Ben Orkin, are the Form Family, delicate brass bowls by Tom Dixon. | Brie the Maine Coon lounges on a Patricia Urquiola chair from True Design below a Diamantini & Domeniconi cuckoo clock. The side table is from Weylandts and the French Bulldog is by Frank van Reenen. | Both the couch and the coffee table are from Tonic Design. OPPOSITE Opening the front and back sliding doors creates wonderful cross ventilation.

076 |

visi.co.za


VISI

| Tamboerskloof Home


VISI

| Tamboerskloof Home

ABOVE The Hästens bed in the master bedroom had to be delivered to the top floor by crane as it couldn't fit up the spiral staircase. The sculptural wallcovering is Ajanta 06 Sterling by Wemyss Fabrics, sourced locally from Home Fabrics, and the chevron flooring is Oggie. BELOW The master en-suite features acid-washed marble and matt black Meir taps from Flush Bathrooms.

078 |

visi.co.za


The smart positioning of apertures REVEAL THE VIEWS and direct the gaze so that the neighbouring properties are ALL BUT FORGOTTEN.

OPPOSITE To layer the view from the master bathroom, Renato designed a larger planter that runs the width of the building's perpendicular middle box. Bradley has filled it with cuttings from his visits to Babylonstoren's hotel and gardens, a place that is an ongoing source of inspiration to him.

visi.co.za

| 079


LEFT The zinc roof was extended to form modern utilitarian cladding. Bobby enjoys the sunshine on the upstairs blacony, which sports outdoor furniture from Fermob and an outdoor carpet from Weylandts. BELOW The design of both the upstairs and downstairs spaces encourage you to open the doors wide and draws you out to take in the views. OPPOSITE Bradley has been a longtime collector of bonsai. In the middle of the tranquil courtyard, he designed a large, built-in circular planter where he planted his late father's favourite tree – a pin oak – in memory of him.

“With a mostly MONOCHROME INTERIOR, the colour comes from the things that I CAN CHANGE.”


VISI

| Tamboerskloof Home

visi.co.za

| 081


VISI

| Saxonwold Artist's Studio

WO RDS MI L A C R E W E - BR OWN

BONA FIDE ORIGINAL

A radical extension of a

1920s HOME

served as the base of this pioneering artist’s career. PH OTOS DOOK PR OD UCT ION AN N EM ARIE M EIN TJES

082 |

visi.co.za


Owner Hannatjie van der Wat's geometric hard-edge paintings cover the terrace leading off her studio. Some of her works were inspired by her travels to Japan, while others were a sign of the times. “The more you work, the more your art changes,� she explains.

visi.co.za

| 083


or many, home is not permanent. While we set down roots, it’s often the case that we will move and even move again. But for 64 years, Hannatjie van der Wat has lived in her Saxonwold home on one of the suburb’s quiet, jacaranda-lined streets, and she wouldn’t have it any other way. What is striking about Hannatjie is her strong sense of individuality, which, even at the age of 96, hasn’t been blunted. “You must do what you want to do, not what you think people want you to do,” she asserts. Being authentically Hannatjie was already well formed when she and her late gynaecologist husband, Doctor JJ van der Wat, embarked on the expansion of their 1920s home. “Few things really concern me,” she states when asked about the blatant variance in the two sides of the house. An avant-garde extension in every aspect, the new wing was added to the original gable and clay-roofed dwelling to give her growing family room to breathe and, more importantly, to give her a studio of her own. Strikingly modern, and more so when it was added in 1955, the new wing was designed by architect Sidney Abramowitch and channels modernism by way of a daring, linear structure, flat roofed and generously glazed along the north and east by floor-to-ceiling sliding doors. “Abramowitch was a brilliant architect.The way he did it was almost as if that was the house next door,” she points to the original structure. Connected by a long and wide curving passage, the old is reserved for bedrooms and the kitchen while the new wing is dedicated to entertaining, lounging and most importantly, the practice of art. Having trained under Maurice van Essche, it was years before Hannatjie took a step back from raising her three children and returned to painting seriously. Her studio upstairs is flooded with north and south light and was, until a few years ago, the space where she would feel most at home. “Every artist dreams of having their own studio. Once I had mine, I worked very hard toward exhibitions. When the kids returned home from school I could help with homework, but I never had to leave,” she recalls. Countless paintings of hers fill the walls of the home, indicating the shifts that her style has undergone. As a woman in the mid-20th century practising abstract art, Hannatjie carved a unique path that took her against the current. Her work has always been bold and explores colour and form unapologetically. Her first solo was in 1966 at Adler Fielding Galleries, followed by another in Pretoria just a year later. In 2013, at the age of 90, she had a retrospective at SMAC Gallery. While her home bears so many of the markers of the time in which it was built – the quarry tiles, panelled ceilings and sunken lounge – it’s in keeping with modern homes of today. It’s open plan and light filled thanks to generous glazing, and spacious with a great collection of mid-century pieces. Art, mostly her own, brings a shot of colour to each of the rooms. A large canvas stands in the rear of the living room, covered in a wash of green paint, to which Hannatjie still returns every so often to continue at her own pace.


VISI

|

Saxonwold Artist's Studio

The curved passage that connects the new and original wings acts as a gallery for Hannatjie’s paintings. OPPOSITE Hannatjie van der Wat with one of her earlier paintings, photographed by David Goldblatt for Vogue South Africa in 1966.

visi.co.za

| 085


VISI

The sculpture by Zoltan Borbereki sits atop an Eero Saarinen Tulip Table. OPPOSITE The dining room is separated from the living room by the fireplace wall. The carpets were bought on the couple’s travels abroad, many in Iran during the 1970s.

| Saxonwold Artist's Studio


WHILE HANNATJIE’S HOME bears so many of the markers of the time in which it was built, it’s IN KEEPING with MODERN homes of today.

visi.co.za

| 087


The sunken lounge and its fireplace are dedicated to winter use. The antique Spanish cupboard is one of Hannatjie’s favourites and currently displays her collection of clay sculptures. “This was an interlude between the paintings,” she explains. The bronze horse alongside it was acquired on a trip to China.

088 |

visi.co.za


VISI

| Saxonwold Artist's Studio

COUNTLESS PAINTINGS of Hannatjie’s fill the walls of the home, indicating the SHIFTS that her STYLE has undergone.

visi.co.za

| 089


VISI

| Saxonwold Artist's Studio

A riot of colour enlivens Hannatjie’s studio, which is bathed in natural light all year round.

090 |

visi.co.za


THE NEW WING was added to the original dwelling to give the family ROOM TO BREATHE and, more importantly, to give the artist a STUDIO of her own.

visi.co.za

| 091


STRIKINGLY MODERN, and more so when it was added in 1955, the new wing channels MODERNISM by way of a DARING, LINEAR STRUCTURE, flat roofed and generously glazed.

The stark contrast between the two wings of Hannatjie’s home is most striking from her garden. “We wanted it like that,” she affirms. OPPOSITE The east-facing façade of the new wing connects the living rooms seamlessly with the pool in summer via the expansive sliding doors.

092 |

visi.co.za


VISI

| Saxonwold Artist's Studio

visi.co.za

| 093


VISI

| Rosebank Hotel

P HOTOS D O OK

P R OD UCT IO N ANN EM AR IE MEINTJE S WOR DS MI L A C R E WE - B R OW N

different

to be

Setting the pace for design-minded comfort, BRISTOL is the new Joburg hotel that refuses to fit in.


A Tonic Mulholland Slipper chair is teamed with T&Co Fabrics velvet curtains and a Streamlight lamp in one of the Blue Rooms. OPPOSITE Colour comes standard at the Bristol. Here a rich caramel hue lends the passageway a dose of luxury.

visi.co.za

| 095


VISI

| Rosebank Hotel

lounge with plush sofas and coffee tables festooned with the kind of books you’d collect for your own home, bunches of flowers and an open-plan kitchen-dining area; this is the scene that greets guests at Rosebank’s new Bristol hotel. Like the Labotessa hotel featured on page 116, Bristol Rosebank is part of a new breed of lifestyle hotel that’s all about blurring the lines between outstanding service and home-from-home comfort. Having entrusted the design to Tonic Design’s Greg Gamble and Philippe van der Merwe, a unique approach to the hotel experience emerged that challenges the status quo. It’s the duo’s bold use of colour that is immediately obvious, eschewing the safe neutral-to-greige spectrum for rust, mustard, emerald, moss and butterscotch shades that wrap entire rooms and cover sofas and armchairs. It’s a clash that works, invigorating the interior and providing a punch that hotels here have not yet seen. Part of this can be attributed to the Johannesburg traits they wanted Bristol to reflect, one of which was energy, the others being luxury and vibrancy. With just 28 rooms, all of them unique in some way, Bristol could afford to be distinctive. “Everything has been custom designed for this space specifically,” Philippe says. Barring a couple of high-end original lighting designs by brands like Vibia, one of which hangs over the stairwell spanning two to three floors, and some James Mudge chairs. “With so few rooms, we could afford to do something different,” he adds.The inventory is uncomplicated and the hotel small, but what they do, is done with distinction. Here, guests slumber on Hypnos beds (approved by the Royals), sip on the city’s best coffee courtesy of Father and are treated to the cream of the South African artist crop. In keeping with Tonic’s belief that art lends interiors depth, the hotel features a glut of works, all of them originals by prominent South African artists. You’ll find names like Michele Mathison, Walter Battiss, Cecil Skotnes and Sam Nhlengethwa, among other greats, featured throughout and giving guests a taste of our country’s art pedigree. Objet and accessories fill the rooms, avoiding the standard hotel mould. Books on design, art and lifestyle, small sculptures and a collection of incredible ceramics share space, lending Bristol a lived-in feel that appeals to those seeking a styled dose of comfort from their travels. The open-plan kitchen amplifies the intimate atmosphere of the hotel, where guests can see what is being prepared and, if they like, gather around a large communal table for a meal. Here, emerald green tiles wrap the walls, Lievore Altherr’s Tempo wall lamp makes an appearance and a shelf teeming with trailing plants and ceramics envelops the room. The fruit bowl is always full and a cabinet of midnight snacks awaits. Bristol is the first of the Home* Suite Hotels to open; another will open in Sandown, followed by two more, all of them expertly put together by Tonic. Soon there’ll even be a resident rescue dog joining the team at Bristol. Are you surprised? homesuitehotels.com | tonicdesign.co.za

096 |

visi.co.za


A stylish reception desk greets guests as they arrive, featuring the yellow Pillow and Alya chairs by Andreu World, available at Tonic.

visi.co.za

| 097


BOLD COLOURS

like rust, mustard, emerald, moss and BUTTERSCOTCH wrap entire rooms and cover sofas and ARMCHAIRS.

098 |

visi.co.za


VISI

| Rosebank Hotel At a luxuriously spacious 65 m2, the Apartment includes a fitted kitchenette complete with James Mudge table and chairs. OPPOSITE Small details matter. Even the Tonic-designed tables are customised with curved edges to provide a physically and visually softer improvement on the standard.

visi.co.za

| 099


Rooms on the upper floor enjoy leafy views into the treetops of Rosebank. Here, James Mudge’s Hardwood and Spindleback chairs and Round Tapered-leg table are teamed with Tonic’s Sofia sofa.

100 |

visi.co.za


VISI

| Rosebank Hotel

With JUST 28 rooms, all of them UNIQUE in some way, BRISTOL

could afford to be

DISTINCTIVE.

visi.co.za

| 101


VISI

| Rosebank Hotel

The Bristol

INTERIORS were designed to reflect the ENERGY, luxury and VIBRANCY

of Johannesburg.

The Green Room bathroom features a vibrant shot of colour by way of vivid emerald green. The tiles are from Tilespace and the mirrors were custom designed by Tonic to stand apart from the norm. The generous bath is from Bella Bathrooms.

102 |

visi.co.za


visi.co.za

| 103


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT The bedside lamp is a Nemo Lampe de Marseille (available from Tonic); the Parktown server was custom designed by Tonic; the pool deck offers spectacular views to the south of Johannesburg; the open-plan kitchen-dining area features Tonic’s Barrel Table, lit by a Flamingo lamp by Antoni Arola for Vibia. OPPOSITE A small but sassy rooftop bar provides guests with a cool spot from which to experience stunning Joburg sunsets, refreshing beverage in hand. The bar stools are from Sean Williams Contracts.


VISI

| Rosebank Hotel

visi.co.za

| 105


VISI

| Bo-Kaap Loft

WO RDS N OREEN JO HNS ON

In contrast to the

vibrant exteriors of its

Bo-Kaap neighbourhood, the monochromatic interiors of FRANCOIS IRVINE’S light-filled loft apartment reflect his creative collector’s eye. P RO D UCTI O N S HEL LEY S TREET /B UREAUX

PH OTOS WAR REN HE ATH/B URE AUX

106 |

visi.co.za


The main sitting area features a pair of French-style armchairs owner Francois Irvine bought in Egypt and had re-upholstered locally in cream linen. The central coffee table is covered with a local cowhide and the cast-iron wood-burning stove is a vintage piece he sourced, though it is no longer in use because “it smokes too much�. The two white-painted, four-legged wooden stools are from West Africa.

visi.co.za

| 107


VISI

| Bo-Kaap Loft

It was when I saw this view,’’ says homeowner Francois Irvine, ‘‘that I knew I wanted to be in this space.’’

Like many views in central Cape Town, it’s an urban one but also includes seductive slivers of the natural landscape that takes in Kloof Nek, lying to the right of Table Mountain’s looming bulk, along with one of Signal Hill’s signature curves. Situated in the lively, historic Bo-Kaap, Francois’ loft occupies the third floor of a Cape Georgian house and, while its facade might match the riot of bright reds, oranges, pinks and greens that are the neighbourhood’s signature, the interior of his home is almost entirely monochromatic. Climb the three flights of stairs to the top of this small industrial building (the first and second floors contain small businesses) and you’re enveloped by an interior that layers multiple shades of cream and white, punctuated by a few carefully selected darker elements that add subtle contrast. The immediate effect is calming, tranquil and refreshing. “I’ve always loved these tonal off-whites,” says Francois. “At work I’m bombarded with colour, so it’s great to have a more restrained, disciplined space here at home.” As the co-founder and co-owner of the renowned Cape Town design studio, coffee shop and gallery Haas, Francois’ days are spent on the other side of the CBD in a workplace filled with artworks, ceramics and products by a wide range of local creatives. While it’s of course true that, as Francois puts it,“neutrals always work together”, keeping the colour scheme so controlled also means that elements of texture and shape are thrown into sharp relief. It liberates your eye from the task of absorbing colour, and it is instead drawn to other elements: the sculptural shapes of furniture pieces; the textures of the textiles used for upholstery; subtly carved decorative details; and plenty of evidence of the handmade. The loft is a fairly large one, with the main living area – entered directly from the front door – taking up the vast majority of the floor space.There’s a place for in-depth conversation, complete with enveloping armchairs and couches, a more intimate sitting area facing the view through the wooden doors, and an elegant love seat that’s close to the open-plan kitchen area – and perfectly situated for chatting to the cook. Leading off the main space are the kitchen (with a sliver of guest bathroom tucked in behind it) and a guest bedroom, on the one side; and on the other, a more spacious main bedroom.West facing, this room is bathed in warm afternoon light year round. Another bathroom and what Francois calls “the workroom” also lead off the main living area. It’s in this room that Francois still conjures up his maker’s magic and his loft is filled with items he’s created, ranging from the cleverly improvised white cotton lampshades, to the elegant cream-upholstered armchairs from which his three rescue dogs rise to greet visitors. Whippets Ru and Kio, and the young Italian greyhound Willow, all stand out from the neutral interiors on the chilly winter’s day I visit, because they’re all clad in colourful dog jackets that – of course – were also made by Francois. This is a home in which its owner’s creative

hand and eye are evident absolutely everywhere.

OPPOSITE Seen through industrial doors on one side of the loft, Lion’s Head soars above the Bo-Kaap’s homes, shops and mosques. Francois’ cat, Pepe, perches on the black loveseat sourced from Egypt and upholstered in a black T&Co Fabrics damask velvet.

108 |

visi.co.za


visi.co.za

| 109


VISI

| Bo-Kaap Loft

At work I’m

BOMBARDED BY COLOUR,

so it’s great to have a more restrained, disciplined space

HERE AT HOME.

110 |

visi.co.za


The extra-long dining table has vintage cafÊ chairs along one side that were bought from a scrap collector, and the bench is made from a solid wooden beam and two tree stumps. The ornately carved wingback chairs are two of Francois’ favourite possessions, discovered years ago in a market in Egypt. In the foreground, the simple lines of the two-seater sofa pair well with two four-legged, white-painted wooden stools from West Africa. Plain linen upholstery and animal hides add natural texture to the mix. visi.co.za

| 111


VISI

| Bo-Kaap Loft

Francois lounges on the couch with his cat, Pepe, and his three dogs, Ru, Willow and Kio. The couch is covered in vintage French linen bought for “next to nothing” in Marché Saint-Pierre and the lampshade on the right was designed and made by Francois to fit the lamp stand he recently rediscovered in a storeroom.

112 |

visi.co.za


Keeping the COLOUR SCHEME so controlled means that elements of texture and SHAPE are THROWN into sharp relief.

This side of the loft faces Table Mountain, Kloof Nek and Lion’s Head, and the original old cast-iron windows allow light to stream into the space. Next to the wooden table and cafÊ-style chairs are vintage metal tables topped with a range of collectibles, including a brass lamp from India, a bust from a brocante in France, and a selection of glass bell jars. Under the tables are a metal and glass lamp from an old renovation project and a vintage basin from China.

visi.co.za

| 113


VISI

| Bo-Kaap Loft

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Ideal for enjoying breakfast in front of the Bo-Kaap view are a wooden-topped café table and vintage chairs that “have just always been around…”. Grouping collectibles in shades of white and cream creates a calming effect; the artwork is an original Flip Coaton from around 1965. The small guest room is tucked just under the eaves. The white canvas on the wall above the wooden pew is the perfect counterpoint to the plethora of collectibles and artworks displayed beneath it.

114 |

visi.co.za


THE MONOCHROMATIC

interiors of this light-filled loft apartment belonging to a

CAPE TOWN

designer

are a TRUE REFLECTION of his creative collector’s eye.

visi.co.za

| 115


VISI

Tucked away on a cobbled city square, a heritage building in

CAPE TOWN

PH OTOS JAN R AS

has been transformed into

LABOTESSA

– an understated and elegant lifestyle hotel.

WOR DS STEVE S M ITH

sophisticate

The city

| Cape Town Hotel


visi.co.za

| 117


VISI

| Cape Town Hotel

here’s a space-time portal in CapeTown.

It’s at the corner of Bureau and Parliament Streets. Drive up Adderley, past the Groote Kerk, take a left into Bureau … and suddenly you’re in a small corner of another city. It’s a Parisian vista – a quiet little cobbled square overseen by an imposing multi-gabled, granite building and flanked by three more classically elegant structures. Mercifully free of parked cars, there are people sitting on benches enjoying the last rays of spring sunshine and, outside a hotel, a few more taking their afternoon tea.This is Church Square – one of Cape Town’s quiet little gems and home to Labotessa, a new type of hotel in the Mother City. Its proprietors are Johan du Plessis and Jan Fourie, two lifelong friends whose successful careers took them far away from the neighbouring Free State farms they grew up on. Jan, a global citizen residing in North America, Europe and Cape Town, is a doctor, businessman and philanthropist, while Johan is a hotelier who has opened and run hotels quite literally across the globe – from Los Angeles, through Europe, to Tokyo and Shanghai. In size and appearance, Labotessa might appear to be a boutique hotel – there are six front-facing suites and a penthouse – but Johan is clear that it extends to something more. “Particularly here in South Africa, I think we get stuck on the idea of boutique hotels. In terms of size, yes we may be, but we’re aiming at the lifestyle traveller. And what that means is that our guests want to continue their usual lifestyle, but in a different city. When they arrive here they can – just as they may do at home – wake at 6am and order a cup of coffee, or if they want a later checkout, it’s not restricted by traditional checkout times.” For Johan, it is this genuinely personal service that is the key. It’s why Labotessa doesn’t have a traditional reception desk – instead you are met at the door by a member of staff who will also check you in via a remote device and take you up to your room. It’s the kind of personal attention that also sees Johan opening the hotel early in the morning and wishing his guests a good night as he closes up. This hands-on approach extends to Labotessa’s design and PREVIOUS PAGE, LEFT Custom décor as well. Based on his hotelier experience of guest requiresofa by LEON at CCIX with ments, the flow a hospitality establishment needs, and the kind of fabric from Urban Fabrics. materials to be used in areas that are subject to high wear, Johan Painting by Emma Aspeling. and Jan both penned the interior structure and decorated it. RIGHT The hotel’s doublevolume entrance hall with “It’s about simplicity, sophistication and the feeling of chairs by LEON at CCIX below a relaxation,” says Johan describing Labotessa’s style.“The rooms are 17th-century Flemish opulent but the quality and space shine through. We have done chandelier. The custom our job if a guest leaves here and, while they may perhaps not cabinets are by MSM Kitchens and the small furniture pieces remember a specific colour or detail of the building, they will sourced by SKEP Studio. remember a hotel in the corner of a square that was exquisite because of the quality, detail and personal service.” labotessa.com

118 |

visi.co.za


visi.co.za

| 119


VISI

| Cape Town Hotel

In its SIZE

and APPEARANCE, Labotessa might appear to be a boutique hotel, but JOHAN is clear it extends to something BEYOND THAT.

This is the lower level of the Governor Suite and like much of Labotessa’s dÊcor, it originated from co-owner Johan du Plessis taking long walks through Cape Town to see what was on offer. The ceiling light fitting is custom made by The Artisan Lighting Design, the carpet is from LUND Rug Gallery, and the paintings are by Johan van Vuuren. Like all those in the property, appliances are by Smeg.

visi.co.za

| 121


TOP The mezzanine level in the entrance hall features more LEON at CCIX custom furniture, with a bookcase by MSM Kitchens and a cement-mould fireplace that’s been locally made to replicate a 17th-century French design. The Persian rug is sourced from Tirmah Interiors. BOTTOM LEFT AND RIGHT Like most fabrics in the hotel, the curtains have a soft, simple texture. All the rooms have an open closet space that fits well with the open-plan layout, and the top of the chest of drawers has been specifically designed to house a large suitcase. OPPOSITE A space-saving barn-type door affords entrance to the luxuriously appointed bathroom.

122 |

visi.co.za


VISI

| Cape Town Hotel

‘‘The rooms are OPULENT, but the QUALITY and SPACE shine through.’’ - Johan du Plessis

visi.co.za

| 123


‘‘It’s about SIMPLICITY, SOPHISTICATION and the feeling of RELAXATION.’’


VISI

| Cape Town Hotel

THIS PAGE The Governor Suite’s main bedroom features crisp white linen, while the Milanese lamps sourced from Lights By Linea are all suspended from the ceiling to allow more table space. All lights in the room can be controlled from the light/plug/ USB panel. OPPOSITE TOP Japanese-inspired Cole and Son wallpaper sourced by SKEP Studio with custom sofa and table by LEON CCIX; view over the city from the Governor Suite's entertainment deck. BOTTOM And to the right, a glimpse of one of Cape Town’s few art deco gems. “Timeless quality and practicality” was the aim for the bathrooms, featuring Calacatta marble tiles and fittings from Yourspace Bathrooms.

visi.co.za

| 125


VISI

| Pretoria Home

With a bushveld backyard and the bustling PRETORIA skyline as its backdrop, this ultramodern family home balances setting and structure with

ELEGANT SIMPLICITY.

126 |

visi.co.za


By echoing the natural slope of the landscape, the multi-tiered levels of the house invite an abundance of light into the home and facilitate uninterrupted views across the nature reserve.

PH OTOS DOOK

|

WOR DS AD ĂˆLE DE L AN GE

visi.co.za

| 127


VISI

| Pretoria Home

EVER SINCE THEY WERE A NEWLYWED COUPLE,

OPPOSITE The frameless spider glass curtain wall blurs the edges between inside and outside as one approaches the entrance, by casting reflections of the tranquillity pond and garden onto the interior.

128 |

visi.co.za

Albert and Adéle Nieuwenhuys had been dreaming up a vision for their perfect home – a space with a sense of openness enveloped in raw concrete, steel and glass with generous expanses of double volume. They found the perfect site in the heart of Pretoria – the first step to realising their dream – with the most incredible views across the Faerie Glen Nature Reserve. But it wasn’t until they met with architect André Eksteen from Earthworld Architects that they knew their vision would finally become reality. “At Earthworld Architects we believe that the architect’s primary role is that of mediator between people and the landscape they live in,” says André. “We were therefore incredibly excited by the owners’ challenging brief for this unique site, because we knew from the start it would require pushing creative boundaries.” True to his word, the main design concept for the house is a complete contradiction in terms. “I wanted to preserve the site’s intimate connection with the nature reserve by designing the house as an airy, lightweight shelter that simply floats over the indigenous landscape – with the structure being nothing more than a protective shell that can adapt from day to day according to the needs of the family,” André explains. Even though concrete is usually perceived as a heavy, solid structure, the series of slim, interlocking concrete boxes seems to glide weightlessly over the earth. As one steps across a floating concrete bridge to approach the front door, it is evident that the central design theme of lightness and openness is carried throughout the entire house. The glazed curtain walls all move and open up, allowing inside space to become a seamless part of the outdoors. “Because the site is not very big, I wanted the exterior spaces to become additional living rooms – activating the entire site as dwelling space,” André explains. Apart from satisfying the aesthetic senses, the dramatic double-volume spaces with high-level clerestory windows and deep overhangs have an important function. The house’s main façade faces west to maximise the views, requiring the design team to perform extensive sun and climate control studies to get the shading of the house right. Inside, there is interconnectedness between the multiple level spaces, accentuated by the natural beauty of concrete, steel, glass and oak.The crisp and clean-cut interior style combines raw, textured and flamed finishes to provide sensual variety. Adéle’s favourite place is the kitchen: “I love the sleek industrial lines, but mostly it’s being part of everything else that’s going on in the house – whether it’s the boys playing in the pool, the game that’s on in the living room or the occasional zebra walking past,” she laughs. Finding balance between complexity and simplicity, architectural mastery and family homecoming, it comes as no surprise that the house received a South African Institute of Architects award in 2017. ewarch.co.za


visi.co.za

| 129


RAW CONCRETE floats lightly on top of a SLENDER STEEL structure to create a generous double-volume SPACE.

130 |

visi.co.za


VISI

| Pretoria Home

Carrying through the central theme of weightlessness, individual spaces are defined within the open-plan area by cantilevering concrete floors and floating staircases. These are interspersed with semi-transparent features, such as the clear Perspex hanging light pendants from Hi-Tech Lighting.

visi.co.za

| 131


ABOVE The black leather and chrome finishes of the Le Corbusier lounge chairs and sofas contrast vividly with the overall neutral palette. LEFT Floating on a plinth of exposed concrete, the bespoke built-in sofa, with integrated consoles, was designed by Kristen Page from Inside Interiors, an affiliate of Earthworld Architects, and manufactured by Nic Gaudard from Swiss Joinery. BELOW Adéle’s office was designed to allow for privacy while still being “a part of it all”. Storage space was incorporated into the structure, with the suspended steel balustrade doubling as shelving space and extra cupboard space in the room divider. OPPOSITE Albert’s wine cellar is insulated from seasonal temperature fluctuations nestled between cool, concrete walls below ground.

132 |

visi.co.za


VISI

| Pretoria Home

AN INTRICATE INTERPLAY between light and shadow on the white oak woodwork transforms the cellar into a FOCAL POINT.

visi.co.za

| 133


A VERTICAL WALL GARDEN invites a splash of vibrant COLOUR into the MINIMALIST hues of the interior.

134 |

visi.co.za


VISI

| Pretoria Home

ABOVE Despite the compact site, it was very important to the family to have a garden for the children to play in. The architects resolved this by creating a green roof complete with a generous lawn area on top of the subterranean sections of the house. BELOW AND OPPOSITE The sleek, industrial look of the kitchen was achieved by combining high-gloss laminated cabinetry with a precision-cut steel framework and Neolith sintered stone countertops. The granite of the breakfast nook was honed to add a sense of warmth to the touch.

visi.co.za

| 135


VISI

| Pretoria Home

The theme of openness and transparency is continued into the master bedroom, where a low-level screen wall wraps around the bed to create an intimate nook within the spacious open-plan layout of the room.

136 |

visi.co.za


IT COMES AS NO SUPRISE that the house recieved a SOUTH AFRICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS award in 2017.


VISI

| Kenyan Villa

Characterised by classic forms and strict proportions, this beautiful Swahili-styled villa on the KILIFI coast is a study in symmetry.

138 |

visi.co.za


P H OTOS DOOK

|

PRODUCT ION AN N EM ARIE M EIN TJES

|

WO RDS BIDDI RORKE

visi.co.za

| 139


VISI

On arrival, guests are surprised by the scale and dramatic simplicity of the entrance, which frames the view through a series of arches and openings. The gardens, here newly planted, are now filled with lush, tropical vegetation.

140 |

visi.co.za

| Kenyan Villa


an extraordinary stretch of land: six acres of Kilifi coastline on a clifftop overlooking Sirai Beach, thick with ancient baobabs and leading down to white sand so soft it squeaks beneath bare feet. At its centre, surrounded by landscaped tropical gardens, is a stately private home for a 12-strong blended family. The main building comprises a downstairs dining area and separate formal lounge, connected by a colossal, partially-covered outdoor seating area. This is topped by a palatial master suite, upstairs study and lounge. A series of interleading courtyards fans out from this central point, leading to sleeping quarters in two separate wings and affording the owners a voluminous yet cohesive living space. As architect Nick Plewman explains, the entire building is arranged around the central oversized, semi-outdoor sunken lounge that allows the family and guests to make the most of the temperate climate. “The main circulation moves out laterally from

there and a long colonnade runs through the site to connect the living areas.” Material choices, informed by the vernacular use of coral stone, Lamu plaster and makuti thatch, allow this private residence to settle comfortably into its remarkable landscape. A key consideration of the build was harnessing the best of the two prevailing winds that circulate in the area. “The stately tower and vertical slits in the upper levels induce vertical air flow, drawing up the cooling monsoon during the hot season,” explains Nick. These simple yet effective elements also make a suitable nod to the architectural style of the traditional Arabic stone houses found on nearby Lamu island. Another well-considered adoption of Arabic architecture lies in the use of brise-soleil screens that form a strong narrative throughout the home. These fretwork screens – made from a selection of brass, plastered concrete and timber – aren’t just whimsical decoration. They’re hardworking elements that allow for privacy and air flow. Exterior walls, plastered in natural lime,

THIS GENTEEL HOME, with its well-proportioned arches and fortress-like demeanour, has the feeling of a NATURAL and AUTHENTIC addition to the landscape. bound with egg white and polished with beeswax, offer a natural burnished lustre to the site. And this bleachedbone tone continues seamlessly inside where, sheltered from heat of the African sun, it’s all about natural textures and raw linens, in a colour palette informed by the surrounding baobabs. “Artisanal pieces were sourced from Kenya, Morocco, India and South Africa, yet the home feels unmistakably Kenyan,” says Chris Browne of Fox Browne Creative, tasked with the project. “The interiors are rooted in Swahili design that captures the languorous ambience of the coast.” Tucked into an estuary leading to a creek, Kilifi is a lesser-visited stretch of the Kenyan coastline that has largely escaped the major developments that have changed the face of Mombasa. And this genteel home, with its well-proportioned arches and fortress-like demeanour, has the feeling of a natural and authentic addition to the landscape.

visi.co.za

| 141


VISI

| Kenyan Villa

ABOVE The monastic arrival foyer features custom-made beaten brass doors as well as bespoke lighting from Marrakesh. The “Shark Boy� sculpture is part of the owner's private collection. BELOW The main veranda is where days are whiled away. Fabrics by Evolution change from day (muted greys) to night (dusty pinks) and the space awakens as night falls. Fox Browne Creative swinging chairs add a playful note to the space.

142 |

visi.co.za


The outdoor dining veranda features a Fox Browne Creative table with built-in ice well for long, lazy lunches. In the evenings, the large basket lights reference local fishing baskets.


VISI

| Kenyan Villa

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT The beaten brass front doors from Marrakesh with custom-made handles by Ironwood Africa open into a quiet yet dramatic entrance hall. The owners‘ favourite artwork is highlighted by brass hanging lights from Marrakesh, and the walls have a Lamu plaster finish. The magnificent Indian Ocean view through an arched opening overlooking the main veranda. The arched veranda of the master suite creates a cool and private space to watch dhows sailing up and down the coast.

144 |

visi.co.za


IT’S AN EXTRAORDINARY stretch of land: six acres of KILIFI coastline on a clifftop overlooking SIRAI BEACH, thick with ancient baobabs and leading down to white sand so soft it squeaks beneath bare feet.

visi.co.za

| 145


‘‘THE INTERIORS are rooted in Swahili design that captures the LANGUOROUS AMBIENCE of the coast.’’

ABOVE Every guest suite has its own rooftop hideaway, and the custom-designed brise-soleil wall allows maximum airflow. The Kenneth Cobonpue chair is a nod to traditional basket craft integrated with modern technology. LEFT Guests can enjoy sunset cruises in a traditional dhow along the Kilifi creek, where the mangroves create a serene backdrop. OPPOSITE A coral stone shower takes centre stage in this bathroom, with a Lamu-plastered niche wall in the background. PREVIOUS PAGE ABOVE An infinity pool, perfectly framed by the massive baobabs, takes the eye straight to the view - seemlessly merging the sea, pool and sky. PREVIOUS PAGE BELOW Opposite the pool bar in the shade of the baobabs, a built-in oversized day bed accommodates whole families or large groups of friends to relax and enjoy perfect days on the coast.


VISI

| Kenyan Villa


ABOVE The hand-carved Moorish-inspired bed, framed by soft, romantic mosquito netting, is the hero of this guest suite. BELOW An oversized, built-in terrazzo bath anchors the guest suite bathroom, and large, shuttered doors give guests a sense of bathing at one with nature.

148 |

visi.co.za


VISI

The upstairs sala on this suite features a suspended hanging bed for long, lazy, indulgent afternoons. foxbrowne.com plewmanarchitects.co.za

| Kenyan Villa


Innovation for life. Valcucine has deďŹ ned the way the world uses kitchens for closer to 40 years. Today, we remain at the helm of innovative design, focusing on wellbeing, timeless design and innovative solutions. Visit our showrooms in Cape Town and Johannesburg

www.valcucinesa.co.za


VISI

to love design, art, architecture, tech, books, booze & entertainment

REAT ESIGN IS...

“ ... about the PEOPLE, the PLACE, the ENVIRONMENT, and aims to be FUNCTIONAL, BEAUTIFUL and TIMELESS.” – Luke Pedersen Read about Pedersen + Lennard‘s design journey on page 164.

PHOTO JAN RAS

WIN

Labrador wears Chommies custom collar with O-ring (from R750) and standard leash (from R700), which are available in customisable colourways. Polyresin Labrador designed by Mervyn Dragsund of Composite Decor (R4 300 from CASA LEON). More dog breeds and colours available. chommies.com | leonat219.com

A DESIGNER DOG & CHOMMIES SET See p64

visi.co.za

| 153


1

V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

Best of 100% Design South Africa

Africa’s leading design showcase, held at Gallagher Convention Centre in August 2019, included gems from the finest local artisans, crafters and designers in the country. We highlight a few of our favourites...

SURFACE APPEAL Winner Best Surface Design: MaXhosa wallpaper by Laduma Ngxokolo n ”My aim is to offer a new way of living within our surroundings as a new generation of Africans,” says Laduma Ngxokolo, who headlined 100% Design SA 2019 as Feature Designer. Lauded for his iconic graphic garments, the versatile designer and founder of MaXhosa displayed his easy crossover from fashion to homeware, presenting a collection of rugs, cushions, throws, wallpaper and curtaining. The award-winning wallpaper, which is set to be released later this year and is currently a made-to-order experience, is a statement in strong geometry and dynamic colours while referencing an African aesthetic. Variations in colour and patterns will be steered by the clients’ direction with guidance from Laduma. “The wallpaper allows us to create an array of wall art from our universe of patterns. I want to bring an African utopian feel with my designs – to shake people’s preconceptions,” Laduma explains. Laurence Brick, creative director of Platform Creative and one of the curators of 100% Design SA, added, “All of Laduma’s designs draw on personal heritage and a sense of culture, which we feel is an important narrative to champion. He has an ability to interpret tradition in a very contemporary way.” maxhosa.africa

154 |

visi.co.za


TOUCH WOOD

Timber took centre stage with a range of sustainable, innovative solutions for everyday living Winner Best Product Design: RAW Studios n Already known for its birch furniture and modular systems, RAW Studios pushed the envelope with InHouse, a prototype of a semi-permanent dwelling space. “It’s quite literally furniture you can live in,” says creative director Peet van Straaten. “While conventional building methods are timeconsuming and divorce-inducing, this weatherproof structure takes only ten weeks to complete.” Crafted from Finnishsourced spruce plywood because of its affordability and weight-to-strength ratio, InHouse can be disassembled and easily transported, tapping into the growing trend of small, light living. rawstudios.co.za

Special Mention Best Furniture Design: John G Williams Fine Furniture n “My artisanal ambition is summed up in three main ideas: craftsmanship, enduring quality and beauty,” says John G Williams of Fine Furniture, which showcased two versions of the REPOSE chair. “The highest quality materials and crafting processes are used in each chair – and each detail is handled in the simplest, strongest way.” When it comes to ’enduring quality’ the idea is to achieve an ageless design that uses a material selection and a construction of the highest standard – ”and to earn the right to use the most beautiful solid hardwoods”. John explains that he aims to make furniture that is beautiful to sit in through very careful attention to all the ergonomic details. “I try to achieve this through clean, simple lines, combined with graceful surfaces, to achieve a compelling whole.” johngwilliamsfinefurniture.com

PHOTOS SUPPLIED WORDS TRACY CHEMALY

takk n “It’s all about respecting the material, but we also want our furniture to be delicious and playful,” says director Marcus van der Hoven of the new ice cream-coloured powder-coated pieces takk unveiled at 100% Design SA. “By showcasing our pieces in different rooms, we chose to express how our furniture is able to facilitate multiple special roles while drawing focus to our assembly detail. Being light, flexible, robust and eco-conscious, plus easy to transport and assemble, means our furniture is easy to live with. And it's flavourful! Our new colours are far less serious than the strong greys and whites seen elsewhere.” takkfurniture.co.za


V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

CAFÉ CULTURE Clout Café, curated by Studio LeeLynch and fired up by Nando’s, served up the very best of Mzansi design n From the Naturalis café tables with their patterned prints by Spamandla Mdunyelwa, to the cement tiles by Wolkberg and skyline lights by Thabisa Mjo in collaboration with Sakhile Cebekhulu, this zone wasn’t just for socialising and engaging during the show. Under the expert guidance of creative director Tracy Lee Lynch of Studio LeeLynch, the space doubled as a thrilling showcase for new works from established designers and emerging talent. “SA designer-makers are telling our stories and sharing our collective culture with the world,” Tracy says. “When they’re united in one space, it culminates in a unique expression of a bold Southern African aesthetic.” leelynch.co.za

156 |

visi.co.za


WALK OF ART A bespoke stretch of rich wool pile carpet, produced by MONN and 100% Design South Africa’s curator and creative director of Platform Creative Cathy O’Clery, showcased six dynamic designs n Participating designers for the once-off Carpet Gallery included 100% Design South Africa Feature Artist r1., textile designer Sindiso Khumalo, The Collection Studio and Cathy O’Clery. “The Carpet Gallery was conceived to showcase the quality of MONN’s carpets with colourful, contemporary designs,” says Cathy. “Their production is world-class and they lead in innovation, but people are often timid in their choices when it comes to floors. Design is a great way to draw attention to the luxury products that MONN manufactures. With this piece, people could see how rich wool pile really enhances good surface design.” The carpet yarn used to manufacture this 34 m-long showstopper comprised 80% wool and 20% nylon. Designs featured were “Blue Maze” by The Collection Studio, “Degrees of Comparison” and “Jagged” by r1., “Blossom Rain” and “Modern Medina” by Cathy O'Clery and ”Inanda” by Sindiso Khumalo. monn.co.za | platformcreative.co.za


V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

TALENT TO WATCH Winner Best of 100% New Talent: Sifiso Shange n Furniture manufacturer and crafter Sifiso Shange of Afri Modern is a modern-day storyteller who references Zulu design in his narrative. “I see myself as a vessel between the past and the present. My design story is based on value systems shared with me from my grandparents, uncles, siblings and other relatives.” Drawing on a rich heritage of symbols and sacred geometry and using an innovative colourway of green and black, Sifiso’s Ma Wami Server pays homage to his mother. “Green is the colour of rebirth and new beginnings. Black is the colour of power and eternal life. Mothers give birth and provide us that power, too,” Sifiso says of his choice of hues for the server. Another Afri Modern piece, the Emakhaya Server, is a collaboration with John Vogel of Vogel Design. Complete with horns, it depicts the story of a child’s memory of sitting in the back seat of a car while passing a herd of goats. “I want to create an African luxury brand that becomes a lifestyle,” he says of his work. “I choose symbols with powerful stories in order to give people hope and strength.”

Special Mention Best of 100% New Talent: Mbongiseni Nxumalo n Vryheid crafter Mbongiseni Nxumalo is the brainchild behind an assortment of pieces created from foil litter. Intrigued by the brightly coloured sweet and chip packets that littered the roads where he lives, Mbongiseni started collecting and “playing around” with them. Two of his first creations were a belt and beer pot cover made from foil chip packets. Today, the crafter who sees beauty and potential in the mundane, fashions plates, fruit baskets, placemats, trays and wall hangings from other people’s trash.

Special Mention Best Product Design: Chuma Maweni n Already admired for his exquisite ceramics, Eastern Cape artist Chuma Maweni has branched out into furniture. His Imbizo collection sees him applying his distinctive eye for bold shapes and precise patterning on a much larger scale. “The culture and the traditions of the Eastern Cape have played quite an important role in my craft as a designer especially in the four years I spent in the rural Transkei. That’s where I got to know about Imbizo (a “gathering”) where important matters of the village are discussed. This informed the Imbizo Table set.” Chuma says he draws inspiration from anything that catches his eye. “It might be a natural shape, or the shape of a building. Sometimes I look at other artists' work and reinterpret and change it completely to make it my own.” 100percentdesign. co.za | Read our full interview with Chuma at visi.co.za.

158 |

visi.co.za


2

V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

Loving Laundry

Known for her beautiful, origami-esque swan bowls made from recycled paper, artist and designer Morongwe Mokone has wowed New Yorkers with her latest creation.

s New Yorkers have recently discovered, Mo’s Crib’s handmade laundry baskets should make even the most tedious of tasks something to look forward to. Morongwe Mokone's African contemporary-style baskets were a firm favourite at the NY NOW show in Manhattan, with some finding new homes in New York and beyond. An environmentally conscious approach is at the helm of Morongwe’s design process both in terms of materials and production: “As a team, we maintain an out-of-the-box approach. We’ve made products from plastic bags, PVC pipe and even newspapers.” She uses a clever combination of recycled PVC water pipes and galvanised wire to creatively deploy waste materials and conjure up a highly durable, sustainable and versatile storage basket. The intertwined materials make for Afrocentric patterning and captivating texture that add a distinctly artistic element to her products. Part of the Artists and Resource Goods category at the NY NOW show, Morongwe’s team was selected out of 400 nominees to win the Best New Product award. Returning to South Africa victorious, prestigious new title in hand, Morongwe and her team plan to expand their range and uplift others. Future projects include a versatile storage design and a furniture range, as well as generating employment opportunities for South Africa’s skilled artisans. moscrib.com |

The PVC range, which includes planters, starts from R480. RIGHT Morongwe Mokone, right, works with her sister Moshibudi.

@mos.crib

160|

visi.co.za

PHOTO AND PORTRAIT CARIKE RIDOUT WORDS NKULI NHLEKO

A


/

R E A S O N S

Visual Tension

The collab between architect and designer Meghan Ho-Tong and local artisan Jaekan Coetzee to produce the Hyraxhotong Chair One is an exploration in geometry and imagination.

Dimensions 420 mm (height) x 300 mm (diameter) x 21 mm (timber thickness) Material Yellowwood Cost R3 000 per unit

ooking at the Hyraxhotong Chair One elicits an immediate sense of intrigue. “I really enjoy that this creates an interesting visual tension,” says Cape Town-based architect and designer Meghan Ho-Tong. “When viewed from a particular angle, it feels as if the chair might fall over, but as you move around it, you begin to understand that the geometries are balanced and support each other.” Together with Jaekan, Meghan designed the stool with a strong circular form and a contrasting triangular base structure. “Jaekan is a master woodworker with a lot of knowledge in timber construction, materiality and the ways that wood behaves,” elaborates Meghan. “I came to him with an idea and sketches for the chair. From there we started prototyping. We built a 1:1 scale model and made assessments and adjustments as we developed the design.” The chair’s construction employs interlocking timber joints and the design is void of any glue or mechanical fixings. “It is built from solid yellowwood. Every piece that gets used is carefully selected taking into consideration its character and markings.” hyraxhotong.com

L

162 |

visi.co.za

PHOTO AND PORTRAIT JAN RAS PRODUCTION MARCUS VILJOEN WORDS MICHAELA STEHR

3

V I S I


4

V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

Design Journey

As Pedersen + Lennard, James Lennard and Luke Pedersen combine their background in industrial design to produce functional pieces that stand the test of time.

WIN

TWO BUCKET STOOLS See p64

2011 n HUGUENOT TABLE This table emerged as an expression of our ongoing fascination about the point where steel and timber meet. My grandfather was a French Huguenot farmer in the Karoo – the proportion and tapered legs of the table were inspired by furniture from his home.

164 |

visi.co.za

2009 n BUCKET STOOL As part of our first range, we came up with the idea for a fun piece with hand- and machinemade elements. The Bucket Stool illustrates something beautiful about South African craft and our ability to use colour – in fact, we released new colours recently. The bucket is handmade using galvanised steel in an informal settlement in Cape Town. The timber is cut out of birch plywood from the Baltic and the upholstery is done in our workshop. Our Bucket Stool has been bought in more than 20 countries worldwide and won many awards. It continues to amaze us how such a humble piece has captured the world’s imagination.


2015 n KPA CHAIR We spent a year designing and refining this chair into something that would compete with the cheap imports you find almost everywhere these days. The name originates from the stamp at the back of school or hospital furniture, an abbreviation for Kaapse Provinsiale Administrasie. We drew a lot of inspiration from this type of furniture.

2017 n STOCKHOLM HOOK We often run into young people who love our work, but can’t afford to buy a table just yet, so this kind of piece is a great way to start the journey. Designing things that bring order to spaces is very gratifying – even something as humble as a coat hook. I’m not sure if it’s a sign of getting old, but having the right hook in the right place is a nice feeling when you get home.

PHOTOS SANTJIE VILJOEN WORDS CELESTE JACOBS

2019 n ESCARPMENT TABLE The softer edges highlight the highly tactile nature of timber. Through the simplicity of this range we are hoping to bring the appreciation of natural materials and all the good things in life into focus. pedersenlennard.co.za

visi.co.za

| 165


5

V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

LED Luminosity

Local abstract installation artist Lisa Swanepoel uses her passion for colour and light in her latest project currently being exhibited in New York City.

WHAT WAS YOUR INSPIRATION BEHIND THE BLUE BUTTERFLY? n I see the world in colour, shape and light. I use light, exploiting it for reflection and refraction, creating illusion and

confusion in the multitude of layers and clustering. I seek out inspiration in my trips to New York and Washington. The grand-scale digital light and infinity shows are spectacular and trigger creativity in a new world of installations. EXPLAIN THE PROCESS BEHIND CREATING THIS PIECE. n The colour is enhanced by changing LED lights on Perspex, and metallic and glittery rainbow vinyl lend the final

product a radiant, magical effect. The luminosity is the result of LED light combined with mirror and neon translucent Perspex, but a 3D element is vital for the shimmer and dazzle I’m after. The added colour explosion is achieved by rolling RGB lights to transform it into the colours of the rainbow. TELL US ABOUT THE EXHIBITION THAT BLUE BUTTERFLY IS A PART OF.

works by Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Damien Hirst and Keith Haring. lisaswanepoel.com

166|

visi.co.za

PHOTOS AND PORTRAIT SHAVAN RAHIM INTERVIEW MICHAELA STEHR

n The Butterfly LED installation is exhibiting at Carlton Fine Arts in New York. I’m thrilled about this as this gallery exhibits


6

V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

St Mametja

Johannesburg-based artist Kgabo Mametja, also known as Saint Rose, creates bold illustrations inspired by women and their vast experiences.

WHAT INSPIRES YOU ABOUT THE FEMALE FORM AND HOW DO YOU TRANSLATE THIS INTO YOUR WORK?

n The female form is represented excessively in art but often, especially in a more historical context, this is through the perspective of the heterosexual man ... male gaze. I made a conscious decision to not only illustrate women, primarily black women, but also to find a way to give the women I draw some agency. I’m in awe of female bodies and how they exist and change. My main source of inspiration is women owning their choices and having fun, however they choose to. WHAT ARE YOU TRYING TO EVOKE BY USING WOMEN AS YOUR SUBJECT MATTER? n I’m trying to evoke the feeling of being seen by the women who enjoy my work. My aim is to break stereotypes and provide representation for women who often don’t fit into the mould. For instance, it’s important for me to show that a “powerful woman” isn’t just one thing or that “sexy” exists in multiple forms. HOW DID YOU GET INTO DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION?

HOW DO YOU APPROACH CREATING A NEW ILLUSTRATION?

n I have a design background, so I tend to approach illustrating similarly. The idea always comes first, especially if it’s work that is briefed in. With ideation comes way too much scamping and colour picking; then I move everything over to Illustrator where I play around until I get the composition right. WHAT IS YOUR OPINION ON SOUTH AFRICAN DESIGN?

n Generally, I think that the design industry is doing really well. Accessible South African design and designers are getting the recognition that they deserve on a global scale and that is incredible. However, I do think that my little chunk of the industry, graphic design and illustration, still has a long way to go. These are both very powerful mediums and tools, but they always seem to be an afterthought when it comes to their commercial influence. I’d like us to get to the point where young people can leave school knowing that being an illustrator is a sustainable option and a way to make a living. behance.net/kgabomametja | @iamsaintrose

168|

visi.co.za

PHOTOS SUPPLIED INTERVIEW MICHAELA STEHR

n I left home at 16 to study visual art at NSA (National School of Arts) and then went on to Vega School to get my degree in visual communications. It was during this period that I fell in love with branding and commercial art. This, along with my desire to create work that interested me, was what got me to teach myself how to illustrate. I basically picked up a Computer Arts Illustrator manual and went for it.


V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

visi.co.za

| 169


7

V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

Creativity Unleashed

Cape Town-based fashion label Chommies creates appealing handcrafted accessories for dog owners and their besties.

KlûK CGDT x Chommies clutch, R17 800.

WIN

The ostrich leather and feathers are sourced from a small scale farmer in the Karoo.

A CHOMMIES BAG See p64

Sunny Side Up phone necklace, R390. The leather patches are made from leather offcuts that would normally be discarded.

170 |

visi.co.za

RIGHT Zac Rusagara and Nathalie Klijn with Ringo.

PHOTOS SUPPLIED WORDS AMELIA BROWN

N

athalie Klijn moved from Germany to Cape Town in 2012, and while she’d settled well into her new city, it was only when she adopted a puppy named Ringo that Cape Town really became home. Ringo was her connector, and she began making collars for him and friends as a side project. It was Ringo who initiated a fortuitous meeting with Superdawg, the late rescue pup belonging to animal-loving entrepreneur Zac Rusagara, at a local market. Zac’s appreciation for Nathalie’s creations and enthusiasm to share them with the world was contagious and eventually she fell for it – Zac included! – and Chommies was born. “Every Chommies product is handmade with love and care by local artisans who come mainly from the townships,” Zac says of what he describes as an “economic upliftment fashion label”. “Talent is everywhere in South Africa and sometimes all it takes is someone to take a chance on you and to be patient while you learn the skills required.” With a wide and everexpanding range of leashes and collar wear, which can all be customised, Chommies has launched baskets, rope bags, ostrich feather accessories and the Sunny Side Up phone necklace for its two-legged fans. This year saw a collab with atelier KlûK CGDT on a line of clutch bags. What about feline fashion, we ask? “You won’t believe how often we get asked that question!” laughs Zac. “So yes, we’re working on a little something for cats, too.” Meow-vellous. chommies.com


From the Masters

sort Developers

You’ve found the ideal location, now let’s work together to bring your dream to life! Luxury tent manufacturers and tented resort developers. Here’s to creating a wildly irresistible destination! +27 (0)12 671 1117 | info@bushteccreations.com | www.bushteccreations.com


V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

Eyes to the Wall

The walls of The Onyx, Cape Town Foreshore’s new apartment hotel, are swathed in bold imagery courtesy of Cara Saven’s striking wallpaper designs.

aking her cue from interior designer Francois du Plessis’ jewel-toned furniture curation, Cara Saven of Cara Saven Wall Design has recreated aspects of the city’s natural surrounds and local history inside The Onyx. In the bedroom suites, black-and-white photographs of dolosse from the nearby shoreline and prints of the Castle of Good Hope’s bell tower have been blown up to turn the walls into dramatic monochromatic landscapes. “The scale and the angle of the images make them feel almost Alice in Wonderlandish,” says Cara, “but then, on closer inspection, you realise they are very recognisable landmarks within a kilometre or two from where you are sleeping.”

T

172 |

visi.co.za


The lift lobbies are equally eye-catching, bringing one face to face with oversized birds in waterside environments. “It’s an awkward space, a lift lobby,” she says, explaining how this wallpaper adds an immediate talking point to an often-overlooked public locale. “I also love that these images bring a natural element into a very urban space.” But it’s perhaps the swimming-pool area that is likely to cause the most Instagram swooning. Seamless and able to withstand high levels of moisture (two rarities for such wall surfaces), a tropical scene consumes the entire length of a wall. Plant imagery appears to come alive in this rooftop setting, making one believe that walls really can talk. carasaven.com

WIN

PHOTOS SUPPLIED WORDS TRACY CHEMALY

WALLPAPER See p64

visi.co.za

| 173


V I S I

9

/

R E A S O N S

The Green Scene

Just as National Braai Day has become an annual celebration, on 20 October, Garden Day will see the green-thumbed across the country extol the value and virtues of plants.

Plant parent Corrie Gunter at his home in Cape Town.

here’s a whole new crop of gardeners sprouting up and many don’t even own gardens. These apartment-dwelling “plant parents” are reaping the feel-good benefits of growing something green. New research shows a promising link between happiness, purpose and gardens. According to the study, a significant 68% of under-35s now enjoy looking after the humble houseplant, and those that do say they are happier with their lives. As Corrie Gunter of the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at UCT says, “There’s a reason why millennials are showing an increasing interest in gardening. We live in an online world of social media and instant gratification. Gardening forces you to slow down and step into a [different] time frame.” Corrie is a cell biologist with a current focus on plant-produced pharmaceuticals. He shares his apartment with roughly 90 indoor plants – from humble sweetheart vines and philodendrons to the carnivorous Asian Pitcher Plant (AKA Monkey Cup). “Looking after plants makes you exercise patience. And it feeds our need for greenscapes: The further away we get from nature, the more we crave it.” Corrie says he plans to spend Garden Day with a few plant-loving friends around a braai. gardenday.co.za

n DIAIRISE THE DAY Garden Day was proudly created by Candide, a gardening app that connects gardeners with fellow plant lovers, public gardens and plant nurseries. Show your support for Garden Day on Sunday 20 October by wearing a flower crown and celebrating all things green with neighbours, family and friends. Join the movement (@GardenDaySA on social channels) and visit gardenday.co.za to download a toolkit with loads of hints, tips and how-to videos.

174 |

visi.co.za

PHOTOS SUPPLIED WORDS BIDDI RORKE

T


V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

Crafty Thinking

10

Featuring homegrown design and crafts, KAMERS/Makers is the country’s most-anticipated artisan ‘‘up-market’’ and it’s back for two more instalments in 2019.

PHOTOS CHARL DU PREEZ PRODUCTION NICKY MYBURGH WORDS BIDDI RORKE

Kingfisher art block from Carry On & Co; washing liquid from Green Bee Biodegradables; and eco-printed organic hemp cloth from Aucamp Studio.

Handwoven runner from Scatterlings from Africa; belter moonbag from Verse; leather tote from Campbell Armoury; scarf from Ilan Life; and canvas bag from Bark and Mill.

ith five shows a year KAMERS/Makers has become a highlight on the calendar of those who appreciate local handmade design. Known for its wide selection of fashion, accessories and jewellery, this pop-up retail market showcases the best of South African talent. Nicky Myburgh of KAMERS/Makers explains that out of over 550 hopefuls, 170 talented makers have been handpicked for each of the two upcoming shows in Stellenbosch and Pretoria. “We are seeing a definite increase in sustainable and ethical fashion production. Handmade African craft, such as beading, is moving into the design realm and we are looking forward to seeing these skills continue to be reinvented. Another trend is a return to DIY. Various artisans have created knitting, weaving and even leather product kits.” In a concerted effort to reduce the environmental footprint of each market, KAMERS/Makers has also partnered with Consol Glass to minimise the need for single-use plastic bottles: every visitor receives a free Consol Glass water bottle that they can fill with filtered water at the Consol Glass pop-ups at the shows. KAMERS/Makers 2019 Stellenbosch takes place at the Blaauwklippen Wine Estate from 29 October to 3 November 2019, and from 3 to 8 December 2019 at Cornwall Hill College in Irene, Pretoria. Tickets, which include a limited-edition KAMERS/Makers shopping bag, Consol Glass water bottle and magazine, cost R70 online and R100 at the entrance. A multi-entry ticket costs R130. Students and pensioners pay R70, and under-18s enter for free. kamers.co.za

W

visi.co.za

| 175


V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

Size Matters

A

176 |

visi.co.za

n AGA oven has come to be the symbol of both homeliness and craftsmanship. And while its designs have remained relatively unchanged, technological advancements and an evolution in how we live and entertain have led to more choice and flexibility. At just 60 cm, the AGA 60 is still made the traditional way from molten iron, much of which is created from used materials such as car gearboxes, lamp-posts and so on. Despite its diminutive size, it features two ovens, which can be switched on and off independently, and the choice of a hotplate or gas hob. With programmability on the roasting/baking oven, there’s no waiting for the cooker to heat up. The proven three-day application of AGA’s famous enamelling in a fresh range of contemporary colours helps ensure its longevity. White, heather, cream, aqua, blush or baby blue … This model maximises style and function for a space-efficient home and simultaneously modernises a kitchen icon. agaliving.co.za

PHOTOS SUPPLIED WORDS AMELIA BROWN

The AGA 60 delivers all of the personality and kitchen credentials you’d expect from this iconic British brand in a colourful, compact package that's ideal for a city pad.


V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

Cutting Edge

L

178 |

visi.co.za

ocated in Bryanston, Johannesburg, blu_line’s sophisticated 600 m², two-storey showroom gives visitors the chance to not just view its finishes and interact with its innovative tech, but actually imagine how a kitchen would look in context. Different stone finishes have been combined in each considered space along with other complementary materials like concrete, timber, glass and aluminium. According to Philip Richards, the group brand director at blu_line, the company’s approach to kitchen architecture comes from two decades in the industry and focuses on four key areas: functionality; texture; interest, with designs that feature different levels and depths; and the creation of a dynamic space that adapts to one’s needs and the environment. The cutting-edge showroom allows you to experience the newly launched sensorline 4.0 technology, developed in-house, that includes a sensor tap system that’s seamlessly integrated into the counter and floating aluminium wall units with different light sensors depending on the intended mood. But perhaps the biggest wow-factor tech advancement is blu_line’s moving stone counters and vertical panels. “We have developed a system that runs off your home automation and allows you to open up your kitchen,” explains Philip, “creating a dynamic, adaptable space that works with the surrounding interiors and your needs.” blu-line’s Cape Town showroom in De Waterkant is under construction and due to open in early 2020. blu-line.co.za

PHOTO SUPPLIED WORDS AMELIA BROWN

Beyond a space to interact with a product, blu_line’s state-of-the-art Johannesburg showroom visually displays how kitchen architecture can establish and reinforce a home’s aesthetic.


WELCOME TO MOBELLI FURNITURE + LIVING

Come dine with me Gather family and friends and dine in style with the GrandĂŠ extendable table. Enjoy total flexibility and up to four additional places with a table that extends in seconds. Made from scratch-resistant, power-coated aluminium it is easy to maintain and can stay outside year-round.

mobelli.co.za | 0861 66 23 55 Paarden Eiland | Sea Point | Illovo | Fourways Mall | Menlyn Piazza | Umhlanga Ridge

NOW OPEN AT FOURWAYS MALL


V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

En Vogue

I

180 |

visi.co.za

t’s the “difficult second album” syndrome… How does one follow up a debut that was a bona fide, groundbreaking original? Do you go with option one: more of the same? Or two: another leap into the unknown? Because when it was launched back in 2011, the Evoque not only took the Range Rover brand into new, smaller territory, but it was an altogether more svelte and stylish execution of the design DNA sported by its elder siblings – the Range Rover and Range Rover Sport. Nearly 800 000 Evoques later, you can see why making the right call on a successor was such a biggie for the crew over in Whitley, Coventry. The person making that call is Land Rover chief design officer Gerry McGovern and he’s gone for the first option. While that may seem the safe route, his more-evolutionary-than-revolutionary approach completely echoes the new Evoque’s engineering. More sophisticated and refined would describe the new car with an all-new chassis that’s 13% stiffer than its predecessor and a range of four-cylinder turbocharged petrol and diesel engines that transfer power through smooth-shifting nine-speed automatic transmissions. Matching those mechanics, Gerry’s gang have chosen subtle styling refinements and, being designers, they’ve had to give it an impressive-sounding name. “Reductive design” is their expensive descriptor for what’s basically a less-is-more approach. And what that means is the Evoque’s familiar sporty, coupé-like silhouette remains

PHOTOS SUPPLIED WORDS STEVE SMITH

With its predecessor a global success, the second-generation Range Rover Evoque makes a tricky debut. How do you repeat that accomplishment? Through “reductive design”, that’s how.


V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

with its distinctive sloping roofline and rising beltline, but shining the light directly reveals details of a body that is now tighter and ultra clean with no extraneous creases. Much like its Velar stablemate, all the surfaces are now smoother with flowing curves rather than sharp creases, as well as flush door handles and glazing. The theme continues inside with a minimalist, modern-luxe interior of sharp lines, plush leather and alloy-trimmed surfaces. It’s dominated by the two crisp, clear Touch Pro Duo touchscreens stacked above one another that are both intuitive to operate and provide access to a swathe of infotainment tech that includes Apple CarPlay and a 4G WiFi hotspot capable of supporting up to eight devices. “For me, this car is about its charm, it is about its character,” said Gerry at the Evoque’s launch in London. “It’s a vehicle that clearly resonated with people before, and I think the new one will continue to do that.” And we agree. Gerry has nailed the brief and even with stiffer competition in the small boutique crossover segment from the likes of Volvo, Lexus and the Germans, this second album should prove to be another global hit. landrover.co.za

RANGE ROVER EVOQUE Two engine options... D180 turbo-diesel, 132 kW/430 Nm P250 turbo-petrol, 183kW/365 Nm … with 10 variants of different spec levels Pricing R738 475 – R994 099

visi.co.za

| 181


V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

A Sound Future

Known as a market-leader in the audio sector, now Bose's Frames Lens Collection combines premium sunglasses and wearable technology for a fusion of form and function.

at R4 600 a pair.

W

ireless earbuds merge with designer sunglasses in these stylish new optics from high-end audio brand Bose. With built-in sensors and hidden speakers that pipe music to your ears, they also come in a choice of two black frames: the round Rondo and the square Alto. “Frames are both magical and practical,” explains director of Bose Frames Mehul Trivedi. “With the new lens options, they’re versatile premium sunglasses. But when you turn them on, they function like headphones, instantly connecting to your phone, contacts, the web, and all its audible content. Frames have taken the wearable category by storm and we’re really excited to bring their groundbreaking performance – and new accessories – to people all over the world.” bose.com | sound-systems.co.za

182 |

visi.co.za

PHOTOS SUPPLIED WORDS MICHAELA STEHR

The sunglasses retail


VISI

SPONSORED CONTENT

A PALETTE FOR EVERY SHOW

Take colour inspiration for your next project from the palettes of these trending series and movies, all streaming on Showmax.

Big Apple: Manhattan’s all about money, which is why green tones perfectly represent a series set in New York’s publishing industry. Ballers

Cool as Ice: The slick, sophisticated lead (Dwayne Johnson) is aptly embodied by the calm and tranquil aqua palette. Kidding

Mood Swing: Childish pastels to darker tones of brown reflect a life in conflict in this complex comedy/drama.

Euphoria

Teen Spirit: The changing temperaments of the average teenager are captured in this palette, with the sunny side at the centre. Find Me in Paris

Berry Blast: The pop of magenta gives a brightness that captures the whimsy of this fun ballet series for teens. The Happytime Murders

Expect the Unexpected: Seemingly unrelated hues are pulled together to reflect this slightly risqué movie about puppets.

Project Blue Book

Out of this World: The blues, greens and black of the night sky, where alien visitors might reside, the very essence of this drama. Being Bonang

Royal Flush: Shades of regal purple are perfectly suited to South Africa’s own Queen B. Chernobyl

Tan Throwback: The mustard/fawn/orange palette of Chernobyl is true to 80s era interior design.

Source: Palettemaniac, Instagram

Younger


V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

High Spirits

To celebrate the return of summer, mixologist Jody Rahme shares five classic cocktails made with South African spirit(s).

rom agave spirits to rum, there’s a proliferation of South African distilled alcohol emerging in the path that local craft gin pioneered. And they’re all worth investigating: The majority are handcrafted from local ingredients; they’re often small batch in distinctive bottles with beautifully designed labels, most of which would have been applied by hand. “Local spirits are a great way to showcase South Africa’s rich and diverse landscape,” says mixologist Jody Rahme, who goes by the moniker Liquid Squire and is responsible for the bar at Gigi Rooftop, the inner-city drinks spot at the top of Gorgeous George hotel in Cape Town. ”We are extremely fortunate to have such a variety of climate zones, which enables us to produce a wide variety of spirits such as rum, agave, brandy and whisky and, of course, wine.” Here are five classics with South African flavour...

HOW TO MAKE A QUICK SIMPLE SYRUP 1:1 ratio sugar to water Bring 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water (or your ratio) to the boil in a pot, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Reduce the heat and allow to simmer gently until the liquid is a thicker, more syrupy consistency. Remove from the heat and allow to cool.

184|

visi.co.za

PHOTOS JAN RAS PRODUCTION MARCUS VILJOEN WORDS AMELIA BROWN

F


V I S I

1

1. WHISKY SOURS In a cocktail shaker, combine the following and shake well: 50 ml (2 x tots) Copper Republic Bourbon Cask Finish* 25 ml lemon juice 20 ml simple (or sugar) syrup 4-5 dashes Angostura Bitters 20 ml cellulose or egg white ice cubes Strain and pour into a tumbler with ice and garnish with a dehydrated slice of lime.

* Distilled from South African maize, this small-batch whisky is matured in freshly charred and aged ex-Bourbon casks, offering a complex depth of flavour, notes of vanilla and a creamy finish. copperrepublic.com 2. MARGARITA In a cocktail shaker, combine the following and shake well: 50 ml (2 x tots) 4th Rabbit* 25 ml fresh lime juice 15 ml agave nectar or syrup 10 ml Cointreau ice cubes Strain and pour into a glass with ice and garnish with slice of lime.

2

/

R E A S O N S

3

* Made with slow-cooked agave plants hand-harvested in the Karoo, there’s a gentle smokiness on the nose mingled with honey on the palate that provides a long, smooth finish. the4thrabbit.com 3. FRENCH MARTINI In a cocktail shaker, combine the following and shake well: 50 ml (2 x tots) Hope on Hopkins Small Batch Vodka* 40 ml pineapple juice 15 ml Crème de cassis ice cubes Strain and pour into a coupe.

* Blended down to bottling strength with Table Mountain spring water, this is a delicately handcrafted pot-stilled and neutral spirit. hopeonhopkins.co.za 4. FRENCH 75 In a cocktail shaker, combine the following and shake well: 50 ml (2 x tots) Geometric Gin* 20 ml lemon juice 20 ml simple syrup

4

5

Pour into the flute, top up with MCC and garnish with a twist of orange zest.

* Described as a post-modern definition of classic Cape dry gin and distilled from neutral (or rectified) grape spirits, it’s an artful marriage of juniper and fynbos. geometricdrinks.co.za 5. JUNGLE BIRD In a cocktail shaker, combine the following and shake well: 50 ml (2 x tots) Copeland Rum* 50 ml (2 x tots) pineapple juice 15 ml lemon juice 10 ml Campari 15 ml simple syrup ice cubes Strain and pour into a tumbler with ice and garnish with a pineapple quill or edible flowers.

* Distilled in small batches from blackstrap molasses, its initial spiciness develops into spun sugar and finishes with dark cacao and roasted pineapple. copelandrum.com

visi.co.za

| 185


V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

Illustrious

Fascinating people, buildings and histories are the subject of this selection of inspiring reads.

2

186 |

visi.co.za

CÉCILE By Kerryn Fischer Cécile & Boyd, R390 As co-founder Boyd Ferguson says, it is fitting that in the year renowned design and retail business Cécile & Boyd celebrates its 30th birthday, there’s a book to celebrate the life of the other half of the duo. Cécile Tilley passed away in 2014 and through insights from those who knew her best and were nurtured and inspired by her, and a wonderful selection of images, the book charts her life from growing up in Mauritius in the 1920s/30s and through her five-decade-long career that included being a restaurant owner, decorator and of course the beginnings and growth of Cécile & Boyd.

3

BETWEEN DREAMS AND REALITIES By Marilyn Martin Print Matters Heritage, R599 Written by its influential former director Marilyn Martin, this meticulously researched book tells the story of the South African National Gallery, from its roots in 1871 when a bequest of 45 paintings and a sum of money led to the start of a public art gallery, right up to 2019. With beautifully shot images of key artworks, installations and individuals, the narrative looks back through significant exhibitions, and the struggles its directors have faced both in overcoming political agendas and securing funding. It’s been a tough battle – this wonderful building’s decaying exterior is testimony to that – but the book also pays homage to the public funding and support, as well as the staff who have kept it going.

4

THE ILLUSTRATOR By Julius Wiedemann and Steven Heller Taschen, $60 Definitely an irony-tinged gift for anyone who thought the digital age would mean the end of illustration, this 600-page tome selects what its editors regard as the top 100 illustrators from around the globe. It’s a compelling snapshot of styles and techniques and includes VISI favourites Diana Ejaita, Jean Jullien, Monica Obaga and South African Christi du Toit. You will not only find highquality reproductions of their works, but also a detailed biography of their background, philosophy and motivations. If you’re a working illustrator, considering it as a career option, or just have an interest in the genre, you’ll find this collection both inspiring and Illuminating.

PHOTOS JAN RAS PRODUCTION MARCUS VILJOEN WORDS STEVE SMITH

1

COLOUR: A VISUAL HISTORY By Alexandra Loske Ilex, R659 Art historian, curator and editor Alexandra Loske has partnered with the UK’s Tate collection of modern and contemporary art to create a book that looks at the fascinating history of how Western colour has been recorded, explored and understood. Using painter’s tools, art, printed ephemera and literature, it charts the journey of colour exploration, expression and discovery using an extraordinary collection of original colour material that includes charts, wheels, artists’ palettes, swatches and rare documentary images. Essentially a review of colour theory, it takes you from the 18th century’s colour revolution (inspired by Newton splitting white light into the rainbow spectrum), through to the current Pantone Colour Standard charts via various influential artists, designers and even psychologists. And if you think it sounds a bit sciencey, don’t be put off. Even if you’re just generally interested in the colour that fills your life and surroundings, you’ll find this fascinating.


V I S I

/

R E A S O N S

WIN A BOOKS HAMPER See p64


V I S I

/

S T O C K I S T S

AGA agaliving.co.za Bella Bathrooms bellabathrooms.co.za Block & Chisel blockandchisel.co.za blu_line blu-line.co.za Bose sound-systems.co.za Cara Saven Wallpaper carasaven.com Casa Leon leonat219.com Cécile and Boyd cecileandboyds.com Chommies chommies.com Cole & Son cole-and-son.com Establishment establishment.co.za Evolution evolutionproduct.co.za Exclusive Books exclusivebooks.co.za Flush Bathrooms flushbathrooms.co.za Gregor Jenkin Studio gregorjenkin.com Hästens hastens.com Hi-Tech Lighting high-techlighting.co.za Home Fabrics homefabrics.co.za Hyraxhotong hyraxhotong.com Inside Interiors insideinteriors.com Ironwood Africa ironwoodafrica.com James Mudge jamesmudge.co.za John G Williams Fine Furniture johngwilliamsfinefurniture.com KAMERS/Makers kamers.co.za Kenneth Cobonpue kennethcobonpue.com Lights By Linea lightsbylinea.co.za

Lisa Swanepoel lisaswanepoel.com LUND Rug Gallery lundruggallery.co.za MaXhosa maxhosa.africa Mo’s Crib moscrib.com MONN monn.co.za MSM Doors and Joinery msmdoors.co.za Neolith neolith.co.za Pedersen + Lennard pedersenlennard.co.za Print Matters Heritage printmatters.co.za Range Rover landrover.co.za RAW Studios rawstudios.co.za Sean Williams Contracts swcontracts.co.za Smeg smeg.co.za Streamlight streamlight.co.za T&Co Fabrics tandco.co.za takk takkfurniture.co.za Taschen taschen.com The Artisan Lighting and Accessory Design the-artisan.co.za Tilespace tilespace.co.za Tirmah Interiors tirmahinteriors.com Tonic Design tonicdesign.co.za True Design truedesign.co.za Urban Fabrics urbanfabrics.co.za Vibia vibia.com Weylandts weylandts.co.za Yourspace Bathrooms yourspacebathrooms.co.za


35% OFF + FREE MASSAGE

THERAPY SYSTEM

SALE

0800 242 343

Celebrating 10 Years in SA

ENJOY BATH TIME AGAIN

VM 01/10/19

The simple solution that is easy to use No need to change your existing bathroom Lowers and raises you at the touch of a button Retracts to allow normal bath use by others Professional installations in less than 2 hours

strength

WILLOWBROOK RECLINERS

FOR A FREE BROCHURE OR HOME DEMONSTRATION

CALL US TODAY: 0800 242 343 www.aqualift.co.za


VISI

SHOPPING DIRECTORY

Cinda Hunter WHEN THERE ARE ELEPHANTS IN THE ROOM...

TO ADVERTISE HERE PLEASE CONTACT Eva Cookson Eva.Cookson@newmediapub.co.za or Diane Lubbe Diane.Lubbe@newmediapub.co.za cindahunter.com ~ furniture, jewellery, textiles

THE STEADFAST STAYS TRUE TO ITS NAME It’s the 1ST choice Boma chair at Many of Africa’s finest lodges including Abu Elephant Camp Botswana www.melvillandmoon.com

Contemporary Planters

|

Bespoke Designs

Visit our new showroom: The Palms Décor & Lifestyle Centre Woodstock Cape Town

plantr.co.za info@plantr.co.za | 084 6777666


�ISI

SHOPPING DIRECTORY

NATURAL MATERIALS We are committed to using naturally replenish-able, and thus sustainable materials. Coconut fiber, natural rubber, wool, cotton, goose down, oak, seaweed, lavender, eucalyptus, horsehair, and cactus fiber all hide unique inherent properties and are used in our recipe for making innovative sleep products. Extra pride is taken when using raw materials sourced locally in Greece.

If what you got is a e m p t y f l at, t h e n a l l you need’s a coco-mat Guided and inspired by mother nature’s wisdom

COCO-MAT 15 On Orange, Gardens C a p e Tow n capetown@coco-mat.co.za www.co co - m at .co m

As a sleep company, our vision is simple and clear: to offer everyone who uses our beds and mattresses a healthy, blissful sleep. However, simply making the world’s best sleep products is not enough for a good night’s sleep. It’s important to have a clear conscience too. That is why our every action aims to a greater cause.

Single Coat Oil-Based Wood Stain

Protects, nourishes and colours wood in one easy application Can be used on all types of uncoated wood for both interior and exterior application Easy to apply in one single coat 1 litre covers up to 50m² Low VOC’s and Global Green Tag Certified Wide colour range with over 70 colours to choose from Good stock levels and quick turn around time Competitively priced quality product backed by great service Proudly made in South Africa

Connect with us

Jax Oleum is incredibly effective, highly durable, it enhances the grain and transforms the look of any natural wood.

+27 11 444 7221

www.jaxoleum.co.za info@jaxoleum.co.za


dea BY CANDLELIGHT

aking a bedtime bath by candlelight is a relaxing, romantic treat, but scrubbing melted wax off surfaces the next morning is no fun. A candle in a screw-top glass jar offers light on demand and the benefit of lid to store it when the water’s cold. n Buy a packet of candlewicks that have flat, round metal discs on one end from your local hardware store. Secure the disc to the middle of the base of a clean, dry cosmetic or small glass jar with a drop of superglue. Tie the other end of the wick to a bamboo sosatie stick that can rest flush on top of the jar to keep the wick straight and centred. n Melt the remains of burnt-down candles – including the last of those half-filled tealights – in an old glass jar in the microwave oven, checking and stirring with a takeaway chopstick regularly.

T

n Remove any old wicks, dirt and debris from the melted wax and pour slowly into the jar or tub without disturbing the new wick. Give the wax time to settle, cool and become solid again before cutting the wick down to the top of the jar. n Screw on the top or use immediately to set the mood.

192 |

visi.co.za

PHOTO MARIJKE WILLEMS PRODUCTION AND WORDS ANNEMARIE MEINTJES

Find a purpose for your empty glass cosmetic jars. Transformed into homemade candles, these tubs are sleek and stylish, nifty to stow away, and contain the melted wax.


www.coralstephens.

Profile for Superprime

Hyyjjhhho  

Hyyjjhhho  

Advertisement