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Foreword I first met and trained with Tony Sargeant on my second visit to his dojo in Cambridge in 1986. At that time I was a 2nd Dan Aikikai and thought I knew most of what there was to know to teach and progress in my Aikido. How wrong can one be! On my first visit Tony was away (possibly training somewhere in the world under Saito Sensei) but from that first visit, training with his students, I sensed immediately that their teacher was someone cast from a different mould to those I had been following since returning to the UK in 1977 after 3 years in Tokyo, where I trained regularly at the Hombu dojo. Training under Tony means getting the basics right no matter what your style. We always started with Tai no henko and I soon realised that my understanding of this exercise was not complete; I couldn’t move once he held my wrist and when we changed to Kokyu techniques I was generally swatted away like a fly. I had more success with the ken and jo but here, too, there was still lots I could learn. Tony and I had been trained in the same weapons katas but by different masters, both of whom had been disciples of O-Sensei. Attending the Cambridge dojo I found a genuine desire and need to reinvigorate my own passion for Aikido. What Tony had to offer would help me achieve that end and I attended his classes twice a week over the next year after which work took me back to Oxfordshire. Tony then became a regular guest instructor at my dojo in Witney. During that year, and in the years that followed, I learned so much about Tony the man, as well as Tony the dedicated Aikido practitioner. Those who know him – and those who read this book – will be aware that he speaks candidly from the heart and his words have in the past lost him students and friends. I can tell you with all sincerity that it is not Tony who has been the loser but those who have walked away from him. I have found that Tony has endless patience with those he recognises as genuine in their pursuit of knowledge and wish to understand this martial art. I wasn’t ‘Iwama’ trained and I’m sure Tony knew I never would be; but he still believed he could make me a better Aikidoka to fit whatever style I eventually chose to follow. That was Tony ‘the man’ – someone who would give you his friendship and pass on all his Aikido wisdom and experience even though you may not be giving back to him in like measure. It is also what this book does – it imparts Tony’s unquestioned belief in the merits of Takemusu Aikido, questions your own understanding in the art, but makes no specific demands upon you in return.

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Takemusu Aikido: A Martial Artist's Journey of Discovery in Aikido  

A selection of pages from "Takemusu Aikido: A Martial Artist's Journey of Discovery in Aikido" by Tony Sargeant

Takemusu Aikido: A Martial Artist's Journey of Discovery in Aikido  

A selection of pages from "Takemusu Aikido: A Martial Artist's Journey of Discovery in Aikido" by Tony Sargeant

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