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panda regala design portfolio 2013

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PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013


Panda is a designer and visual artist based in Quezon City, with focus in graphic design, advertising, and publication. They graduated from the University of the Philippines College of Fine Arts with a Bachelor in Fine Arts in Visual Communication, and awarded Best Thesis in Graphic Design for undergraduate batch 2013.

Unit 302 Dona Zenona Bldg 54 Maginhawa St UP Village Quezon City (63) 927 773 6973 // cjdregala@gmail.com

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PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013


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PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013


PANDA REGALA

design portfolio 2013

Undergraduate Thesis Project // 5 Advertising and Campaigns // 10 Publication and Illustration // 17 Identity/Branding // 26


WAYFINDING SYSTEM FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES-DILIMAN Undergraduate Thesis Project (Graphic Design Category)

Wayfinding is a field of information design for manmade spaces and environments that aims not to direct people to where they should go, but instead empowers them to confidently make their own journey-related choices by making the environment and its components accessible. This wayfinding system project for the university aims to develop a visual language and information system that is clear, understandable, and efficient with the aid of colour as both an aesthetic as well as an information organisation element. Elements included in the design of this wayfinding system include: content, visual identity, physical elements, and the supporting print collateral.


CONTENT DEVELOPMENT The content developed for this project consists mainly of a revised map and referencing system. Color is used as a main organisational element. The territory is divided into zones, each assigned with their color and letter. The Academic Oval is the root from which the community grows. The map also features all jeepney stops with their corresponding number, and this system was used to develop a transit map that visually presents the four main jeepney routes in relation to each other and to the geography of the campus. It includes prominent location codes near the numbered jeepney stops. A linear version shows the routes only with the sequence component.

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PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013


University of the Philippines Diliman

PHYSICAL ELEMENTS

19 08

Palma Hall

college of social sciences and philosophy (as)

Institute of Chemistry pavillion 1

Miranda Hall

national science research institute (nsri)

Vidal A. Tan Hall

6 ft

national institute for science and mathematics education development (nismed)

5’3”

Science Complex

1 jeepney 9 0 8route map

Physical/installed elements of the wayfinding system carry all content developed as needed, These include site/building identifiers, rolling directories, jeepney stop markers, pointers, and a main overview directory.

22 21 23 6 13 14

23

21

6 1 2

24

12

8 11

20 18

10

7 6 5

4 8

20

37

16

14 12 18

39 1

15 16 15

5 6 5

7 22

3 2 1 38

25

9

36 17

2 1

1

1 9

2

9 7 3

1 3 4

3

30

43

42

5 6 7

3

3 1 2

8

1 2

7

2

3 ft

6

8 7 6 1

31

5 4 1

35

34

32

10 11 12

1 6

1

8

5

7 40 26 12

8 33 13 14

15 29 9 8 6

41 9 10

46

28 21 19 18

16 45

17 27

9 7 3

18 20 22 21 23 6

22 21 23 6

15 16

1 9

1

3 1

44

6 8 9 1

18 19 21

2 1 3

2 8

48

2 1 1 9

9 7 3

2 1

14 12 15 16

47

14 12

18 20

8 7 6 5

2 1

8

8 7 6 5

2 1 3

2

3 1

6 8 9

2 1

1 8 6 7

10 11 12 7

18 19 21

8

12 1

3 1 6

5 6 7

2 1 3

2 1 6

15 16

4 8 12 14

18 20

8

1

7 2 3 1

22 21 23 6

5 7 6

2 1 2

3 2 1

12 14

3 1 1 9

7 5 6 5

18 20

10 5 4 1 8

9 7 3

10 9

38 1 12

1 2 3

15 14 13

1.5 ft

17 16

Academic Buildings Facilities and Services Abelardo Hall (College of Music)

J-2

Mechanical Engineering Dept (Engg)

H-8

Advanced Science and Technology Institute Bldg (ASTI)

C-28

DMST Complex and Barracks

J-5

Albert Hall (Archaeology) Alonso Hall (Home Economics Complex)

EEE Department (Engg) Energy Research and Development Center

C-9 K-14

K-6

Engineering Library 2 / Computer Science Bldg (Alumni Engineers Centennial Bldg)

C-19

K-10

German Yia Hall

H-3

Athlete’s Quarters Bartlett Hall (College of Fine Arts)

I-11 A-12

Benitez Hall (College of Education)

E-1

Benton Hall (Center for International Studies)

D-7

Bocobo Hall (UP Law Center/Law Library) Bonifacio Hall (School of Labor and Industrial Relations) (SOLAIR) Center for Women’s Studies Center for Appraisal Studies (Institute of Philippine Real Estate Appraisers) (IPREA) Chemical Engineering Bldg

G-2 K-3

Gonzales Hall (Main Library / School of Library and Information Studies)

D-1

E-9

Institute of Biology Main Bldg Institute of Chemistry (Pavillion 1)

D-10 D-4

J-6

Institute of Chemistry Bldg

C-15

H-11

Institute of Environmental Science and Meteorology (IESM) Bldg

C-20

B-11

Institute of Mathematics Building

C-17

E-8

Kalinga Daycare

G-7

H-7

Lorena Barros Hall

E-3

E-11 K-8

Institute of Physics (Pavillion 2)

D-5

Malcolm Hall (College of Law)

G-1

Marine Science Institute (MSI)

C-8

C-1

Melchor Hall College of Engineering

H-1

B-6

Miranda Hall (Natural Science Research Institute) (NSRI)

C-7

College of Architecture BLDG 2

B-7

College of Arts and Letters (CAL)

C-4 F-1 E-12

College of Science Administration*

C-10

C-5 A-4 E-5 E-4

Claro M. Recto Hall Faculty Center

College of Business Administration (BA)

Science Teacher Training Center Seaweed Chemistry Building (MBB) UP Integrated Grade School (UPIS K-6) UP Integrated High School (UPIS K-12) UP Integrated Primary School (UPIS K-2)

College of Architecture BLDG 1

College of Home Economics Gusali 2

F-3 F-2 G-3 K-1

D-6

B-12

MMMEngg Bldg*

B-9

Vanguard Bldg Vidal A. Tan Hall (National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development) (NISMED) / UP ITDC Villadolid Hall (Archaeological Studies Program) Virata Hall (Institute for Small Scale Industries) (ISSI) Ylanan Hall (UP Gymnasium / College of Human Kinetics) (CHK)

J-4 C-6 A-3 K-2 K-7

Administrative Buildings

B-10 I-5

H-6

Office of Campus Architect (Coral Bldg)

A-5

K-4

Office of the University Registrar (OUR) Office of Admissions (OAdm)

B-3

National Engineering Center (NEC) National Institute of Geological Sciences (NIGS)

H-2 C-21

Office of the Vice Chancellor for Community Affairs / Community Affairs Building (CMO/ Housing/BCO/OCR)

C-18

National Institute of MBB

C-14

Quezon Hall (Administration)

B-1

J-7

National Institute of Physics

C-16

Quezon Hall Ampitheatre

B-2

C-11

Palma Hall (College of Social Sciences and Philosophy) (CSSP)

Computation Science Research Center

H-5 E-7

I-2 K-6 D-9

University Health Service (UHS) (Infirmary)

G-6 I-6

University Hostel UP Consumer’s Cooperative Grocery

H-20

G-5

UP Police Force Headquarters / Fire Dept

B-5

A-20

UP Press/University Press

B-4

Computer Center Dance Studio

H-5 J-3

A-13

UP Veterinary Hospital

I-7

UPAA Recreation Hall

A-18

Commission on Higher Education

K-5

Commission on Human Rights

B-15

INP Headquarters National Computer Center

A-17

National Hydraulic Center

K-18 A-16

PHIVOLCS Building

Delaney Hall(Catholic Parish Office)

G-4

UP-Ayala Techno Hub

K-13

Philippine Association of University Women Annex Bldg (PAUW)

F-10

Development Bank of the Philippines

A-22

UP-Ayala Technology park (Technology Business Incubator)

C-27

Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) Philippine Nuclear Research Institute

K-15

Diliman Interactive Learning Center DZUP Parish of the Holy Sacrifice

H-4 A-6

A-23 H-23

Post Office Procurement Service

Vargas Museum Park

C-2

Wet Market

A-21

F-8

Petron Gas Station (Philcoa) Philippine National Bank

H-18 H-10

Shell Gas Station (Commonwealth)

K-12

Shopping Center

H-21 F-6 H-9

Tennis Court 2

H-19

Track-and-field Oval and Grandstand

I-10

University Arcade Canteen

F-6

University Book Center (Vinzons Hall)

E-2

K-9 K-14 K-11

SEAMEO Innotech

K-17

Sewerage Treatment Plant Bahay ng Alumni

I-8

Balay Kalinaw

F-9

Bulwagan ng Dangal

D-2

Dalisay Aldaba Recital Hall GT-Toyota Asian Center Auditorium

I-4 F-4

E-13

PAGASA Astronomical Observatory

H-17

Area 1

G-8

C-12

Area 2

H-25

F-12

UP Film Center / Film Institute (Cine Adarna)

I-3

Villamor Hall (University Theatre)

I-1

H-24

Area 3

C-26

Hardin ng Bougainvilla Cluster Housing

A-11

Hardin ng Dona Aurora Walk UP Housing Hardin ng Rosas Walk UP Housing

C-25

Kapitbalay ng Kalinaw

F-11 F-13

Pook Dagohoy Acacia Residence Hall

H-22

Kamagong Residence Hall

A-9

G-9

Pook Palaris

Centennial Dorm

A-10

Kamia Residence Hall

D-12

Pook Ricarte

F-15

Ilang-ilang Residence Hall

F-7

Molave Residence Hall

H-12

UP Bliss (San Vicente)

A-19

Supply and Property Management Office (SPMO Diliman)

A-2

Sampaguita Residence Hall

D-11

Palma Hall Annex

D-8

UP Pampanga Extension Office

I-9

Ipil Residence Hall

H-13

Sanggumay Residence Hall

H-15

Village A

A-8

PAUW Daycare/playground

B-8

Vinzon’s Hall (Office of Student Affairs)

E-2

Kalayaan Residence Hall

H-16

Yakal Residence Hall

H-14

Village B

A-7

D-3

International Center

F-5

5’3”

K-5

State Auditing and Accounting Building

UP Provident Fund

Residential Areas

C-3

National Science Complex Ampitheatre University Hotel

Lim Museum

6 ft

A-15

Philippine National Red Cross Building (Pnrc) Philippine Social Science Center PNOC Energy Companies

Function Areas

Dormitories

A-14

College of Science Library and Administration Hall (CSLab)

Computer Center

Archery Range CASAA Food Center Church of the Risen Lord Citimall (Philcoa)

Swimming Pool

C-24 K-16

Executive House

National Center for Transportation Studies National College of Public Administration and Governance (NCPAG)

College of Social Work and Community Development Complex

CSSP Faculty Building

Andres Bonifacio Centennial Hall (Carillon Tower)

Tennis Court 1 Balay Chanselor Campus Landscaping Office

Fonacier Hall (Alumni Center)

Government and Nongovernment Agencies

J-1

C-13

ICEngg Bldg

C-22

Child Development Center

School of Economics School of Statistics School of Urban and Regional Planning (SURP)

Institute of Biology (Pavillion 3)

CHE Craft and Design Laboratory (CDL)

CHK Covered Court (New Gym)

Plaridel Hall (College of Mass Communication) (CMC) Romulo Hall (Asian Center and Institute of Islamic Studies)

Institute of Biology

CHE Home Management House Chemical Engineering Laboratory

Design manuals have been created for all physical elements.

A-1 E-10

Archery Range Asian Institute of Tourism

B-14

UP Bliss (Sikatuna)

19 08 4 ft

1.5 ft

MAIN DIRECTORY POINTERS

5’3”

3.5 ft

Palma Hall college of social sciences and philosophy (cssp) third world studies center

3 ft

University of the Philippines directory map

C

Academic Buildings

19 08

Abelardo Hall (College of Music)

J-2

Mechanical Engineering Dept (Engg)

H-8

Advanced Science and Technology Institute Bldg (ASTI)

C-28

DMST Complex and Barracks

J-5

Albert Hall (Archaeology) Alonso Hall (Home Economics Complex) Archery Range Asian Institute of Tourism

23 18 17

7

14

15

22

20

23 24

6

25

1

21

17

2 1

1 9

2

4

42

5 6 7

3 42

18 20

8 7 6 5

8

4 8 12 14

3 2 1

12 14

3 1 1 9

18 20

7 5 6 5 10 5 4 1 8 9 7 3

10 9

38 1 12

1 2 3

PAUW Daycare/ Playground)

15 14 13

17 16

15

D-6 C-13 D-10 D-4 C-15

Institute of Mathematics Building Institute of Physics (Pavillion 2) Kalinga Daycare

C-20 C-17 D-5 G-7

Lorena Barros Hall

E-3

Malcolm Hall (College of Law)

G-1

Marine Science Institute (MSI) Melchor Hall College of Engineering Miranda Hall (Natural Science Research Institute) (NSRI)

UP Integrated High School (UPIS K-12) UP Integrated Primary School (UPIS K-2) Vanguard Bldg Vidal A. Tan Hall (National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development) (NISMED) / UP ITDC Villadolid Hall (Archaeological Studies Program) Virata Hall (Institute for Small Scale Industries) (ISSI) Ylanan Hall (UP Gymnasium / College of Human Kinetics) (CHK)

E-4 E-9 J-4 C-6 A-3 K-2 K-7

Administrative Buildings

C-8 H-1

Balay Chanselor Campus Landscaping Office

C-7

Executive House

C-24 K-16 B-10

MMMEngg Bldg*

B-9

Fonacier Hall (Alumni Center)

I-5

National Center for Transportation Studies

H-6

Office of Campus Architect (Coral Bldg)

A-5

K-4

Office of the University Registrar (OUR) Office of Admissions (OAdm)

National College of Public Administration and Governance (NCPAG) National Engineering Center (NEC) National Institute of Geological Sciences (NIGS) National Institute of MBB

H-2 C-21 C-14

Office of the Vice Chancellor for Community Affairs / Community Affairs Building (CMO/ Housing/BCO/OCR) Quezon Hall (Administration)

B-3 A-14 B-1

J-7

National Institute of Physics

C-16

Quezon Hall Ampitheatre

B-2

C-11

Palma Hall (College of Social Sciences and Philosophy) (CSSP)

D-3

Supply and Property Management Office (SPMO Diliman)

A-2

Computer Center

46

Institute of Biology (Pavillion 3) Institute of Biology Institute of Biology Main Bldg Institute of Chemistry (Pavillion 1) Institute of Chemistry Bldg Institute of Environmental Science and Meteorology (IESM) Bldg

B-11

H-7

E-12 C-10 C-18

College of Social Work and Community Development Complex Computation Science Research Center

CSSP Faculty Building

45

H-5 E-7

Palma Hall Annex PAUW Daycare/playground

D-8 B-8

UP Pampanga Extension Office Vinzon’s Hall (Office of Student Affairs)

5’3”

I-9 E-2

Andres Bonifacio Centennial Hall (Carillon Tower) Archery Range

44

CASAA Food Center Church of the Risen Lord Citimall (Philcoa)

K-6 D-9 G-5 A-20 H-5 J-3

Diliman Interactive Learning Center

G-4 A-22 H-4 A-6

Parish of the Holy Sacrifice

F-8

Petron Gas Station (Philcoa)

A-23

Philippine National Bank Post Office

VELASQUEZ

I-2

Computer Center Dance Studio

DZUP

Procurement Service Shell Gas Station (Commonwealth)

H-23 H-18 H-10 K-12

Shopping Center

H-21

Swimming Pool

F-6

Tennis Court 1 Tennis Court 2

IESM Bldg

Government and Nongovernment Agencies

Facilities and Services

16 17

21

Institute of Biology Main Bldg

Sampaguita Residence Hall Kamia Residence Hall

Marine Science Institute

Track-and-field Oval and Grandstand

H-9 H-19 I-10

University Arcade Canteen

F-6

University Book Center (Vinzons Hall)

E-2

University Health Service (UHS) (Infirmary) University Hostel UP Consumer’s Cooperative Grocery UP Police Force Headquarters / Fire Dept UP Press/University Press

G-6 I-6 H-20 B-5 B-4

Commission on Higher Education Commission on Human Rights INP Headquarters National Computer Center

A-13

National Hydraulic Center

K-18

I-7

PHIVOLCS Building

A-16

UP-Ayala Techno Hub UP-Ayala Technology park (Technology Business Incubator)

K-13 C-27

Vargas Museum Park

C-2

Wet Market

A-21

Philippine Association of University Women Annex Bldg (PAUW) Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) Philippine Nuclear Research Institute Philippine National Red Cross Building (Pnrc)

GT-Toyota Asian Center Auditorium Lim Museum National Science Complex Ampitheatre University Hotel

F-4

29

SCIENCE COMPLEX

Acacia Residence Hall*

College of Science Library

State Auditing and Accounting Building

E-13 H-17

I-3 I-1

Residential Areas Area 1 Area 2

H-24 C-26

Hardin ng Rosas Walk UP Housing

Kamagong Residence Hall

A-9

Centennial Dorm

A-10

Kamia Residence Hall

D-12

F-7

Molave Residence Hall

H-12

Sampaguita Residence Hall

D-11

Ipil Residence Hall

H-13

Sanggumay Residence Hall

H-15

Kalayaan Residence Hall

H-16

F-5

Yakal Residence Hall

H-14

G-8 H-25

Area 3 Hardin ng Bougainvilla Cluster Housing

Kapitbalay ng Kalinaw H-22

K-11 K-17 K-5

PAGASA Astronomical Observatory UP Provident Fund

C-3 C-12 F-12

UP Film Center / Film Institute (Cine Adarna) Villamor Hall (University Theatre)

Ilang-ilang Residence Hall International Center

F-10 K-15

K-9 K-14

SEAMEO Innotech I-8 F-9 D-2 I-4

A-15

Philippine Social Science Center PNOC Energy Companies

Sewerage Treatment Plant Bahay ng Alumni Balay Kalinaw Bulwagan ng Dangal Dalisay Aldaba Recital Hall

Hardin ng Dona Aurora Walk UP Housing

EEE Dept (Engineering)

A-18 K-5 B-15 A-17

UP Veterinary Hospital UPAA Recreation Hall

Function Areas

Dormitories OS

2 1 6

2 1

15 16 18 20

8

1

7 2 3 1

2 1 3

2 8

22 21 23 6

14

K-3 J-6

K-8 C-1 B-6 B-7 C-4

F-2 G-3 K-1 C-5 A-4 E-5

H-11

E-8 C-22

F-1

College of Home Economics Gusali 2 College of Science Administration*

J-1 F-3

School of Economics School of Statistics School of Urban and Regional Planning (SURP) Science Teacher Training Center Seaweed Chemistry Building (MBB)

E-11

College of Architecture BLDG 1

College of Arts and Letters (CAL) College of Business Administration (BA)

Plaridel Hall (College of Mass Communication) (CMC) Romulo Hall (Asian Center and Institute of Islamic Studies)

UP Integrated Grade School (UPIS K-6)

Chemical Engineering Laboratory

College of Science Library and Administration Hall (CSLab)

10

Delaney Hall(Catholic Parish Office)

Miranda Hall

Science Teacher Training Center

SANT

5 6 7

9 7 3

3 1

5 7 6 2 1 3

2

12 1

3 1 6

1

2 1

4 9

Development Bank of the Philippines

QUIRINO

31

Vidal A. Tan Hall (nismed)

42 Office of the University Registrar (OUR) Office of Admissions (OAdm)

S

7

6 8 9

1 9 1 8 6 7

10 11 12

QUIRINO

KALAW

1

DELO

18 19 21

18 19 21

2 1

14 12 15 16

22 21 23 6 6 8 9

13

18

48

PAV3 (Bio)

T.

2 1 1 9

8

47

PAV2 (Physics)

PAV1 (Chem)

30

College of Arts and Letters (CAL)

15 16

5

13

28

19

10 27

Claro M. Recto (Faculty Center)

Lim Museum

UP Police and Fire Dept

22 21 23 6

8

C-9 K-14 C-19 H-3 D-1 B-12

29

16 45

44

14 12

18 20

8 7 6 5

2 1

1

34

9

9 41 Palma Hall (CSSP/AS)

4 Vargas Museum Park

46

17

2 1 3

2 8

6

7

11

EEE Department (Engg) Energy Research and Development Center Engineering Library 2 / Computer Science Bldg (Alumni Engineers Centennial Bldg) German Yia Hall Gonzales Hall (Main Library / School of Library and Information Studies) ICEngg Bldg

Child Development Center CHK Covered Court (New Gym)

2

College of Architecture BLDG 2

35

8 10

32

12

6

33

11

ROXAS

15 29 9 8 6 28 21 19 18

48

9 7 3 3 1

CHE Home Management House

1

6

7

30

5

43

7

2

5 4 1

35

34

8 33 13 14

3

47

D-7 G-2

CHE Craft and Design Laboratory (CDL)

2

5

9

4

7 31 5 6

6

8 7 6 1 32

10 11 12

1 6 43

41 9 10

3

5

4

E-1

Benton Hall (Center for International Studies)

Chemical Engineering Bldg

9

Claro M. Recto Hall Faculty Center

2

3

1

2 3

1

8

5

7 31

30

1

1 2

7

9 7 3

1 3 3

40 26 12

3 1 2

Bocobo Hall (UP Law Center/Law Library) Bonifacio Hall (School of Labor and Industrial Relations) (SOLAIR) Center for Women’s Studies

1

1

4

3 40

9

8

I-11 A-12

Center for Appraisal Studies (Institute of Philippine Real Estate Appraisers) (IPREA)

3

2 1

17

7

7 6 5

12 36

18

A-1 E-10 K-6 K-10

Athlete’s Quarters Bartlett Hall (College of Fine Arts) Benitez Hall (College of Education)

10

5

8

36

9

8

10

16

14 12

1

6

16

10

3 2

2

2

11

26

37

27

7

22

16 14

12 11

1

18

8

11

15

8

4 2

6

12

39

1

8

12

20 18

4 8

20

ROCES

6 1 2 39

37

6 1

1

23 24

5

19

21

7

1

38

2

25

22 21 23 6 13 14

15 16 15

5 6 5

7 22

3 2 1 38

9

7

5

6

3

jeepney route map

21

13 20

Pook Dagohoy

A-11 C-25 F-11 F-13

Pook Palaris

G-9

Pook Ricarte

F-15

UP Bliss (San Vicente) UP Bliss (Sikatuna)

6.5 ft

A-19 B-14

Village A

A-8

Village B

A-7

5 ft 7 ft

ROLLING DIRECTORY

7|

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013

SITE IDENTIFICATION


8| PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013 Lending services, information and bibliographic services, reader’s advisory services, reference and referrals, library

E-5

UP Integrated Primary School (UPIS K-2)

UP Integrated High School (UPIS K-12) E-9

Vanguard Bldg J-4

Vidal A. Tan Hall (National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development) (NISMED) / UP ITDC

E-4

C-6

H-3 Villadolid Hall (Archaeological Studies Program)

Gonzales Hall (Main Library / School of Library and Information Studies) D-1 Virata Hall (Institute for Small Scale Industries) (ISSI) K-2

ICEngg Bldg* B-12 Ylanan Hall (UP Gymnasium / College of Human Kinetics) (CHK) K-7

Shell Gas Station (Commonwealth)

A-3

Dormitories

K-12

Archery Range K-6 Shopping Center H-21

CASAA Food Center D-9 Swimming Pool F-6

Church of the Risen Lord G-5 Tennis Court 1 H-9

Citimall (Philcoa) A-20 Tennis Court 2 H-19

Post Office H-18 UPAA Recreation Hall I-7

Procurement Service H-10 UP-Ayala Techno Hub K-13

Area 1

Area 2

Ipil Residence Hall H-13 Sanggumay Residence Hall H-15 Village A

Kalayaan Residence Hall H-16 Yakal Residence Hall H-14 Village B

22

Area 3 38

Acacia Residence Hall* H-22 Kamagong Residence Hall A-9 Pook Palaris

Centennial Dorm A-10 Kamia Residence Hall D-12 Pook Ricarte

Ilang-ilang Residence Hall F-7 Molave Residence Hall H-12 26 12 UP Bliss (San Vicente)

International Center F-5 Sampaguita Residence Hall D-11 UP Bliss (Sikatuna)

Facilities and Services

Vargas Museum Park

JEEPNEY STOP SHEDA-16

B-8

Plaridel Hall (College of Mass Communication) (CMC) J-1 Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) Philippine Nuclear Research Institute K-15

Romulo Hall (Asian Center and Institute of Islamic Studies) F-3 Philippine National Red Cross Building (Pnrc) A-15

School of Economics F-2

School of Statistics G-3

Philippine Social Science Center K-9

PNOC Energy Companies K-14

SEAMEO Innotech K-11

Sewerage Treatment Plant

jeepney route map H-17

State Auditing and Accounting Building K-5

PAGASA Astronomical Observatory

K-17

E-13

7 23

3 Bougainvilla 2 1 Hardin ng Cluster Housing

24

6 1 2 21

Pook Dagohoy

20

5 6 5

UP-Ayala Technology park (Technology Business Incubator) 27

G-8

H-25

25 2

Hardin ng 1 Rosas Walk UP Housing

Hardin ng Dona Aurora Walk UP 39 Housing 1 C-25

Kapitbalay ng Kalinaw

18

F-11

40

1

3

43

5 6 A-7 7

A-8

47

Wet Market

Computer Center H-5 Track-and-field Oval and Grandstand I-10

Dance Studio J-3 University Arcade Canteen F-6 Bahay ng Alumni I-8

Delaney Hall(Catholic Parish Office) G-4 University Book Center (Vinzons Hall) E-2 Balay Kalinaw F-9

Development Bank of the Philippines G-6 Bulwagan ng Dangal D-2

Diliman Interactive Learning Center H-4 University Hostel I-6 Dalisay Aldaba Recital Hall I-4

DZUP A-6 UP Consumer’s Cooperative Grocery H-20

Parish of the Holy Sacrifice F-8 UP Police Force Headquarters / Fire Dept B-5

Petron Gas Station (Philcoa)

A-22

A-23

University Health Service (UHS) (Infirmary)

UP Press/University Press B-4

Philippine National Bank H-23 UP Veterinary Hospital A-13

GT-Toyota Asian Center Auditorium F-4

Lim Museum C-3

National Science Complex Ampitheatre C-12

University Hotel F-12

UP Film Center / Film Institute (Cine Adarna) I-3

Villamor Hall (University Theatre) I-1

Quezon City CirCle

jeepney route map

UP Provident Fund

13 14

Residential Areas 37

15 16 15

H-24

2 1 A-11

C-26

F-13

F-15

A-19

B-14

30

4

41 9 10

C-2

12

22 21 23 6

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20 18

IKOT

TOKI

katipunan

17

1 9

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3 92 1 38 7 3

22

G-9

42

1 6

31

7 25 1 5

10 11 12

32

82 7 6 1

3 29 9 8 6

40 26 12

C-27 48

Function Areas

8 3 1

7 6 5 22 21 23 6

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24

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35

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27

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philcoa, pantranco, sm north, mrt

13 14

4 8

20

18 17

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37

1 9

33 13 14

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46

15 43 42

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47

2 1 7 6 5

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8

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30 7 6 7 5 31

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A-21

18 19 21

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48

10

14 katipunan 12

8 18 20

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22 21 23 6

32 5 7 6 8

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36

25

1

63 35

15 16

8 2

23 6

2234

33 13 14 18 20

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46

12 14

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12 14

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10 5 4 1 8

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19 18 e. JaCinto

K-18

n

38 1 2 3

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14 13

2 1 3

2 1 1 18 19 21 6 8 9

6 8 9

2 1 18 19 21 1 6

6 23

4 2

22

university ave

16

11

8 philcoa, pantranco, sm north, mrt

7 10 11 12 1 8 6 7

3 8

12 1

5 6 7 2 3 1

24

25 1 2

14 12 26

s teaCher’s village moog JaCinto

11

7 6 5

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10

10 9

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38

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40

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22

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A

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41

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15 16

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27

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10

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39

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ri no 30

10

moog velasQuez

Cruz na ligas 23

C

21 23

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14

8 14

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15 13

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18

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821

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magsaysay

3

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32

10 7 6

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33

F. m. guerrero

19

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13 20 e. agonCillo

25

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3

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A-17

ar

e. delos reyes

PEOPLE-ONLY PASSABLE

5

7

CAMPUS MAP

UP Integrated Grade School (UPIS K-6)

PHIVOLCS Building

20

H G 7 8 12

9

2 1 36

D 2

F

E

12

14 46

sCienCe ComPlex

44

F

10

3

sunken garden 7

1

2

10 3

12 16

University of the Philippines Diliman Diliman, Quezon City 1101, Philippines www.upd.edu.ph

PAUW Daycare/playground

Philippine Association of University Women F-10 JEEPNEY STOP (NO SHED) Annex Bldg (PAUW)

23

m ve sa

Over a hundred years of Service to the Filipino

A-4

B-15 BOUNDARIES (NON-PASSABLE)

12

on 8

moog ylanan

As a repository of decades of student records, the OUR is both a source and resource of data that can be used for various researches. In order to improve the systems of acquiring, recording, storing, and retrieving information, full computerization of records, admission, registration, and other procedures are in order.

K-1

C-5

Seaweed Chemistry Building (MBB)

C-24

Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Development The OVCRD formulates policies and guidelines on research and development; provides assistance in the generation of resources needed to support R&D thrusts; coordinates with offices, agencies and institutions in the regular dissemination of information to the UP Diliman research community; and assists UP Diliman personnel in the protection,licensing, patenting and/or copyrighting of their work, as well as marketing of their publications. The OVCRD also has a reward and incentive system for publication, including commercial applications arising from R&D activities

D-8

K-5

(d

19 08

Palma Hall Annex

A

o e av Co

The Academic Oval (Roxas, Osmena, going around the Sunken Garden) follows one way traffic (counter-clockwise from Quezon Hall/Oblation). There is also a bike lane along the innermost lane of the Academic Oval.

National Hydraulic Center

PhilCoa

m h lt ar

Office of the University Registrar The Office of the University Registrar is a vital arm of the University. It is the official recorder and keeper of records of the students. As official recorder, it serves as Secretariat in different administration committees, such as the Executive Committee, the Curriculum Committee, the Committee on Student Progress, Admission and Graduation, and in the University Council meetings, and also acts as steering committee of the University Council Committees.

National Computer Center

D-3

FIELDS

m ea m

Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Administration The OVCA administers the university’s physical, financial and human resources. Under it are the Human Resources Development Office (HRDO), Accounting Office, Budget Office, Cash Office, Supply and Property Management Office, and the PABX and Utilities Monitoring Team

C-16

Palma Hall (College of Social Sciences and Philosophy) (CSSP)

11

For visitors without UP I.D, take the entrance through Philcoa into University Avenue.

National Institute of Physics

B-6

Co

nw no

9

Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Community Affairs The OVCCA attends to UPDiliman’s community concerns, including management of employee and faculty housing, coordinating business concessions on campus, supervising security and safety, and maintaining campus facilities

C-1

College of Architecture BLDG 1

15

The only entrances to the campus is through the gates (Moog Jacinto and Moog Velasquez along C.P. Garcia, Moog Magsaysay along Katipunan, and Moog Ylanan along Commonwealth) and only for those with UP I.D.

Claro M. Recto Hall Faculty Center

13

VISITOR GUIDELINES

INP Headquarters

A-18

uP teChnohub

10

Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs The OVCAA is in charge of development and implementation of quality and responsive programs, systems and mechanisms in curricular, instructional, research and extension work that ensure the attainment of the University of the Philippines Diliman’s goals and objectives

C-14

K

Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Student Affairs The OVCSA is tasked to attend to several nonacademic needs of students such as counseling, discipline, scholarships, food service, housing, tutorials/learning centers, student/graduate assistantships, loans, organizations and visa requirements for international students

National Institute of MBB

16

Office of the Chancellor The Office of the Chancellor is the excutive office of UP Diliman. It supervises campus operations through the related offices of the Vice Chancellors.

K-8

14

Administrative Offices

School of Urban and Regional Planning (SURP)

Science Teacher Training Center

Legend Government and Nongovernment Agencies PARKING LOTS

928-2558 (Telefax; 925-2930, 925-3544; 981-8500(T) loc.3928

CHK Covered Court (New Gym)

GATEWAYS

17

981-8500(T) loc. 3002, 3003

Commission on Higher Education

Commission on Human Rights

The NEC is the fulfillment of what members of the University of the Philippines-College of Engineering (UP-COE) faculty envisioned in the early 1970s. A center fully dedicated to the provision of research, consultancy and continuing education services in the engineering and allied fields.

H-2

C-21

National Engineering Center (NEC)

K-4

18

920-5802/ 920-5996/ 9207556

National Engineering Center (NEC)

National Institute of Geological Sciences (NIGS)

The University of the Philippines Press is the official publishing house for all the constituent units of the University of the Philippines System. Its primary function is to publish and disseminate scientific, scholarly, and creative works that represent distinct contributions to knowledge in various academic disciplines.

H-7

E-11

UP Press

Chemical Engineering Laboratory

Child Development Center

9818500(T) loc.113, 4001 to 4010 928-36-15

H-6

E-2

This is the venue for gala performance and concerts by local and international artist, as well as by UP’s own talent.

B-9

National Center for Transportation Studies

National College of Public Administration and Governance (NCPAG)

I-9

The University Theater

MMMEngg Bldg*

UP Pampanga Extension Office

Vinzon’s Hall (Office of Student Affairs)

981-8500(T) loc.2116, 2117

C-7

The purpose of the center is to stimulate writers from all parts of the country to create and contribute to national cultural development. Another purpose is to assert the leadership of the University in Creative Writing and, at the same time, to recognize the assistance of the University to the national government in the formulation of policies and programs related to the development of national culture , particularly to Creative Writing.

A-2

campus map

A-14

UP Institute of Creative Writing (ICW)

B-2

Supply and Property Management Office (SPMO Diliman)

H-1

University of the Philippines diliman, quezon city

981-8500(T) loc.4227 4226

B-1

Quezon Hall Ampitheatre

C-8

The UP Diliman Police (UPDP) is tasked with maintaining campus security. their station is located in front of the College of Architecture

Quezon Hall (Administration)

G-1

Marine Science Institute (MSI)

UP Diliman Police

Institute of Physics (Pavillion 2)

9818500(T) loc. 2020 up to 2023

G-7

E-3

Malcolm Hall (College of Law)

K-3

Provides high speed computer services for the use of the University faculty, administration and students in academic research, administration and instruction.

A-12

University Computer Center

Kalinga Daycare

Lorena Barros Hall

G-2

Bonifacio Hall (School of Labor and Industrial Relations) (SOLAIR)

981-8500(T) loc.4583 ,4584, 92447-47

E-1

D-7

Bocobo Hall (UP Law Center/Law Library)

Aims to encourage and strenghten teaching, research, extension and advocacy for women in the University. It also provides crisis counseling and legal services.

Bartlett Hall (College of Fine Arts)

University Center for Women’s Studies (UCWS)

B-3

929-5664; 929-0495 loc. 201 & 211

Office of the University Registrar (OUR) Office of Admissions (OAdm)

C-17

The purpose of the center is to develop and spread the use of Filipino language as the medium of instruction in education.

Conducts training and researches in the field of transportation and traffic planning, management and engineering.

A-5

C-20

Institute of Mathematics Building

Sentro ng Wikang Filipino (SWF)

National Center for Transportation Studies (NCTS)

I-5

Philcoa, Pantranco, SM north EDSA, Ikot, Toki, Katipunan jeepneys operate inside the campus and follows specific routes which enable them to pass by most of the academic buildings and to some extent the housing areas for the convenience of the University constituency.

Fonacier Hall (Alumni Center)

Offers postal and telegraphic services

K-16

B-10

D-4

UP Post Office

Campus Landscaping Office

Executive House

Institute of Chemistry (Pavillion 1)

424-3633

Benitez Hall (College of Education)

Benton Hall (Center for International Studies)

Miranda Hall (Natural Science Research Institute) (NSRI)

Balay Chanselor

PNB (921-82-72/ 92189-10 Loc.5874) Landbank (9283020)

C-13

D-10

Transportation

PNB, Land bank and Veterans Bank- offers services such as savings, deposits, time deposit, checking account, demand drafts telegraphic transfers and ATM.

Banking Facilities

Institute of Biology*

Institute of Biology Main Bldg

981-8500(T) loc.2442

I-2

The Training Center for Applied Geodesy and Photogrammetry was established in 1964 and continues to be a center of excellence for education, training and research in the fields of surveying and mapping in the Philippines.

Andres Bonifacio Centennial Hall (Carillon Tower)

The center remains committed itself to the pursuit of intellectual competence in political economy, development issues, and the advocacy of genuine alternatives.

German Yia Hall

Training Center for Applied Geodesy & Photogrammetry (TCAGP)

C-19

Third World Studies Center (TWSC)

K-14

Includes the cooperative store and various commercial establishments. The UP shopping center provides basic needs for students, faculties and employees such as fastfood, computer shops, RTWs, tailoring, barber shop, hair saloon, typing jobs, bookbinding, photocopy, a bayad center and western union.

C-9

University Shopping Center (SC)

D-5

Office of the Vice Chancellor for Community Affairs / Community Affairs Building (CMO/ Housing/BCO/OCR)

Melchor Hall College of Engineering

981-8500(T) loc.3909, 3910 http://www.dilnet. upd.edu.ph/~ismed

Energy Research and Development Center

Engineering Library 2 / Computer Science Bldg (Alumni Engineers Centennial Bldg)

Engaged in research, curriculum development, teacher training, science and mathematics education, extension work to the education community and training laboratories. The facilities include a library, teaching laboratories, micro teaching room, astronomical observatory, video studio and control room, a workshop for prototype development, printing and photograhic equipment.

J-5

EEE Department (Engg)

National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development (NISMED)

Office of Campus Architect (Coral Bldg)

Institute of Environmental Science and Meteorology (IESM) Bldg*

I-11

19 08

981-8500 Loc.4407

DMST Complex and Barracks

Eight(8) lanes of duckpin bowling and Six(6) billard tables housed in the UPAA Recreation Hall

E-7

H-8

Olympic size pool with shower and locker facilities, adjacent to the University Arcade.

CSSP Faculty Building

Mechanical Engineering Dept (Engg)

Billiard and Bowling Facilities

H-5

Swimming Pool

C-11

Computer Center

D-6

928-39-14 Loc. 4427

J-7

Computation Science Research Center

It is primarily a technical and service organization. Emphasizes practical and specific solutions to problems encountered by local government. It is also involved in basic research and formal course offerings on local government

C-18

College of Social Work and Community Development Complex

Local Government Center (LGC)

C-10

Located behind the University Library. Softball, baseball, soccer and frisbee games can be held here. This is also the venue for the UP Fair held in February during the UP Diliman month

E-12

College of Science Administration*

Sunken garden

College of Science Library and Administration Hall (CSLab)

9818500(T) loc.4351 4352, 4353

F-1

College of Home Economics Gusali 2

Performs the research and extension functions of the Law Complex (which includes the College of Law) and is composed of the following institutes: Institute of Government and Law Reform, Institute of Human Rights, Institute of Judicial Administration, Institute of International Legal Studies and Office of the National Administrative Register.

College of Business Administration (BA)

UP Law Center

B-7

C-4

Institute of Biology (Pavillion 3)

981-8500 loc.4128

College of Architecture BLDG 2

College of Arts and Letters (CAL)

It has two basketball courts, two dance areas, four volleyball and nine badminton courts. It also has facilities for table tennis, weight lifting, judo-karate-wrestling and dressing rooms and lockers.

C-22

University gymnasium

E-8

CHE Home Management House

CONTACT PERSON: Jeng Borillo 929-6033

B-11

CHE Craft and Design Laboratory (CDL)

Located beside the Engineering building & also near the shopping mall. Fees are charged by ball pickers for services rendered.

ChemEngg Bldg*

Located behind the Bahay ng Alumni and the Alumni Center where track races, relays and football games can be held.

H-11

Tennis Courts

J-6

Center for Appraisal Studies (Institute of Philippine Real Estate Appraisers) (IPREA)

981-8500(T) loc.4269, 4268

981-8500(T) loc. 4021, 4022;4023, 926-3640

Center for Women’s Studies

UCIDS encourages interdisciplinary and integrative studies of critical issues bearing on development policies. It also provides needed support for research into new and challenging areas within disciplines that deserves priority. The Center’s secondary function is to conduct training, workshops, seminars, conferences and colloquia related to its primary functions.

Vargas Museum houses the collection of art, stamps and coins, library, personal papers and memorabilia of to Mr. Jorge B. Vargas which he bequeathed to the University in March 1, 1978.

C-15

K-10

Athlete’s Quarters

E-10

University Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UCIDS)

UP Vargas Museum

Institute of Chemistry Bldg

Asian Institute of Tourism

K-6

Track and Field Oval

928-3608, 981-8500(T) loc. 2701, 2702, 2704, 2709

Alonso Hall (Home Economics Complex)

A 50-bed primary hospital which offers Preventive-Promotive Health Care (e.g annual medical examinations, family planning srevices), Curative Health Care (In-patient and Out-patients services), Medical and Ancillary Services (e.g pharmacy, radiology and electrocardiography)

981-8500(T) loc. 4286, 4289; 9263640

Archery Range

University Archives & Records Depository is also in the main library. It is the official archival agency of UP.

Film Institute is located on Magsaysay Ave. It has four sections undertaking different functions: Film Archives, Cineamanthque, Research and Information; Production and Training; and Management Services. The UP film Institute houses the Cine Adarna and the Ishamael Bernal Gallery

UP Film Institute

A-1

University Health Service (UHS)

http://www.mainlib. upd.edu.ph/

Albert Hall (Archaeology)

networking and resources sharing. Also offers Filipiniana books, serials and special collections.

C-28

katiPunan road

The brochure includes the map and director y and the jeepney route maps (front), and visitor information (back).

loans, microfilming, computerized book 1 9 0tours, 8 inter-library cataloging, media services, exhibits, research & publications,

The print support comes in the form of a brochure-type map (similar to tourist city guides).

J-2

Advanced Science and Technology Institute Bldg (ASTI)

a

UP Diliman University Library

Brochure map Abelardo Hall (College of Music)

rCi C.P. ga

University of the Philippines visitor information

Academic Buildings

University of the Philippines Diliman directory map Administrative Buildings 24 8 9

11

7

10 14

13

5 moog magsaysay

15

9

2 4

balara distriCt

8

9 4

29

E 13 15

11

17

C.P. garCia

45

27 28

C

13 48

22 24

16 TOKI

1

26

B

Legend PARKING LOTS

17

FIELDS

GATEWAYS

BOUNDARIES (NON-PASSABLE)

PEOPLE-ONLY PASSABLE

JEEPNEY STOP SHED

JEEPNEY STOP (NO SHED)

19 08

1 12 10 9

16 17


The content and the physical elements, together with the visual identity, make up a wayfinding system that addresses the wayfinding process from beginning to end, with considerations specific to the University of the PhilippinesDiliman and its academic community.

9|

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013


advertising and campaigns

10 |

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013


SEVEN SAMURAI Integrated campaign for a movie launch (2012) Objectives Recreate original movie poster, identify the target audience, and create an integrated campaign for a (re) launch of chosen movie including the communication plan and all necessary collaterals and mockups Idea To present Seven Samurai as more than an old action movie by reevaluating societal norms through creation of avenues that present provoking questions and discussions about the present Philippine society (eg. rich/poor, hero/victim) Executions - Website (discussion boards)

Revised poster and teasers, website (jointherevolution.com) and forum/online exhibit, ambient advertising, special release collector’s DVD

Executions - Website (online exhibit)

THE FLAG

The samurai at the end have lost four of their seven, yet there are no complaints, because that is the samurai’s lot. The villagers do not much want the samurai around once the bandits are gone, because armed men are a threat to order. That is the nature of society.

Previous

CHAPTER 271

Next

Original packaging concept by Andrey Koodenko & Ilya Lovtsov

11 |

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013


Materials - giveaway shirts

Materials - ambient

MAG-usap tayo (“lET’S TALK”)

Materials - giveaway stickers

Advocacy campaign for Filipino, the National Language (2012. mini-thesis) Objectives Identify the target audience, its problems, and create an integrated campaign for an advocacy including the communication plan and all necessary collaterals and mockups

Materials - stickers

Materials - giveaway shirts

Idea Initiate a dialogue between the youth and the national language as an opportunity not only for its use but for its rediscovery Materials - stickers Materials - ambient

Campaign logo, ambient advertising (“conversations”), giveaway shirts, stickers (guerilla)

12 |

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013

Materials - ambient


Mag-usap tayo FORUMS

MAG-usap tayo (“lET’S TALK”) Advocacy campaign for Filipino, the National Language (2012. mini-thesis)

Bumalik sa Home Page

Init ngayon, no?

Kumusta ka na?

Buhayin natin ang Filipino. www.magusaptayo.com.ph Mapapaunlad lamang ang Filipino kung gagamitin natin ‘to.

www.magusaptayo.com.ph

Objectives Identify the target audience, its problems, and create an integrated campaign for an advocacy including the communication plan and all necessary collaterals and mockups Idea Initiate a dialogue between the youth and the national language as an opportunity not only for its use but for its rediscovery

Teasers (“conversation starters”), website/HQ/forum, campaign posters (“Filipino facts”), editorial support layout

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013

Password FORUM

Topics Posts Last Post

LOGIN

NEWS AT UPDATES

Gawa mo ngayon?

• • •

Mapapaunlad lamang ang Filipino kung gagamitin natin ‘to.

Kids join fight vs climate change People urged to do something nice for teachers on Tuesday Poetry

Latest Threads • • •

Materials - editorial

Mapapaunlad lamang ang Filipino kung gagamitin natin ‘to.

www.magusaptayo.com.ph www.magusaptayo.com.ph

C. JEAN REGALA

47-D Maalalahanin St Teacher’s Vill East Quezon City 1101 PH (63) 927 773 6973 cjdregala@yahoo.com

C. JEAN REGALA

47-D Maalalahanin St Teacher’s Vill East Quezon City 1101 PH (63) 927 773 6973 cjdregala@yahoo.com

Filipino Fact #1:

Filipino Fact #2:

Filipino Fact #3:

Hindi “Tagalog” ang Pambansang Wika ng Pilipinas kundi “Filipino”.

Wika ang daluyan ng ating kultura.

Lahat ng Pilipino ay nakakaintindi ng pasalitang Filipino.

Kilalanin pa natin ang wika ng ating bansa.

Kilalanin pa natin ang wika ng ating bansa.

Kilalanin pa natin ang wika ng ating bansa.

www.magusaptayo.com.ph

www.magusaptayo.com.ph

www.magusaptayo.com.ph

C. JEAN REGALA

13 |

Username C. JEAN REGALA

47-D Maalalahanin St Teacher’s Vill East Quezon City 1101 PH (63) 927 773 6973 cjdregala@yahoo.com

47-D Maalalahanin St Teacher’s Vill East Quezon City 1101 PH (63) 927 773 6973 cjdregala@yahoo.com

C. JEAN REGALA

47-D Maalalahanin St Teacher’s Vill East Quezon City 1101 PH (63) 927 773 6973 cjdregala@yahoo.com

C. JEAN REGALA

47-D Maalalahanin St Teacher’s Vill East Quezon City 1101 PH (63) 927 773 6973 cjdregala@yahoo.com

Adi quuntium, si dolenim olenimo luptatatem aut que vollaut ad qui num quiaerciaspe excepera velenis dis ma Porporestios eum volorumqui nusdae. Nequo cone

Latest Threads • • •

Adi quuntium, si dolenim olenimo luptatatem aut que vollaut ad qui num quiaerciaspe excepera velenis dis ma Porporestios eum volorumqui nusdae. Nequo cone


“hataw na” for HONDA TMX

Malakas

Matibay

Matipid

Maaasahan

HATAW NA!

Revision of the existing campaign for Honda TMX (2011) Objectives Assess the market position of assigned brand/product, realign the brand to the target audience, and (re)design all necessary collaterals (including TVC and campaign gantt chart)

HATAW NA!

Humataw sa pasada kasama ang Honda

Humataw sa pasada kasama ang Honda

Malakas

Matibay

Matipid

Maaasahan

HATAW NA!

Customer Care Hotline PLDT 1-800-10-HONDAPH-4663274 DIGITEL 1-800-3-HONDAPH-4663274 customerservice@hondaph.com

direct selling support flyer - FRONT

TMX155

New sticker design

High-capacity fuel tank

Hataw sa features!

Double front suspension hub and fender

SPECIFICATIONS Engine Type

155.3 cc 58.5 mm x 57.8 mm

Starter Ignition System

Spectrolite Blue Metallic

Heavy-duty stainless muffler

Also available in:

Idea “Hataw na” is a familiar catchphrase for the target audience, which is then reappropriated to embody a more vibrant image and identity for the motorcycle brand targeted to tricycle drivers

Sub-frame for easy sidecar attachment

Durable double rear shock (optional for tricycle use)

Candy Ruby Red

Powerful 155cc motor

Black

Suspension (Front) Suspension (Rear)

Primary Kick

Telescopic Fork Twin 1,915mm x 735mm x 1,032mm

Wheelbase Dimensions

1,201 mm

Dry Weight

108.3 Kg

Seat Height

743 mm

Ground Clearance

150 mm

Fuel Tank Capacity Fuel Maximum Horse Power Maximum Torque

bunting 2

bunting 1 Giveaway shirt

AC-CDI (Capacitor Discharge Ignition)

Over-all Dimensions (LxWxH)

Engine Oil Capacity

Sige lang... Humataw na!

4 - Stroke OHV Air Cooled

Displacement Bore & Stroke

9.0 Liters (Reserved 2.0 Liters) Unleaded Gasoline 1 Liter 9.29 (12.6) @ 8,000 rpm 12.1 @ 6,500 rpm

Front

Back

direct selling support flyer - BACK

Sige lang sige! BAGONG TAON PROMOTION Main poster and flyer (front and back) for merchandising, buntings, giveaway shirt, and promotional event streamer

Nov 14-Dec 30, 2011

TMX155

HATAW NA!

Available in: Spectrolite Blue Metallic, Candy Ruby Red and Black

Customer Care Hotline PLDT 1-800-10-HONDAPH-4663274 DIGITEL 1-800-3-HONDAPH-4663274 customerservice@hondaph.com

Bumisita na sa pinakamalapit na Honda Motors dealer! sales promotion support banner

14 |

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013

product poster


Open programme, front/inside (upper left), furoshiki info + manual inside; underside/back (left), info about goodplanet and Home inside

PERFORATED LINE

PERFORATED LINE

FUROSHIKI

29 October 2011

The age-old “green bag”: a fashionable revival

Marriott Hotel Manila Newport City Complex Pasay City Philippines

Furoshiki is a type of wrapping cloth that was traditionally used to carry clothes, gifts, or other goods. Although only just a very recent trend, the revival of the furoshiki’ is being promoted as a means of protecting the environment. Originating from Japanese culture where it promotes caring for the environment and reducing waste; Furoshiki is the eco-friendly wrapping cloth. Using techniques similar to origami, it can be used for gift wrapping, grocery shopping, décor, or even an outfit accent. Why furoshiki? It is reusable and multipurpose. Each year billions of plastic bags end up as litter; reusable bags, such as furoshiki can help reduce the impact to our environment. Its versatility allows you to wrap almost anything regardless of its shape or size - with its stylishness as a plus. A number of new and innovative uses of furoshiki have been proposed on top of ancient, conventional techniques, and it is now becoming more and more versatile.

FOLDLINE GoodPlanet is a foundation that was created in 2005 to raise public awareness of environmental protection and to bring concrete solutions to the Earth’s ecological crisis. The foundation is chaired by Yann Arthus-Bertrand. Our objective Since 1990 Yann Arthus-Bertrand has flown over one hundred countries around the world. Extraordinary aerial views of nature and descriptive texts invite all of us to reflect upon the our planet’s evolution and its inhabitants’ future.

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013 Sample pattern swatches for adapted furoshiki wrap

FOLDLINE

Folded programme cover detached from giveaway setup, clasping flaps removed

In just 50 years mankind has modified Planet Earth’s environment faster than in the whole history of humanity! As Earth’s ecosystem worsens, nature is expressing its violent anger: fresh water, oceans, forests, air, climate, and arable land are all diminishing drastically.

15 |

Mock-up of packaging setup (standard wrap furoshiki + label/programme)

Stage design and event logo, event poster/ invitation to contest, giveaway shirts, giveaway furoshiki packaging and editorial support

LEFT: All presentor and sponsor logos to be displayed in a photowall on ballroom foyer. Height: 10ft, arbitrary length

We live a decisive moment - right now! A worldwide governmental policy must establish without delay norms which will make it possible “to meet present needs without compromising the needs of future generations”. We are personally responsible for the future of our Earth, and each of us has a role to play; we are all able – have the duty - to take action. Here’s where we start.

HOME Through visually-stunning footage from over fifty countries, all shot from an aerial perspective, Yann Arthus-Bertrand shows us a view most of us have never seen. He shares with us his sense of awe about our planet and his concern for its health. With this film, Arthus-Bertrand hopes to provide a stepping-stone to further the call to action to take care of our HOME. The stakes are high for us and our children. Everyone should take part in the effort, and HOME has been conceived to take a message of mobilization out to every human being. HOME is a non-profit film. Watch it for free online: homethemovie.org HOME has been made for you: share it! And act for the planet.

FOLDLINE

FOLDLINE

FOR MORE FUROSHIKI FUN, GO TO

FUROSHIKI.COM/TECHNIQUES

Idea “HOMEBOUND: Fashion and Art for the Earth” is a contest that culminates in a fashion event, integrating environmental awareness with fashion in order to target influencers while opening a positive dimension for the topic. The giveaway product uses furoshiki, a Japanese wrapping technique, that doubles as an editorial support.

GIVEAWAY PACKAGING

TOP: Proposed stage design. White/light gray backdrop setup with lighted panels; event title to be lighted from inside. Stage to be supplemented with a ramp for exhibition of contest entries.

Mock-up of packaging setup (standard wrap furoshiki + label/programme)

PERFORATED LINE

PERFORATED LINE

Sample pattern swatches for adapted furoshiki wrap Gold stamp mockup (dark grey shirt)

www.goodplanet.org for registration and more info, go to 29 October 2011 at Marriott Hotel, Resorts World Manila

Exhibition and awarding for the Top 20

Objectives Identify and select a target audience, create an activation event/campaign and develop and layout the plan, and design all necessary collaterals (including a giveaway packaging design)

Entries will be judged by the countrys top fashion designers

using only ecofriendly materials Deadline of entries 15 October 2011

Gold stamp mockup (white shirt)

of Home in all parts of the Philippines GIVEAWAY PACKAGING

inspired by the many different manifestations

The challenge

Conceive and design a look

fashion design students in the philippines

CALLING all junior and senior Women’s shirt design (placement)

An activation for goodplanet.com’s new documentary, “Home” (2011) PRESENTS

GOODPLANET+HOME


alum x Promotional and merchandising design for Gilette “Alum X”, a deodorant brand for men (2011)

Targets and neutralises body odor at the source

Targets and neutralises body odor at the source

Reactive Technology absorbs odor and releases scent

Reactive Technology absorbs odor and releases scent

Stays on skin, not on shirt

Stays on skin, not on shirt

16hr protection

16hr protection

Targets and neutralises body odor at the source Reactive Technology absorbs odor and releases scent

Objectives Create a brand image and design merchandising for the brand based on an assessment of the target market

Stays on skin, not on shirt 16hr protection

Idea “Corporate Bond” is the 007 of the real world - stylish and sleek and always ready for action!

X

Be e ceptional For more information, visit

www.gillette.com

X

Be e ceptional For more information, visit

www.gillette.com

Main frame Background Product die-cut

X

Be e ceptional Backdrop board (front view)

The 3 separate parts of the main backdrop are made of thick board, to be adhered together as shown to create illusion of 3D

Parts, measurement and setup

2’

Main poster for promotion and merchandising (three designs), and the kiosk design for merchandising

X

Be e ceptional

Main backdrop board (2’x4’)

4’

Base (2’x2’), to be fixed to floor with temporary mounting adhesive

For more information, visit

www.gillette.com

16 |

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013

Mock-up

Triangular supports

All boards and backside of main backdrop are to be SOLID BLACK. Optional: affix A3/A4 promotional support posters at the back or main backdrop board.

1”


publication and illustration

17 |

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013


IDENTITY Photography folio and publication design (2011) Objectives Choose a theme for the portfolio, produce illustrations, and design a printed publication Idea Identity explores each memeber as both artist and subject as they interact with each other and with an external element (water) through a series of photographs and collaborative writeups

18 |

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013


DISTILL: VISIONS IN FOCUS DISTILL

CAMPAIGNS

VISIONS IN FOCUS

Catalogue for the UP College of Fine Arts Undergraduate Thesis Exhibit (2013) Objective Given the one-page illustration from each exhibitor and their corresponding writeups, create a simple indexed catalogue for the exhibit based on its identity

IN/VISIBLE: A CAMPAIGN ON THE ROLE OF PARTICIPATORY PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE LIVES OF THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED

MARIA CARMELA D. BALITAAN melaibalitaan.tumblr.com mcdbalitaan@gmail.com

contents

We are distilled. We have been refined by experience and training down to our individual core as creatives. Together, we have been filtered from and above all the rest.

Campaigns Graphic Design Hypermedia Illustration Moving Images Publication Industrial Design

7 49 61 77 89 111 135

INDEX OF EXHIBITORS Acknowledgements

180 182

The concept of combining photography and visual impairment may be vague but it has become a constant subject of research aimed at discovering new possibilities for certain groups in society to communicate their views and current situations. One example of this workshop uses a method called participatory photography where a photographer and a researcher allow their subjects to document their own lives by teaching them to produce their own photographs. The IN/VISIBLE campaign applied the said method to a basic photography workshop with visually impaired participants from Resources for the Blind, Inc., which was conducted by the researcher of this thesis herself. Materials such as braille calling cards, brochures, information catalogue and a website were then created to promote both participatory photography method and the capabilities of the visually impaired in generating their own photographs.

12 | DISTILL: Visions in Focus

index of exhibitors

ALMAZAN, Maria Victoria. “Maria Manaliksik: An alternative public school instructional material on women’s history for fifth graders” (Publication) 112-113 ALMONTE, Jose Mari. “Human-powered Cargo-carrying Vehicles for Rural Farming Communities in Mountainous Regions of Southwestern Luzon (Reg. IV-A)” (Industrial Design)136-137 APOSTOL, Carla Marie. “An Advertising Campaign for Underwood Craft Brews Ginger Beer” (Campaigns) 8-9 AREJOLA, Giusseppe Gabriel. “ÜSENS: UltraSonicEnhanced Navigation System for the visually impaired” (Industrial Design) 138-139

Cover, spreads (category marker, contents, exhibitor spread, index), back cover

ARZADON, Juan Carlos. “A Convenient System of Providing Internet-based Video Instructional Materials as Educational Supplement for Children with Autism” (Hypermedia) 62-63 BABARAN, Joseph Hansel. “Human-powered Transportation System for Students in the University of the Philippines Diliman” (Industrial Design) 140-141 BACARRO, Rekkel Gelica. “Informative Campaign on Basic Food Safety Focusing on Food Handling for Filipinos in the Domestic Scene” (Campaigns) 10-11 BALITAAN, Maria Carmela. “IN/VISIBLE: A Campaign on the Role of Participatory Photography in the Lives of the Visually Impaired” (Campaigns) 12-13 BANSALE, Cherrie Lyn. “SIBOL: Strengthening the Cultural Value of Respect Towards The Elderly” (Moving Images) 90-91 BARAYUGA, Kyla Jeska. “REINVENTING SOUVENIR SHIRTS: Exploration of Materials Designing Interactive Souvenir Shirts for Island Souvenirs showcasing Iconic Philippine Eco-Tourism Destinations” (Campaigns) 14-15

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013

BRIGINO, Marie Antoinette. “BITBIT-ARALAN: Mobile Classroom Para sa mga Katutubo” (Industrial Design) 144-145 BUGAYONG, Amado. “Basura Project: A Visual Campaign to Develop Positive Attitude and Behavior on Proper Waste Disposal and Recycling” (Campaigns) 16-17 CABATIT, Jamie. “Spicing up McCormick: Applying Cross-Modal Associations Between Taste and Vision in the Rebranding of McCormick’s Image and Packaging Design” (Campaigns) 18-19 CANAY, Isias Domingo Emmanuel. “Signs of Change: An Artist’s Book Utilizing the Diaristic Approach in Revealing Local Sign Lettering in Quezon City and Manila – Its Value and Decline as a Skill and Craft” (Publication) 114-115 CANLAS, Lance Leland. “Sharing the Four Spiritual Laws by Utilizing Illustrations” (Illustration) 80-81

DE LEON, Fatima Merced. “SHELF-LIFE EXTENDER (SLE): A solar-assisted cooling system for perishable food source” (Industrial Design) 148-149

HWANG, Yoo Jin. “Wearable Device that alert surround sounds to the Deaf and the Hearing Impaired People” (Industrial Design) 154-155

DEDEL, Samantha Nicola. “RELIVE INTRAMUROS: An Advertising Campaign for the Local Tourists of Intramuros” (Campaigns) 26-27

IGNACIO, Anna Cristina. “ROUND GROUNDS: A 5-Piece Wellness Kit Made From Used Ground Coffee Beans” (Industrial Design) 156-157

DEL CASTILLO, Francesca Adrienne. “STRESS MANAGEMENT: effectively manage stress through changing cognition” (Campaigns) 30-31

JACINTO, Razil Rj. “Time Mashin: An EraserHeads Promotional Campaign Using Nostalgic Novelty Item” (Graphic Design) 52-53

DELA PEÑA, Giselle Joyce Nadine. “Patlang: Isang taon ng pagsipat sa nawala at napunan” (Publication) 120-121

JAVIER, Christine Joan. “Use of Illustrations as a Way to Promote Awareness and Raise Interest of Filipino Youth on the Sulod Epic Hinilawod: Humadapnon sa Tarangban” (Illustration) 82-83

DIMAANO, Marie Angelique. “Gender Stereotypes Between Men And Women” (Moving Images) 96-97 EVANGELISTA, Kevin Paulo. “ILLICIT: A video miniseries on the dangers of Drug use” (Moving Images) 98-99

CARINGAL, Sarah. “ANINO: A Shadow Art Pop-up Book” (Publication) 116-117

FLORES, Isabelle. “Ano Daw? Ano Yun? Si Aka at ang Basag na Bangang Baybayin: A Children’s Book on Baybayin Basics for 9- to 12-Year-Old Children” (Publication) 122-123

CASACLANG, Franz Oliver. “PHILIPPINE MAPP: An infographic map of the Philippines App” (Hypermedia) 66-67

GAGALAC, Manny. “Cooperation is the Best Option in Coastal and Fisheries Management” (Campaigns) 32-33

CEMBRANO, Leah Michelle. “Don’t Start: A smoking prevention campaign”(Campaigns) 20-21

GALISIM, Giselle. “Exploring the Gestalt laws of perceptual organisation in magazine design to promote awareness towards the skills of PWD wheelchair basketball athletes” (Publication) 124-125

COROTAN, Isaac Joseph. “FITNESS FURNITURE: transforming home furniture into exercise equipment for small interiors” (Industrial Design) 146-147 CORTINA, Myra Denise. “PWeDe: An Advocacy Campaign for the Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities” (Campaigns) 22-23 CRUZ, Mary Anne Cecilia. “Tagem no Tegat ta Bedek” (Moving Images) 94-95

GARCIA, Leanza Mae. “LUNTIAN: Educational Toy for Introducing Environmental Education and Instilling Behavior that is Helpful to the Environment for Preschoolers” (Industrial Design) 150-151 GARIBAY, Gwen Nina. “Cellphone Box” (Campaigns) 34-35

BARCELON, Oliver Paulo. “Tuwaang at ang Dilag ng Kalangitan ng Buhong” (Illustration) 78-79

CUBILLAS, Zandro. “GOODNIGHT, OWL! A Shadow popup book” (Publication) 118-119

BAUTISTA, Alessandro Felix. “Adjustable head gear made of alternative materials for the motorcycle riders in the Philippines” (Industrial Design) 142-143

GRAJO, Ananias. “THE SCENT TRAIL: The use of visual semantics of perfumes in information design to influence fragrance choice in men in view of individuality versus trendy stereotypes” (Graphic Design) 50-51

DAVID, Jessica. “ISANG PINAY: An Advocacy Campaign Showcasing Filipina Beauty” (Campaigns) 24-25

GUINGONA, Kara Marie. “BAHAY KUBO: The Vegetable Story” (Moving Images) 100-101

DE GUZMAN, Raisa Anne. “Ngalan ni Juan: A campaign promoting genealogy as a tool for the development of national identity” (Campaigns) 28-29

GUPALOR, Paolo Miguel. “Kinetic Powered Ultraviolet Floodwater Purifying System for Stranded Flood Victims” (Industrial Design) 152-153

BERNARDINO, Jeremy. “Moving Images in Relating the Bible to Modern Filipino Children to Promote Biblereading” (Moving Images) 92-93

19 |

BLANCO, Andrei Lean Karlo. “NSOLL INTERACTIVE: Built for Seniors” (Hypermedia) 64-65

MENDOZA, Lance. “Informing Teens about the Detrimental Effects of Teenage Pregnancy” (Campaigns) 38-39 MIGUEL, Lelbert Daine. “GREEN CART: Human-powered Electric Assisted Cost-Effective Garbage Collecting Equipment for the Waste Treatment in Residential Areas of the University of the Philippines Diliman” (Industrial Design) 164-165 MORGIA, John. “Torch: A Solar Powered Warning Indicator For Street Lighting Fixtures in Flood Prone Areas” (Industrial Design) 166-167 PAGUYO, Guennesse Aina Marie. “KARIBI: Baby Carrier for Better Public Transit Experience of Families Who Do Not Own Cars” (Industrial Design) 168-169

LAÑOJAN, Lyn Joey. “COCO STRAP: Safety Gear for Coconut Climbers” (Industrial Design) 158-159

PECHO, Raymund Sigfreid. “Thumbs Up: An Ad Campaign on Down Syndrome” (Campaigns) 40-41

LAPEÑA, Jessica Francesca Maria. “A Diagrammatic Hand-Sewing Sourcebook for the Enhanced Instruction and Learning of Beginning Sewers” (Publication) 126-127

PERNIA, John Paul. “Agos: An Outdoor Shower System That Collects, Filters And Stores Rainwater for Maia, A Sustainable Eco Village In Bacungan, Puerto Princesa, Palawan” (Industrial Design) 170-171

LAZO, Veronica Louise. “HIVE: organic design for playground equipment” (Industrial Design) 160-161 LIMA, Albert. “Use of Visual Mnemonics in Teaching History to Grade Five Elementary Students” (Illustration) 84-85 LOPEZ, Roselle. “Pamana: A short film on promoting cultural consciousness among the youth” (Moving Images) 102-103 MACARANAS, Julie Antoinette. “Encouraging Children to Read” (Illustration) 86-87 MACEDA, Amaya Lara. “Krayola at Kloset ; a docudrama on emotional setback and stroke” (Moving Images) 104-105

POBLETE, Frances Catherine. “The Chess Club: A multidirectional webcomic” (Hypermedia) 68-69 REGALA, Panda. “Colour and Wayfinding: Designing a Revival for the University of the Philippines Diliman” (Graphic Design) 54-55 REYES, Charisse Marie. “Patient Carrier Device for Brgy. Bagong Silang, Los Baños, Laguna” (Industrial Design) 172-173 RICAFORT, Godofredo. “YOUTH INVESTMENT” (Campaigns) 42-43

MAGAT, Rafael Romeo. “HYPOTHETICS: A Graphic Anthology” (Publication) 128-129

RIOS, Marianne Antoinette. “HULMA: kampanya ng kamalayan ng kabataan sa mga T’boli ng Timog Cotabato sa larangan ng brass casting” (Campaigns) 44-45

MAGNO, Pacifico Andreo “The Journey North: Through the Eyes of Kalinga Tradition “ (Moving Images) 106-107

ROCENA, Ma. Veronica “Dozepod: Modular Sleeping Pod System for Airport Travelers” (Industrial Design) 174-175

MALLARE, Patricia Ann. “Greener Fast Food Packaging in the Philippines” (Industrial Design) 162-163

SALVADOR, Nathaniel. “REAP Plant Furniture System: The Use of Plants as Outdoor Furniture “(Industrial Design) 176-177

MANUEL, Aira Veronica. “Ako Romantiko: A Campaign On The Promotion Of Filipino Romance Pocketbooks” (Campaigns) 36-37

SANTOS, Andre Alexis. “Utilising colour-coding and movement cues as means to improve wayfinding systems around Makati Central Business District” (Graphic Design) 56-57

SENA, Oddin. “Palengkeng Gubat: Wayfinding with Environmental Graphic Design for the Streets of Divisoria” (Graphic Design) 58-59 SOLOMON, Anne Therese. “Creating a Social Stories™ Visual Instructional Manual for Incoming and Beginning Filipino Teachers of Children with Autism”(Publication) 130-131 SUNGA, Denise Nicole. “Matamata: Weaving Contemporary Viewpoints on Itneg Culture & Traditions through Textile Design” (Hypermedia) 70-71 TANTUICO, Natalya Bernice Regina. “Illustrating Alternate Endings Through the Use of Sequential Art As A Tool for Behavioural Therapy for Filipino Adolescents with ADD” (Publication) 132-133 URSUA, Maika Anthoni. “Diego’s Quest: A learning material for 5 years old and above children with dyslexia” (Hypermedia) 72-73

DISTILL: VISIONS IN FOCUS 2013 undergraduate thesis exhibition

VICENTE, Janel Aubrey. “WHERE’S THE FISH? A 2D instructional flash game that will provide significant information about the tropical reef fishes” (Hypermedia) 74-75 VILLANUEVA, Viscount. “Alternative Personal Protective Helmet with Gas Mask Augmentation for Firemen and Enthusiasts” (Industrial Design) 178-179 VILLAVICENCIO, Maria Carmelli. “Ako Ang Solusyon: Using campaign and ambient media to spark behavioral change to the informal settlers of Paco” (Campaigns) 46-47 WEE, Jessica Clarice. “Sayaw ng Bituin at Buhay: A Short Film Narrative on Philippine Ethnoastronomy” (Moving Images) 108-109

Department of Visual Communication College of Fine Arts University of the Philippines, Diliman


TIMELINE2011-2012

SCALING NEW HEIGHTs PBSP Accomplishment Report for 2012 (2013)

SCALING NEW HEIGHTS

16

a shelter for the unwell

17

learning and getting better

18

innovative active case finding in the community a joint effort for a common concern

Sustaining TB Control and Ensuring Access to Comprehensive Quality TB Care Project

27 28

ntrl conducts nationwide lab mapping

the second drug resistance survey nearing completion Astride with the world

ACComPliShmEnT REPoRT 2012

map of operations

29

keeping things in check

33

34

38

clinical trial for new anti-mdr-tb drug advances financial statement 2011

53

39

in Barangay laug, mexico, Pampanga, a group of volunteers comb through the barangay every weekend in search of possible TB cases. All 17 volunteers walk tirelessly against the elements in pursuit of this objective, educating the people along the way about the dreaded health hazard.

Soon, TRiDev will be launching a complementary program called “Patrol, USap, Aksyon” (PUSA). it involves the formation of cured TB patient groups who can readily share their TB ordeal and success stories with the public in order to boost the CATS’ advocacy and communication missions.

Accomplishment Report 2012 | 23

22 | SCALING NEW HEIGHTS

NCR

Dr. Jose n. Rodriguez medical hospital (TAlA) (Caloocan City)+ PTSi Tayuman (manila)+ San lazaro hospital (manila)*+ Kabalikat Sa Kalusugan (KASAKA) (Quezon City) lung Center of the Philippines (lCP) (Quezon City)+ Dr. lagrosa health Center (Pasay City) Gat Andres Bonifacio medical Center (manila) Tondo Forshore health Center (manila) lacson health Center (manila) Batasan hills Super health Center (Quezon City) moonwalk health Center (Paranaque City) Puericulture Grace Park (Caloocan City) UP-Phil. General hospital (manila)

NEW PMDT Treatment Centers

Cover, spreads and infographics, back cover

A Lab on the Move in mindanao, a different organization brings the concept of community TB care to a new level by bringing the testing phase of TB case finding closer to the people, particularly those residing in far-flung areas. The muslim Youth Religion organization (mYRo) has recently brought active case finding and sputum collection and smearing to the most remote barangay in their area — once seen as an impossible task by TB service providers. Conducting their first Sputum Caravan activity in november 2012, the group went to work in barangay Tubak, Ampatuan, maguindanao, which houses about 400 families and is reported to have a high prevalence of TB cases. The community is only accessible through a steep unpaved road in what is mainly a mountainous region.

All in all, the caravan was able to collect 46 individual samples in the three days that it stayed in the barangay. The samples were subsequently brought to the RhU of the municipality for analysis. Those that yielded positive results were referred to DoTS facilities for treatment. having started their operations only recently (late 2012), the leaders of both TRiDev and mYRo admit that their respective endeavors are still in the early stages. much of last year was spent on organizing and capacitybuilding activities, leaving only a small window within which to assess the initial impact of the programs. nevertheless, there is a shared optimism given the initial results observed (increased case detection in the covered sites) and all the positive feedback they have been receiving from various stakeholders. it won’t be long, they believe, before the fight against TB turns a new leaf and the threat of the disease becomes significantly less in the face of more innovative countermeasures. ●

REGION 2

REGION 3

[ChD 3] Center for health Development (San Fernando, Pampanga)

REGION 4A

[ChR 4A] Batangas Regional hospital De la Salle health Sciences institute Cainta municipal health Center De la Salle health Sciences institute (Dasmarinas City)

REGION 4B

[ChD 4B] ospital ng Palawan

REGION 5

Sorsogon medical mission Group hospital and health Services Cooperative+ Bicol medical Center [ChD 5] Center for health Development (legaspi City, Albay)

REGION 11

Southern Philippines medical Center Davao Regional hospital [ChD 11] Southern Philippines medical Center (Davao) Davao Regional hospital (Tagum City)

Foundation. in his case, the training given was on the production of ornate box containers.

For Susan, 37 years old, and Roger, 24, (not their real names) life these days is all about taking in the good along with whatever unfortunate circumstance life decides to throw their way. it is a lesson highlighted by their shared experience as beneficiaries of De la Salle University health Sciences institute’s (DlSU-hSi) pioneering livelihood program.

While the program is still in its initial stages, Roger is already helping new patients learn the craft to ensure continuity. he knows that soon enough, he will also have to leave the halfway house and the next batch of residents

Fortunately, it was around the same time that DlSU-hSi launched its pilot livelihood program, which gave its patients training on the production of beaded earrings and bracelets. Today, she is able to produce the beaded accessories on her own and sell them to various bazaars in imus, Cavite, for a small profit.

20 |

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013

• international Union Against TB and lung Disease (iUATlD) Conference in malaysia

Roger, meanwhile, is still a resident of the halfway house. Unlike Susan, his experience lies with the second installment of the livelihood program under the tutelage of the Villar

Accomplishment Report 2012 | 21

TRAININGS conducted

Training on Community-based TB management Program

Community TB Care (CTBC)

mEDiCAl SUPPlY

AnCillARY DRUGS

Trng-Workshop on Advocacy, Communication and Soc mob for CBos

Practice on TB Education Campaign Training of Project management Team

Php 7,022,748.00

Training on organizational Development level 1 (Formation) among Task Force members

ToTAl

Vicente Sotto memorial medical Center (Cebu)

Training on Basic leadership for CBos

Training on TB Education and Counseling and interpersonal Communication

Php 16,528,780.16

REGION 7

organizational Development Training for CBos

Training on Counseling and interpersonal Communication Skills

Php 5,840,677.60

Training of Trainers on PmDT for ChD Staff

Programmatic management of Drug Resistant TB (PmDT)

Training of Treatment Site Physicians and nurses Training of Treatment Site Community health Workers Basic Course for Referring Public Physicians

Dr. Jose Rizal memorial hospital (Zamboanga)

Philippine Coalition Against Tuberculosis (PhilCAT)

REGION 10

Summary of

Health Procurement

Accomplishment Report 2012 | 35

40 | SCALING NEW HEIGHTS

© 2012 Philippine Business for Social Progress

360 384 16 13

3,328

25,503

40

260 260 340 191

1,091

70

70

TB Team Basic DoTS Training (Public hospitals) TB Team Basic DoTS Training (Private hospitals) DoTS Training for Public hospital Care Workers

251 173

1,224 1,550

3,374

12 3

mGiT Training

6

lPA Training GeneXpert Training Workshop on Equipment and Facility maintenance QA Training for nurse Coordinators QA Training for nTP Controllers (nTRl)

Bureau of international health Cooperation - Department of health (information management Service)

120

240

176

Culture Training

Bureau of international health Cooperation - Department of health (national TB Reference laboratory)

760

360

PCC orientation of hospital DoTS initiative (Regional)

DoTS Training for Private hospital Care Workers

REGION 11

20

1,200

Training of Trainors for new Courses

iPCC Training for PmDT Clinic Staff

PBSP - Primary Recipient

5,441 17

Two-day orientation on Wellness for CBos

Php 3,665,354.56

6,539 6,685 20

Referral, Recording, and Reporting System

Roxas City health office (Roxas)

Cotabato Regional and medical Center (Cotabato)

like Susan, he thanks DlSU-hSi for the free treatment and accommodation he enjoys. he also shares Susan’s view that their training will go a long way into helping them and their fellow patients build their lives back once they are finally well and healthy.

PBSP Accomplishment Report 2012 | 21

Gender Sensitivity Training

Davao Del norte Davao Regional hospital

must be able to make the products on their own.

22

40 11

23

117

17

ToT-DSSm

125

ToT on iT iS basic DoTS module Training Roll out iT iS for health Facilities

527

ToTAl BEnEFiCiARiES TRAinED 34 | SCALING NEW HEIGHTS

• muslim Youth Religion organization

With her treatment almost over, Susan is extremely grateful for her halfway house experience. She looks forward to continuing her bead-making enterprise, well after re-opening her eatery.

TAP for PTl and Po

ospital ng Palawan (Puerto Princesa)

REGION 12

• Training, Research, and information for Development Specialists Foundation inc. (TRiDev)

The livelihood project and the halfway house program, as a whole, both aim to lessen the financial strain experienced by TB patients. if successful, the country’s TB recovery rate is expected to improve significantly as treatment interruptions and defaults among patients are increasingly avoided. one need not wait further, however, to feel its other benefits. The communal setup has allowed a strong fellowship to form among the patients, while the cooperative activities help them deal with boredom, which is yet another recurring struggle for them. As far as the livelihood effort is concerned, it turns out its advantages go well beyond the confines of the treatment center, with former patients making use of their training even after getting back to their regular trade or occupation. By far, these are pleasant news welcomed by TB healthcare providers with open arms. ●

Training on TB Education and Counseling

REGION 6

iligan Society of internists (iligan City)

• Philippine Coalition Against Tuberculosis

• Release of Call for new Sub Recipients (SR) Expression of interest

DoTS Training

hEAlTh EQUiPmEnT

REGION 9

• orient integrated Development Consultants, inc.

• 14 laboratories with GeneXpert established across the country

• TB-hiV Collaboration detailed Planning Workshop • national TB Program Recording and Reporting Workshop • Programmatic management for Drug Resistant TB (PmDT) Strategic Planning Workshop

To deal with continuity and knowledge-transfer issues, a succession program is being set up so that a mentoring system between newly enrolled patients and trained ones can be developed.

So far, entrepreneurs are impressed with the initial outputs. once the prototypes are finalized, the project is expected to start regular production. Some additional products like planners and notebooks are also in the works. By year’s end, management plans to sell the finished products through trade fairs, with patients receiving a reasonable amount for every box completed.

2012

Cainta municipal hospital (Cainta) los Baños Rural health Unit (los Baños) Gumaca District hospital (Gumaca)

REGION 13

CARAGA Regional hospital [ChD CARAGA] Center for health Development (Butuan City)+

• 10 non-regional culture centers established across the country

Learning and Getting Better

REGION 4A

REGION 4B

• World Vision Foundation, inc.

Accomplishment Report 2012 | 25

REGION 12

Koronadal City health office+ [ChD 12] Cotabato Regional medical Center (Cotabato City) The Doctors’ Clinic & hospital, inc. (Koronadal City)

• mindanao integrated Resource Development, inc.

20 | SCALING NEW HEIGHTS

REGION 8

REGION 10

• 15 regional culture centers established across the country

• Culion Foundation, inc.

Accomplishment Report 2012 | 17

This time around, the project is looking at the production of ornate box containers as a more profitable enterprise. With the laguna Deaf Association supplying bare cardboard boxes, the TB patients use water-based paints and glue to decorate and complete the package.

A resident of imus, Cavite, Susan is no stranger to TB. Treated for the disease in 2004, she was again diagnosed in 2010 — this time with mDR-TB — and was enrolled into DlSU-hSi’s Programmatic management of Drug-resistant TB (PmDT) program. her treatment compelled her to stay at the halfway house and close down her small eatery which was her main source of income.

24 | SCALING NEW HEIGHTS

[ChD 8] Center for health Development (Tacloban City, leyte)

Xavier University Community health Care Center iligan Society of internist [ChD 10] northern mindanao TB Reference lab (Cagayan de oro City) CDo Polymedic hospital (Cagayan de oro City) German Doctors Treatment Center (CDo)+

• Alay Buhay Foundation, inc.

iSTC Training

REGION 9

• Workshops:

• 14 Satellite treatment centers established across the country

16 | SCALING NEW HEIGHTS

Quezon City Jail (Quezon City) lacson health Center (manila)

South-Eversely Childs Sanitarium+ Vicente Sotto memorial medical Center [ChD 7] Cebu TB Reference lab+

Zamboanga City medical Center+ [ChD 9] Zamboanga City medical Center Jamelarin hospital (Pagadian City)

[ChD 2] Center for health Development (Tuguegarao City)

NCR

REGION 7

REGION 1

ilocos Training and Regional medical Center (iTRmC) Region 1 medical Center [ChD 1] ilocos Training & Regional medical Center (San Fernando, la Union) Dagupan Doctors Villaflor memorial hospital (Dagupan, Pangasinan)

• Global Fund visit to PBSP

For its second take on the project, DlSU-hSi partnered with Cavite’s Provincial Cooperative livelihood and Entrepreneurial Development office (PClEDo) for technical support and the Villar Foundation for additional training. PBSP also infused P50,000 as seed money to jumpstart the initiative.

PBSP Accomplishment Report 2012 | 23

22 | SCALING NEW HEIGHTS

Region 1 medical Center (Dagupan City)

• Awarding of newly Selected Phase ii GF TB Project Sub Recipients:

That initial foray yielded valuable lessons critical to the project’s second venture which is currently underway. its inherent limitations due to the patients’ physical condition were brought to light. Physically tiring work or those involving chemical fumes and fine powder are strictly off limits, while food processing is avoided for health and sanitary reasons. Sustainability is also problematic given the limited stay of patients in the facility.

Upon arrival, the team set up three separate operational areas before welcoming the public for testing. The first housed those who went on to examine participants for TB symptoms. The second was allotted for sputum collection which was overseen by trained mYRo personnel. The third served as the smearing station where sputum was processed and readied for further analysis. Both the format and procedure used will be adopted in all succeeding similar activities.

Western Visayas medical Center PPmD Unit Dr. Pablo o. Torre memorial hospital Roxas City health office [ChD 6] Western Visayas medical Center (iloilo City)+ Dr. Pablo o. Torre memorial hospital (Bacolod City)

• 18 treatment centers established across the country

52

TRiDev first trains CATs members on the protocol for proper sputum collection before deploying them for TB case finding sorties. The volunteers then work under a simple and efficient system through which they educate the people about the disease. They particularly emphasize its curability to dispel or erase the stigma that usually goes along with it. in the process, they also get to collect sputum samples safely, send these to Rural health units (RhUs) for testing, and then refer confirmed TB cases for treatment to the nearest Directly observed Therapy Short-course (DoTS) facility.

Reaching out to the People

REGION 6

• Cash Cards released to patients (1,200 patients are already using cash cards equivalent to 42m worth of transportation allowance)

Rafael C. lopa Executive Director, PBSP

The group is but one of many similar units called Community Action Teams (CATs) currently operating in Zambales and other areas of Pampanga. Together, they constitute the brainchild of the Training and Research for information Development (TRiDev) designed to organize and empower community-based organizations and patient groups into delivering the national TB Program’s (nTP) local services, in line with the PhilPACT strategy of promoting positive behavior in certain priority sites.

country’s fight against the disease.

CAR

OCT-DEC

in 2010, the DlSU-hSi PmDT treatment center decided to pilot a livelihood program to benefit its stay-in patients. Using a meager P10,000 startup fund from the Culion Foundation, patients were given valuable training in making bead bracelets which they could sell for a small profit. The pioneering effort lasted for a few months.

in the Philippines, two sub-recipients of the Global Fund TB Grant under the Community TB Care Service Delivery Area, are making a case for themselves in this respect as each one defines its invaluable role in the

Baguio General hospital & medical Center [ChD CAR] Baguio City Gen hospital+

DEC 2012

APR-JUNE

4 | SCALING NEW HEIGHTS

The World health organization (Who) has long acknowledged the critical role that Community-based organizations (CBos) play in ensuring the success of TB Awareness drives around the world. Their involvement is not just widely seen as a cost-effective strategy, but the groups themselves are known to serve as the primary driver of TB control programs in their regions.

REGION 1

JULY-SEPT

OCT-DEC

• TB-DoTS Community health Education (This program has mobilized more than 5,100 volunteers in 13 cities and four provinces throughout the Philippines. Collectively, this program referred 34,807 people showing TB signs and symptoms.)

INNOVATIVE ACTIVE CASE FINDING IN THE COMMUNITY

Treatment Centers Satellite Treatment Centers Regional Culture Centers [CHR] Non-regional Culture Centers* Laboratories with GeneXpert+

JAN-MARCH

APRIL-JUNE

• halfway houses established

Accomplishment Report 2012 | 5

MAP OF OPERATIONS

• Department for international Development (DFiD) of United Kingdom visited the country to inquire about the status of our project implementation against Tuberculosis

41

pbsp leadership and staff partners

As i congratulate the PBSP Global Fund team and all our development partners for continuously making strides in the fight against Tuberculosis, i pose a continuing challenge. We need to create more partnerships and further encourage the business sector to invest in our health PlaCE.

36

Inauguration of the NTRL Biosafety Level 3 Laboratory 37 2012: summary of health procurement and trainings

• Panel review and final endorsement of winning SRs

JAN 2012

it is important that we fight this battle together and save more lives.

tb and hiv collaboration strengthened anew

conducted

JULY-SEPT

i assure you that PBSP remains committed in ensuring the success of our TB-control projects. We will be more aggressive in inspiring others to leverage our pooled resources to match the scale of our societal problems.

30

32

new pmdt treatment centers

• more treatment/satellite treatment centers were established across the country

APR 2011

however, the number of Filipinos whose lives are burdened by this disease continues to increase as 73 Filipinos still die of TB daily.

20

24

patients give nod to tb care and services

• 3,600 patients are already using cash cards

• on-site assessment among shortlisted SR applicants

• 12 Vehicles purchased for PmDT operations in Regions 1, 4a, 5, 6, 7,10, 11 and nCR.

Under PBSP’s Platform for Collective Engagements in health or health PlaCE, we strengthened our country’s TB-control delivery systems. We built the capacities of our sub-recipients, set up state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment, forged lasting partnerships, and strategically reached out to more communities nationwide. Through both public and private engagements, we were able to support the Department of health in attaining the program targets of 70% TB cases detected and 85% TB cases cured.

14

halfway houses

• Capacity Buildings/Trainings for Community TB Care SRs

• notification of shortlisted SR applicants

• Php 400m worth of 2nd line TB Drugs purchased

For over six years, we in the Philippine Business for Social Progress have been harnessing the collective strength of the public and private sectors in the aim of making a meaningful progress in our Tuberculosis-control initiatives.

12

phase 2 performance timeline

message from the executive director

6 8

staying the course

PHASE 1 Jan 2010-Dec 2011 PHASE 2 Jan 2012-Dec 2014

• Screening process for all potential SR applicants

Contents Executive summary

Implementation period

669

30,709

Published by Philippine Business for Social Progress PSDC Bldg., magallanes cor. Real Sts., intramuros, manila Telephone: (63 2) 527-7741 local 107/222 Email: pbspgftb@gmail.com


BREAKING NEW GROUND

JULY TO SEPTEMBER

2010 to 2011 At the outset, the drive towards making quality TB care more accessible to Filipinos was spearheaded by the continuation and expansion of quality Directly Observed Treatment Short course or DOTS in the public sector and the strengthening of the multidrugresistant TB (MDR-TB) treatment and laboratory network in the country.

© 2012 Philippine Business for Social Progress

Breaking New Ground

Published by Philippine Business for Social Progress Sustaining TB Control and Ensuring Access to Comprehensive Quality TB Care Project

PBSP Accomplishment Report for 2010-2011 (2012)

2/F PSDC Bldg., Magallanes cor. Real Sts., Intramuros, Manila Telephone: (63 2) 527-7741 local 107/222 Email: pbspgftb@gmail.com Website: http://www.pbspgftb.org

Sustaining TB Control and Ensuring Access to Comprehensive Quality TB Care Project

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, mimeographing, or by any information and retrieval system without written permission from the copyright holder.

ACCOMPLISHMENT REPORT 2010 TO 2011

The views described herein are the views of this institution, and do not represent the views or opinions of The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, nor is there any approval or authorization of this material, express or implied, by The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

Pursuant to this drive, the lead roles of the Lung Center of the Philippines and the National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory – both government institutions – were firmly set in place to emphasize the critical role of government in the crusade against TB. Accordingly, the lead in Programmatic Management of Drug-resistant Tuberculosis efforts was properly turned over to the Department of Health in lieu of the previous arrangement where a private party held this critical function. To further consolidate the existing network of TB laboratories, initial GFTB measures included the construction of new facilities and the upgrading of existing laboratories and culture centers. A standardized

Breaking New Ground Sustaining TB Control and Ensuring Access to Comprehensive Quality TB Care Project

10

treatment regimen was instituted to provide a quick and effective procedure to address suspected TB cases. Infection control measures were then adopted, coupled with the infusion of modern equipment, in order to ensure safety and radically increase efficiency in patient services.

TIMELINE

New TB diagnostic tools purchased to improve the speed of detection New Laboratories and Treatment Centers Established; Site Expansions

2011

2010

JANUARY TO MARCH JANUARY TO MARCH Conduct of negotiations between PBSP and Global Fund

With respect to the long-term objective of making drug-resistant TB treatment less dependent on facilities and machineries in Metro Manila, priority was next given to the construction of treatment centers and satellite treatment centers strategically located across the country. As frontline entities in the war against TB, these facilities are primarily responsible for bringing closer to the people the resources that would enable them to overcome the disease and its adverse effects.

Continuation of activities implemented by the previous principal recipient World TB Day

APRIL TO JUNE Contract signing between PBSP and Global Fund Reengagement of subrecipients from the previous principal recipient

The second front in the push for accessible TB care consisted of enlisting and empowering care providers and the population at large in the anti-TB campaign through the use of various advocacy, communication, social and resource mobilization (ACSM) strategies.

Regular submission of project updates and disbursement requests to the CCM for endorsement to Global Fund Accomplishment by PBSP of grant condition precedents to ensure grant approval, including the improvement and adoption of new procedures both from the principal recipients and subrecipients

More Halfway Houses Established Enhancement of Quality Assurance Centers

New TB diagnostic tools purchased to improve the speed of detection

Vehicles purchased and distributed to Regions for PMDT use

Enhancement of Quality Assurance Centers

More organizations engaged

More organizations engaged

High Quality DOTS training

JULY TO SEPTEMBER

Site Expansion

PhilCAT Convention

Regional conferences attended by PBSP and partner agencies

High Quality DOTS Trainings

400M worth of 2nd Line TB Drugs Purchased

World TB Day

Photocontest

OCTOBER TO DECEMBER Participation in Regional Conferences by PBSP and partner agencies Holding of International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Conference

APRIL TO JUNE

OCTOBER TO DECEMBER

Cash Cards released to patients

More Laboratories Established

Halfway houses established

Modules and Manuals Developed

Conduct of project development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation training Regular submission of project updates and disbursement requests to CCM for endorsement to Global Fund

More organizations engaged

Enhancement of Quality Assurance Centers

Conduct of financial management trainings for subrecipients

Interface with PMDT where community groups received technical support and assistance

Creation of Provincial Coordinating Councils

High Quality DOTS training

New Satellite Treatment Centers Established Enhancement of Quality Assurance Centers NTRL Laboratory upgraded to Bio Safety Level 3 NEC Monitoring & Evaluation Handbook produced Social Workers Facilitation Training

Accomplishment Report 2010-2011 11

BREAKING NEW GROUND

ACCOMPLISHMENT REPORT 2010 TO 2011 MODERN SOLUTIONS: ADVANCED TOOLS AND INNOVATIVE PRACTICES 6 Executive Summary

CONTENTS

A

mong the GFTB project’s notable achievements for its first phase (2010-2011), the developments it set in motion in the battle against multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is arguably the most relevant.

8 A Steady Hand for a Shaky Start 14 Modern Solutions: Advanced Tools and Innovative Practices 19 Map of Operations

MDR-TB is tuberculosis resistant to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, the two most powerful first-line anti-TB drugs available today. While less transmissible than the regular TB strain, its treatment is far more difficult with a mortality rate reaching as high as 80% of all recorded cases.

28 Drawing and Channeling Information Towards Success 30 Moving Forward 33 Audited Financial Report 52 Partners and Staff

An assortment of treatment mechanisms have been developed since the mutant strain’s rise in the 1980’s. In the Philippines, the collective strategy for the effective management of MDR-TB is called Programmatic Management of Drug-

14

Message from DOH

The Department of Health, through the National Tuberculosis Control Program (NTP) is committed to reduce by half the prevalence and mortality of Tuberculosis in 2015. The creation of 20102016 Philippine Plan of Action to Control TB (PhilPACT) is a testament that we are serious of successfully meeting the objectives as also set forth in the country’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Indeed, we are grateful to have you and the Global Fund as one of our staunchest allies of providing better health for our people. May this report serve as a guide for all of us to continue working together to come up with effective key strategies and quality solutions to raise the standards of TB health care. Likewise, let it also inspire us to remain true to the commitment of serving the needs of our countrymen especially those who are vulnerable and underprivileged. As we strive to achieve our noble goal of Kalusugan Pangkalahatan or Universal Health Care, we are counting on the support of our partners to aid us in pursuing critical reforms that will help ensure better access of our countrymen to quality health care. Together, let us all unite to achieve our vision of a TB free Philippines. Congratulations and Mabuhay kayong lahat!

A STEADY HAND FOR A SHAKY START

At the end of the day, our social bottomline all boils down to how we helped ease the stigma of TB. It is about how we, in one way or another, in this great merger for health care private-public partnership, did our share in removing the unwanted effects of social stigma and discrimination on people who suffer from this disease.

ABOUT THE PROJECT

Message from PSBP

The Global Fund TB Project (GFTB Project) is a multi-faceted campaign that ultimately aims to reduce TB prevalence and mortality in the Philippines. It utilizes an array of complementary strategies carried out by partner organizations committed to the realization of a TBfree population.

Our projects were able to provide for the installation of laboratories, improvement of health centers, and training and mobilization of key members of the community to detect cases of TB. We responded to the need in these cases and treated them at the earliest stages we could. We trained both public and private health care providers, and detected, if not treated, cases of regular and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. It is our poorest brothers and sisters in the community, drivers and jail inmates, vulnerable groups like women and children, who most often suffer the brunt of fear and discrimination in the community, resulting to personal rejection, if not social isolation. TB is often and mostly associated with poverty. This disease further pushes the most vulnerable ones, those with scanty social capital, into abject poverty. Research has proven that the poor are at great risks, although all ranks of society may contract the disease. It is because the poor are in even greater contact with the other sufferers, like overcrowding at home, at work, or while travelling and interacting with folks in the neighborhood and in polluted areas. And it is likely because, their health have further weakened due to poorer nutrition. As if they are not already marginalized in the strata of society, TB makes them even more.

By design, the project is meant to complement and enhance the programs and activities of the country’s official anti-TB strategy, the Philippine Plan of Action to Control TB (PhilPACT). It is also properly aligned with the government’s Millennium Development Goals and its emphasis on poverty reduction.

As we help them move out of poverty, we also help them build up their dignity. TB destroys not just their family, but their ability to earn a decent source of livelihood or subsistence. With our partnership for health care, we make light the burden and the often costly diagnostic and treatment processes involved in the treatment of this disease. Thank you, and may our lasting partnership uplift the lives of our fellow Filipinos.

ENRIQUE T. ONA, MD Secretary of Health Rafael C. Lopa Executive Director, PBSP

2

Accomplishment Report 2010-2011 3

BREAKING NEW GROUND

REGION 1

Cover, spreads and infographics, back cover

Ilocos Training and Regional Medical Center Medical Center

CHD 2 Tuguegarao City

*CHD CAR Baguio City General Hospital Dagupan Doctors Villaflor Memorial Hospital, Dagupan, Pangasinan CHD 3 San Fernando Pampanga

REGION 4A

21 |

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013

TREATMENT CENTERS SATELLITE TREATMENT CENTERS Regional Culture Centers Nonregional Culture Centers

CHD = Center for Health Development *Laboratories with GeneXpert

REGION 5 Sorsogon Medical Mission Group Hospital and Health Services Bicol Medical Center

CHD 5 Legaspi City, Albay Sorsogon Medical Mission GHHS*

REGION 6 Western Visayas Medical Center PPMD Unit Roxas City Medical Office

REGION 7

CHD 4B Ospital ng Palawan

*CHD 6 Western Visayas Medical Center, Iloilo City Dr. Pablo O. Torre Memorial Hospital, Bacolod City *CHD 7 Cebu TB Reference Lab

Northern Mindanao TB Reference Lab, CDO City CDO Polymedic Hospital *CHD 9 Zamboanga City Medical Center

18 Treatment Centers 14 Satellite Treatment Centers 15 Regional Culture Centers 10 Non-regional Culture Centers 14 Laboratories with GeneXpert

• Department of Health- Infectious Diseases Office (IDO); • Department of Health- National Epidemiology Center (NEC); • Department of Health- National TB Reference Laboratory (NTRL); • World Vision Development Foundation Inc.; • Philippine Coalition Against Tuberculosis (PhilCAT);

The transfer of responsibilities from the former project implementer to the present one did not proceed in the most ideal of terms, as PBSP was left on its own to work on the project framework and implementation strategies that had already been prepared by the previous PR. Confronted with the daunting task of ensuring that the support to the TB initiatives of the government continues despite operational and programmatic challenges brought about by the transfer of the grant, PBSP stood unfazed and dove right into the task at hand. It took a fresh approach and found itself starting from scratch to establish a sense of order and meet the project’s predetermined targets.

Actual expenditure

ACSM (Advocacy, Communication, and Social Mobilisation) and Community TB Care 9.22% 4,027,761.21 (3,513,239.57)

MDR TB 20,035,586.64 (11,218,789.22)

87%

45.87% 56%

PPM/ISTC (Public-public, Public-Private Mix (PPM) Approaches and International Standards for TB care) 4,919,975.27 (2,715,394.21)

11.26%

55% 33% 32%

3.9%

27%

35%

4.23%

87%

Procurement and supply management 1,847,463.90 (597,855.72)

4.2% 1.9%

Programme based operational research 831,240.21 (0.00)

9.92% PR 4,331,916.31 (1,526,365.36)

M&E 1,704,235.06 (565,297.74)

9.5%

Standardised treatment, patient support and patient charter, TB/HIV, High Risk Groups abd HSS (beyond TB) 1,832,505.06 (488,376.70)

Improving diagnosis 4,148,736.54 (3,594,111.78)

Total approved budget: 43,679,420.21 Total actual expenditure: 24,219,430.30 (55%)

Accomplishment Report 2010-2011 9

CHD 8 Tacloban City, Leyte

South Eversely Childs Sanitarium* Vicente Sotto Memorial Medical Center

Sometimes, the strength one needs to overcome tuberculosis lies not in the outside, but from within. Such is the case of Linda (not her real name), who credits her survival to God and in her own deep well of inner strength. Linda believes she contracted TB from her mother who died in 2003. In 2009, she began to complain about her nonstop coughing and drastic loss of weight. Consultations with private doctors did not help as her health continued to deteriorate. It was only when she went to the Lung Center that she was confirmed as a TB case in dire need of strong medication against the illness. She wasted no time in accepting her condition. Linda made no attempt to hide it, and instead explained it well to her friends and family. What was particularly difficult for her was deciding to stop teaching in Pangasinan while trying to fight her disease. She had to live in Quezon City during treatment in order to make her trips a less tiring ordeal.

REGION 13

Jamelarin Hospital, Pagadian City CHD 12 Cotabato Regional Medical Center, Cotabato City

CHD CARAGA Butuan City*

The Doctors’ Clinic and Hospital, Inc. Koronadal City Tawi-Tawi

REGION 12 *Koronadal City Health Office

REGION 10

Xavier University Community Health Care Center Iligan Society of Internist CHD 11 Southern Philippines Medical Center (formerly Davao Medical Center) Davao Regional Hospital, Tagum City

She admits that she nearly gave up hope on still getting better had it not been for her faith. There was nothing else for her to cling on except the belief in someone looking after her above all else. Of course, it also helped that she received medicine through the Lung Center -supported by GF-TB project - without cost, and a small allowance through the cash card system, to tide her over harsher times. The support of other TB patients, who root for one another in the face of their common adversary, has also proven to be very encouraging. Today, there are still eight (8) months to go before Linda’s TB treatment ends. She looks forward to the day when she will be able to look back to this time in her life with complete peace of mind and, more importantly, a clean bill of health. She shares that she has been humbled by the entire experience. TB does not care whether you are rich or poor, she says. In the end, we are all just as fragile and helpless as the next one.

With the second phase now underway, the GFTB project looks to build on the innovations it introduced in the initial stage. Expansion of patient services to all regions and the strengthening of existing treatment centers are certain to continue. A manual for the protocols developed (i.e., infection control measures) will be drafted and circulated for greater familiarity among the personnel involved. Moreover, the project intends to devise a solid business model that would ensure the sustainability of all programs set in place without relying on grants and similar sources of funding. With better management firmly in place and a competent work force determined to attain the goals set for the next stage of the project, the days of MDR-TB prevalence may just be numbered, and the future for Filipinos and for public health can only be brighter.

Php 42 million 1200 patients

TRAININGS

ENABLER CASH CARDS RELEASED

12 VEHICLES

REGION 1 NCR REGION 4A REGION 5 REGION 6 REGION 7

purchased to be used in PMDT Operations distributed to the following Regions

REGION 10 REGION 11

WORTH OF 2ND LINE MDRTB DRUGS PURCHASED

Southern Philippines Medical Center Davao Regional Hospital

26

BREAKING NEW GROUND

• Pmdt Training for Doctors, Nurses, Midwives, Barangay Health Workers, Pharmacists and Social Workers • Staff training • Basic Course on PMDT for Public and Private Physicians • Trainings of Trainers on PMDT • Social Workers Training Management Workshop • ACSM Trainings • Culture Training • Quality Assurance Training • DST/MGIT Training • Genexpert Training • TOT-QA on DSSM Training • Basic Training for DOTS Referring Providers

TOTAL TRAINED: 15,810

MODULES

DEVELOPED

PHP 400 MILLION

REGION 11

Other laboratories with GeneXpert: National TB Reference Laboratory (Alabang) German Doctors treatment center CHD 10 (CDO) Accomplishment Report 2010-2011 19

OTHER ACTIVITIES

FAITH FROM WITHIN

CARAGA Regional Hospital

REGION 9

BREAKING NEW GROUND

LEGEND:

San Lazaro Hospital, Manila* UP-Phil General Hospital, Manila De La Salle Health Sciences Institute, Dasmarinas City CHD 4A Batangas Regional Hospital

Zamboanga City Medical Center

18

NCR Dr. Jose N. Rodriguez Medical Hospital (TALA) (Caloocan)* PTSI Tayuman (Manila)* San Lazaro Hospital (Manila) KabalikatSaKalusugan (KASAKA) (Quezon City) Lung Center of the Philippines (Quezon City)* Gat Andres Bonifacio Medical Center (Manila) TondoForshore Health Center (Manila) Lacson Health Center (Manila) Batasan Hills Super Health Center (Quezon City) Dr. Lagrosa Health Center (Pasay City) Moonwalk Health Center (Paranaque City) Puericulture Grace Park (Caloocan City)

CHD 1 Ilocos Training & Regional Medical Center San Fernando, La Union

Batangas Regional Hospital De La Salle Health Sciences Institute Cainta Municipal Health Center

Today, PBSP oversees the entire GFTB project machinery and directs its implementation through several partner organizations and subrecipients, namely:

• Holistic Community Development Initiatives Inc.; and • Lung Center of the Philippines.

FIRST PHASE PERFORMANCE

BREAKING NEW GROUND

MAP OF OPERATIONS

CAR Baguio General Hospital and Medical Center

and maintenance on the priority list of any serious anti-TB campaign. With this in mind, the GFTB project made the establishment of treatment facilities one of its first crucial activities upon the project’s implementation. By 2011, thirteen (13) treatment centers had already been established across the country, eight (8) of which are located outside of Metro Manila. Only Regions 2, 3 and 8 remain without a treatment facility. Satellite centers have also been set up to further expand the reach of TB-related services. At present, there are already nineteen (19) satellite treatment centers in the Philippines, twelve (12) of them outside of the national capital. With the increasing number of treatment centers, TB patients have much better access to drugs and facilities, as they no longer need to travel all the way to Metro Manila to avail of proper treatment. According to reports, 3,433 (87%) of the 3,932 new smear-positive TB cases have been successfully treated.

The Philippine Business for Social Progress (PBSP) is the largest corporateled social development organization in the Philippines. It is the first of its kind in Asia, leading the promotion and practice of corporate citizenship with its 236 member companies from large, medium-scale, and small businesses. Through its Platforms for Collective Engagements (PlaCEs), PBSP synchronizes all efforts of the business sector and development stakeholders towards a common goal using cohesive strategies, and setting uniform parameter to effect a more lasting collective impact. 8 BREAKING NEW GROUND

Currently, PBSP is the project’s principal recipient (PR) and manager. In 2009, the contract with the original implementer was terminated due to financial management concerns. From the rigorous screening process that followed, PBSP emerged as the most qualified to manage the remainder of the grant in December of that same year.

Throughout this process, the roles of two government institutions are critical. The National TB Reference Laboratory (NTRL) takes charge of detection and diagnosis, handling all the laboratories and culture centers currently in operation; while the Lung Center of the Philippines (LCP) directly engages the people by delivering various patient services.

he Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (TGF) is an international organization that secures, manages and disburses resources to fight AIDS, TB and malaria prevalence all around the world. Through a broad network of partnerships with other development organizations on the ground, it supplies local knowledge and technical assistance wherever it is required. As a matter of strategy, TGF operates by addressing gaps in country efforts to fight the three diseases and by strengthening their respective health systems. It finances programs developed by the recipient countries themselves in line with their national strategic health plans and priorities.

1 January 2010 to 31 December 2011 Approved budget

PBSP’s TB health care projects implemented all over the country, in partnership with the Global Fund for HIV-AIDS, TB and Malaria, have greatly contributed to the national government’s aim in eventually eradicating the disease. TB, after all, mostly affects the most disadvantaged sectors of our society.

Before the GFTB project, the country standard in MDR-TB detection was tedious and very time-consuming. Various medical and health establishments, from government Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS) facilities to health providers and hospitals, would identify MDR-TB suspects and refer them to the nearest treatment center for sputum collection. A specimen is sent to a laboratory for Direct Sputum Smear Microscopy (DSSM), which determines the presence of TB bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis).

Two (2) samples are then sent to a culture center where bacteria are cultured, and their sensitivity and resistance to specific anti-TB drugs are determined. Test results are sent back to the treatment center of origin where, for confirmed MDRTB cases, patients are made to undergo individualized treatment regimen. Molecular testing has been introduced and a sample is sent for processing to at least one molecular test.

T

GLOBAL FUND FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE Kudos to the team for the second phase of the PBSP-Global Fund partnership in the fight against the threat of tuberculosis.

Warm greetings to the officials and employees of the Philippine Business for Social Progress (PBSP), as you undertake the creation of the GF-TB Grant Performance Report FY 2010 – 2011, with its theme “Harnessing Innovative Technologies and Practices to Improve TB Detection, Treatment and Care”.

resistant Tuberculosis (PMDT). It utilizes the different components of the National Tuberculosis Control Program (NTP) and includes activities on case detection, treatment, surveillance, monitoring and evaluation of the program’s performance.

• Facilitator’s Manual Basic Course on PMDT • Participant’s Handout Basic Course on PMDT • Modula A - Management of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Training for Health Facility Staff in the Philippines Accomplishment Report 2010-2011 27

© 2012 Philippine Business for Social Progress Published by Philippine Business for Social Progress PSDC Bldg., Magallanes cor. Real Sts., Intramuros, Manila Telephone: (63 2) 527-7741 local 107/222 Email: pbspgftb@gmail.com Website: http://www.pbspgftb.org

While treating the disease takes almost three years to complete, screening and confirming TB alone already entail a 6-month waiting period at the very least. During this time, it is not uncommon for MDRTB suspects to die before their test results come out. In other cases, the disease unnecessarily spreads because the MRTB suspect, unrestrained by any medical or legal basis, travels to other locations and can no longer be traced when the confirmation finally arrives. To help improve local MDR-TB management, the GFTB project included among its objectives the adoption of key measures that would seamlessly complement the present PMDT program. It took a two-pronged approach where priority was given to all upgrades and activities that enhance the existing screening process, such that the transition from diagnosis to treatment is radically shortened. The strategy was guided by a simple rationale: less time spent on confirming an MDR-TB case means more time allotted for actually treating the disease.

MODERN TOOLS When MDR-TB cases are referred for treatment early on, patients’ chances for survival increase dramatically and the spread of the disease is considerably mitigated. With this in mind, one of the primary thrusts of the project consisted in infusing modern equipment and establishing treatment centers and upgraded laboratories to reinforce the government’s anti-TB machinery.

New Technologies for Detection Cepheid GeneXpert. GeneXpert is a cartridge-based, automated diagnostic testing machine that confirms the presence of TB bacteria and its resistance to rifampicin in just two (2) hours, significantly shortening the time needed for screening MDR-TB suspects. It can simultaneously process four (4) cartridges loaded with sputum and reagents. One model, like the unit located in the NTRL, can process as many as 16 samples all at the same time. It poses minor risk of biohazard and requires very minimal technical training

JOURNAL TITLE HERE | 15


PAVING THE WAY TOWARDS HIGHER TOBACCO TAXES

YEAR 2 Annual Report

PERCENTAGE (%)

Southeast Asia Intiative On Tobacco Tax

The Southeast Asia Initiative on Tobacco Tax (SITT) is SEATCA’s program for intervening specifically on the area of tobacco taxation and pictorial health warning in the region. It recognizes specific interventions recommended under WHO FCTC relating to the reduction of tobacco demand through price and tax measures (Article 6) and packaging and labeling of tobacco products (Article 11). SITT is a five-year program that targets five low- and middle-income countries in Southeast Asia: Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Philippines, and Vietnam. With funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), SITT uses globally-proven evidence to encourage governments to adopt more progressive tobacco tax regimes that will lower smoking incidence while at the same time increase government revenues that can further assist national health and social development programs.

• Simplified, uniform and specific tobacco taxation regimes with real and regular tobacco tax increases in five target countries.

SITT Year 2 Annual Report (2012)

• Pictorial health warnings that equal best practice standards applied to all tobacco products in Indonesia.

This Year 2 Annual Report is once again a collaborative work of the regional and country teams. This time, it uses not only the customary narrative to summarize the achievements of the past year, but also captures in a case study format some vignettes of collective learnings from the field.

Tobacco Taxes in ASEAN

The case studies document the processes and outcomes of technical assistance for achieving policy changes and capture lessons learned for knowledge transfer among partners in the region.

Article 6 of the WHO FCTC emphasizes the importance and effectiveness of tax and price measures to reduce tobacco consumption by various segments of populations, particularly young people. All Parties to the Convention are obligated to establish effective policies for its implementation. To this end, the World Bank has recommended a tobacco tax burden of 66 to 80% of the retail price, and WHO recommends a tobacco excise tax burden of 70% of the retail price to effectively reduce consumption. In Southeast Asia, cigarette prices are generally very low, and only Brunei, Singapore, and Thailand have attained these tax benchmarks (Figure 1).

They focus on two central themes: •

Building alliances across sectors to change policy

Evidence-informed policy making

These themes, embracing SEATCA’s strategy to achieve the SITT goals in moving tobacco taxation and pictorial health warning policies in the region are: working closely with multi-sectoral networks to harmonize and strengthen country efforts in tobacco control, and working with researchers and think tanks in setting research priorities and generating evidence to support fiscal and health policy reforms.

Although government revenues from tobacco taxes have slowly increased in nominal terms over the past several years, the increases in their real values

• Elements of the SEATCA organizational model incorporated into other regional alliances for tobacco control in developing countries. As a South-to-South initiative, SITT also seeks technical assistance and mentorship for each target country provided by their own neighbors: Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. Other project partners include the World Health Organization, the American Cancer Society, and the Nossal Institute for Global Health at the University of Melbourne in Australia.

Half of Southeast Asia’s smokers will die from diseases caused by tobacco use. More than 30 million will die by middle age. If tobacco use remains unchecked in these countries they will face higher tobacco-related mortality and lower productivity.

W

hile most high-income countries acknowledge the dangers of using tobacco products and are strengthening tobacco control laws in accordance to the WHO FCTC recommendations, other countries, particularly those in ASEAN, are trailing behind.

Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance | 3

The slow implementation of the FCTC in most ASEAN countries has provided an opportunity for the tobacco industry to exploit the lack of regulations and target the most vulnerable: poor people, women, and young people. Cambodia is a prime target for transnational tobacco companies’ global expansion into Asian markets: British-American Tobacco (BAT) identified Cambodia as an attractive target for investment as the country emerged from civil war in the early 1990s, and BAT currently controls 40.3% of the country’s tobacco market. In Cambodia about 1.4 million (42.5% of adult men and 3.5% of adult women) smoke cigarettes while more than half a million (0.8% of adult men and 13.8% of adult women) consume smokeless tobacco such as betel quid. Consequently, tobacco use imposes enormous economic costs to the country and to individuals: it is estimated that close to 10,000 Cambodians die per year from diseases related to tobacco use. Compared to other low- and middle-income countries in the ASEAN, Cambodia has the lowest tobacco tax rates (20-25% of the retail price). Tobacco products remain highly affordable as a consequence. Despite about onethird of the population living below the national

February 2012

poverty line, it was found that at least one family member from each lower-income household smokes and can afford tobacco products. Building momentum for change The WHO Cambodia in collaboration with SEATCA is supporting local decision-makers to achieve an optimal annual increase in tobacco tax (FCTC Article 6). This work is part of the SEATCA-Southeast Asia Initiative on Tobacco Tax (SITT) and has led to new partnerships between the WHO Cambodia and the Ministry of Economy and Finance (MOEF) and General Department of Taxation (GDT) to restructure the tobacco tax system. The GDT, previously known as the Tax Department, was established in September 2008, and is in charge of collecting tax on domestic cigarettes. The General Department of Customs and Excise is responsible for collecting tax on imported cigarettes. WHO Cambodia and SEATCA also work closely with other stakeholders such as the Inter-ministerial WHO FCTC Secretariat, Inter-ministerial Committee for Education and Reduction of Tobacco Use (IMC), and the Cambodian Movement for Health (CMH). A comprehensive National Action Plan for tobacco control (2011 to 2015), developed with technical support from SEATCA and WHO Cambodia, prioritizes tobacco tax measures and also institutes steps to secure sustainable long-term funding for tobacco control and health promotion activities through the implementation of a surcharge tax on tobacco products.

Bilateral meetings have been a strategic way for policy makers to learn from respected neighbors. High-ranking government officials and members of the National Assembly, met with the Royal Malaysian Customs and the Malaysia Health Promotion Board on a study visit to Malaysia in early 2010. Experiences about implementing effective tobacco control measures, such as improving the tax administration system, controlling smuggling, and using tobacco taxes in health promotion programmes, were shared. The policy makers gained a greater understanding about the need for promoting tobacco control measures through taxes and were subsequently convinced about the efficacy of establishing a Tobacco Tax Working Group (TTWG). Tobacco tax is a sensitive policy issue in Cambodia requiring diplomatic promotion accompanied with evidence-based information. The combination of multi-sectoral meetings, study tours, and consultations have enabled government and non-government organizations to understand the importance of all the WHO FCTC provisions and, in particular, why tobacco tax is one of the more effective measures to reduce tobacco consumption. Not all participants had been aware that Cambodia was a Party to the WHO FCTC and its ensuing obligations. In addition, it was recognized that in order to achieve effective tobacco tax policies in Cambodia, rigorous, local, and policy-driven research was a priority. Studies on tobacco affordability and the impact of taxes, and a retailer survey on cigarette prices were supported by research collaboration from GDT, WHO Cambodia, General Department of Customs and Excise, Royal University of Phnom Penh and CMH. The research, led by GDT, provided important evidence and helped to build the research skills among the team members.

Policy makers now understand and acknowledge that tobacco tax increases will make cigarettes less affordable and safeguard health and save lives: a proposal to increase excise tax on tobacco products has been submitted to the Deputy Prime Minister and the Minister of Economy and Finance. The adoption of effective fiscal policies for tobacco control; however, will take more time and effort. A new platform for change The collaboration between MOEF and the SITT project country partner (WHO Cambodia) was instrumental in establishing the TTWG, which is endorsed by the Deputy Prime Minister and the Minister of Economy and Finance. This commitment by the government is significant and the first step towards accelerating tobacco tax increases. The TTWG is responsible for improving the current tobacco tax system and is a platform for stakeholders to identify research priorities, set the tobacco taxation policy agenda, and increase tobacco tax to above 65% of retail price as recommended by the World Bank. The cross-sectoral partnerships between health and finance and between the government and nongovernment sector have set a new policy agenda for a more efficient tobacco tax system in Cambodia.

Lessons Learned • Building awareness and knowledge among key decisionmakers and implementers about a policy agenda is an important first step. • Building trust between partners is critical for gaining momentum for policy reform. • The start-up phase may be protracted but is useful for achieving two aims: knowledge and commitment to reform among those that will lead the long-term process; and a strong partnership built on shared goals, trust, and access to credible evidence.

Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance | 1 8 | SITT Year 2 Annual Report

Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance | 9

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2 | SITT Year 2 Annual Report

By Ms. Tan Yen Lian, SEATCA Knowledge and Information Manager, and Dr. Yel Daravuth, SITT Cambodia Coordinator

YEAR 2 ANNUAL REPORT

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Figure 1: Tobacco Tax Burden as a Percentage of Retail Prices in ASEAN, 2011

Setting the Agenda for Tobacco Tax: A Cambodia Case Study

Southeast Asia Initiative on Tobacco Tax (SITT)

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Rather than seeing policy as one single, discrete decision, it is important to broaden one’s view, so that policy is understood ‘as a series of documents and decisions that are best described as a set of processes, activities or actions’ (Neilson, 2001)

PERCENTAGE (%)

PAVING THE WAY TOWARDS HIGHER TOBACCO TAXES

Pictorial Health Warnings on Cigarette Packages Through Civil Society Efforts in Indonesia

provides evidence and technical assistance to the government to support the implementation of pictorial health warnings policy by 2014. In 2010, the regional collaboration provided assistance to the drafting of a new PP. The key learning platform for the Packs Project was learning about the experiences and knowledge about pictorial health warning law from meetings with counterparts in Brunei and Malaysia. The government also supported the drafting of the PP law through an inter-sectoral technical task force formed by the Ministry of

By Ms. Sophapan Ratanachena, SITT Regional Research Coordinator, and Dr. Widyastuti Soerojo, SITT Indonesia Packs Coordinator

T

he Southeast Asia Initiative on Tobacco Tax (SITT) project not only builds capacity in countries in the region to raise tobacco taxes in order to curb tobacco consumption and increase government revenue, but also supports Indonesia to implement pictorial health warnings on cigarettes packages. Although Indonesia has not yet acceded to the FCTC, in 2009 the government passed the new Health Law No. 36/2009, which has built momentum for further health information on cigarette packages. Proven pictorial health warnings in a new Government Regulation (PP) are to replace existing text warnings regulated under Government Regulation (PP) No. 19/2003.

Indonesia has implemented health warnings since 1999: While the Government regulated text warnings on cigarette packages, there was only one authorized text warning stating: “smoking can cause cancer, heart attack, impotence and harm pregnancy and fetal development”. There was also no specific regulation of the coverage and size of text on cigarette packages, and the text placement was not easily seen. The shift from textual health warnings to pictorial health warnings is a complex process that involves not only significant technical knowledge but strong political resolve to counter the cigarette industry’s interference. SEATCA first facilitated multi-sectoral collaboration in 2006: The Indonesian tobacco control movement became more organised after participating in SEATCA advocacy training. The training not only built the capacity of 14 NGOs that later established the civil society group Indonesian Tobacco Control Network

(ITCN) but also allowed participants to replicate knowledge and skills gained from the training in their own practice. In addition, it led to a joint Heart and Cancer Foundation submission to SEATCA, which heralded the beginning of the ongoing collaboration between SEATCA and civil society groups in Indonesia.

“A country and regional platform for sharing knowledge and experience is the most effective way for establishing pictorial health warnings. Although each country may have a specific context and concerns, the common challenges in establishing the policy can be shared and learned.” Widyastuti Soerojo, SITT Indonesia Packs Coordinator

With SEATCA support and encouragement the Indonesian team has advanced the pictorial health warnings policy. Initially, a multi-sectoral working team comprising the SITT country team and a research institution undertook a study that found that the general public preferred both text and picture warnings on cigarette packages: the large majority of respondents supported 50% health warning coverage on cigarette packages. The study findings were disseminated widely via public media and through targeted communications with the Ministry of Health and other stakeholders. The group also established a resource centre on pictorial health warnings providing fact sheets, regional materials, examples of Pictorial Health Warning laws from and outside of the region, and most importantly, samples of cigarette packs with graphic warnings from the region, including Indonesian cigarette packs with graphic warnings exported to neighboring countries.

Health and comprising 18 ministries. The Packs Project team also organized a seminar to discuss the tobacco farmers’ and small-scale tobacco producers’ issues and opposition to the PP, in which representatives from the economic and trade ministries participated and benefited from. In addition, a technical working group or “think tank” also provided technical assistances to the government. The think tank comprises members from the Public Health Faculty, and relevant units at MOH, NGOs, WHO, and the SITT Tax Coordinator. Technical assistance, coordinated by the Ministry of Health, is offered in several forms: 1) formal input to inter-sectoral discussions and involvement in impromptu consultations; 2) provision of local and regional evidence and examples of cigarette packages; and 3) forums/seminars that respond to issues raised by Economic Ministries (Ministry of Industry and Ministry of Trade). In the process of providing technical assistance, a key insight was made about how best to frame the argument for pictorial health warnings. By expressing the case as a consumer right to information in accordance with Consumers Law No. 8/1999, the proposed

These collaborative efforts contributed significantly to the Ministry of Health’s Country Action Plan to amend PP No. 19/2003 from text warnings to pictorial health warnings. The SITT Indonesian Packs Project works in partnership with the Faculty of Public Health at the University of Indonesia and

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48

41

30

25

20

• Generated a state of readiness for policy implementation including: BRUNEI (50% front and back, 75% by September 2012)

MALAYSIA (40% front, 60% back)

SINGAPORE (50% front and back)

THAILAND (55% front and back)

Tobacco Package Health Warnings in ASEAN Parties to the FCTC are duty-bound to implement specific packaging and labeling measures for tobacco products (Article 11). This obligation includes the implementation of effective health warnings and the prohibition of misleading terms, descriptors, or trademarks (such as “light” and “mild”). To assist Parties meet this obligation, the FCTC Article 11 Guidelines, based on international best practices and scientific evidence, recommend that governments require large pictorial health warnings (PHWs) on tobacco packages to inform consumers of the harms of tobacco use. At least 43 countries now implement PHWs, including four in ASEAN, which are further described below. In addition, to further enhance the effectiveness of the PHWs and eliminate the use of the pack for advertising, the Australian government has successfully

Cover, spreads and infographics, back cover

passed legislation that requires standardized or plain packaging of all tobacco products by December 2012, and several other countries are also planning to introduce similar packaging measures. Moreover, at least 73 countries have banned the use of false, deceptive and misleading terms such as “light” and “mild” on cigarette packages. Singapore was the first ASEAN country (2004) to apply six rotating PHWs covering 50% of the upper front and back of tobacco packages with accompanying English language text messages and a Quitline number. A second set of six rotating PHWs was introduced in 2008. The recently amended Tobacco (Control of Advertisements and Sale) Act (effective 1 March 2013) bans the use of false and misleading terms and applies to all trademarks, including prohibiting these terms as part of tobacco brand names.

o Completed assessment study on the PHW implementation strategy; prepared guidelines and approved copyright of images for PHW implementation.

In 2005, Thailand also required six rotating PHWs covering 50% of the upper front and back of the cigarette pack with text messages in Thai language. The total number of PHWs was increased to nine in 2007 and to ten in 2010, at which time the size of PHWs was also increased to 55% of the upper front and back of the pack, and a Quitline number was introduced. Specific information on tobacco constituents and emissions as defined by national authorities is also required on the side panels of cigarette packs. Brunei implemented its six rotating PHWs in 2008, requiring that they cover the upper 50% of the front and back of the package and are accompanied by both Malay and English language text messages. Recently, amendments to the Tobacco (Labeling) Regulations (effective 1 September 2012) increased the size of PHWs to 75%, currently the largest in the region.

Regrettably, in our five SITT countries, cigarette prices relative to income (expressed as Relative Income Prices in Figure 2) have been steadily and seriously declining, indicating increasing affordability and thus providing little incentive to reduce consumption. It is thus crucial to increase tobacco tax at much higher rates than at present, in order to not only save lives and reduce health care costs, but 70 69 also to contribute to more government revenues to fund health promotion activities and social development 45 programs.

19.7

10 0 BRN KHM IDN

LAO MYS MMR PHL SGP THA VNM

Further research studies produced by SITT clearly demonstrate the positive impact of tobacco tax increases (higher government revenues, reduced prevalence, and more lives saved, with little or no

Over the course of three tax increases in Indonesia, the revenue from tobacco tax increased from IDR 32.6 trillion in 2005 to IDR 69 trillion in 2010, while the smoking prevalence was estimated to have dropped by 1.6% points, saving 890,000

Excise Tax Increase Scenarios

Reduction in Smoking Prevalence (% points)

Lives Saved (persons)

Cambodia*

100% (from 10% to 20%)

0.85 (from 23% to 22.15%)

N/A

KHR 172,702,008,1641

Indonesia

14% (from 50% to 57%)

0.9 (from 32.4% to 31.5%)

500,000

IDR 13,443,692,5152

Lao PDR

Additional specific tax of 1,500 Kip (on top of 15% ad valorem tax)

0.47 (from 38.71% to 38.24%)

5,838

LAK 347,043,887,3223

Philippines

215% (from 41% to 66%)

5.3 (from 28.3% to 23%)

1,130,000

PHP 63,429 million4

Vietnam*

50% (from 65% to 97.5%)

6.6 (from 23.8% to 17.2%)

1,000,000

VND 14,150 billion5

1 2 3 4 5

1 USD equals to KHR 4,200 1 USD equals to IDR 9,043.25 1 USD equals to LAK 7,922 1 USD equals to PHP 42.76 1 USD equals to VND 20,800

Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance | 5

• Policy-relevant evidence from country-specific research is required to build confidence for policy makers to advance the regulation and policy. • Keeping a flexible and creative mind. The reframing of pictorial health warnings policy messages created a stronger lever for change. • Seizing opportunities and synergies. The capacity building, networking, financial and technical assistance from the region (in particular, SEATCA) were key catalysts for change.

Challenges • Pictorial health warnings are integrated into the complete PP Health Law, which means that the passage of the PP is a very long process, as all components require review and agreement.

Creating regional momentum through regional forums and working directly with policy makers in each country

• Gaining consensus on policy: the two economic ministries (Ministry of Industry and Ministry of Trade) as well as the tobacco industry, have not reached accord on the Pictorial Health Warning coverage size.

The SITT project’s effective multi-sector collaboration has built a solid foundation to support the effective implementation of pictorial health warnings after the passage of PP in the near future. Such collaboration provides the strength and expertise to counter anticipated industry opposition and ensure that the optimal coverage size is specified in the PP.

o Conducted “Towards Equality of Rights: Indonesian and Exported Cigarettes”, a seminar which discussed how Indonesian cigarette makers have produced PHW for exported products to comply with regulations in recipient countries. o Conducted an orientation workshop on PHW best practices for public lawyers during the Lawyers Training organized by Jakarta Residents Forum (FAKTA). o Produced several factsheets on consumer rights and the right to information in relation to pack warnings.

40% of the front and 60% of the back and are accompanied by Malay and English language text messages. A Quitline number is also printed on the pack. Additionally, the sale of kiddie packs (less than 20 cigarette sticks per pack) is banned in Malaysia.

Generating more local evidence for advancing tobacco control policy through a collaborative research program

VISION Towards a healthy, tobacco-free ASEAN

Strengthening local capacity and policy development though an advocacy fellowship program and national working groups

MISSION Working together to save lives by accelerating effective implementation of the FCTC in ASEAN

Increasing the number and capacity of tobacco control workers in each country

Supporting progressive policy development in each country

Indonesia’s cigarette packs currently carry only a small text warning; however, the country’s Health Law 2009 requires PHWs, and this has been upheld and clarified in the Constitutional Court after a legal challenge by the tobacco industry. Approval of government regulations for implementation of PHWs, however, is still pending. All other ASEAN member states (Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Philippines, and Vietnam) carry text-only warnings, although legislation has been proposed in some countries to also implement PHWs.

Malaysia has also enforced PHWs from January 2009. The warnings cover the top

Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance (SEATCA) Health Warnings on Tobacco Packages in ASEAN, 2011.

18 | SITT Year 2 Annual Report

CAMBODIA (30% front and back)

INDONESIA (19% back only)

LAO PDR (30% front and back)

MYANMAR (side panel only)

PHILIPPINES (30% front only)

VIETNAM (30% front and back)

Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance | 19

Table 1: Tobacco excise tax increase scenarios and impact on smoking prevalence, lives saved, and tax revenues

The challenges for achieving the SITT project’s tax objectives: • Simplifying the multi-tier tax systems, particularly in Indonesia and Philippines • Increasing taxes to a level that counters the increase of per capita GDP and economic growth, in order to make cigarettes increasingly affordable • Countering the tobacco industry’s expected opposition to tax increases and its consistent actions to defeat tax initiatives that could effectively reduce consumption • Developing country-specific sustainable funding mechanisms, based on tobacco taxes, for tobacco control and health promotion

• Involving key government officials at every stage of the initiative.

changes are now framed as ongoing policy improvement rather than anything radically ‘new’.

Total Tax Revenue

*Note: Cambodia excise rate is % of 65% of invoice price. Vietnam excise rate is % of ex-factory price. Indonesia and Philippines use a specific excise tax system.

• Finding the right management and communication mechanisms. The technical working groups formed by the government and civil society group have been key to success so far.

• Tobacco Industry interference on the passage of PP: they have deployed delaying tactics including: a halfpage advertisement to counter the PP; cases filed at the Constitutional Court to undermine Pictorial Health Warnings; and the mobilization of farmers’ rallies.

lives (over a 5-year period). In Lao PDR, after the imposition of an additional specific excise tax at LAK 100 per pack in 2010, which was increased to LAK 500 per pack in 2011, the revenue from tobacco excise tax was estimated to have increased from LAK 31,800 million in 2009 to LAK 162,885 million in 2011. The smoking prevalence was also estimated to have dropped by 0.72% points, saving 8,708 lives. While both these country experiences clearly demonstrate the large fiscal benefits from small tax increases, the reductions in prevalence and lives saved have been relatively small.

Countries

4 | SITT Year 2 Annual Report

Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance | 21

• The Constitutional Court stated that PHW are mandatory in a judicial review of the Health Warning provisions

have generally not been significant, and they have largely not been accompanied by a reduction in tobacco consumption. A key factor contributing to this situation is the fast growth of national economies and household incomes in Southeast Asia, enabling whole populations to easily afford cigarettes. Therefore, while it is important to set a high tax rate as a fiscal goal, the public health goal, as stated in Article 6, is better achieved by tax rates that have an impact on affordability and purchasing power of consumers.

negative impact on industry revenues) and suggest prospective actions to decrease affordability for achieving these positive outcomes. Some of these potential impacts on government revenue, smoking prevalence and the number of lives saved are shown in Table 1.

Lessons Learned

20 | SITT Year 2 Annual Report

• The Minister of Health’s presentation to the Cabinet Secretary of the Draft Regulation (PP) on Tobacco Control containing implementation of PHW is pending

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2011 Highlights of SITT Indonesia Packs Achievement

PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013

*RIP = percentage of per capita GDP required to purchase 100 packs of cigarettes

Project Background

SITT Objectives

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Figure 2: Relative Income Prices (RIP)* in six ASEAN countries, 1999-2010

Thakolsuk Place, Room 2B, 115 Thoddamri Rd, Dusit, Bangkok 10300 THAILAND Telefax: +662 241 0082 | email: info@seatca.org www.seatca.org


The Unbearable Lightness of Being The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera takes place in Prague in 1968, exploring the artistic and intellectual life of Czech society during the Communist period, from the Prague Spring to the Soviet Union’s August 1968 invasion and its aftermath. It is a philosophical novel about two men, two women, a dog and their lives in the Prague Spring of the Czechoslovak Communist period in 1968.

Objectives Create an original illustration for a book of choice and its jacket design

The Czech writer Milan Kundera has lived in France since 1975, persuaded to self-exile by the censoring or suppression of his work by the government of his native country. Kundera has long denied any political motivation in his writings, however. His work is always humorous, skeptical, and fundamentally pessimistic in describing the universal human condition, whether under Communism or elsewhere. The Book of Laughter and Forgetting (1979) is his most celebrated novel. Other highly regarded works include The Joke (1967); Laughable Loves, a collection of short stories originally published in the 1960s; Life Is Elsewhere (1969). In The Art of the Novel (1988), a collection of essays, Kundera repeats his conviction that the novel must be “autonomous,” created independent of any system of political belief. Kundera’s characters are often explicitly identified as figments of his own imagination, commenting in the first-person on the characters in entirely third-person stories. Kundera is more concerned with the words that shape or mould his characters than with the characters’ physical appearance. In his non-fiction work, The Art of the Novel, he says that the reader’s imagination automatically completes the writer’s vision. For him the essential may not include the physical appearance or even the interior world (the psychological world) of his characters.

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PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013

The German expression, Einmal ist keinmal (once is never) encapsulates “lightness,” the concept of which is well expressed in the quote: “what happens but once, might as well not have happened at all.” Following this logic, life is insignificant, and decisions do not matter and are thus rendered light, because they do not cause personal suffering. Yet the insignificance of decisions — our being — causes us great suffering, perceived as the unbearable lightness of being when it is considered that people want their lives to have transcendent meaning. The “unbearable lightness” also refers to the lightness of love and sex. Kundera portrays love as fleeting, haphazard and perhaps based on endless strings of coincidences, despite holding such significance for humans.

“How can life ever be a good teacher if there is only one of them to be lived? How can one perform life when the dress rehearsal for life is life?” Although written in 1982, The Unbearable Lightness of Being was not published until two years later, in France. The Czech: Nesnesitelná lehkost bytí and French: l’Insoutenable légèreté de l’être titles are more common worldwide. At present, it is regarded as a literary classic.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being

MILAN KUNDERA

Idea The essence of the narrative: polar concepts - man and woman, marriage and singlehood, war and peace, weight and lightness - and their inevitable vagueness inside philosophical thought

Challenging Friedrich Nietzsche’s concept of eternal recurrence, the story’s thematic meditations posit the alternative: that each person has only one life to live, and that which occurs in life occurs only once and never again — thus the “lightness” of being. In contrast, the concept of eternal recurrence imposes a “heaviness” on our lives and on the decisions we make.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being

Book cover and jacket design (2011)

HarperPerennial

A division of HarperCollinsPublishers Book design (c) 2011 by C Regala Author photograph (c) 1998 Fridrik Rafusson

Milan Kundera

In 1988, an American-made film adaptation of the novel was released. In a note to the Czech edition of the book, Kundera remarks that the movie had very little to do with the spirit either of the novel or the characters in it. In the same note Kundera goes on to say that after this experience he no longer allows any adaptations of his work.


DISENYO: the BAG ISSUE Thematic magazine design (2011) Objective Create a magazine layout based on a single topic expounded through illustration

Cover, table of contents, and sample article spread; hand-drawn illustrations (ink)

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PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013


TRAIN MAN Book cover and jacket design (2010)

NAKANO HITORI This name is a pun on the Japanese term “Naka no hitori”, a term that refers to all the people who are part of message boards on the Internet. There isn’t a specific person that is credited as the author; rather, it is close to a shared pseudonym.

More than a million copies in print! Boy-bashful and not overly-brave defends girl from obnoxious drunk on a Tokyo train. Girl sends boy a thankyou pair of pricey Hermes teacups. Boy’s a geek and doesn’t know what to do next... End of story for most nerds?But this one turns to the world’s largest online message board and asks for help, so for him it’s just the beginning. This matchless love story is told through a series of Internet chat room threads. As Train Man, our hero, charts his progress and unveils each new crisis?from making conversation to deciding what to wear on a date and beyond?in return, he receives advice, encouragement, warnings, and sympathy from the anonymous netizens. And Train Man discovers the secret to what makes the world go round and proves we really do live in a universe where anything can happen.

Publisher: Del Rey Trade, Ballatine Books, New York Design: Panda Regala

HITORI NAKANO

Idea Typographic illustration using computer-related symbols with Japanese influence both in symbolism and style: a love story between a nightingale (the girl), symbolising the herald of spring and anticipated happiness, and a cicada chrysalis (the boy), emblematic of humaneness and rebirth which is marked by springtime

The internet-generation love story from Japan comes to the Philippines!

About the Author

Train Man (Densha Otoko)

Objectives Create an original illustration for the book “Train Man” and its jacket design

An instant bestseller when it was first published in Japan, Train Man became a multimedia sensation, generating a smash-hit TV series, a blockbuster film, and multiple manga series. Now here’s the novel that started it all shared to all Filipinos with a knack for social networking and its trivialities!

Train Man Densha Otoko

Php1200

ISBN 978-1-569-70123-2

HITORI NAKANO

Translated by Bonnie Elliot

CMYK

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TRAIN MAN The Novel


identity/branding

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MATSURI CREATIVE STUDIOS (2011)

identity manual

26F Equitable Bank Tower 8751 Paseo de Roxas Makati City, Philippines M: (63) 916 244 0599 F: (632) 935 0799 E: info@matsuricreatives.com

Panda Regala Senior Project Designer

(63) 927 773 6973 panda@matsuricreatives.com

identity

26F Equitable Bank Tower 8751 Paseo de Roxas Makati City, Philippines

26F Equitable Bank Tower 8751 Paseo de Roxas Makati City, Philippines M: (63) 916 244 0599 F: (632) 935 0799 E: info@matsuricreatives.com

M: (63) 916 244 0599 F: (632) 935 0799 E: info@matsuricreatives.com

Panda Regala Senior Project Designer

tagline

Panda Regala Senior Project Designer

(63) 927 773 6973 panda@matsuricreatives.com

60째 60째

(63) 927 773 6973 panda@matsuricreatives.com

60% black

100% black 80% black

100% black

Business card (front and back), official envelop and letterhead, logo bible (3-fold, out-side and in-side) 26F Equitable Bank Tower 8751 Paseo de Roxas Makati City, Philippines M: (63) 916 244 0599 F: (632) 935 0799 E: info@matsuricreatives.com

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PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013

Panda Regala Senior Project Designer

(63) 927 773 6973 panda@matsuricreatives.com

26F Equitable Bank Tower, 8751 Paseo de Roxas Makati City, Philippines M: (63) 916 244 0599 F: (632) 935 0799 E: info@matsuricreatives.com

26F Equitable Bank Tower 8751 Paseo de Roxas Makati City, Philippines M: (63) 916 244 0599 F: (632) 935 0799 E: info@matsuricreatives.com

Panda Regala Senior Project Designer

(63) 927 773 6973 panda@matsuricreatives.com

30mm (actual size)

Matsuri Creative Studios 26F Equitable Bank Tower 8751 Paseo de Roxas, Makati City Philippines

M: (63) 916 244 0599 F: (632) 935 0799 www.matsuricreatives.com

creative studios


MATSURI CREATIVE STUDIOS (2011)

contents

The company

Vision

The Company 2

Matsuri Creative Studios is a design firm that provides design services to clients, whether corporate, commercial, institutional or personal. The services include logos and identity systems, brochures, signages, books, zines, and other forms of print media.

Our vision is to be a global name in the field of visual design, inspiring creativity in people and the world.

Vision and Mission 3 Officers 4

mission

Previously known as Jeanre Design Studios and founded in 2010, Matsuri Creative Studios have been constantly providing design solutions to a variety of clients, and delving into the realm of advertising design and multimedia.

Capabilities 5 Portfolio 6 Contact Details 16

Matsuri’s mission is to deliver quality visual designs to clients all over the world through the integration of people, creativity, and technology; to constantly strive towards our vision, driven by our core values, with great emphasis on our team, productivity, and clients.

With headquarters in Makati City, Philippines, we aim to reach clients all over the world and help them translate their ideals and visions into effective visuals to reach their respective markets and audiences.

Our people. To be a great place to work, learn, grow, and have fun Productivity. To be effective, flexible, resourceful, efficient and responsive to change Our clients. To deliver quality, enduring visual design that will be able to efficiently support our clients’ products and services; to understand the client’s vision and goals through effective communication and produce the best possible visual presentation to meet that vision

This is the “celebration” that Matsuri (Kanji:「祭」) stands for – the celebration of the fantastic transformation of idea and vision into visual design; like a firework in the sky, with its light and sparks reaching and spreading out to the world.

Company Profile

core values Vision. Creativity. Flexibility. Diversity. Resourcefulness. Teamwork. Fun. Passion.

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Officers

Company profile booklet (cover, spreads, back cover)

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3

Company Profile

capabilities

Xzavier Eldridge Elliott Farnham Fábia Nishimura Ansel Micheli Panda Regala

Chief Executive Officer Chief Financial Officer Vice President Director Senior Project Designer

Alfonso Calabrese Alissa Ueda Marquinhos Abatantuono

Project Manager Supervising Art Director Art Director

Denis Tucker Serafina Backus Elia Collins

Senior Editors

Marina Stroud Bysshe Butcher Reanna Brassington

Senior Copywriters

Vince Bloxam Neville Nicastro Baldwin Blanxart

Senior Graphic Artists

Advertising design • Packaging design • Merchandising support materials • Activation materials • Misc. print advertising materials

Liana Barlow Luís Rye Darlene Terzi

Senior Illustrators

Photography and Ilustration (supplementary for editorial and advertising materials)

Durante Frye Purdie Belmonte

Senior Concept Artists

Multimedia • Flash presentations • Web banners • Broadcast Title Boards

Client: Megawide Holdings Project: Buendia Gardens & Terraces Flyer and Banner

Matsuri Creative Studios offers a variety of design solutions in both print and digital media.

Client: The Roof Restaurant Project: Phil. Market and Cuisine BookDesign/Layout

Corporate communication • Corporate identity systems • Corporate communication collaterals Editorial design • Brochures and prospectus • Newsletters • Catalogs • Book and magazine design and layout • Infographics • Manuals • Misc. editorial support materials

flyer (L) and construction banner (above)

cover (above), title page (top R), inner page (bottom R)

Matsuri Creative Studios 26F Equitable Bank Tower 8751 Paseo de Roxas, Makati City Philippines E: info@matsuricreatives.com M: (63) 916 244 0599 F: (632) 935 0799 www.matsuricreatives.com

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Company Profile

5

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Company Profile

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PUDGY

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Branding and promotion for Wood & Spoon (2011)

PUDGY

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We deliver the fudge

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Pudgy Parcels @ 140 php each

0915 352 9146 0927 773 6973 pudgyfudgy@ymail.com Like Pudgy Fudgy Brownies on Facebook! www.facebook.com/pudgyfudgybrownies

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Logo and packaging (with tag and postage stamp), launching collateral

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PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013

O SP & O OD

We deliver the fudge

For orders:

0927 773 6973

pudgyfudgy@ymail.com


PUDGY FUDGY Branding and promotion for Wood & Spoon (2011)

February promotions: Valentine’s and Toujin cosplay cafe tie-in

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PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013 Unit 302 Dona Zenona Bldg 54 Maginhawa St UP Village, Quezon City (63) 927 773 6973 // cjdregala@gmail.com

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PANDA REGALA design portfolio 2013


Panda Regala: Design portfolio 2013