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Shihonage – Overcoming Points Of Weakness Saito Sensei said, “Take what you need with strength until it turns to Kokyu”. This part of Shihonage is one of those cases when it may be required.

 A good way to develop useful body memory for an effective shihonage is to look at your hands throughout the whole technique. By training this way, the all too common weakness as Uke’s arm passes over Nage’s head will become obvious. Observing your own hands throughout the move creates a positive and powerful effect. Nage should raise the hands high and stretch Uke; Uke has to do the work and Nage has to keep control. Many Aikidoka lower their body during this move to accommodate Uke’s body, this is wrong, Uke should fit Nage, not the other way around. If the person you train with is small then you may have to adjust your height a bit by lowering your hips but in real life – you would not do Shihonage as it would not show itself as Takemusu. Never adjust too much, ask yourself, “Who is in control?”



 It is a common occurrence that the hands will disappear from Nage’s sight at the top of the movement, just as Nage is about to turn. Nage will not normally notice this if they are too interested in reaching the end point. Note: If, like many, you make a fast turn it will be at this time that you will lose sight of your hands. Train slowly until the movement is mastered. Shihonage has many problems but this losing sight of the hands means you have lost extension and handed the technique over to Uke. Perfect alignment means that at this juncture of the move, by just opening your hands Uke should fall to the floor. However, connection is retained with hands on wrist and blending with their fall to the ground adding the ground control at the end.

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Takemusu Aikido: A Martial Artist's Journey of Discovery in Aikido  

A selection of pages from "Takemusu Aikido: A Martial Artist's Journey of Discovery in Aikido" by Tony Sargeant

Takemusu Aikido: A Martial Artist's Journey of Discovery in Aikido  

A selection of pages from "Takemusu Aikido: A Martial Artist's Journey of Discovery in Aikido" by Tony Sargeant

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