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Course Guide 2014-2015

Sun Prairie High School 888 Grove St Sun Prairie WI 53590

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Welcome to the 2014-2015 school year! As with any journey, a destination must be chosen and then a route must be mapped. High school is a journey in its own right, with carefully chosen classes becoming the route to the desired destination – a high school diploma. Each year, students discuss course selection with parents, counselors, and teachers in hopes that they will select courses that will prepare them to be economically viable, socially informed, and intellectually able. Whether students dream of becoming doctors or artists, engineers or business owners, it is our mission to provide appropriate courses that will allow students to reach their dreams. At Sun Prairie High School, student choice determines our master schedule. We offer myriad courses that appeal to the many diverse interests of our students while also meeting all core requirements for graduation. The importance of students making informed decisions about their courses cannot be overstated. Student choice determines which courses will actually become a part of the next year’s schedule; if students do not show interest in a course, based on minimal student requests, then that course is not offered. Students must give serious thought about their future goals and the courses that will best serve their needs. Further, Sun Prairie High School faculty and staff hope that each student experiences high school in a way that deepens a love of learning, fosters an ability to reason, and strengthens a commitment to apply knowledge in ways that will enhance our local and global communities. We hope that we are helping our students become thinkers! Please take the necessary time to review and understand the information contained in this course guide. Each student’s high school journey is personalized by the courses that s/he selects. A high school education is only meaningful if it has challenged students, if it has stretched students to new dimensions, if it has inspired students, and if it ultimately helps students find future fulfillment. Choose wisely! Sincerely, Lisa Heipp Principal

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Table of Contents Graduation Requirements ......................................................................................4 Scheduling Guidelines ...........................................................................................5 Grading ..................................................................................................................9 Student Services ....................................................................................................10 AgriScience and Natural Resources.......................................................................12 Art ..........................................................................................................................17 Business and Information Technology ...................................................................24 & Marketing Education English ...................................................................................................................33 Reading .................................................................................................................40 English and a Second Language ...........................................................................42 Family and Consumer Science ..............................................................................48 Mathematics ..........................................................................................................54 Music .....................................................................................................................60 Physical Education/Health .....................................................................................65 Science ..................................................................................................................68 Social Studies ........................................................................................................76 Technology and Engineering Education .................................................................86 Traffic Safety Education .........................................................................................95 World Languages ...................................................................................................96 Special Learning Opportunities ..............................................................................103 SPHS School-To-Work Opportunities ....................................................................110

Appendix 1 – Forms ..................................................................................... 118

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Graduation Requirements Subject

English 4.0 Credits (minimum)

Sun Prairie Requirements  25 Total Credits  Successful completion of the following subject and credit requirements: 1 credit  English 9 1 credit  Comprehensive English 10 .5 credit  American Experience .5 credit  Writing Elective .5 credit  Communications .5 credit  English Elective

Social Studies 3.0 Credits (minimum)

   

World History United States History Economics Foundations of American Democracy

1 credit 1 credit .5 credit .5 credit

Science 3.0 Credits (minimum)

  

Life Science Physical Science Science Elective

1 credit 1 credit 1 credit

Math 3.0 Credits (minimum)

  

Algebraic Concepts Geometric Concepts Math Elective

1 credit 1 credit 1 credit

Physical Education 1.5 Credits (minimum) Health .5 Credit Electives 10 Credits

Physical Education Electives

1.5 credits

.5 credit

Health Education

10 credits 

Competency Requirement

Service Learning

Option 1: Meet or exceed the score of proficient on the reading and math sections of the state approved standardized test as established by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.  Option 2: Meet the district-established competency with an additional ½ credit course (beyond the number of credits required for that content area) aligned to the state standards. One ½ credit course must be passed for each deficit or opted-out content area of reading and/or math.  Option 3: Meet or exceed the score of proficient on the reading and/or math sections on the Measure of Academic Progress assessment, as established by the Sun Prairie Area School District.  Service Learning is a graduation requirement that is met by completing projects within certain courses. Courses that offer the Service-Learning component have a project embedded within the curriculum for students to complete if they choose. Specific community-based Service-Learning activities will be considered to be part of the curriculum, will be aligned with the curriculum standards for the course, and will be assessed as part of the course. All students must complete one service-learning project during their high school experience.

Total Credits

25

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Post-Secondary Admission Requirements Subject

Minimum Entrance Requirements for most University of Wisconsin System institutions**

English 4 Credits Social Sciences 3 Credits Natural Sciences 3 Credits Math 3 Credits Electives 4 Credits

 Successful completion of the following subjects:  4 Credits (literature-based and composition-based English courses recommended by many universities)  3 Credits  3 Credits (Biology, chemistry and another lab science recommended by many universities)  Algebra  Geometry  Algebra 2 Recommended:  2 years of a single World Language (UW-Madison and UW-Eau Claire both REQUIRE 2 years of a single World Language for admission)  Fine arts, computer science, business, family and consumer education, and other academic, career, and technical areas.

Total 17 Credits Credits **Please verify admission requirements with the specific school of your choice**

Entrance Requirements for Wisconsin Technical College System institutions**     

Consult website for specific admission requirements. Some programs require the ACT or ASSET/COMPASS. Some programs require specific courses and grades. Applications should be submitted in early November of the senior year to optimize chances of admission into preferred programs. Some programs fill on the first day of application.

SCHEDULING GUIDELINES Calendar for Student Scheduling for the 2014-2015 School Year 

February 10, 2014 - Student course expo in the gym at the high school. Department representatives will be on hand to discuss courses within their departments and answer questions about which courses may best fit a student’s need. Parents and students are encouraged to attend this evening, from 5:00-7:00 p.m. so that informed decisions can be made.

February 5-20, 2014 – Students will enter course selections online from home or school. Registration access is 24/7 during this 10 day window. Computers in Student Services will be available for students to use during their study halls, before or after school, and lunchtime. All students are expected to enter their course selections during this time frame. These selections will be final and will be used to determine our SPHS master schedule.

NOTE: At least 3 alternate course choices MUST also be chosen and entered by all students so that in the event of a schedule conflict or a requested class not running, students can be placed in other acceptable options. If students do not select alternatives, in the event of a conflict, courses will be selected for them.

August 2014 – During registration week, student schedules will be distributed. In addition, after registration week, all student schedules are available online through Infinite Campus student and parent portals. 5


COURSE CHOICES FOR FULFILLING GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

English 9 -

Exploring English or Expanded English

English 10 -

Comprehensive English 10

English 11 -

American Experience

Writing Elective -

Advanced Composition, Applied Composition, Creative Writing

Communications -

Communications

English Elective -

Any of the other English course options listed

World History -

World History, Expanded World History, African Heritage or Native American & Latin American Heritage, International Studies & Global Realities

United States History -

US History or AP US History

Economics -

Economics, AP Macroeconomics, or AP Microeconomics

Civics -

Foundations of American Democracy or AP Government

Life Science -

Biology, Natural Science/Wisconsin Ecology, Genetics/Biotech, Physiology, Human Anatomy, Environmental Science, AP Biology, or AP Environmental Science

Physical Science -

Integrated Physical Lab Science, Chemistry, Physics, Aviation & Space, Forensic Science, AP Chemistry, AP Physics C: Mechanics, AP Physics 1, Kinetics, or Weather & Climate

Algebraic Concepts -

Algebra I, Algebra 2, Algebra Concepts for Transcripted Credit (ACTC)

Geometric Concepts -

Geometry

Math elective -

Any of the mathematics course options other than Algebra I and Geometry

Physical Education -

Any of the Physical Education course options

Health -

Health

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Attention Student Athletes NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION COURSES THAT HAVE BEEN APPROVED BY THE NCAA CLEARINGHOUSE www.NCAA.org ENGLISH COURSES

SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES

Critical Reading

Legal Studies

WORLD LANGUAGES COURSES Spanish I

Reading Writing & Reasoning

World History

Spanish II

Exploring English

Expanded World History

Spanish III

Essential English

United States History

Spanish IV

Comprehensive English 10

AP United States History

AP Spanish

AP English Literature

Psychology

French I

Applied Composition

Sociology

French II

Advanced Composition

Economics

French III

Creative Writing I & II

Current Affairs

French IV

Literature Composition

African Heritage

AP French

Contemporary Literature

Native and Latin American Heritage

German I

American Dream

AP US Government and Politics

German II

American Heritage

AP Macroeconomics

German III

Modern American Writers

AP Microeconomics

German IV

World Literature

AP Psychology

AP German

Accelerated English

Diversity Studies

CAPP German

American Experience

Foundations of American Democracy

Chinese I

Real World Reading

International Studies and Global Relations AP European History

Chinese II

MATHEMATICS COURSES

SCIENCE COURSES

SCIENCE COURSES

Algebra IA

Natural Science

AP Physics C: Mechanic

Algebra IB

Integrated Physical Lab Science

Algebra I

Biology

Geometry

Chemistry

Algebra II

Physics

Pre-Calculus

Physiology

AP Calculus AB

Human Anatomy

AP Statistics

Genetics and Biotechnology

Transition To College Math

Forensic Science Environmental AP Environmental AP Biology AP Chemistry

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Schedule Changes Classes and teachers are to remain as scheduled after February. Students are required to keep all classes as assigned.

Schedule changes will NOT be made for the following reasons:      

Lunch preference Teacher preference Course preference Hour preference Employment Extra-curricular activities

During the first week of the semester, counselors may change schedules for the following reasons:      

Graduation requirement needed Failure of a required class Failure to meet pre-requisite Teacher’s evaluation of student ability Medical recommendation IEP/504 Documentation Student Scheduling Requirements

All students are required by Wisconsin Statute 118.33 to be in school for the full day unless a student is in an accredited work program or has an I.E.P. designating otherwise. A full day of school for Sun Prairie Senior High School students is defined by the Sun Prairie School Board.

Students with Special Needs Accommodations will be made for students who have met legal requirements for programs established by Board policies and Board/administrative procedures.

Early Graduation Students who will complete all credit and graduation requirements earlier than in eight semesters may apply for early graduation. A written request for early graduation, signed by the student’s parents/guardians, must be submitted to the high school principal by the end of first semester of the Junior year for consideration of approval.

Transfer Students Transfer students must earn a minimum of three credits at Sun Prairie High School to be eligible for a Sun Prairie High School Diploma

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GRADING Grading Scale 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.3 1.0 .7 0

A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DF

93-100 90-92 87-89 83-86 80-82 77-79 73-76 70-72 67-69 63-66 60-62 59 and below

Grade Reports Progress Reports reflect current achievement at mid-quarter. Quarter Report Cards reflect grades earned for a nine-week period. No credit is awarded at quarter. Semester Report Cards reflect grades earned each of the two quarters, the semester exam grades, and final semester grades. Credit is awarded for classes that are successfully passed. NOTE: Semester Grades are: Permanent Appear on transcript Determine credit earned Factor into cumulative grade point average (GPA) Credits A student earning a passing grade in a semester course will earn one-half credit. Sun Prairie High School runs two-quarter credit classes: Traffic Safety and Career Workshop. A student earning a passing grade in either of these quarter credit classes will earn one-quarter credit.

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STUDENT SERVICES: Student Services is comprised of School Counselors, School Social Workers, and School Psychologists. The Student Services team works collaboratively to best help students in the areas of academic achievement, personal/social development and career services, as well as providing responsive services. School Counselors The School Counseling program is designed to work with all students throughout the school year. The major components of the School Counseling program are to promote the academic success of all students by providing the following programming and services on behalf of students: Academic Achievement Scheduling of students and making schedule changes Learning problem-solving strategies Referral for special help Maintenance of student records Administration/interpretation of standardized testing Personal/Social Development Student Advocacy Responsive Services One-on-one brief counseling Social Academic Instructional Groups (SAIG) Career Exploration Provide counseling regarding options Discuss class options with students given career goals School Social Workers In addition to promoting personal/social development, additional School Social Worker roles include:

    

Coordinating with and access to community resources Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Services C.A.R.E. Program Coordination One-on-one brief counseling Facilitating IEP Meetings

School Psychologists In addition to promoting personal/social development, additional School Psychologist roles include:  Special Education Testing  One-on-one brief counseling  Facilitating IEP Meetings  Facilitating 504 Meetings

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SUN PRAIRIE HIGH SCHOOL COURSES

Course fees are under consideration by the Sun Prairie Area School Board and are subject to change for the 2014-2015 school year.

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AGRICULTURE FOOD AND NATURAL RESOURCES Agricultural Education Mission Statement Agriculture Education prepares students for any career; supports students in their career choices; and develops leadership skills in students to benefit their community and the food, fiber, and natural resource systems. Future Farmers of America (FFA) Mission Statement The Wisconsin and National FFA Organization is dedicated to making a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education.

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Career and Technical Education: Agriculture Science Course #

Title

Grades

Prerequisites

Length of Course/Credits Earned

8002 AGR

Large Animal Science

10-12

none

Semester / .5

8010 AGR

Horticulture and Landscape Design (Previously: Introduction to Horticulture) Advanced Horticulture and Greenhouse Management

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

Semester / .5

8046 AGR

Companion Animal Science

10-12

Horticulture and Landscape Design (Previously: Introduction to Horticulture) none

8022 AGR

Veterinary Science (Previously: Introduction to Veterinary Science) Agri-Business Leadership

11-12

Semester / .5

10-12

Companion Animals or Large Animal Science none

10-12

none

Semester / .5

8017 AGR

Conservation and Recreational Resources Land Water and Energy

10-12

none

Semester / .5

8030 AGR

Welding I

10-12

none

Semester / .5

8036 AGR

Welding II

10-12

Welding I

Semester / .5

8014 AGR

8003 AGR 8016 AGR

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Semester / .5

Semester / .5


The class has a heavy emphasis on application from soil testing and preparation to plant propagation along with landscape architecture and fertilization and pest management. This is a hands on course so be prepared to get your hands dirty working in the green house or outdoors for our projects!

LARGE ANIMAL SCIENCE Course 8002AGR Elective Course .5 credits Students interested in horses as companions, livestock including beef, dairy, sheep, swine, and chickens for food and fiber production, or a career in animal science, veterinary science, or food and fiber products and processing should consider this course. We will study animal handling, care, management, nutrition and safety as well as the food and fiber production of dairy, beef, sheep, swine, and chickens. Labs will include making and evaluating food products like cheese, butter, beef jerky, and sausage, as well as hatching baby chicks and handling livestock and horses.

ADVANCED HORTICULTURE AND GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT Course 8014AGR Elective Course .5 credits Prerequisite: Horticulture and Landscape Design (Previously: Introduction to Horticulture) This course will build on the skills learned in Horticulture and Landscape Design. Our primary goal is to expand each student’s working knowledge regarding soils and soil media, fertilization requirements for various plants and growing conditions necessary to obtain desired results with ornamental and food producing grasses, herbaceous plants, trees, and shrubs. Labs will include tree pruning and care, mixing and testing soil and soilless media, manipulating environmental conditions for growing poinsettias and lilies, forcing bulbs, and designing specific landscape plans. We will also study cost and return analysis in the plant science industry and learn techniques used in floriculture while developing and managing a greenhouse plant sale.

HORTICULTURE AND LANDSCAPE DESIGN (Previously: Introduction to Horticulture) Course 8010AGR Elective Course .5 credits Horticulture and Landscape Design is the study of, and the practical use of, plants in the landscape environment. In this course we will look at how plants impact our daily lives as food producers and in ornamental surroundings, and also discuss the big picture aspects of local, national, and global importance of plants in agriculture. Throughout the class we will build upon the concepts of how to care for plants based upon their biological needs and how we can use these plants to help support our lives. 14


COMPANION ANIMAL SCIENCE Course 8046AGR Elective Course .5 credits Students interested in companion animal handling and care or interested in a career in veterinary science should consider this course. Animal care and safety including handling, training, grooming, nutritional needs, and showing will be discussed and demonstrated with classroom and personal pets. Animals covered will include dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters and many various other companion animals. Students will have the opportunity to bring their pets into the classroom for presentation and demonstration purposes. Students will create a care and management guide for an animal of their choice that will be beneficial to them in their future ownership of animals.

AGRI-BUSINESS LEADERSHIP Course 8003AGR Elective Course .5 credits The materials in this course will be presented in such a way that it can apply to all forms of business; however, agriculture will be the focus. Students will study different types of business organizations and what it takes to properly establish a business. Farm organizations, cooperatives, laws, and advancing technology will be addressed. We will take a look at where we started in agriculture and how far we have come! The marketing of agriculture products will be extensively studied as they move from producer to consumer. Careers will be a major focus as there are many opportunities in agriculture within the realm of business and marketing. With an everincreasing need for leaders within our school, community, state, and nation, we need you to be competent citizens who can make things happen! This class will also teach students how to tweak their leadership skills to be the best they can be. Students will help to organize field trips to local businesses.

VETERINARY SCIENCE (Previously: Introduction to Veterinary Science) Course 8022AGR Elective Course .5 credits Prerequisite: Large Animal Science and/or Companion Animal Science This advanced level Animal Science course is designed for students who are seriously considering careers in veterinary medicine, lab animal or veterinary technician programs, or plan to be working in animal production facilities in the future. Students will develop greater skills based on the knowledge gained in Companion Animal Science and Large Animal Science, with an emphasis on animal systems including skeletal, tissue, reproductive, digestive, respiratory, and neurological terminology and physiology. Labs will include dissections of lung, heart, liver, and reproductive organs. Practical applications will include animal restraint, reproductive and nutritional management, and disease and parasite control.

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CONSERVATION AND RECREATIONAL RESOURCES Course 8016AGR Elective Course .5 credits

geothermal and solar energy as it is even used in our high school.

How many National Parks can you name? How did the National Park Service develop and who takes care of the National and State Forests? These are just a few of the questions that will be answered in this class. Students who have an interest in outdoor recreation, protecting unique environmental areas, or entering careers in Natural Resources will benefit from this course. Units of study will include history of our park and forest service, skills that rangers and technicians need to handle current environmental challenges, and issues such as wildfires, floods, and environmental damage due to human interaction. One of the class projects will be developing a camping trip plan that includes four states and a variety of National and State parks and forests and another will be an animal taxidermy.

WELDING I Course 8030AGR Elective Course 1.0 Credits Course fee: $27.00 for safety equipment The semester course in welding will include work in all of the common procedures of welding with arc and Oxyacetylene processes. It will include AC and DC Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Plasma Arc Cutting (PAC), and introductory Oxyacetylene cutting and fusion welding. Safety glasses are required.

LAND WATER AND ENERGY Course 8017AGR Elective Course .5 credits

WELDING II Course 8036AGR Elective Course 1.0 Credits Prerequisite: Welding I Course fee: $27.00 for safety equipment

If you are considering entering a career in studies related to environmental systems, this course will help you gain the skills and experiences necessary for success in that field. We will study and learn about the various land and soil characteristics in North America with an emphasis on soil fertility and erosion control. We will study our water resources including ground and surface water, discuss water quality and pollution issues, and discover new methods of utilizing and conserving our water resources. Our study of energy will include developing an understanding of how we use our existing fuel sources and participate in lab experiences, which include producing renewable fuels from grains and vegetable oil resources, as well as studying

Welding II is an advanced course in welding for students who have demonstrated excellence in the basic welding processes. Students will be challenged with out of position welding in both Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) and Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) processes and introductory assignments in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) welding. Students will review Oxyacetylene cutting and fusion welding and complete a sheet metal project using Resistance Welding (RW) and specialized hand-tools.

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ART All students can benefit from art education. At SPHS we offer a wide variety of challenging Art courses to help you discover, develop and appreciate individual creative talents in the visual arts. Knowledge and experience of Art and design is a vital part of a growing number of careers you may be interested in for your future. Art classes will:     

Allow learners to express themselves creatively. Promote individuality, bolster self-confidence, and improve overall academic performance. Help all students develop more appreciation and understanding of the world around them. Help students develop a sense of craftsmanship, quality task performance, and goal-setting skills needed to succeed in the classroom and beyond. Strengthen student problem-solving and critical thinking skills, adding to overall academic achievement and school success

When an advanced class is not offered, the Art Teachers encourage students interested and skilled in specialized areas to repeat courses that will refine their skills and expand their knowledge by completing advanced projects. Students receive one-half credit and are allowed to repeat all art courses once, with teacher approval. Use the number of the course you are interested in repeating when filling in your schedule. General supplies will be provided by the Art Department, but some supplies must be purchased from the Art Department, i.e. sterling silver, copper, matboards, canvas, film or photo paper. Grades are determined using rubrics that evaluate individual work, quizzes and a final exam.

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Course #

Title

Grades

7336 ART

Architecture

10-12

none

Semester / .5

7315 ART

Ceramics

10-12

none

Semester / .5

7318 ART

Advanced Ceramics

10-12

Ceramics

Semester / .5

7320 ART

Art Metals

10-12

none

Semester / .5

7325 ART

Drawing I

10-12

none

Semester / .5

7324 ART

Drawing II

10-12

Drawing I

Semester / .5

7326 ART

General Painting

10-12

none

Semester / .5

7335 ART

Graphic Design

10-12

none

Semester / .5

7350 ART

Photography I

10-12

none

Semester / .5

7351 ART

Photography II

10-12

Photography I

Semester / .5

7316 ART

Sculpture

10-12

none

Semester / .5

7352 ART

Arts of Industry

10-12

none

Semester / .5

7310 ART 7311 ART 7312 ART 7313 ART 7308 ART 7309 ART

AP Studio Art – 2D Design - Drawing AP Studio Art – 3D Design - Photography AP Art History

11-12

Recommendation of art teacher Recommendation of art teacher none

11-12 11-12

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Prerequisites

Length of Course/Credits Earned

Year/ 1 Year/ 1 Year/ 1


mugs and a variety of other functional and decorative creations. Students will have free time to create ceramic work for themselves beyond the assigned projects. Quizzes are part of the semester grades.

STUDIO ART COURSES ARCHITECTURE Course 7336ART Elective .5 credit

Prerequisite: None

ART METALS

Course Fee: $30.00 Fees for student take home project materials and other consumable materials such as matboard, model making supplies, colored pencils, markers, acetate, and pastels.

Course 7320ART Elective .5 credit

Prerequisite: None Course Fee: $25.00 Fees for student take home project materials and other consumable materials such as flat metal, solder, buffing rouge, wire, and wood.

Architecture and art is the focus of this semester. Students will focus on artistic skills such as drawing, shading, form, function, Architectural terms, and model making. Architectural styles and the history of Architecture will provide students a foundation to build upon. Students will develop their own personal style after experimenting with different types of media. Units include floor plans development, elevation drawings and model making.

In Art Metals, the student learns to design and make various projects using copper, brass, and silver. The students can design the projects freehand or with a computer. Tasks include soldering, polishing, enameling, casting, setting a stone, and forging different metals. Students will select a design from their sketches and then produce a project in one of the appropriate techniques possible. Student assignments may include; forged rings, wire sculptures, necklaces, pins, money clips, and castings. Sketches and quizzes are part of the semester grade.

CERAMICS Course 7315ART Elective .5 credit

Prerequisite: None Course Fee: $25.00 Fees for student take home project materials and other consumable materials such as clay, glazes and tools.

ADVANCED CERAMICS Course 7318 ART Elective .5 credit

This course is designed for students who are interested in constructing with clay. During the first nine weeks the students will concentrate on the basics of forming clay on and off of the potter's wheel. The second nine weeks, the students will focus on creatively applying the knowledge gained during the first nine weeks as well as the techniques of adding color to work through glazing. Students will select a design from their sketches and build the clay form in a chosen construction technique. Students will express themselves in each project through the use of good proportion, surface decoration and craftsmanship. Student projects may include ceramic vases, cups,

Prerequisite: Ceramics Course Fee: $25.00 Fees for student take home project materials and other consumable materials such as clay, glazes, tools, and gas used in firing. Advanced ceramics is a class that is designed for students that have already taken ceramics and are interested in furthering their knowledge of ceramics. The assignments will be based around working on the potter’s wheel, with a small portion based on hand building. Student assignments include teapots, dish sets,

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large thrown vessels and other advanced ceramics technique work. Students will work with stoneware as well as earthenware clay and the processes of firing both types of clay bodies. Students will need to purchase on their own a sketchbook and a pencil.

to create sophisticated artworks. Students will use their own talents and interests as a guide. Students will experiment with diverse media and techniques. Some units of focus will include: Biological and Botanical Illustration, Figure Drawing, Abstract Art, Animals in Art, and printmaking.

DRAWING I Course 7325ART Elective .5 credit

GENERAL PAINTING Course 7326ART Elective .5 credit

Prerequisite: None Course Fee: 20.00 Fees for student take home project materials and other consumable materials such as matboard, colored pencils, markers, inks, a variety of papers, erasers, shading pencils, and pastels

Prerequisite: None Course Fee: $25.00 Fees for student take home project materials and other consumable materials such as acrylic and watercolor paints, papers, gesso, medium, and other miscellaneous supplies related to the painting task.

Students will use drawing to express themselves. Drawing is the basic language that an artist uses in order to create any work of art whether it be painting or making jewelry. This class encourages the student to accurately see and record objects as seen from real life. Basic value and shading techniques are taught through a variety of media such as graphite and pastels. Students will have the opportunity to selfselect media and will have many personal choices when solving given problems.

The first nine weeks of this course will consist of an introduction to painting with watercolor and ink. Students will create and explore the transparent qualities of both media using wet as well as dry techniques. Students will explore Eastern sumie and Western painting techniques, experimenting with different tools and papers. The paintings will be developed from beginning sketches through preparation of the surfaces, to matting of the finished painting. The second nine weeks of this course will include the introduction to acrylic painting as a medium of expression. Color theory, perception, composition, art history, and specific techniques in handling acrylics will be the tasks of the painter in this course. Subject matter will include a 3-dimensional painting, a landscape and compositions of the students' own creations.

DRAWING II Course 7324ART Elective .5 credit Prerequisite: Drawing I Course Fee: $25.00 Fees for student take home project materials and other consumable materials such as matboard, colored pencils, markers, inks, a variety of papers, erasers, shading pencils, printing supplies, and pastels Students who are interested in illustration or advancing their general drawing skills should take this course. Students will apply unique, individual and advanced visual design techniques. Students will use accurate scientific information, advanced observation skills and a high level of detail

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and digital images to complete a photo essay and a calendar.

GRAPHIC DESIGN Course 7335ART Elective .5 credit

Service Learning

Prerequisite: None Course Fee: $30.00 Fees for student materials.

PHOTOGRAPHY II take

home

Course 7351ART, Course 7351ART Elective .5 credit Prerequisite: Photography I Course Fee: $40.00 Fees for student take home project materials and other consumable materials such as lab supplies, developing chemicals, paper, film, and mounting board.

project

Students will simulate some actual assignments that a graphic designer might do. Graphic design introduces students to art in the design and selling of ideas and products. Students solve specific problems and use a variety of media to communicate a visual message. Assignments include designing logos, advertisements, playing card decks, business packages, posters, and stickers. Students will be introduced to Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop and its use in professional graphic design and will use Mac computers for some project work.

Building on the basic knowledge and experiences from Photography I, students will be exposed to higher-level techniques and processes in black and white photography. The assignments will be more challenging and more in depth than Photography I. Students wishing to take this course should have a secure knowledge of techniques and procedures learned in Photography I and the approval of their Photography I instructor. Digital cameras and computers will be incorporated into several projects. Photography II will incorporate school and business/community related projects when possible. Career exploration related to photography will also be encouraged.

PHOTOGRAPHY I Course 7350ART Elective .5 credit

Prerequisite: None Course Fee: $40.00 Fees for student take home project materials and other consumable materials such as lab supplies, developing chemicals, paper, film and mounting board.

SCULPTURE In Photography I students are taught how to correctly and effectively use a single lens reflex 35mm camera. Picture taking will be in the classroom and on the high school grounds. The student will be encouraged to check out a camera over night, on weekends, and vacations in order to expand photo opportunities and to have a greater variety of photo images. The student is taught how to develop film and produce prints from their negatives. The second nine weeks introduces the use of black and white photography as fine art by hand coloring, toning, solarizing, and chemically altering photos. Students will also be introduced to the digital camera and Photoshop. Students will use the computer

Course 7316ART Elective .5 credit Course Fee: $25.00 Fees for student take home project materials and other consumable materials such as wire, plaster, wood, metal, fabric, and other miscellaneous sculpture materials. Projects created in this Sculpture class are different than those at the 8th and 9th grade level. Sculpture class is designed for the student that loves to create with his/her hands or would like to explore all of the different possibilities and mediums available to create 3- dimensional artwork. Students will use many mediums including; glass,

21


plaster, recycled items, foam board, and other mediums to create their art. This art class will allow students to create slumped glasswork, soapstone sculptures, and many other 3-D sculptures. Students will be expected to research famous sculptors that will help motivate and direct student ideas into aesthetically pleasing sculptures.

quality matboards for framing and mounting their portfolio. This section is for students who work in drawing (not computer-aided), and painting. AP Studio Art is designed primarily for the advanced level art student who is preparing a portfolio for art school admission requirements, scholarships, and possible Advanced Placement credit. Every student is required to create and compile a portfolio based on the Advanced Placement guidelines for Studio Art. The two portfolios currently offered are Drawing and 2-D Design (photography). Students opting to send in the portfolio will have the added exam fee of $86.00 (subject to change), as well as the class fee of $40.00. Portfolio compilation occurs during AP exam week in May. Students need to be self-motivated, conscientious, and be capable of producing artwork under strict timelines. The lessons in the first semester for drawing students will be designed to help them learn and gain skill in various painting and drawing mediums and styles. The 2-D Design students will work in either computer-aided graphics programs or photography. During the second semester, students will develop a body of work based on a concept or focus of their choice. A total of 24 works will then be compiled and sent to the College Board for review. Successful portfolios will receive college credit. Students need to have successfully passed two additional art courses and have the recommendation of an art teacher to register for the course. The testing fee is an additional cost to the class fee, and is paid to the Advanced Placement Testing Board through Student Services.

ARTS OF INDUSTRY Course 7352ART Elective .5 credit Arts of Industry is designed for those students who want to get a complete education in the elements and principles of design and be able to apply it to their art through the use of more ―industrial‖ type tools and machines. This class goes way beyond the typical art room setting in that larger scale sculptures will be created through the use of technologically advanced tools/machines. Arts of Industry will teach students to have an artistic eye for creation and the trade/skill of how to use first-rate industrial tools/machines. While working in the class, students will be creating various projects that will be a part of the school and/or the community. Students will be encouraged to use class time and what they have learned toward their community service requirement for graduation. Arts of Industry will offer much opportunity to learn and create many self-rewarding pieces of artwork.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) STUDIO ART – 2D DESIGN DRAWING

http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing /ap/sub_studioart.html?studioart

Course 7310ART, 7311ART Elective 1 credit AP Contract Required Prerequisite: Recommendation of an art teacher Course Fee: $40.00 Fees for student take home project materials and other consumable materials such as papers, paints, all types of drawing media, workable sprays, solvents and high

22


graphics programs or photography. During the second semester, students will develop a body of work based on a concept or focus of their choice. A total of 24 works will then be compiled and sent to the College Board for review. Successful portfolios will receive college credit. Students need to have successfully passed two additional art courses and have the recommendation of an art teacher to register for the course. The testing fee is an additional cost to the class fee, and is paid to the Advanced Placement Testing Board through Student Services.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) STUDIO ART – 3D DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY Course 7312ART, 7313ART Elective 1 credit AP Contract Required Prerequisite: Recommendation of an art teacher Course Fee: $40.00 Fees for student take home project materials and other consumable materials such as papers, paints, all types of drawing media, workable sprays, solvents and high quality matboards for framing and mounting their portfolio.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ART HISTORY

This section is for students who do computer -aided drawing and Photography.

Course 7308ART, 7309ART Elective 1 credit AP Contract Required

AP Studio Art is designed primarily for the advanced level art student who is preparing a portfolio for art school admission requirements, scholarships, and possible Advanced Placement credit. Every student is required to create and compile a portfolio based on the Advanced Placement guidelines for Studio Art. The two portfolios currently offered are Drawing and 2-D Design (photography). Students opting to send in the portfolio will have the added exam fee of $86.00 (subject to change), as well as the class fee of $40.00. Portfolio compilation occurs during AP exam week in May. Students need to be self-motivated, conscientious, and be capable of producing artwork under strict timelines. The lessons in the first semester for drawing students will be designed to help them learn and gain skill in various painting and drawing mediums and styles. The 2-D Design students will work in either computer-aided

AP Art History is designed to provide the same benefits to secondary school students as those provided by an introductory college course in art history: an understanding and enjoyment of architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within historical and cultural contexts. Students will be challenged to look at works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and to articulate what they see or experience. No prior exposure to art history is required. However, students who have done well in other courses in the humanities, such as history and literature, or in any of the studio arts are especially encouraged to enroll. This course is intended for students who plan to take the College Board AP Art History Exam in May. http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing /ap/sub_art.html?arthist

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BUSINESS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MARKETING EDUCATION What can Business and/or Marketing do for you? Employers are continuously looking for conscientious, well-qualified, highly trained employees in the business world. Career opportunities with unlimited possibilities for advancement exist in Accounting, Information Technology, management, administrative and the Marketing fields. Our mission is to prepare students for college, business and/or marketing careers and to prepare students to become familiar with the business environment in our ever changing global economy. Business Education focuses on those aspects of business that affect every member of society. Our classes focus on many aspects of business whether you are attending postsecondary learning, working in business, or wanting to start your own business. Our curriculum also prepares students with the skills required to be successful in a variety of business entities. The Business and Information Technology and Marketing Departments of Sun Prairie High School are organized to contribute to the education of students in four ways:    

Preparation for college Specific career education General education about the world of business and marketing Real-life scenarios with opportunities to work in the area/field of choice.

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BUSINESS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MARKETING EDUCATION Course #

Title

See Course Description for number 6300 BUS

Career Workshop

6443 BUS

Grades

Prerequisites

Length of Course/Credit s Earned

10-12

none

Business Concepts

10-12

Note: option to take with Driver’s Ed none

Semester / .5

Business and Consumer Law Business and Information Technology Keyboarding

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

Keyboarding or Computer Applications I

Semester / .5

6328 BUS

Computer Applications I (Previously: Document Processing I) Computer Applications II (Previously: Document Processing II) IT Essentials

10-12

none

Semester / .5

6335 BUS

Networking Essentials

10-12

none

Semester / .5

6339 BUS

Medical Office Procedures

11-12

Semester / .5

See Instructor for number

Business Occupations Work Experience

10-12

6411 BUS

Managing Personal Business Records Accounting I

10-12

Medical Terminology and adequate keyboarding skills Must have successfully completed or currently enrolled in a business course and have a career interest in a business pathway of study none

10-12

none

Year / 1

Accounting II

11-12

Accounting I

Year / 1

Marketing Education I

10-12

none

Year / 1

Marketing Education II

11-12

Marketing Education I

Year / 1

Entrepreneurship and Management Marketing Merchandising and Retailing

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

6332 BUS 6303 BUS 6311 BUS

6319 BUS

6421 BUS 6422 BUS 6431 BUS 6432 BUS 6461 BUS 6462 BUS 6471 BUS 6472 BUS 6475 BUS 6480 BUS

25

Quarter/ .25

Semester / .5 for 90 hours of supervised work experience

Semester / .5


CAREER WORKSHOP Course 6341BUS W/7502DRE Course 6342BUS W/7501DRE Course 6343BUS W/7504DRE Course 6344BUS W/7503DRE Elective .25 Credits (This course may be paired with Traffic Safety Education)

content includes many hands-on projects as well as speakers from area businesses.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND MANAGEMENT Course 6475BUS Elective .5 Credits

Career Workshop is a course that will help students identify and refine the interpersonal skills and values that lead to success in the world of work. This course will help students understand the expectations and professionalism demanded in the job marketplace, and develop job acquisition skills needed for employment. Students will explore career options and develop a personal career plan and portfolio. This is an excellent way for students to help prepare themselves for ―life after Sun Prairie High School.‖

Being your own boss, owning your own business; these are the foundations of the American Dream. This class provides students with the opportunity to make that happen. Students will gain an understanding of what goes on ―behind the scenes‖ before a business opens its doors for the first time by completing two projects. Students will create their own ―business‖ and experience the steps taken when creating a business plan. Students will learn about obtaining financing, meeting the needs of a market, selecting a location, hiring, and managing a workforce.

BUSINESS CONCEPTS Course 6300BUS Elective .5 Credits

BUSINESS AND CONSUMER LAW Course 6443BUS Elective .5 Credits

This is a course designed to help a student explore various business concepts and understand the role business plays in our economy. Units covered include: what businesses do, how they function, producing goods and services, international business, consumer decision making, personal and family money management, the different types of insurance, how to open and maintain a checking account, and investments.

Students study the underlying legal concepts that personal and business law are based on to understand the importance of the law in general. They then become familiar with relevant specific laws, and explore the applications of law both in business situations and in more familiar personal transactions. Discussion of current law-related events in the news makes the subject relevant to everyday life. Business ethics is also addressed. Students may have the opportunity to hear guest speakers, be involved in a mock trial in class, take field trips to Sun Prairie Municipal Court, Dane County Circuit and/or Federal District Courts.

This course is also helpful for students to understand procedures/policies of all businesses, so they are better prepared to enter the workforce or continue their career path in the business field. This course provides basic business/working knowledge for any student that will work in our global economy.

The course content emphasizes contracts and other legal issues as they relate to the world of business. Contracts, product liability, warranties, negotiable instruments, and secured transactions are covered.

This course is the first class students should take if they are planning on taking additional Business or Marketing classes. Class

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Students also study personal legal issues such as renting, buying a house, getting married, and the importance of making a will.

technology for the day-to-day operations of the business. Students will learn how to analyze, create and publish web pages keeping them on the cutting edge of technology. They will develop an understanding of the importance of web pages in today’s society, by exploring innovative WEB 2.0 sites. Students will build their own sites by first understanding the newest language of the web HTML, and then move on to utilizing Adobe programs: Dreamweaver, Flash, and Fireworks. Students will also enhance their presentation skills using the latest tools in technology.

Students interested in an in-depth study of the history of criminal, civil, and constitutional law should enroll in Legal Studies, a course offered by the Social Studies Department. Because the course contents are different, students may enroll in and receive credit for both courses. Students who are really interested in law should consider taking both courses some time during high school.

KEYBOARDING Course 6303BUS Elective .5 Credits Do you struggle with using a computer keyboard? Keyboarding is a skill that you should master before leaving high school. Computers are in all facets of every business. BUSINESS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Course 6332 BUS Elective .5 Credits NOTE: This is a Transcripted course (Madison College)

Students will learn the keyboard, master keyboarding techniques, develop speed and accuracy and will also learn the basic format of typing reports, letters and tables. This is a must class for your high school assignments, and career and/or college basic computer (key board) knowledge.

Do you want to learn how to write software programs? Do you want to learn how businesses communicate to the public?

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I

(Previously: Document Processing I) Course 6311BUS Elective .5 Credits NOTE: Dual-Credit Course

This course is designed for students who are looking for extensive knowledge of how to use computers to increase their employability skills in the 21st Century. This course will focus on the necessary skills required for career and/or college paths. Businesses seek savvy employees competent in technology and it is also a necessary component in preparing students for college.

Computer Applications I is a 21st Century class designed to help all students! Students in Computer Applications I will learn the necessary skills to excel in high school, postsecondary education, and in the professional world. Students will learn how to navigate the many features and functions of Google Docs, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and various Web based

The course focuses on the latest technology and on how companies communicate using

27


programs. Upon completion of Computer Applications I, students will be better prepared to meet the expectations of high school curricular expectations and business needs. Curriculum will be aligned with Madison College and may offer the option for advanced standing or transcripted credit.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II

(Previously: Document Processing II) Course 6319BUS Elective .5 Credits Prerequisite: Keyboarding or Computer Applications I (Previously Document Processing I)* "*NOTICE: A student may skip Computer Applications I and go directly into Computer Applications II if the student has mastered the formatting skills (letters, tables, WordArt, Smart Graphics, etc.) that are taught in Computer Applications I. NOTE: Dual-Credit Course

IT ESSENTIALS Course 6328BUS Elective .5 Credits NOTE: Dual-Credit Course

Service Learning

Interested in computers? Maybe you want a career in computer hardware? IT Essentials builds knowledge of basic computer hardware and operating systems, covering skills such as installation, building, upgrading, repairing, configuring and troubleshooting. Students will be able to diagnose PC hardware problems, along with learning preventative maintenance and safety procedures. This course validates the basic skills needed for any entry-level service technician regardless of the job environment. Students will have the handson opportunity to demonstrate their skills by working with computers. Students taking this course will have the opportunity to be CISCO, A+ certified.

Computer Applications II is a continuation from Computer Applications I designed to ready students to meet tomorrow’s career and college expectations. Students will learn the necessary skills to excel in high school, post-secondary education, and as a profession. Students will learn many of the features and functions of Microsoft Office, primarily Excel and Access. This is a must course for all students who want to be successful in today’s technology driven business world.

When taught by a certified MATC trained teacher and with successful completion of the course (passing the required exam) the student can receive Madison College credit. Dual credit is available only to Juniors and Seniors.

Curriculum includes creating, organizing, and manipulating data within spreadsheets and data sets. Students will be able to manage data and create charts, reports, and forms to present in an organized and professional manner. Curriculum will be aligned with Madison College and may offer the option for advanced standing or transcripted credit.

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NETWORKING ESSENTIALS Course 6335BUS Elective .5 credits NOTE: Dual-Credit Course

providing real-world experience with physician’s dictation and hands-on practice with all the components for a busy office environment. This class prepares students for work in the office of a doctor, clinic, hospital, or employment wherever knowledge of medical terminology, professional procedures and ethics are required. This course also provides excellent preparation for administrative assistant positions in any business office environment.

Welcome to the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Discovery course, Networking for Home and Small Businesses. The goal of this course is to introduce you to fundamental networking concepts and technologies. This course provides a hands-on introduction to networking and the Internet using tools and hardware commonly found in the home and small business environment. These online materials will assist you in developing the skills necessary to plan and implement small networks across a range of applications. This course prepares you with the skills needed to obtain entry-level Home Network Installer jobs. It also prepares you for some of the skills needed for Network Technician, Computer Technician, Cable Installer, and Help Desk Technician jobs.

BUSINESS OCCUPATIONS WORK EXPERIENCE See instructor for course numbers Elective .5 Credits/Semester/Minimum of 90 hours of supervised work experience Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed or concurrently enrolled in one of the following: Accounting, Computer Applications II or Business and Information Technology Students will go into an actual job for more supervised experience. Students work, on average, fifteen hours outside of class time per week and are paid for this experience. The career goal of each student determines the placement of the student for the work experience. Students are evaluated quarterly by their employers and receive a grade for this on-the-job training; one half credit is earned each semester for a minimum of 90 hours. A student can earn a maximum of two credits for this work experience in either their junior or senior year. Students must complete an application to be considered for acceptance into the program. Students who wish to enroll in this work-based program must meet the work program requirements.

When taught by a certified MATC trained teacher and with successful completion of the course (passing the required exam) the student can receive Madison College credit. Dual credit is available only to Juniors and Seniors.

MEDICAL OFFICE PROCEDURES Course 6339BUS Elective .5 Credits Prerequisite: Medical Terminology and adequate keyboarding skills Medical Office Procedures introduces and describes the tasks of a medical assistant or related career. The student will learn records management, medical communications and scheduling skills. The student will learn business telephone procedures, payroll, business correspondence, inventory control and entering daily transactions using software designed for the medical industry. The student will participate in simulations

29


MANAGING PERSONAL/BUSINESS RECORDS Course 6411BUS Elective .5 Credits

year or two of accounting while in high school. When taught by a certified MATC trained teacher and with successful completion of the course (passing the required exam) the student can receive Madison College credit. Dual credit is available only to Juniors and Seniors.

The principles of planning, managing and recording the transactions of daily personal life are covered. Emphasis is placed on checking and saving accounts, budgets, household finance records, personal tax records and payroll records, entering and maintaining records manually and electronically, keeping personal and business budgets, applying for credit cards, maintaining accurate personal records such as checking accounts, and knowing how to process payroll records. Business forms and records are also stressed, using a computer to record transactions.

ACCOUNTING II Course 6431BUS, 6432BUS Elective 1.0 Credit Prerequisite: Accounting I Course Fee: $30.00 for workbook NOTE: Dual-Credit Course Further refinement of the knowledge and skills attained in Accounting I. This secondyear course continues with the Accounting process and builds accounting knowledge for college accounting classes. Departmentalized, corporation, management, and cost accounting are studied, as well as general accounting adjustments and other accounting systems. Managerial accounting will also be learned.

Service Learning

ACCOUNTING I Course 6421BUS, 6422BUS Elective 1.0 credit NOTE: Dual-Credit Course

When taught by a certified MATC trained teacher and with successful completion of the course (passing the required exam) the student can receive Madison College credit. Dual credit is available only to Juniors and Seniors.

The principles of recording business transactions, preparing financial statements, and keeping records of small businesses, partnerships, and corporations are covered. Many opportunities exist in accounting and related fields, particularly in computers. Accounting is the language of business and is highly regarded in the business world. This class is strongly recommended for students planning to pursue a degree in any area of business (marketing, sales, finance, management, owning your own business, etc.) There is tremendous value to taking a

30


MARKETING EDUCATION II Course 6471BUS, 6472BUS 1.0 Credit Elective Prerequisite: Marketing Education I

MARKETING EDUCATION I Course 6461BUS, 6462BUS Elective 1.0 credit NOTE: Dual-Credit Course

Service Learning

This class provides students with further opportunity to explore the world of marketing. Students will use the concepts learned in Marketing I by applying them with greater depth. Extra stress will be placed on business rigor and relevance. This is a project based course with special emphasis in market research, marketing information, 21st century skills, and business expectations.

Service Learning

Do you ever wonder why companies use different advertising campaigns, or why products are continually changed or adapted? Then this is the class for you. This class teaches students the fundamentals of marketing in our society. As one third of all careers incorporate some aspect of marketing, this course will be invaluable to the future success of its students.

Students will have the opportunity to take the Marketing CLEP Test (similar to an AP exam) upon completion of the course. Students earning successful scores on this exam will be qualified to earn 3 college credits transferable into 1200 universities across the country.

Students will become familiar with the six clusters of marketing, marketing strategy, understanding consumer behavior and developing a product for the marketplace. Special emphasis will be placed on sales, promotion, and advertising. This class will be project based and students will have the opportunity to use their creativity and apply their business knowledge in productive ways. Students enrolled in Marketing I will manage and staff a school-based enterprise in addition to creating its marketing mix. Participation in DECA, an association of marketing students (the students’ professional development opportunity), is highly recommended. When taught by a certified MATC trained teacher and with successful completion of the course (passing the required exam) the student can receive Madison College credit. Dual credit is available only to Juniors and Seniors.

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MARKETING MERCHANDISING AND RETAILING Course 6480 BUS Service Learning Elective .5 Credits

MARKETING EDUCATION II WORK EXPERIENCE See instructor for course numbers Elective .5 Credits/Semester/Minimum of 90 hours of supervised work experience Prerequisite: Marketing Education I

This course will change our school store into a learning laboratory! Students will work in and operate the school-based enterprise; the Red Zone. They will learn skills on developing and starting a retail business and learn retail business functions that are involved in running a successful operation. Students will serve as the school store management team, making important decisions that change the operations of the enterprise. Students will also learn the skills and attitudes required in any job. They will study store design and visual merchandising, promotion and advertising, merchandise planning, retail market strategy, inventory and risk management. Careers in Management and Entrepreneurship will be focused on throughout the course. Students will go through all the steps real retail businesses take, including; store design and visual merchandising, promotion and advertising, merchandise planning, retail market strategy, inventory and risk management.

Students, in addition to class work in Marketing Education II, will be placed on a job for actual work experience in the field of marketing. In order to be accepted into this program, the student must have targeted marketing as a career goal. Students work an average of 15-20 hours a week. Students are evaluated quarterly by their employer. One credit is granted each semester for Marketing Education II work. A student can earn a maximum of two credits for this work experience in either their junior or senior year. Students must complete an application to be considered for acceptance into the program. A student may have an early release to work if appropriate. Students who wish to enroll in this workbased program must meet work study requirements.

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ENGLISH & READING The vision of the Sun Prairie High School English Department is to create a classroom atmosphere of mutual respect where students exhibit compassion and empathy for others, developed through a community of learners who feel valued, understood, and successful in their pursuit of life-long learning. We strive to introduce our students to great works of literature, challenge them to think beyond the ordinary, and encourage them to express themselves competently both in speaking and writing. We are dedicated to ensuring that our students will leave Sun Prairie High School with the critical thinking skills and independence that will allow them to participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of the global community.

Course #

1309 ENG

Title

Grades

Prerequisites

Length of Course/Credits Earned Semester / .5

Advanced Composition Advanced Drama African Literature American Experience AP English Literature

11-12

none

11-12

Dramatic Arts

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

11

none

Semester / .5

11-12

none

Year / 1.0

Applied Composition Communications Comprehensive English 10

11-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10

none

Year / 1.0

Contemporary Literature Creative Writing I Creative Writing II Digital Storytelling Dramatic Arts Interdisciplinary Poetics

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

Creative Writing I

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester/ .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

11-12

None

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

1101RDG

Native American/Latin American Literature Real World Reading

11-12

Semester / .5

1411 ENG

Technical Theatre

10-12

Comprehensive English 10 none

1333 ENG

World Literature

10-12

none

Semester / .5

1395 ENG 1334 ENG 1346 ENG 1365 ENG 1368 ENG 1305 ENG 1382 ENG 1220 ENG 1221 ENG 1332 ENG 1311 ENG 1313 ENG 1413 ENG 1393 ENG 1390 ENG 1335 ENG

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Semester / .5


Students will study in more complexity the elements of theatre explored in Dramatic Arts as they become leaders for the class. Students will learn to create resumes, practice the audition process and direct a short play. This is a perfect course for students who are interested in advancing their performance abilities and confidence in speaking in front of audiences. Students looking to pursue any career can benefit from training in theater!

ADVANCED COMPOSITION Course 1309ENG Elective Course .5 credit Strong writing skills are still essential to success in college and the world beyond. Advanced Composition is a course that strengthens writing skills and prepares students for the future. The course reviews usage, mechanics, and sentence structure to help students become accurate writers. Using the writing process, students will write a variety of essays and a persuasive research paper to obtain the writing experience and confidence necessary to prepare them for the writing expectations in their futures. As we follow this process, students will read and analyze model essays, plan and draft essays about issues that are important to them, peer edit work with classmates, and revise essays to work toward high standards in the quality of each individual’s writing. A semester long writing project will give the opportunity to write about students’ own interests and experiences, while providing the weekly writing experience that creates successful writers.

AFRICAN LITERATURE Course 1334ENG Elective Course .5 Credit In African Literature, students will read a variety of literary works from Africa, focusing on exploring the changing social structures of African societies. Within this overall theme, students will examine common literary devices, trace arguments in literary nonfiction, explore unique narrative forms, and analyze gender roles in African text. In class, students will be expected to demonstrate critical thinking skills regularly in small group discussion, large group discussion, informal writing, and formal literary analysis. Students will read, analyze, and discuss literature, poetry, short stories, non-fiction texts, journal articles, and internet articles related to issues and perspectives of Africans. As such, this English course elective will provide a rich humanities perspective examining, among other topics, contemporary issues of African Diaspora, as a complement to the African Heritage Social Studies class.

ADVANCED DRAMA Course 1395ENG Elective Course .5 credit Prerequisite: Dramatic Arts or instructor consent.

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE Course 1346ENG Required Course .5 credit

This course engages the imagination, fosters flexible ways of thinking, develops disciplined effort, and builds self-confidence.

Service Learning

Over the semester the students will become acquainted with the styles, writers, and

34


themes that are part of the development of American literature. The readings of the course begin to reflect the diversity of the American experience and show the evolution of the American culture and identity. The study of the literary styles, trends, and themes of American literature provide a framework for the independent reading of and understanding of literature.

the ways writers use language to achieve purpose as well as entertain. Students will analyze the conventions of literary discourse and will learn to speak and write analytically and insightfully about what they read. They will refine the reading and writing skills important for success in college and beyond while cultivating the habits of reading, writing, speaking, and thinking which are attributes of lifelong learning and enjoyment of the written word. Major literature studied will include Beowulf, Grendel, The Canterbury Tales, Hamlet, Pride and Prejudice, Wuthering Heights, The Sun Also Rises, The Bluest Eye, and Brave New World among several others.

Expectations for this course are that through discussions and readings the students will look critically at the American identity. The course follows several significant themes that reflect this American identity. The readings of the course begin to reflect the diversity of the American experience and show how American values and identity take shape. Students will apply reading strategies and skills to improve their comprehension and to understand course content. The students will have the opportunity to improve vocabulary, writing skills, and most importantly, critical thinking skills.

Three summer reading books are required as well as a brief reflective essay to be completed in the summer.

Students are expected to be active learners and participant in discussion and reflection. This attitude is essential for the reading, discussion, and writing components of this course. The instructor takes great care to foster an environment conducive to learning through class bonding exercises and different groupings so that students will know their classmates and be comfortable speaking and sharing thoughts and ideas. It is suggested students take Advanced Composition prior to this class.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ENGLISH LITERATURE Course 1365ENG & 1368ENG Elective Course 1.0 credit AP Contract Required Required Summer Assignment

The course prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam in English Literature and Composition and the Advanced Placement exam in English Language and Composition. These tests are optional and are for those students who wish to earn college credit. Students pay a required fee for each test.

AP English Literature is a yearlong collegelevel class for seniors who are ready to engage in the careful reading and analysis of literature. The course includes in-depth reading from texts from multiple genres, periods, and cultures. Through analytical reading of selected texts, students will deepen their understanding of

http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing /ap/sub_englit.html?englit

35


will learn to critically analyze and use various forms of verbal and non-verbal messages. The Communication Arts teachers strongly urge students to take this course during their sophomore year. The skills taught in

APPLIED COMPOSITION Course 1305ENG Elective Course .5 credit Applied Composition is a course that provides students with the skills, strategies, and techniques to write for the wide variety of audiences and purposes they will encounter in future academic and career opportunities, focusing on technical writing skills. Instruction will focus on the use of the writing process and the way the purpose and audience influence the writer’s form, organization, and stylistic elements.

Communications will benefit students in future courses during the junior and senior years, and in life after high school.

Students will write various forms of business pieces such as emails, memos, letters, resumes, and various technical reports. They will also practice sentence construction, usage, and mechanics. In technical pieces, students will emphasize and practice explanation and description, culminating in a formal proposal project and presentation.

COMPREHENSIVE ENGLISH 10 Course1220ENG & 1221ENG Required Course 1.0 Credit

Service Learning

This course provides a comprehensive study of language arts skills such as writing, reading literature, speaking, and presenting. Students will read novels, plays, and myths about lives and experiences in other places and times. Students will be able to see some of their own experiences paralleled in these works. Students will complete activities and assignments that will help them to think critically about what they read and make connections to the world around them. Students will participate in class activities that help them to present opinions and ideas supported by strong evidence and help them to listen critically to the ideas of others.

COMMUNICATIONS IN THE LANGUAGE ARTS Course 1382ENG Required Course .5 credit In this course students will be introduced to basic communication skills and personal responsibilities for being an effective citizen in the 21st Century. They will learn about communication & technology literacy within the global and diverse perspectives of modern society. Students will engage in group dynamics, strengthen listening skills, and take part in learning to organize ideas and present them effectively using 21st Century technologies to an audience. They

Students will continue to develop the effective writing skills they will need in the future. The course will provide them with a review of sentence writing, usage, and

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mechanics. Students will work on successful writing strategies that will help to complete writing assignments such as persuasive essays, research papers, essays about topics and themes in literature, creative or narrative pieces, and service-learning projects. Students should expect to work on these assignments by completing them in steps leading to a final product. Students will be able to transfer these strategies and steps to the writing expectations they will encounter in the future.

Slumdog Millionaire, students will explore and discuss current issues in American society and around the globe. Students are expected to reflect on what they read through discussion, writing, and critically listening to others’ opinions. The course is designed to give students options in what they read and how they demonstrate what they’ve learned.

CREATIVE WRITING I Course 1311ENG Elective Course .5 credit

Throughout the course, work will be done on individual and group projects that expand on the topics in the reading assignments. These projects may be informative or persuasive. Students will share and present these projects to their class in a variety of ways that involve speaking and visual media.

Students interested in creative writing should take this course. Students will learn how to write short fiction and poetry and use the language skills they have acquired in previous English courses. In this class students will also work with other students, as class members help each other solve problems with their writing.

The course will provide individual choices at different points. Sometimes students will choose the level of challenge for an assignment; sometimes they will choose the title they will read; sometimes they will choose the type of writing or project that suits them. All students will read memoirs such as Night and plays such as Macbeth and be expected to apply critical thinking skills to understand and analyze these works of literature, sharing ideas and opinions in class and listening critically to the ideas of others.

This course is suitable for anyone considering a two or four-year college but does not provide the structure and strategies for writing term papers and essays in college composition classes.

CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE Course 1332ENG Elective Course .5 credit

CREATIVE WRITING II Course 1313ENG Elective Course .5 credit Prerequisite = Creative Writing I

Contemporary Literature will help students become more aware of the conflicts humans face, both within themselves and with others, through discussion of various novels, short stories, plays, and nonfiction materials. Through the reading of novels such as Pay It Forward; The Kite Runner; The Art of Racing In The Rain; and

This course is designed for students who have a compelling interest in developing further as creative writers. Creative Writing II helps students express themselves 37


through exercises that expand their imaginations and creativity. Students study published writing in order to study the qualities of good writing, which include content, focus, organization, and style appropriate to specific genres. In-class exercises include lessons related to characterization, dialogue, perspective, rhythm and pacing, foreshadowing, sensory details, and color. In Creative Writing II, students will be provided time to develop self-selected semester-long writing projects.

DRAMATIC ARTS Course 1393ENG Elective Course .5 credit

Service Learning

This unique English course engages the imagination and emphasizes learning by doing. Dramatic Arts will help cultivate creativity and problem solving skills while working in a cooperative group environment; the course focuses on theatre history, improvisation, acting, theatre production, and dramatic literature. In the second half of the course students will produce a play to present to elementary school audiences. Successful completion of this project satisfies service-learning requirements for graduation. This course emphasizes verbal and non-verbal communications skills that are important for success in any field.

DIGITAL STORYTELLING Course 1413 ENG Elective Course .5 credit This course is for students who love stories, images, and technology. This course's purpose is to encourage fluency by promoting creativity and engagement emphasizing the production process and visual storytelling. Students will read and write various materials to develop their storytelling and analysis skills. Students will work independently and in collaboration with others of varying degrees of experience. Students will learn the terminology of video production/news and how to shoot and edit. Students will read and write script stories, analyzing good storytelling. Students will create multiple short videos and reflect on their learning. The classroom and its works will represent the diversity of student voices and experiences within the school community. Not only will each student gain confidence as an artist, sharing their work with others, but will also provide feedback and accept feedback on their own work.

INTERDISCIPLINARY POETICS Course 1390ENG Elective .5 credit Interdisciplinary Poetics is a bit like ―HipHop 101,‖ guiding students through the history, forms, techniques, and evolution of hip-hop music. Students will study the music's roots, the style of its poetry (especially with relation to other poetic forms throughout history), and its many impacts on the larger culture. Students will have a chance to connect hip-hop with their other classes, composing lyrics about -- and interpreting materials from -- a wide range of subject areas. Students will examine closely the work of hip-hop's artisans and analyze the sociological effects of the music and culture. A polished portfolio and public performance will be core components of the course. Parental permission to take the course is required. Permission slips are distributed during the first week of class.

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we equip them with the tools needed to become an expert reader. The skills and knowledge students will gain from this class will support your endeavors in high school, college and beyond!

NATIVE AMERICAN/LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE Course 1335ENG Elective Course .5 Credits

TECHNICAL THEATRE In this course, students will read a variety of literary works from Native American and Latin American authors, focusing primarily on the postcolonial period of American History. Students will not only have the opportunity to examine common literary devices through the unique lens that these authors provide, but they will also have the chance to explore a variety of unfamiliar forms, techniques, and themes. In class, students will be expected to demonstrate critical thinking skills regularly in small group discussion, large group discussion, informal writing, and formal literary analysis. Students will read, analyze, and discuss literature, short stories, non-fiction texts, journal articles, and internet articles related to contemporary issues and perspectives of Native and Latin Americans. As such, this English course elective will provide a rich humanities perspective as a compliment to the Native American/Latin American Heritage Social Studies class.

Course 1411ENG Elective Course .5 credit This course is designed for anyone who is interested in the ―behind the scenes‖ artistry of designing and running a performance. This is a hands-on class where students will examine theatrical construction techniques, stage and scene shop equipment, stage lighting and sound, costume design, and stage/special effects makeup. Students in this course will be actively involved in productions that take place in the Performing Arts Center.

WORLD LITERATURE Course 1333ENG Elective Course .5 credit World Literature is a survey of literature throughout the world. Although we will spend most of our time reading, discussing, and writing about contemporary works, the course offers students the opportunity to explore world literature ranging as far back as the 19th century. Students will engage in a careful reading and analysis of literature, focusing on the archetypes that are evident throughout cultures and time to find the commonalities of the human endeavor. Close reading is the focus of the course, and discussion in both small and large group is routine. Students will be exposed to new authors, books, and perspectives and learn to both speak and write analytically and insightfully about what they read. This course also has a strong writing component and students should expect to be writing frequently.

REAL WORLD READING Course 1101RDG Elective Course .5 credit Prerequisite = Comprehensive English 10 This course is designed to improve student reading skills with academic, career and personal choice reading materials. We will explore the purposes, characteristics and strategies essential for comprehension and success as a lifelong reader. The course’s three units will have us reading, writing and practicing the skills of successful readers as we encounter a variety of texts: fiction and nonfiction short stories, newspaper and journal articles, academic textbooks, and materials people might encounter in various careers. Students will also select their own reading materials and set personal goals as

39


READING

These reading courses are designed to develop and strengthen reading skills and to improve comprehension. Each course has specific content to meet the needs of a variety of students. Real World Reading fulfills a half credit of English. For instructor consent, please visit the reading specialists in Room 1215.

Reading Course #

1101 RDG

Title

Grades

11-12

1120 RDG

Real World Reading Reading Competency

1106 RDG

Strategic Reading

10-11

Prerequisites

Semester / .5 Student required to schedule this course will be notified by an administrator or school counselor according to Policy IKF

40

Length of Course/Credits Earned

Semester / .5

Year / 1


This course is designed to support students in meeting graduation requirements for reading. It focuses primarily on non-fiction and technical reading. Course materials include current periodicals, everyday text as defined in state testing, and student selfselected reading. Through the application of reading strategies and self-monitoring skills, students’ comprehension will improve reading and writing skills for success beyond graduation. Administrative directive is required to enroll in this course

REAL WORLD READING Course 1101RDG Elective Course .5 credit This course is designed to improve student reading skills with academic, career and personal choice reading materials. We will explore the purposes, characteristics and strategies success as a lifelong reader. The course’s three units will have us reading, writing and practicing the skills of successful readers as we encounter a variety of texts: fiction and nonfiction short stories, newspaper and journal articles, academic textbooks, and materials people might encounter in various careers. Students will also select their own reading materials and set personal goals as we equip them with the tools needed to become an expert reader. The skills and knowledge students will gain from this class will support your endeavors in high school, college and beyond!essential for comprehension and

STRATEGIC READING Year course Course 1106RDG Elective 1 Credit This course is designed to improve your reading comprehension skills with materials from all content areas (Social Studies, Science, English, Math, etc.). We will focus on strategies and techniques for understanding content area texts, vocabulary and how to recognize text features and structures. Organization and study skills will also be discussed. Throughout the semester, we will take various assessments so that you can measure the growth of your reading skills as a result of your hard work. You will also select your own reading materials and set personal goals as we equip you with the tools needed to become an expert reader.

READING COMPETENCY Course 1120RDG Elective Course .5 Credits An administrator or school counselor according to Policy IKF will notify students required to schedule this course.

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ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE English as a Second Language is for students who are learning English as their second (or third, fourth, etc.) language. ESL students are gifted, multilingual individuals who will contribute to the cultural and intellectual integrity of American society in ways only each student can find imaginable. The goal of the ESL Department is to help bridge the learning gap, accelerate cultural and academic knowledge, and put students in the position where the future is wide open. Students assigned to and ESL class can meet the Service Learning requirement by participating in the Cultural Melting Pot activity in the fall.

Service Learning

If any student or family would like to have additional information regarding course offerings, please contact 834-6814. Si desea obtener m谩s informaci贸n en relaci贸n con las clases ofrecidas en nuestro departamento, favor contactarnos por el tel茅fono 834-6813. Yog muaj cov tub ntxhais los sis niam txiv uas xav paub ntxiv txog cov hoob uas peb muaj nyob rau peb seem, thov hu rau 834-6630.

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Course #

Title

5820 ESL 5821 ESL 5822 ESL 5823 ESL 5824 ESL 5825 ESL 5826 ESL 5827 ESL 5830 ESL 5831 ESL 5832 ESL 5833 ESL 5838 ESL 5839 ESL 5842 ESL 5843 ESL 5834 ESL

Beginning English as a Second Language Intermediate English as a Second Language Advanced English as a Second Language ESL Study Skills

5835 ESL

Hispanic Studies—Mexico and Caribbean

5836 ESL

Hispanic Studies—Central America

5837 ESL

Hispanic Studies-South America

5857 ESL

Hmong Heritage and Language for Hmong Speakers

Grades

Beginning Math for ELLs Intermediate Math for ELLs I ESL Novice Science ESL Novice Social Studies Hispanic Studies-Spain and United States

Prerequisites

Length of Course/Credits Earned

Teacher Recommendation Teacher Recommendation Teacher Recommendation Teacher Recommendation Teacher Recommendation Teacher Recommendation Recent arrivals with an ELP of 1 or 2 Recent arrivals with an ELP of 1 or 2 Be able to speak and understand Spanish, or consent of instructor Be able to speak and understand Spanish, or consent of instructor Be able to speak and understand Spanish, or consent of instructor Be able to speak and understand Spanish, or consent of instructor

Year/ 1.0

Teacher Recommendation

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Year/ 1.0 Year/ 1.0 Year/ 1.0 Year/ 1.0 Year/ 1.0 Year/ 1.0 Year/ 1.0 Semester / .5

Semester / .5

Semester / .5

Semester / .5

Year/ 1.0


BEGINNING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE Course 5820ESL and 5821ESL Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Teacher recommendation Students will develop phonemic awareness of the English language and practice oral communication skills. Students will learn to read English and will participate in the writing process. Vocabulary development, expanding background knowledge, listening, and speaking fluency in English will be emphasized. This course is designed for English language learners with an English proficiency level of 1.

INTERMEDIATE ENGLISH SECOND LANGUAGE

AS

ADVANCED ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE Course 5824ESL and 5825ESL 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Teacher recommendation Students will further develop their skills in reading with increasingly sophisticated texts including narrative, expository, poetry and everyday text. This course includes American literature selections. Students will continue to develop their writing skills to communicate for a variety of purposes and to a variety of audiences. Academic English vocabulary development will be emphasized in preparation for involvement in general core classes. This course is designed for English language learners with an English proficiency level of 3.

A

Course 5822ESL and 5823ESL Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Teacher recommendation Students will further develop their skills in reading. Speaking and reading fluency, vocabulary development and comprehension strategies will be emphasized. Students will be introduced to a greater variety of texts for reading, and research. Oral communication will be practiced. Time for writing to communicate for a variety of purposes and to a variety of audiences will increase. This course is designed for English language learners with an English proficiency level of 2-3.

44


ESL STUDY SKILLS Course 5826ESL and 5827ESL Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Teacher recommendation Students will enhance their knowledge of content classes that they are presently enrolled in through additional practice of key concepts. Students will also develop computer and technological skills through the use of computer activities that further demonstrate their knowledge and application of vocabulary across the content areas.

ESL NOVICE SCIENCE Course 5838ESL and 5839ESL Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Teacher recommendation In ESL Novice Science, students will develop the knowledge and academic language of Biology, Health, and Physical Sciences.

BEGINNING MATH FOR ELLs Course 5830ESL and Course 5831ESL Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Teacher recommendation This course develops the language and thinking of math. Basic math concepts will be introduced and reviewed through a variety of manipulatives and guided practice. Each of the strands of mathematics will be emphasized throughout each semester: number sense, basic geometry, problem solving, measurement, and data analysis.

ESL NOVICE SOCIAL STUDIES Course 5842ESL and 5843ESL Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Teacher recommendation

INTERMEDIATE MATH FOR ELLs Course 5832ESL and Course 5833ESL Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Teacher recommendation

In ESL Novice Social Studies, students will develop the knowledge and academic language of World History, US History, Sociology, and Economics.

Students will further develop their math skills with algebraic concepts, linear graphing, and advanced geometry.

45


HISPANIC STUDIES – SPAIN AND UNITED STATES Course 5834ESL Elective Course .5 credits Prerequisite – Be able to speak and understand Spanish; or consent of teacher.

Hispanic Studies is a class for students who speak Spanish fluently. In this class students will work on improving their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills through the study of the history and culture of multiple Spanish speaking countries. Students will read and study literature as a point of departure for advanced vocabulary and grammar instruction. The class will be conducted entirely in Spanish.

HISPANIC STUDIES – MEXICO AND CARIBBEAN Course 5835ESL Elective Course .5 credits Prerequisite – Be able to speak and understand Spanish; or consent of teacher.

HISPANIC AMERICA

STUDIES

Estudios Hispánicos es una clase diseñada para estudiantes que hablen el español con fluidez. En esta clase se hará énfasis en desarrollar las destrezas de producción y comprensión orales y escritas de la lengua española a través del estudio de la historia y cultura de muchos países de habla hispana. Igualmente, los alumnos leerán y estudiarán textos literarios que servirán como punto de partida para el estudio de vocabulario avanzado y gramática. La clase será conducida enteramente en español.

CENTRAL

Course 5836ESL Elective Course .5 credits Prerequisite – Be able to speak and understand Spanish; or consent of teacher.

HISPANIC AMERICA

STUDIES

SOUTH

Course 5837ESL Elective Course .5 credits Prerequisite – Be able to speak and understand Spanish; or consent of teacher.

46


xiv yuav nyeem thiab saib cov ntawv phau los mus pab rau kev kawm lus thiab kev siv lus. Chav no feem ntau yuav siv lus Hmoob.

Note: La clase de estudios hispánicos será alternada cada aňo; es decir, un aňo se ofrecerán las unidades de Espaňa y Estados Unidos, y el otro las de América Central y América del Sur. Note: The Hispanic Studies classes will alternate each year; one year will be the Spain, United States, and Mexico units. The following year will be the Central America and South America units.

HMONG HERITAGE AND LANGUAGE FOR HMONG SPEAKERS Course 5856ESL and Course 5857ESL Elective Course 1.0 credits (Full Year) Prerequisite = Teacher recommendation Hmong Heritage and Language is a class for students who speak Hmong fluently. In this class students will work on improving their reading, writing, speaking, listening and comprehension skills through the study of the history and culture of the Hmong. Students will read and study literature as a point of departure for advanced vocabulary and grammar instruction. The class will be conducted primarily in Hmong. Chav Hmoob Lub Neej thiab Lus Hmoob yog ib chav rau cov me nyuam lub xiv uas txawj hais lus Hmoob. Nyob rau hauv chav no cov me nyuam lub xiv yuav kawm thiab xyaum nyeem ntawv, sau ntawv, hais lus, mloog lus thiab kawm kev nkag siab los ntawm kev kawm txog keeb kwm Hmoob thiab haiv neeg Hmoob. Cov me nyuam lub 47


FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE Don’t fall flat on your face in real life! Take Family and Consumer Science courses to learn the practical skills of life management. Choose our occupational courses and get a head start at finding the career that is right for you. Course #

Title

9425 FCE

10-12

none

11-12 10-12

11th or 12th graders or at least 17 years old none

Semester / .5

9420 FCE

Infant and Toddler Development AS Child Development / Assistant Child Care Teacher Personal and Family Living

9400 FCE

Independent Living Skills

10-12

none

Semester / .5

9210 FCE

Foods I-Family, Food and Society Multi-Cultural Aspects of Foods Foods II-Introduction to Food Service ProStart I

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

Semester / .5

ProStart II

10-12

Health Care Career Exploration (Previously: Introduction to Medical Occupations I) Medical Occupations II

10-12

Foods I - Family, Food and Society Foods I - Family, Food and Society Foods II-Introduction to Food Service Foods II- Introduction to Food Service none

Semester / .5

9430 FCE

9326 FCE 9213 FCE 9327 FCE 9328 FCE 9329 FCE 9330 FCE 9431 FCE

9435 FCE

Grades

10-12 10-12

Length of Course/Credits Earned Semester / .5

Semester / .5

Semester / .5 Year/ 1 Year/ 1 Semester / .5

9433 FCE

Certified Nursing Assistant- 11-12 -CNA

9432 FCE

Medical Terminology

10-12

Health Care Career Exploration (Previously: Introduction to Medical Occupations I) Health Care Career Exploration (Previously: Introduction to Medical Occupations I) none

9110 FCE

Design Studio

10-12

none

Semester / .5

9103 FCE

Clothing I

10-12

none

Semester / .5

9106 FCE

Clothing II

10-12

Clothing I

Semester / .5

9109 FCE

Fashion Analysis

10-12

none

Semester / .5

9410 FCE

Housing and Interior Design Teenage Parent

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

For expectant parents as needed

Semester / .5

See Counselor

10-12

Prerequisites

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Semester / .5

Semester / .5


PERSONAL AND FAMILY LIVING Course 9420FCE Elective .5 Credits

CHILD AND FAMILY CAREERS INFANT AND TODDLER DEVELOPMENT Course 9424FCE Service Elective Learning .5 Credits

This is an interesting and valuable course for all young adults. Classroom learning is highly discussion-focused with numerous group activities. Much of the work is done in teams. Topics of study include selfconcept, personal decision-making, communication skills, single and married lifestyles, parenting, and the human life cycle. This course is especially relevant to students considering a career in human services such as counselors, social workers, or police officers.

Do you enjoy working with young children birth to 3 years of age? This development time is the most important in determining a positive future for a child. Through a variety of hands-on activities and student projects you will discover how fascinating the behavior of children can be. Special emphasis will be given to infant and toddler development. You will take a simulated baby home and learn first hand what it is like to care for an infant.

INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS Course 9400FCE Elective .5 Credits Course Fee: $20.00 for class experiences

Students completing both child development courses will receive Infant/Toddler certification.

This course will give students practical learning experiences and skills necessary for living on their own. Budgeting and personal finances, apartment selection and legal responsibilities, transportation and insurance, and food purchasing topics are covered.

AS CHILD DEVELOPMENT/ASSISTANT CHILD CARE TEACHER Service Course 9430FCE Learning Elective .5 Credits Prerequisite: Wisconsin ACCT guidelines require student enrollees to be 11th or 12th graders or at least 17 years of age Learn how children develop and why they act the way they do. During this class you will observe and play with children to get first-hand practice in positive child guidance techniques. You will volunteer in a local childcare center in order to prepare and teach age-appropriate activities to groups of young children. Students meeting program requirements will obtain certification as Assistant Child Care Teachers (ACCT) qualifying them for employment in Wisconsin child care facilities.

FOOD SERVICE CAREERS FOODS I – FAMILY, FOOD AND SOCIETY Course 9210FCE Elective Course .5 Credits Course Fee: $30.00 for consumable supplies This interesting and fun course teaches students basic life skills in food selection and preparation, and helps them appreciate and understand the importance of food choices and eating habits for a healthy life. Varieties of learning methods will be utilized, including demonstration, hands on

Successful completion of this course will result in 3 advanced standing credits when attending Madison College. http://matcmadison.edu/credit-priorlearning-advanced-standing

49


cooking, and especially group learning. This course is suitable for all students interested in developing healthy lifestyles and learning the methods of food preparation.

PROSTART (Four consecutive semesters) Prostart I, Course 9327FCE, 9328FCE Prostart II, Course 9329FCE, 9330FCE Elective Course .5 Credits each semester Prerequisite: Foods II, Introduction to Food Service Service Course Fee: $50/semester for Learning consumable supplies

MULTICULTURAL ASPECTS OF FOOD (Foreign Foods) Course 9326FCE Elective Course .5 Credits Prerequisite = Foods I - Family, Food and Society Course Fee: $30.00 for consumable supplies

The ProStart Program is a two-year industry-based program that prepares students for careers in the restaurant and foodservice industry. Students gain valuable restaurant and foodservice skills through academic and workplace experiences. Students will have the opportunity to participate in catering activities, and in simulated restaurants, preparing meals for faculty, and the Wall-of-Success recipient and community members. Students may participate in culinary food preparation competitions (Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America-FCCLA, Skills USA-Culinary Arts, and ProStart). Class challenges will help students prepare themselves for competitions, in addition to giving them the chance to test their ability to work under pressure.

This course expands upon Family, Food and Society from a global perspective. Students will explore cultures, customs, traditions and foods from around the world and how they pertain to today’s society. Food customs, special cooking techniques and equipment, and meal patterns of foreign countries and ethnic groups, will be covered. This course is suitable for all students interested in sophisticating their culinary skills. FOODS II – INTRODUCTION TO FOOD SERVICE Course 9213FCE Service Elective Course Learning .5 Credits Prerequisite = Foods I - Family, Food and Society Course Fee: $35.00 for consumable supplies

Students will be matched with a mentor during ProStart III and IV to facilitate mastering of the ProStart Certification Competencies. Students who meet the ProStart Program competencies and pass the Year 1 and Year 2 national exams will receive a National Restaurant Association Education Foundation Achievement Certificate and may be eligible for advance placement credits at Vocational and Culinary Colleges. Students must sign up for a full year (Semesters 1 and 2 or semesters 3 and 4.

This course builds on Family, Food, and Society (Foods I) and will include units of study on food prepared in the different service workstations. Students will be introduced to the food service industry, and will participate in a Food Service entrepreneurial project. This course is especially suitable for students considering a career in food service.

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MEDICAL OCCUPATIONS CAREERS

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY Course 9432FCE Elective .5 Credits Note: Dual-Credit Course

HEALTH CARE CAREER EXPLORATION (Previously: Introduction to Medical Occupations I) Course 9431FCE Service Elective Learning .5 Credits

This course will prove valuable to all students seeking a career in the field of health care. Learn the rules for making medical terms and gain an understanding of the medical terms and abbreviations related to each body system. Assess your personal learning preferences and develop the study techniques that will lead to success in learning the language of medicine.

You could be a doctor or a nurse, but you could also work in one of a hundred other medical occupations that you will learn about in this class. Hands-on activities and Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) field trips will acquaint you with medical work environments. You will learn to measure the vital signs of temperature, pulse, respiration, and blood pressure and you will match your personal abilities to work skills used in the health care field.

When taught by a certified MATC trained teacher, successful completion of this course with a C or above will result in transcripted credits at Madison College for Juniors and Seniors only.

MEDICAL OCCUPATIONS II Course 9435FCE Elective .5 Credits Prerequisite – Health Care Career Exploration (Previously: Introduction to Medical Occupations I)

Service Learning

CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT Course 9433FCE Elective .5 Credits Prerequisite – Health Care Career Exploration (Previously: Introduction to Medical Occupations I). Must be a junior or senior. Course Fee: $58.00 for health history and background check Test Fee (optional): $115.00 paid to Madison College (make payment online directly to Madison College) Note: Dual-Credit Course

You will improve your knowledge of diseases and treatments through a study of body structure and function, and you can increase work skills through CPR and/or First Aid certification. A wide variety of professional speakers will expand your knowledge of healthcare careers. Independent study skills are needed for success in this course.

The nursing assistant program prepares students for employment as nursing assistants and home health aides. The program includes 80 hours of classroom instruction and simulated laboratory practice as well as 40 hours of supervised clinical experience in a hospital or nursing home. Upon successful completion of the program, the student is eligible for the Wisconsin Nurse Aide Registry for employment in nursing homes, hospitals, home health

51


agencies, and homes for the developmentally disabled. Clinical site experience requires TB testing, caregiver background checks, and ability to lift 50 lbs. Certification requires completion of a state written and skills test. This test will cost students $115.00. Students have up to one year to take the test after completing the CNA Course. Certification is good for up to one year after the date of the test. Madison College credit is granted upon successful completion of this course.

Service Learning

CLOTHING II Course 9106FCE Elective .5 Credits Prerequisite = Clothing I Course Fee: $30.00 for class projects This course is a continuation of Clothing I. You will be able to complete more difficult sewing projects with relative ease and will learn more about fabrics and design. Three or four projects will be completed throughout the semester.

DESIGN STUDIO Course 9110 FCE Elective .5 Credits Course Fee: $10.00 for class projects (Additional cost for independent projects) Become a star! Take this course for an introduction to all different careers in the design field. Learn how to apply the principles of design as you complete projects such as window display, fashion design, menu development, child-care and hospital room design. You will also develop a product or service that you will market to students and staff.

TEXTILE AND DESIGN CAREERS

CLOTHING I Service Learning Course 9103FCE Elective .5 Credits Course Fee: $25.00 for project materials Learn how to sew! It’s really fun and rewarding and it is an essential skill needed in any design career! You will make 3 to 5 small projects. You will select your own fabric for the final project. Learn how to read directions, problem-solve, fix mistakes, and enhance your visualization skills. Come join the fun and learn this life-long skill!

FASHION ANALYSIS Course 9109 FCE Elective .5 Credits Course Fee: $12.00 for class projects Note: Dual-Credit Course This is a great course for students with a strong interest in fashion and design. Students will work with the elements and

52


ADDITIONAL COURSE OFFERINGS

principles of design as they relate to fashion promotion and products. The Fashion industry and Fashion trends will be studied and students will apply personal styling theory to self and others.

TEENAGE PARENT Elective .5 credits/semester Prerequisite: for expectant parents

When taught by a certified Madison College trained teacher, successful completion of this course will result in 2 transcripted credits at Madison College. To receive credit from Madison College, students must take this course as a junior or senior.

The teenage parent program provides individualized instruction for students who are parents or expectant parents. The curriculum includes a study of pregnancy, parenting skills and family planning. In addition, life skills units are taught to assist the student in life and work planning. The TAP program is coordinated with available vocational and job training programs to support students in achieving career goals. This individualized instruction is offered for one class period per day.

This course requires a higher level of reading, writing and communication skills. A high level of independent work skills are required. Successful completion of two semesters of English prior to taking this course is highly recommended.

HOUSING AND INTERIOR DESIGN Course 9410FCE Elective .5 Credits Course Fee: $5.00 for class projects Explore and discover your decorating potential. Through many hands on projects, you will learn how to use color, line, design, and furniture selection to enhance your surroundings. You will also become knowledgeable about architecture and housing issues such as homelessness, universal design, and green building. This course requires a high level of reading, writing and communication skills. Successful completion of two semesters of English prior to taking this class is highly recommended.

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MATHEMATICS

Mathematics Mission Statement To inspire our students to reach their full potential through a solid mathematics foundation allowing them to become self-advocates, life-long learners and ultimately responsible contributors to a global society.

Mathematics is an essential tool in many fields including the trades, fine arts, family and consumer sciences, natural science, engineering, medicine and the social sciences. The purpose of our math curriculum is to provide all students with the opportunity to be successful at their current level of math development and to enable them to progress in their mathematical knowledge. The curriculum we offer is comprehensive and due to math’s sequential nature, it is important that you plan your complete math program to avoid scheduling conflicts. Students taking Algebra 2, Pre-Calculus, AP Calculus, AP Statistics and Transition to College Math will need to purchase a graphics calculator (TI-83 or TI-84 series is recommended). All other classes will need a scientific calculator. Students enrolling in Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, and Pre-Calculus will be utilizing the CPM (College Preparatory Mathematics) program. CPM is aligned with the Common Core State Standards for mathematics and has met all the critical benchmarks for fostering academic excellence in mathematics. The K-12 district math curriculum fosters independent thinkers who can work collaboratively to analyze problems and explain or justify their thinking. Because colleges, universities and vocational schools all have different entrance requirements, students should meet with their counselor, speak with college admissions or go online to view specific math requirements.

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Mathematics Course #

Title

Grades

Prerequisites

3265 MTH 3266 MTH 3369 MTH 3370 MTH 3485 MTH 3486 MTH 3267 MTH 3268 MTH

Algebra 1

9

none

Length of Course/Credits Earned Year/ 1

Geometry

10-12

none

Year/ 1

Algebra 2

10-12

Algebra 1 and Geometry

Year/ 1

Algebra Concepts for Transcripted Credit (ACTC)

11-12

Year/ 1

3003 MTH 3004 MTH 3588 MTH

Transition to College Math Pre-Calculus

11-12

11th or 12th grade status, not passing the Algebra 2 portion of the Compass Test, or consent of instructor. Algebra 2

11-12

Algebra 2

Year/ 1

Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus AB Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus BC Advanced Placement (AP) Statistics Consumer Math

11-12

Pre-Calculus

Year/ 1

10-12

Pre-Calculus and Calculus AB

Year/ 1

11-12

Algebra 2

Year/ 1

11-12

Algebra 1 and Geometry

Year/ 1

Year/ 1

3589 MTH 3596 MTH 3597 MTH 3598 MTH 3599 MTH 3005 MTH 3006 MTH 3688 MTH 3788 MTH 3011 MTH

Mathematics Competency

Students required to schedule this class will be notified by an administrator or school counselor according to Policy IFK

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Semester / .5


ALGEBRA 1 Course 3265MTH, 3266MTH 1 credit For first time Algebra students only. Students will learn algebraic concepts by investigating new situations, discovering relationships and figuring out which strategies can best be used to solve problems. During this course, students will collaborate with other students as a member of a study team. Each member of the study team has something to contribute while the team discovers the mathematical ideas and methods. The teacher will support students as they work, but will not take away their opportunity to think and investigate. If something is not clear the first time you work with it, you will have more chances to build your understanding as the course continues. All students must be an active participant, making sure everyone in the study team is involved and asking good questions. Some of the topics covered are problem solving, graphs and equations, solving equations and systems of equations.

Service ALGEBRA 2 Learning Course 3485MTH, 3486MTH Elective 1 credit Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and Geometry

Algebra 2 aims to apply and extend what students have learned in previous mathematics courses by focusing students on multiple representations of functions and relations and on finding connections among the ideas they are studying. Students in Algebra 2 will continue to use problem solving strategies, questioning, investigation and explaining in conjunction with their knowledge of the connections among algebra, geometry and functions to analyze problems and formulate solutions. Throughout they will also use these strategies to extend their current knowledge by making new connections.

GEOMETRY Course 3369MTH, 3370MTH 1 credit

ALGEBRA CONCEPTS for TRANSCRIPTED CREDIT, (ACTC) Course 3267MTH, 3268MTH Elective 1 credit Prerequisite: 11th or 12th grade status, not passing the Algebra 2 portion of the Compass Test, or consent of instructor. Students will take the math Compass test to ensure proper placement. Note: Dual-Credit Course

Geometry centers on the study of shapes. Students will investigate new situations, discover relationships and decide on strategies that can be used to solve problems. The concepts taught in this course will be connected to other topics. During this course, students will collaborate with each other as members of study teams. By the end of the course, they will have an understanding of a variety of geometric principals and properties. Students will see how these principles and properties are related and can be used together to solve problems. Some of the topics covered are shapes and transformations, angles and measurement, polygons and circles and congruent triangles.

This class provides an opportunity to earn three math credits at Madison College and move directly into math requirements of the program of your choice. This is a junior/senior class for students that have not passed the Algebra 2 portion of the Compass Test. After successful completion, with a grade of at least a C on the final exam and course work, students with senior status will earn 3 Madison College credits and will be able to enter into 56


their required math course at Madison College. Topics may include the real number system, linear equations and inequalities in one and two variables, systems of linear equations and inequalities, exponents and polynomials, factoring and applications, rational expressions and applications, roots and radicals, and quadratic equations. This course is most appropriate for seniors planning to attend a two-year technical college or for juniors wanting to improve their algebraic skills before taking Algebra 2 their senior year.

functions. Students will also develop a deeper understanding of limits, area, and slope that are essential in the development of calculus. Pre-Calculus students will continue to use problem solving strategies, questioning, investigation and explanations to extend their current knowledge by making connections.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CALCULUS AB Course 3596MTH, 3597MTH Elective 1 credit AP Contract Required Prerequisite = Pre-Calculus

http://matcmadison.edu/credit-priorlearning-advanced-standing

During the first semester, students will deal with concepts such as the limit of a function, continuity, the derivative and anti-derivative of a function, and the fundamental theorem of Calculus; topics include the extrema of a function, inflection points, related rates, maxima and minima of a function, Riemann sums, and area under a curve. Second semester topics include areas between curves, volumes of solids of revolution by the shell and the disc method, derivatives and integrals of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Emphasis will be on techniques of integration. Second semester will also include review and preparation for the Advanced Placement Calculus Test. A significant amount of time will be needed to complete assigned work.

TRANSITION TO COLLEGE MATH Course 3003MTH, 3004MTH Elective 1 credit Prerequisite = Algebra 2 This course is designed for students who need additional work on topics from Geometry and Algebra 2 before continuing math in college. This course will include an in-depth review of many geometric and algebraic topics. It also includes an introduction to various Pre-Calculus topics. Some additional topics may include truth tables, numeration systems, modular arithmetic, and more work with statistics. Note taking skills are used extensively. This course is most appropriate for students intending on majoring in non-math related fields in college or technical school.

http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing /ap/sub_calab.html?calcab

PRE-CALCULUS Course 3588MTH, 3589MTH Elective 1 credit Prerequisite = Algebra 2

Service Learning

Service Learning

Pre-Calculus provides the tools needed for college mathematics courses, particularly calculus. Students will build on their learning from Algebra 2 and Geometry to construct a deeper understanding of many different functions. Students will investigate functions in new ways and work with more abstract forms, including trigonometric 57


4. Statistical Inference: Confirming models – constructing confidence intervals and hypothesis testing Further information can be found at College Board’s A.P. Statistics Course Home Page (http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/re

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CALCULUS BC Course 3598MTH, 3599MTH Elective 1 credit AP Contract Required Prerequisite = Pre-Calculus and Calculus AB

pository/ap08_statistics_coursedesc.pdf)

Calculus BC is an extension of Calculus AB. It addresses additional topics such as indeterminate forms, advanced techniques of integration, and a detailed study of sequences and series. This is an advanced placement course that prepares students to take the Calculus BC exam. Calculus AB must be completed prior to a student completing Calculus BC. For students wishing to complete both AB and BC in one school year, these two courses may be offered as a double-period full-year course. Note: College Board does not permit students to take both the Calculus AB and Calculus BC exams within the same year.

CONSUMER MATH Course 3688MTH, 3788MTH Elective 1 credit Prerequisite = Algebra 1 and Geometry

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) STATISTICS

This course features applications of practical mathematics for everyday living. Topics may include checking and savings accounts, gross and net income, consumer credit, including charge accounts and credit cards, probability and statistics, income tax, the costs of owning and operating a car, traveling, types of insurance, and investments and personal budgeting. Throughout the year, spreadsheets and online assignments will be used to reinforce topics. This course is typically not accepted as a college entrance course.

Course 3005MTH, 3006MTH Elective 1 credit AP Contract Required Prerequisite = Algebra 2 Statistics, the science of data, introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: 1. Exploring Data: Observing patterns and departures from patterns – analyzing, summarizing, and comparing graphical displays and numerical summaries of data 2. Planning a Study: Deciding what and how to measure – implementing methods of data collection, conducting observational studies and surveys, and designing experiments 3. Anticipating Patterns: Producing models using probability theory and simulation – investigating probability, probability distributions, and sampling distributions

MATHEMATICS COMPETENCY Course 3011MTH Elective .5 credit Students required to schedule this class will be notified by an administrator or school counselor according to Policy IKF. This course is designed to support students in meeting graduation requirements for math. The focus is to increase student knowledge 58


and application of mathematics skills for success beyond graduation. Specifically, topics will include mathematical processes, number operations and relationships, geometry, measurement, data analysis, and algebraic relationships.

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Music Music Department Mission Statement: The Sun Prairie Music Program will provide for all students the opportunity to achieve musical excellence through a variety of musical experiences. Students will learn valuable life skills, grow aesthetically, feel successful, and create connections that will establish a lifelong appreciation of music.

Music at Sun Prairie High School The music curriculum at Sun Prairie High School is designed to expand a student’s insight into music. Multiple performing ensembles and non-performance courses give students many opportunities to study music. Studies have shown the importance of creativity and the arts. Sensitivity to, and understanding of, music will give a student a lifelong appreciation of one of the world’s greatest art forms. Participation in band, choir, and/or orchestra provides for the following instruction: 1. Individualized lesson curriculum 2. Large group rehearsals, five periods each week 3. One credit toward graduation is earned per year Students who enroll in band, choir, and/or orchestra are expected to attend and participate in performances scheduled outside of regular class time. Ensembles of any size require people to work together seamlessly; repetitive absences hinder the ability to understand and work with ensembles as a whole. Repetitive tardiness and/or unexcused absences (class/lessons), therefore, will result in the loss of performance privileges. Course #

Title

Grades

Prerequisites

Length of Course/Credits Earned

7005 MUS 7006 MUS 7001 MUS 7002 MUS 7101 MUS 7102 MUS 7103 MUS 7104 MUS 7105 MUS 7106 MUS 7135 MUS 7136 MUS 7157 MUS 7158 MUS 7155 MUS 7156 MUS

Concert Band

none

Year/ 1

Symphonic Band

Year/ 1

Wind Ensemble

Previous study on a band instrument and Audition Admission by audition

Symphonic Strings

none

Year/ 1

Chamber Strings

Consent of Instructor

Year/ 1

Mixed Choir

none

Year/ 1

Bellissima

Year/ 1

7165 MUS

Music Theory

Experience in Mixed Choir or admission by audition Experience in Mixed Choir, Bellissima or admission by audition Consent of Instructor

7168 MUS 7169 MUS 7167 MUS

Advanced Placement (AP) Music Theory Music in the Mainstream

Concert Choir

11-12

Music Theory none

60

Year/ 1

Year/ 1

Semester / .5 Year/ 1 Semester / .5


Music Department Notes: Enrollment in any music performance ensemble allows for participation in music related extracurricular activities such as 1) Jazz Ensemble 2) Jazz Combos, 3) Epoch Sound Pepband, 4) Sound of Sun Prairie, 5) District State Solo/ Ensemble, 6) String Quartet, 7) Madrigal Singers, and 8) Pop Strings.

FEES All Performance Ensembles A Board of Education mandated music/uniform fee of $25.00 is for all music performance classes. Band A $50.00/ per year fee is charged for use of school-owned instruments (including percussion). Orchestra A $50.00/ per year fee is charged for students using a school owned instrument as their only instrument. A $25.00 per year fee is charged if the instrument is only used at school.

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and concerts is required. Individual practice outside of rehearsals is required.

WIND ENSEMBLE

Service Learning

Course 7101MUS, 7102MUS Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Admission by audition Course fee: $25.00 Uniform User Fee. A $50.00/ per year fee is charged for use of school-owned instruments (including percussion). Designed for the most advanced student. Refined techniques of performance skills are demanded by the advanced music literature, which is studied. Music equipment will be necessary for daily class, lessons and performances. Attendance at all extra rehearsals, lessons, and concerts are required. Individual practice outside of rehearsals is required. Out of district performances are possible.

CONCERT BAND Course 7005MUS, 7006MUS Service Elective Course Learning 1.0 credit Prerequisite = none Course fee: $25.00 Uniform User Fee. A $50.00/ per year fee is charged for schoolowned instruments (including percussion). Available to students wishing to begin study of a band instrument. Once the necessary skill and requirements are achieved, the student will be channeled into the appropriate band periods. Music equipment will be necessary for daily class, weekly lessons and concert performances. Individual practice outside of class is encouraged.

SYMPHONIC BAND

CHAMBER STRINGS

Service Learning

Course 7105MUS, 7106MUS Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Consent of Instructor Course fee: $25.00 Uniform User Fee. A $50.00/ per year fee is charged for students using a school owned instrument as their only instrument. A $25.00 per year fee is charged if the instrument is only used at school.

Service Learning

Course 7001MUS, 7002MUS Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Previous study of a band instrument and audition Course fee: $25.00 Uniform User Fee. A $50.00/ per year fee is charged for use of school-owned instruments (including percussion).

Designed for the advanced student studying the violin, viola, cello, or string bass. Refined techniques of performance skills are demanded by the advanced music literature that is studied. Music equipment will be necessary for daily class, lessons, and performances, some of which students must provide. Participation in performances outside of the normal school concert schedule is expected and attendance at all school concerts is required.

Designed for the high school band student. A wide variety of upper level band literature will be studied. Music equipment will be necessary for daily class, lessons and performances. Attendance at all lessons

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An advanced course in choral music for treble voices. Outstanding choral literature is studied in daily rehearsals and prepared for performance. Attendance at weekly voice lessons and all performances is required. Students in this course will also have an opportunity to attend field trips to professional musical performances and perform for events in the community. Experience in Mixed Choir or consent of instructor is needed for admission to Bellissima.

SYMPHONIC STRINGS Course 7103MUS, 7104MUS Service Elective Course Learning 1.0 credit Prerequisite = none Course fee: $25.00 Uniform User Fee. A $50.00/ per year fee is charged for schoolowned instruments (including percussion). This class is available to students who have a good command of the fundamentals of instrumental performance on the violin, viola, cello, or string bass. A wide variety of orchestra literature will be studied. Music equipment will be necessary for daily class, lessons, and performances, some of which students must provide. Attendance at all school concerts is required.

CONCERT CHOIR

Course 7155MUS, 7156MUS Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Experience in Mixed Choir, Bellissima, or by consent of instructor. Course fee: $25.00 Uniform User Fee

MIXED CHOIR Service Course 7135MUS, 7136MUS Learning Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = none Course fee: $25.00 Uniform User Fee

An advanced course in choral music for mixed voices. Outstanding choral literature is studied in daily rehearsals and prepared for performance. Attendance at weekly voice lessons and performances is required. Students in this course will have an opportunity to attend field trips to professional musical performances, and perform at events in the community. Madrigal Singers, an extra-curricular performing ensemble, is another opportunity for singers in Concert Choir. Experience in Mixed Choir, Bellissima, or consent of instructor is needed for admission to Concert Choir.

An introductory course in vocal music that is open to all male and female students in grades 10-12. Included in the course are the study of singing and performing, and the fundamentals of reading and writing music. Weekly voice lessons and three concert performances per semester are required parts of this course. Students in this course will also have an opportunity to attend a field trip to the Overture Center for the Arts, and experience performances from visiting choirs and soloists. No audition or previous experience necessary.

BELLISSIMA

Service Learning

Service Learning

MUSIC THEORY

Course 7157MUS, 7158MUS Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Experience in Mixed Choir or admission by instructor. Course fee: $25.00 Uniform User Fee

Course 7165MUS Elective Course .5 credit / semester Prerequisite = Consent of instructor. Course fee: none Music Theory is designed for students who are going to pursue music as a major in

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college. This course covers aspects of music theory, musical analysis, ear training, and sight singing in an advanced setting. This course meets the MAC lab in the music department and will use the Alfred 2.0 music theory program as well as Practica Musica.

MUSIC IN THE MAINSTREAM

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) MUSIC THEORY

Course 7167MUS Elective Course .5 credit / semester Prerequisite = none Course fee: none

Course 7168MUS, 7169MUS Elective Course 1.0 credit Prerequisite = Music Theory Course fee: none

Music in the Mainstream is a course available for any student who enjoys and appreciates music. This course looks at music and the role it plays in our lives. Topics include listening to different styles of music, and discovering the ways music is performed and communicated across the world. Students will explore all aspects of the music industry, including recording technology, music in films, and the use of music in the media today. Students will have an opportunity to work in the music technology lab with the music software Garageband and Finale. Students will discover through class and various field trips how music has become an integral part of our everyday lives.

The ultimate goal of an AP Music Theory course is to develop a student’s ability to recognize, understand, and describe the basic materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. The achievement of this goal may be best promoted by integrated approaches to the student’s development of:  aural skills through listening exercises  sight-singing skills through performance exercises  written skills through written exercises  compositional skills through creative exercises  analytical skills through analytical exercises

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH During their four years of high school, all students are required to take 1.5 credits of Physical Education for graduation and also for Wisconsin State Law. Credits must be earned over three separate years. Physical Education classes meet every day for one semester and grades earned are included in the overall grade point average. The PE Department encourages students to take a half credit each year of high school to help maintain a healthy lifestyle. Fitness for Life, Individual Sports, Team Sports, Strength and Conditioning, and Lifeguard Training are the courses offered at the high school. In order to participate in Physical Education, students will be required to have a uniform consisting of a t-shirt, athletic shorts, sweatpants, sweatshirt, and tennis shoes. All Physical Education classes offered will be required to use the pool for activities, and therefore students will need appropriate swimwear and a towel.

Physical Education & Health Course #

Title

Grades

Prerequisites

Length of Course/Credits Earned

5201 PED

Fitness For Life

10-12

none

Semester / .5

5235 PED

Individual Sports

10-12

none

Semester / .5

5301 PED

Lifeguard Training

10-12

Read Course Description

Semester / .5

5275 PED

Team Sports

10-12

none

Semester / .5

5200 PED

Strength and Conditioning Health

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10

none

Semester / .5

5701 HEA

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This course offers students the opportunity to experience a variety of sports, which may provide lifelong fitness and wellness. These sports focus on individual achievement compared to activities that focus on team competition. Some activities offered may include: archery, badminton, bowling, tennis, fitness, golf, biking, table tennis, yard games, pickleball, x-country skiing, snow shoeing and water exercise.

FITNESS FOR LIFE

LIFEGUARD TRAINING

Course 5201 PED Elective Semester Course .5 Credits Course fee- $4.00 for towel fee

Course 5301 PED Elective Semester Course .5 Credits Course fee - $55.00 for American Red Cross certification materials

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn and participate in movement based activities, as well as create a personal fitness plan. Activities may include aerobics, dance, yoga, water exercise, weight training, relaxation, Pilates, power walking, snowshoeing, x-country skiing, biking, fitness related activities, as well as self-defense concepts and skills. There will be a small classroom portion of this course for students to learn about good nutrition and a healthy lifestyle. We will at times be using a textbook to enhance knowledge in combination with written work.

This course is designed for students to become trained lifeguards. To complete this training, students will have days in the water and also in the classroom. Attendance is mandatory as Red Cross specifies you must complete 32 hours of coursework during scheduled class time. Skills developed will help students to recognize and prevent injuries. They will be trained in rescue skills on land and in the water, and also in First Aid and CPR. In addition to mandatory attendance, certification is based on skill/written test completion. Participants will also learn how to interact with school age children, community members, and address uncooperative patrons using the facilities. Successful completion of this course will give the student an opportunity to provide a health related service to the community. Students must be able to successfully complete criteria 1-4 below:

INDIVIDUAL SPORTS

1. Must be 15 years old. 2. Must be able to complete 300 yards of freestyle (front crawl) or breaststroke demonstrating breath control and rhythmic breathing.

Course 5235 PED Elective Semester Course .5 Credits Course fee - $27.00 for towel fee and off campus activities

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3. Tread water for 2 minutes using only the legs. Candidates should place their hands under the armpits. 4. Must be able to swim 20 yards and perform brick retrieval from 7-10 feet of water and return to starting point within Red Cross guidelines established time limit. 5. Score at least 80% on all written material.

TEAM SPORTS Course 5275 PED Elective Semester Course .5 Credits Course fee - $27.00 for towel fee and off campus activities This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to experience a variety of sports in a team setting. In the future, these sports may be included in ones healthy lifestyle choices. Activities may include basketball, volleyball, flag football, floor hockey, lacrosse, softball, eclipse ball, ultimate frisbee, speedball, bowling, rugby, handball, and water polo.

STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING Course 5200PED Elective Semester Course .5 Credits Course fee- $4.00 for towel fee This course is designed to be a challenging strength and conditioning course. In this course the students will be expected to implement a personal fitness program. To assure the students reach their expected results, they will be measured weekly in different areas of achievement. Achievement will be based on personal fitness goals that are designed by the instructor and student together. This course includes strength, cardio, water resistance, and agility training.

HEALTH Course 5701HEA Required Semester Course .5 Credits Course fee - $7.00 Book 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens All sophomores enroll in Health. Some of the topics covered include healthy choices and decision making, mental health, stress management, fitness and weight control, drug use and abuse including alcohol and tobacco, infectious diseases including STDs and AIDS, noninfectious diseases, relationships, and sexuality. Since this course includes material on sensitive topics, parental involvement is encouraged. Successful completion of Health is a graduation requirement. As an option, students may pay the Red Cross fee of $19.00 for certification in CPR.

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SCIENCE VISION STATEMENT Students will be lifelong scientific learners by fostering critical thinking skills through investigation, research, writing, and collaborative communication of scientific concepts. Scientific opportunities will be linked with the community and explored through careers, which connect to the real world.

Science is part of graduation requirements. All students need three credits of science for graduation. One credit must be a physical science credit and one credit must be a life science credit. The third credit can be any science class. Students planning on continuing their education beyond high school are encouraged to take additional credits. Credits in science may come from the courses listed below.

Science Course #

Title

4335 SCI 4435 SCI 4444 SCI 4544 SCI 4580 SCI

Chemistry

4010 SCI 4017 SCI

Natural Science/Wisconsin Ecology Aviation and Space

4581 SCI

Weather and Climate

4334 SCI

Genetics/BioTech

4563 SCI

Forensic Science

4564 SCI

Physiology

4574 SCI

Human Anatomy

Physics Kinetics: Science in Motion

Science Credit

Grades

Physical Science Physical Science Physical Science Life Science Physical Science Physical Science Life Science Physical Science Life Science Life

10-12

none

11-12 10-12

strong math skills are recommended none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

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Prerequisites

Length of Course/Credits Earned Year/ 1 Year/ 1


Science 4575 SCI

Environmental Science

10-12

none

Advanced Placement (AP) Biology Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry Advanced Placement (AP) Environmental Science

Life Science Life Science Physical Science Life Science

4223 SCI 4224 SCI 4554 SCI 4555 SCI 4576 SCI 4577 SCI

11-12

4442 SCI 4443 SCI

Advanced Placement (AP) Physics C: Mechanics

Physical Science

11-12

4438 SCI

Advanced Placement (AP) Physics 1

Physical Science

10-12

Recommended A or B in Biology Recommended A or B in Chemistry Recommended successful completion of one year of biology, one year of chemistry and one year of algebra Recommended currently enrolled in Pre-Calculus or Calculus Recommended strong algebraic math skills

4439 SCI

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11-12 11-12

Semester / .5 Year/ 1 Year/ 1 Year/ 1

Year/ 1

Year/ 1


credit of physical science for graduation. Students planning on taking physics should have a calculator with trig functions, roots and powers on it. Such a calculator will cost approximately $15 if you shop wisely. Physicsclassroom.com

CHEMISTRY Course 4335SCI, 4435SCI 1.0 physical science credit In Chemistry, students study the composition of matter and the changes matter undergoes. Major units stressed in this course are: quantitative and qualitative measurement, the mole concept, atomic structure, equation writing, bonding, gas laws, acids and bases, solutions, applied inorganic and organic chemistry. Mathematical calculations and laboratory techniques are emphasized. Students need a scientific calculator.

KINETICS: SCIENCE IN MOTION Course 4580SCI .5 physical science credit Students have experienced physics interacting with them on a daily basis. Things as simple as an apple falling from a tree to the graceful motion of a dancer all show interactions with physics in our daily lives. In this course we will study the interaction of physics with the body to show how and why athletes move the way they do, why a dancer has to have lower leg strength, what makes a good punch, how a lineman delivers that bone crunching impact, and how students’ bodies deal with physics in everyday life. Kinetics covers many of the core physics principles, but in a project-based learning environment. Students should be prepared to study the concepts and present their understanding with a model that shows what they have learned. Students will be encouraged to work at their own pace and can push further into the materials if they have the drive. If a student is considering a future that includes college, the student should consider this course. It will prepare students for grouprelated practices, managing individual

PHYSICS Course 4444SCI, 4544SCI 1.0 physical science credit Prerequisite = strong math skills Being the most basic science, physics should be pursued by all students having a genuine interest in science. Future engineers, chemists, medical students, and nearly all science majors will have to take a physics course. It is recommended that students taking physics should have taken Algebra I, and Geometry, and be taking more mathematics. Topics covered include: radioactivity, description of motion (kinematics), explaining motion (dynamics), solar system motion and gravity, momentum, energy, waves, light, electricity and magnetism, atomic theory, and relativity. This would fulfill one of the three science credits most post-secondary institutions require. This also fulfills the 1.0 70


learning, and creating a finished product they can truly be proud of. Students considering a future in medical studies are also encouraged to take this course to prepare for the physics they will need to learn in college.

NATURAL ECOLOGY

SCIENCE/

will help students understand celestial events and learn about local stars and constellations in the Milky Way galaxy. Knowledge of these celestial events and objects will also help in our discussion of space travel. Requirements of becoming a pilot or an astronaut are reviewed with practice flying flight simulators. The history of aviation along with the space program will also be a part of the curriculum. Field trips to local planetariums, airports, and aviation museums will help to solidify concepts that have been covered in class. Speakers would include pilots, former astronauts, engineers in the field, sky divers, and amateur astronomers. Representatives from all branches of the armed forces will be available to discuss aircraft they maintain and fly. The course fee covers the model rocket, engines, kites, White Wings model airplanes, and Delta Darts.

WISCONSIN

Course 4010SCI .5 life science credit Course fee $24.00 for fieldtrip Natural Science is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of ecology and natural resources at the local and state level. This course also addresses environmental issues relevant to the state of Wisconsin and makes connections to the effects on the global community. Topics include: ecology, local plant and animal identification, hunting, natural resources, land use issues, and human impacts (both positive and negative) on the environment. Students can expect to spend some class time outside during all seasons. Field trips will be taken to help solidify concepts that have been covered. The course fee covers fieldtrips and eco-columns.

WEATHER AND CLIMATE Course 4581SCI .5 physical science credit Weather and Climate is an introductory class focusing on the scientific study of atmospheric processes and patterns, and their impact on human activities. This introductory meteorology course examines the collection and analysis of meteorological data at local, regional, and global scales. Topics include the heat, moisture, and wind dynamics of the atmosphere; application of satellite and radar data; development and impact of thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes; weather analysis and forecasting; and the study of climate and climate change. This course involves a moderate amount of supplemental reading and a field exercise. Use of on-line information and resources are encouraged, so basic knowledge of web research is assumed.

AVIATION AND SPACE Course 4017SCI .5 physical science credit Course fee: $30.00 for classroom projects Aviation and Space is a course designed for those students interested in engineering concepts required for designing airplanes and launching rockets. A short unit on astronomy

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offers the knowledge and technology of science for the definition and enforcement of such laws. The class will emphasize science as inquiry. The emphasis of this course is to understand how science can be used to analyze physical evidence to solve many crimes. The key topics focused on during this course include document analysis, fingerprinting, serology, hair analysis, fiber analysis and others.

GENETICS/BIOTECH Course 4334SCI .5 life science credit Course lab fee $15.00 for fieldtrip This is a semester course covering transmission genetics and biotechnology. Students will study the heredity of individuals and populations from both a physical and chemical standpoint. Students will also research, debate and discuss current bioethical issues in genetics such as: cloning, stem cell research, genetic engineering, and forensic applications of DNA technology. Students will work together to complete many hands-on lab activities that include genetic crossing using fast plants and fruit flies, DNA extraction and fingerprinting, gel electrophoresis, DNA mapping, and transformation. This also includes an explanation of how human traits are inherited. Students will travel to local laboratories or businesses working in genetic research. This course is an excellent introduction to careers in the biotechnology and the medical fields. The course fee covers field trips and fast plants.

PHYSIOLOGY Course 4564SCI .5 life science credit Physiology is a semester course designed for students who are pursuing a career in: nursing, medical technology, medicine, pharmacy, microbiology, dentistry, biology, biochemistry and other science-related fields. Along with Human Anatomy, it will help you prepare to meet your college science requirements. Emphasis is placed on a biochemical approach to life. Topics including a survey in organic chemistry, the cell, living chemistry, life processes, digestion and metabolism. This class is lab oriented and highly recommended to take in the senior year. This class is independent of Human Anatomy.

FORENSIC SCIENCE Course 4563SCI .5 physical science credit The purpose of this course is to apply science to law. As our society has grown more complex, it has become more dependent on rules of law to regulate the activities of its members. Forensic science 72


HUMAN ANATOMY

ADVANCED BIOLOGY

Course 4574SCI .5 life science credit

PLACEMENT

(AP)

Course 4223SCI, 4224SCI 1.0 life science credit AP Contract Required Required Summer Assignment Recommended = A or B in Biology Recommended but not required – Human Anatomy, Physiology, or Genetics. Course lab fee - $25.00 for fieldtrip

Human Anatomy is a semester course, which places emphasis on the study of human systems: human reproduction, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and cardiovascular. This class is lab orientated. This course is highly recommended for students pursuing a career in nursing, medicine, medical technology, dentistry, pharmacy and other science-related fields. Also, when both Anatomy and Physiology are taken, they are an excellent means of helping prepare students to meet their college science requirements. This class is lab oriented.

This is an advanced biology course similar to a beginning college biology course. The course will be taught at a college level. Students may elect to take the National Advance Placement Biology Exam in May and with satisfactory results, students may earn college credits. ―The two main goals of AP Biology are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and to help students gain an appreciation of science as a process. Primary emphasis in an Advanced Placement Biology course should be on developing an understanding of concepts rather than on memorizing terms and technical details. Essential to this conceptual understanding are the following: a grasp of science as a process rather than as an accumulation of facts; personal experience in scientific inquiry; recognition of unifying themes that integrate the major topics of biology; and application of biological knowledge and critical thinking to environmental and social concerns.‖ (as taken from the http://www.collegeboard.org/ap/biology) Good computer skills, Internet access and email are strongly suggested. The topics to be covered during the course and on the exam include:

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Course 4575SCI .5 life science credit Course fee - $20.00 for fieldtrip This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to acquire the knowledge, values, commitment and skills necessary to protect and improve the environment. Environmental science incorporates a variety of scientific disciplines including, biology, geology, and ecology but also incorporates various aspects of politics and economy. Students will identify different environmental issues and analyze both their impacts on the environment and the underlying causes from different viewpoints. Students will have an opportunity to develop their own philosophy on how humans can live sustainably and what each person can do as an individual to make a difference. Topics include: Ecology, human population, energy resources, and climate change. Field trips will be taken to help solidify concepts that have been covered. The course fee covers the cost of field trips.

   

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evolution biological systems using energy to maintain homeostasis passing heritable information to provide continuity of life the interaction of biological systems with biotic and abiotic factors


ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CHEMISTRY

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Course 4554SCI, 4555SCI 1.0 physical science credit Recommended = A or B in Chemistry AP Contract Required Required Summer Assignment

Course 4576SCI, 4577SCI 1.0 life science credit Recommended: Successful completion of one year of biology, one year of chemistry, and one year of algebra Service AP Contract Required Learning Required Summer Assignment Course fee - $25.00 for fieldtrip

This is an advanced chemistry course taught at the college level. College credit can be earned by taking the National AP Chemistry exam in May. Different colleges require different achievement on the test to achieve credit. The National AP Chemistry exam is optional. The course emphasizes laboratory activities and a mathematical approach to problem solving. Students should be highly motivated and able to work independently. Calculators are required. The topics discussed throughout the year will be: 1) Fundamentals 2) Stoichiometry 3) Reactions in Solution 4) Gases 5) Thermodynamics 6) Atomic Structure 7) Periodic Table 8) Bonding 9) Intermolecular Forces 10) Properties of Solutions 11) Equilibrium 12) Acid-Base Reactions 13) Electrochemistry 14) Oxidation – Reduction Reactions

The purpose of AP Environmental Science is to offer high school students the opportunity to gain college credit for an introductory course in Environmental Science. Students will learn the curriculum designated by the College Board in order for students to successfully pass the AP Environmental Science test, thus, possibly gaining college credit depending on the university or college attended by the student. Of equal importance, students will learn the multidisciplinary approaches used to assess, monitor, and abate problems within the environment we live. After completing the course, students will be able to assess their role within the environment and make personal decisions that will lead to an environmentally sustainable future for their community, state, country, and all human beings. Because we are studying the environment, great emphasis will be placed on conducting real science within the Sun Prairie community. Obviously, this requires us to be outdoors a good deal of time in all weather conditions, sampling and collecting data within our immediate environment. A natural result of this type of science requires more advanced analysis and write-ups than do simple ―fill in the answer‖ labs. Due to the complexity of society, it would be inappropriate to study environmental science in the vacuum of pure science. Instead, we will seek to incorporate social sciences such as economics, politics, ethics, and law to understand real-world perspectives on environmental problems. The course fee covers the cost of field trips.

http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing /ap/sub_chem.html?chem

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The service learning project is an environmental assessment of the Token Creek watershed.

Laboratory work is an integral part of this course. Students will also acquire skills in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, critical thinking, and communication. The math is calculus-based and it is recommended that the student be concurrently enrolled in a calculus course or have completed a calculus course, to obtain the maximum success in this course. Technology skills will be emphasized through using computer probes to gather and interpret data and through the use of an online course management system called Moodle.

http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing /ap/sub_envsci.html?envsci

http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing /ap/sub_physc.html?physicsc

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS C: MECHANICS

ADVANCED PHYSICS 1

(AP)

PLACEMENT

(AP)

Course 4442SCI, 4443SCI 1.0 physical science credit AP Contract Required Required Summer Assignment Recommended = Currently enrolled in PreCalculus or Calculus

Course 4438SCI, 4439SCI 1.0 physical science credit AP Contract Required Required Summer Assignment Recommended = Strong algebraic math skills

This is a science course for students who plan on attending college and majoring in engineering or other similar sciences. This is a college level course, in which college credit can be obtained by passing a National AP Physics C: Mechanics exam. The accredited colleges all have different standards as to what score on the exam is approved for credit. The National AP Physics C test is optional to take. The course content is only the Mechanics portion of physics; topics for the exam include motion, vectors, work, energy, power, momentum, impulse, collisions, rotational kinematics and dynamics, statistics, gravitation, and simple harmonic motion.

AP Physics 1 is the equivalent of a first semester college course in algebra-based physics, but is designed to be taught over a full academic year to enable AP students to develop deep understanding of the content and to focus on applying their knowledge through inquiry labs. The full year also allows time for inclusion of physics content specified by state standards. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound. It also introduces electric circuits.

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SOCIAL STUDIES By fostering an environment that values all students as individuals, the Sun Prairie Social Studies Program attempts to reach the long-range objective of preparing students to be lifelong learners as well as informed and responsible global citizens. Students will be instructed in the social studies strands of history, geography, economics, political science, and behavioral sciences. Students will be engaged in 21st century technologies to gain the skills necessary to prepare them for the world beyond high school. Three credits of Social Studies are required for graduation. Many Social Studies courses offer a Service Learning opportunity. To learn more about the service learning requirement visit: http://sl.dpi.wi.gov/sl_sldppage

Requirements for Graduation: One credit in World Studies One credit in United States History or AP U.S. History One-half credit in Economics or AP Macroeconomics or AP Microeconomics One-half credit in Foundations of American Democracy or AP U.S. Government and Politics

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Social Studies Course #

Title

Grades

2251 SOC 2252 SOC 2451 SOC 2452 SOC 2300 SOC

United States History, 1860-Present Advanced Placement (AP) United States History Foundations of American Democracy Advanced Placement (AP) United States Government and Politics Economics

10-11

none

Length of Course/ Credits Earned Year/ 1

10-11

none

Year/ 1

11-12

none

Semester/ .5

11-12

none

Year/ 1

11-12

none

Semester/ .5

11-12

none

Semester/ .5

11-12

none

Semester/ .5

2471SOC 2472SOC 2030SOC

Advanced Placement (AP) Macroeconomics Advanced Placement (AP) Microeconomics Advanced Placement (AP) European History African Heritage

10-12

none

Year/ 1

10-12

none

Semester/ .5

2604 SOC

Current Affairs

11-12

none

Semester/ .5

2611 SOC

Diversity Studies

10-12

none

Semester/ .5

2605 SOC

International Studies and Global Realities Legal Studies

10-12

none

Semester/ .5

10-12

none

Semester/ .5

10-12

none

Semester/ .5

10-12

none

Semester/ .5

2001 SOC 2002 SOC 2500 SOC

Native American & Latin American Heritage Social Studies Seminar: Beyond the Battlefield Advanced Placement (AP) Psychology Psychology

11-12

none

Year/ 1

11-12

none

Semester/ .5

2502 SOC

Introduction to Sociology

11-12

none

Semester/ .5

2606SOC 2607SOC 2600 SOC 2609 SOC 2610 SOC

2005 SOC 2032SOC 2508SOC

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Prerequisites


Service Learning

cultural, and diplomatic history of America from colonization through the 1990s. The students will read and analyze historical writing, reflect upon historical evidence and participate in discussion and write about central themes in America’s past. Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote considerable time to practice and study are necessary to succeed. Emphasis is placed upon critical and evaluative thinking skills, essay writing, interpretation of primary source documents and historiography. Important student objectives include the following:

UNITED STATES HISTORY 1860— PRESENT Course 2251SOC/2252SOC Fulfills U.S. History Requirement 1 credit This course includes an in-depth, engaging look at a variety of historical periods including, the Civil War; Reconstruction and Civil Rights; Industrial Revolution; Political and Social Reform; American Expansionism; World Wars I and II; the Great Depression and New Deal; evolution of modern American society, economically, socially, and politically; the Cold War and Vietnam conflicts; and America in the modern world. Connections will be made between events of our nation’s past and today, with an emphasis on acquiring 21st Century Skills.

 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY

To relate the past to the present, to develop historical thinking, and to recognize the interconnectedness of the past to the future To develop study skills, to engage in considerable outside reading, and to practice and consistently use higher order thinking skills, notably evaluation, analysis and synthesis To understand the diversity inherent in the American story and to gain an appreciation for contributions from groups and individuals other than those in the majority To produce and present a piece of original historical research To prepare for the Advanced Placement Exam in U.S. History

You will receive information about preparing for the National Advanced Placement U.S. History Test given in May. The test is optional but necessary for those students who wish to earn college credits. Students are required to pay for the AP exam for. Financial assistance can be arranged.

(AP)

Course 2451SOC/2452SOC Fulfills U.S. History Requirement 1 credit AP Contract Required Required Summer Assignment

To learn more about this course visit: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/co urses/teachers_corner/3501.html

AP U.S. History is a challenging course that is meant to be equivalent to a freshman college course and can earn college credit when a student scores a 3 or higher on the AP exam. It is a two semester course focusing on the political, social, military,

78


ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS Course 2606SOC and 2607SOC Fulfills graduation requirement 1 credit AP Contract Required Required Summer Assignment

FOUNDATIONS DEMOCRACY

OF

Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics is a course that allows students to examine the following federal government topics in depth: origins of the American government, the three branches of government, public opinion, political parties, public policy, mass media, the federal court system and Bill of Rights, civil liberties, interest groups, money in politics, campaigns and elections and the decision-making processes of governing our nation on a daily basis. Class activities and instruction will include the following: lecture, debates, research projects, mock elections, guest speakers, and analysis of public opinion polls. Students will be encouraged to get involved in participatory democracy activities such as serving as election workers and volunteering for campaigns. This course prepares students for the National Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics exam in May, and with satisfactory results, students may earn college credits.

AMERICAN

Course 2300 SOC Fulfills graduation requirement .5 credit This course emphasizes local, state, tribal and national government structures and their roles in society. It is designed to encourage active and positive citizenship by increasing students' appreciation of the tools required for participatory democracy. Students will examine the fundamentals of constitutional principles, the organization of all levels of government, the policy-making process, laws, elections, political parties and the citizens' rights and responsibilities.

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ECONOMICS

Service Learning

Monetary Policy: What is the Fed and how does it work? and 6) International Trade and Finance: What is happening in the global economy?

Course 2600SOC Fulfills Economics Requirement .5 credit

The aim of Advanced Placement Macroeconomics is to provide the student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in typical college introductory Macroeconomics course. Instruction is a combination of lecture, group problemsolving discussion, and concept application activities. This course prepares students for the National Advanced Placement Macroeconomics Exam in May, and with satisfactory results, students may earn college credits.

Which is more dangerous, a gun or a swimming pool? What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common? How much do parents really matter? Economics presents a crash course in the operation of a market-oriented economic system and examines your role as a consumer, producer, and citizen. Time will be spent examining current events and how they relate to basic concepts covered in class. Topics covered include scarcity, resources, economic decision-making, supply and demand, alternative economic systems, economic growth, global economic issues, business organization, market structure and labor. Students will also be participating in two life-like projects; the stock market simulation and Reality Rocks. Group discussions and hands on activities are a must in this class.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT MACROECONOMICS

To learn more about this course visit: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public /courses/teachers_corner/2120.html

(AP)

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) MICROECONOMICS

Course 2609SOC Fulfills Economics Requirement .5 credit AP Contract Required May be taken with AP Microeconomics for year sequence

Course 2610SOC Fulfills Economics Requirement .5 credit AP Contract Required May be taken with AP Macroeconomics for year sequence

Macroeconomics explores the ―Big Picture‖ of the U.S. economy and its role in the global economy as well as the historical development and modern relevance of important economic theories. Topics of study include 1) Basic Economic Concepts: What is Economics? 2) Measurement of Economic Performance and Economic Growth: How do we determine the health of the economy? 3) National Income and Price Determination: What is GDP, Inflation, and the unemployment rate and why do they matter? 4) Fiscal Policy: What impact does the government have on the economy? 5)

Microeconomics examines the individual roles of consumers, businesses, and the government in the functioning of the economy. The primary focus of the course is in understanding markets and competition within different sectors of the economy. Microeconomics places a greater emphasis on graphing, accounting, and mathematical relationships within the economy. Microeconomic topics include 1) Basic Economic Concepts: What is Economics? 2) the nature and function of product markets including consumption, production, pricing, and competition, 3) the nature and 80


function of factor markets and 4) the role of government in regulating markets.

History is organized on the assumption that the students will take the College Board national AP exam. This exam allows those who qualify to receive college credit for the course. Therefore there is a constant focus on strengthening test-taking skills for the objective part of the exam and practice of writing skills for the DBQ (Document Based Question) and free response or essay portions of the test. The course is year long.

The aim of Advanced Placement Microeconomics is to provide the student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in typical college introductory Microeconomics courses. Instruction is a combination of lecture, group problemsolving discussion, and concept application activities. This course prepares students for the National Advanced Placement Microeconomics Exam in May, and with satisfactory results, students may earn college credits. To learn more about this course visit: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/cou rses/teachers_corner/2121.html

ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY

(AP)

Course 2471SOC and 2472SOC Elective Course 1 credit AP Contract Required

AFRICAN HERITAGE Course 2030SOC Elective Course .5 credit

AP European History is for students who would like another AP option or who enjoy the study of history. It is a rigorous academic course that presents a basic narrative of events and movements in European History from 1450 to the present. It prepares students for the demands of a university education by providing experience in college level reading, writing and responsibility for learning. Students in this course will investigate the broad themes of intellectual, cultural, and political history and note their relationship in philosophy, literature and the arts. This course also examines demographics, society, gender roles, and economic trends. The impact of industrialization on Europe and the development of a European trade policy leading up to the European Union and its role in world trade today are closely examined. Modern Africa and Asia are products of European involvement and we will examine that link as well. AP European

African Heritage examines how the history of Africa has been shaped by human and geographic forces, explores the impact of the African Diaspora on cultures around the world, examines contemporary issues in African society, and celebrates the rich cultural heritage of African people. This course will cover topics that include origins of man, physical geography of the continent, African civilizations and Empires, African languages and culture, Spread of Islam, European Imperialism and the slave trade, African American history and culture, and contemporary African lifestyles and issues. This course will integrate the methods of History, Human Geography, and Humanities to provide students with a deep understanding of Africa and its people. Students will be expected to interpret both primary and secondary sources to gain knowledge, gather evidence, and analyze

81


different perspectives; read a variety nonfiction and fiction sources; engage in thought-provoking and respectful discussion; develop a research-based project related to personal interests; and use technology in appropriate and productive ways to gather information, communicate ideas, and produce products.

DIVERSITY STUDIES Course 2611SOC Elective Course .5 credit

Servic e Learn

This course addresses contemporary issues regarding diversity in our society. Students examine the history of various ethnic and social groups and determine how and why these groups experience power and/or oppression in our current culture. Topics like immigration, racism, sexism and homophobia are analyzed with a focus on developing an understanding of belief systems, human relations, and the law. This course requires students to be actively involved in their learning by participating in large group discussions, critically reviewing primary and secondary resources, and collaboratively working in small groups.

CURRENT AFFAIRS Course 2604SOC Elective Course .5 credit Course fee - $10.00 for bi-monthly news magazine This course involves a daily examination of local, state, national, and international news and current issues as they develop. Students engage in analysis of topics that include world conflict, economic issues, social questions, the role of government, and people in the news. News magazines, newspapers, internet and video serve as resources for daily activities which are discussion-based and require active student participation. Class activities also include debate, small group collaboration, and weekly news quizzes.

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES GLOBAL REALITIES

AND

Course 2605SOC Elective Course .5 credit Interested in solving world problems and issues through an inquiry, project based learning experience? International Studies and Global Realities is a class allowing students to study the following topics through multiple perspectives, technologies and resources: historical roots of global issues and relations, global resource demands, world security, cultural identity and global migration, international perspectives, global democratization and economic trends, issues facing citizens around the globe, human rights, nuclear proliferation, diplomacy, terrorism, human security, genocide, environmental concerns and the role of nations and international organizations in working together.

82


development of Pre-Columbian American Civilizations; examine patterns of cultural interaction between Native American, European, and African groups and the role of economics in development of the Americas; explore contemporary issues in Latin America and Native American communities; and celebrate the rich cultural heritage of the Americas. This course will integrate the methods of History, Human Geography, and Humanities to provide students with a deep understanding of the Native American and Latin American experience. Students will be expected to interpret both primary and secondary sources to gain knowledge, gather evidence, and analyze different perspectives; read a variety non-fiction and fiction sources; engage in thought-provoking and respectful discussion; develop a research-based project related to personal interests; and use technology in appropriate and productive ways to gather information, communicate ideas, and produce products.

LEGAL STUDIES Course 2005SOC Elective Course .5 credit

Servic e

This course is an introduction to law studies covering topics such as our legal system, basic legal terms and proceedings, and fundamental concepts of constitutional, criminal, and civil law. Students will analyze various sources that have influenced the legal, political, and constitutional heritage of the United States; trace how legal interpretations of liberty, equality, justice, and power as identified in the Constitution have changed and evolved over time; and analyze information, form a reasoned conclusion, and develop a coherent argument on legal issues. The course provides students with opportunities to learn about justice, responsibility, and the role of an individual within a free society. Students analyze and practice decision-making skills based on logic, better equipping them to deal with controversy and conflict. In addition, the course provides exposure to law related careers.

SOCIAL STUDIES SEMINAR 2014-2015 TOPIC: Beyond the Battlefield: The cost of War in Modern Society Course 2508SOC Elective Course .5 credit

Students will engage in cooperative learning, role-play, simulations, presentations, debate, lecture, small- and large-group discussions, mock trials, and case studies.

NATIVE AMERICAN LATIN AMERICAN HERITAGE

This course is a survey of military history and the interaction between society and military institutions, technology, and techniques from 1930 to the present. The course will study the interrelationships of warfare, technology and society in American history. The course will focus on such questions as how changing ―styles‖ of warfare, the rationale for going to war, and the transformations in military technology have impacted the government and society. Conversely, it will also investigate how political and societal changes have influenced the nature of warfare in American history.

&

Course 2032SOC Elective Course .5 credit 1491—What did the Americas look like on the eve of Christopher Columbus’ arrival in the ―New World‖? What does the Native American and Latin American world look like today? This course will trace the

83


PSYCHOLOGY Course 2500SOC Elective Course .5 credit

Servic e

Psychology is the study of individuals’ thoughts and behaviors. Students will attempt to better understand why people act the way they do. Students will use handson activities to study (replicate) psychological studies such as: Freud’s dream interpretations, ESP, sensation/perception – displacement goggles, Skinner’s box, Milgram’s obedience device, Ekman’s facial expressions, right/left brain – dowel experiment, gender difference attitudes – Mars vs. Venus, and personality tests. By studying psychology, the daily events we might ordinarily take for granted now become fuel for thought. This course is geared for all students looking to have fun while exploring the human mind.

Servic e

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) PSYCHOLOGY Course 2001SOC and 2002SOC Elective Course 1 credit AP Contract Required Students will explore the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. Both historical and current major approaches to psychology will be evaluated. The course is largely based on the AP Psychology Course Outline established by the College Board. Units of study include: research methods, sensation/perception, consciousness, development, personality, motivation, abnormal psychology, and social psychology. Students will investigate and replicate previous psychological research and methods. This course requires reading and writing, critical thinking, class participation, collaborative learning, and a high level of motivation. Students are assessed using a variety of techniques, including, quizzes, hands-on activities, unit test, free responses, projects, experiments, and final exams. The main goal for this class is to properly prepare students for the Psychology National Exam in May. To learn more about this course visit: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/publi c/courses/teachers_corner/2265.html

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INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY Course 2502SOC Elective Course .5 credit Did you ever wonder why shoppers are trampled on Black Friday, or why people commit crimes, or how stereotypes are created? Sociology provides students with an introduction to the study of society and why we do what we do. Various topics and questions will be investigated, explored and discussed including, but not limited to: Who defines the norms and values in society? Are you the person you are because of your background, who you surround yourself with, how you were raised, and/or your genetic make up? Why do some people act differently in groups rather than how they would individually? How is society structured, and what are the inequalities that exist in our society? How does change occur? How do the social institutions of family, education, religion, and politics influence who we are? In addition, students will study current social problems that exist, such as deviance, crime, poverty, and the influence of the media. This course requires students to be actively involved in their learning by participating in large group discussions, collaboratively working in small groups, completing various unit projects, and a semester sociological research project.

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Technology & Engineering Education Technology & Engineering Education is committed to preparing students for employment and/or continuing education opportunities by teaching them to understand, design, produce, use, and manage the human-made world in order to contribute and function in a technological society. These are the perfect classes to prepare students for success in today’s economy. The Technology & Engineering Education curriculum has been redesigned to provide students the opportunity to try a variety of interest areas and to utilize many new technologies. The classes provide awareness and information about a wide variety of technology related careers and non-traditional opportunities, and prepare students to prosper in a technologically rich society. The classes focus on problem-solving, critical thinking, teamwork, and are largely project-oriented. In addition, courses that have traditionally been referred to as ―the Trades‖ are also offered, but with a look at current industry standards. Seniors wishing to take a Technology and Engineering Education course for the first time should see the department coordinator for class placement.

86


Technology and Engineering Education Course #

Title

Grades

Prerequisites

Length of Course/Credits Earned

7352ART

Arts of Industry

10-12

none

Semester / .5

8303 TED

Fundamentals of Technology and Engineering 3D Animation and Gaming

10-12

none

Semester / .5

10-12

none

Semester / .5

Advanced 3D Animation and Gaming Biomedical Engineering

10-12

Semester / .5

10-12

3 D Animation and Gaming none

8307 TED (IED 1) 8308 TED (IED 2) 8309 TED (POE 1) 8310 TED (POE 2) 8311 TED (CEA 1) 8312 TED (CEA 2) 8403 TED

Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) – Project Lead the Way

10-12

none

Year / 1

Principles of Engineering (POE) – Project Lead the Way

10-12

Recommended Introduction to Engineering Design

Year / 1

Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA) – Project Lead the Way

11-12

Recommended Introduction to Engineering Design

Year / 1

General Woodworking

10-12

none

Semester / .5

8404 TED

Cabinetry and Advanced Woodworking Construction Skills

10-12

General Woodworking

Semester / .5

10-12

Algebra I and General Woodworking

8405 TED 8406 TED

Home Construction

11-12

8407 TED 8408 TED

Construction Management and Supervision

12

General Woodworking and Construction Skills and completion of application Grade of ―C‖ or better in Home Construction

Year / 1 *Can also be taken for just one semester. No guarantee regarding which semester can be made for those who elect to take just one semester. Year / 1.5 per semester

8801 TED

Power Mechanics

10-12

none

*3 Hour block Semester / .5

8806 TED

Consumer Auto

10-12

none

Semester / .5

8705 TED 8706 TED 8305 TED

8210 TED 8211 TED

87

Semester / .5

*3 Hour block Year / 1.5 per semester


8804 TED

Auto Mechanics I

10-12

none

8805 TED

Auto Mechanics II

10-12

Auto Mechanics I

8030 AGR

Welding I

10-12

none

Semester / 1.0 2 period block Semester / 1.0 2 period block Semester / .5

8036 AGR

Welding II

10-12

Welding I

Semester / .5

88


Students will be working in teams and as individuals to complete projects that show how technology and engineering design impact everyday items. Students interested in career fields such as engineering, research and development, construction, manufacturing, architecture, transportation, mechanical design, biomedical design, or any other technical related field are encouraged to enroll. This course will meet the requirements for other courses offered in the Technology and Engineering Department requiring Introduction to Technology and Engineering as a prerequisite.

GENERAL COURSES ARTS OF INDUSTRY Course 7352ART Elective .5 credit Arts of Industry is designed for those students who want to get a complete education in the elements and principles of design and be able to apply it to their art through the use of more ―industrial‖ type tools and machines. This class goes way beyond the typical art room setting in that larger scale sculptures will be created through the use of technologically advanced tools/machines. Arts of Industry will teach students to have an artistic eye for creation and the trade/skill of how to use first-rate industrial tools/machines. While working in the class, students will be creating various projects that will be a part of the school and/or the community. Students will be encouraged to use class time and what they have learned toward their community service requirement for graduation. Arts of Industry will offer much opportunity to learn and create many self-rewarding pieces of artwork.

3D ANIMATION AND GAMING Course 8705TED Elective .5 Credits The animation and video game industry is already bigger than the film industry worldwide, and many video games now match the quality of the best feature film effects. The primary focus of 3D Animation and Gaming is applying knowledge of 2D and 3D animation concepts to modeling, texturing and concept art, prototype animation in simulated environments, client based 3D animation, game production, and learning how to produce a professional demo reel.

ENGINEERING PROGRAM

Career positions in animation and gaming include 2D/3D animators, modelers, lighting and texture artists, level designers, storyboard and concept artists. Employers in the animation and gaming industry are looking for people who have a strong portfolio to showcase their work.

FUNDAMENTALS OF TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING Course 8303TED Elective .5 Credits Course Fee: $15.00 for project materials Fundamentals of Technology and Engineering provides students the opportunity to explore the different areas of the Technology & Engineering Department. Through this course, students will identify careers, learn basic safety in the technology labs, and become acclimated to the materials and processes used to create prototypes and products. Students will design projects in the Computer Aided Engineering Lab and build these projects in the Material Science Prototype Lab.

ADVANCED GAMING

3D

ANIMATION

AND

Course 8706TED Elective .5 Credits Prerequisite = 3D Animation and Gaming Advanced 3D Animation and Gaming continues developing student skills in the area of Animations and Video Game Design. Students will use 3D Animation and 89


Gaming software through the completion of case studies (simulated real world scenarios). Areas of study may include, but are not limited to: Medical and Health, Construction, Entertainment, Environment, and Manufacturing. Upon completion of the course, students will have created a professional portfolio to showcase their 3D Animations and Game Designs to prospective employers, technical colleges and universities.

appropriate for 9th through 12th grade students who are interested in design and engineering. The major focus of the IED course is to expose students to design process, engineering standards, research and analysis, technical documentation, global and human impacts, communication methods, and teamwork. IED gives students the opportunity to develop skills and understanding of course concepts through activity, project, and problem-based learning.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

Students will employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. In addition, students use a state of the art 3D solid modeling design software package to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems. Students will develop problemsolving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges that increase in difficulty throughout the course. Students will also learn how to document their work, and communicate their solutions to their peers and members of the professional community.

Course 8305TED Elective .5 Credits Biomedical Engineering students will learn about concepts common to engineers in the biomedical, biotechnical, and bioengineering disciplines. Students will conduct case studies as individuals and teams that range from simple exercises to real world problems that students will solve in the classroom. Students will consult with actual engineers and experts in the field of engineering as well as build and test the models they have made using a variety of instruments including computers, rapidprototyping machines, CNC-technologies, and testing equipment.

The course applies and concurrently develops secondary level knowledge and skills in mathematics, science, and technology.

Students will also have the opportunity to compete in engineering competitions offered by the University of Wisconsin system and SkillsUSA. Field trips to universities and businesses and guest speakers will be utilized in the course. Each activity, case study and event in this course is already directly linked to national Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) standards.

*College credit is dependent on school certification and passing the end-of-course exam.

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING Course 8309TED POE 1 8310TED POE 2 Elective 1 Credit Course fee: $20.00 Recommended: Introduction to Engineering Design Note: Dual-Credit Course*

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN (IED) – PROJECT LEAD THE WAY Course 8307TED and 8308TED Elective 1 Credit Course fee: $25.00 Note: Dual-Credit Course*

Principles of Engineering (POE) is a high school-level survey course of engineering. The course exposes students to some of the major concepts that they will encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Students have an opportunity to investigate engineering and a high tech

Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) is a high school level course that is 90


career. POE gives students the opportunity to develop skills and understanding of course concepts through activity-, project-, and problem-based (APPB) learning. Used in combination with a teaming approach, APPB learning challenges students to continually hone their interpersonal skills, creative abilities, and problem solving skills based upon engineering concepts. It also allows students to develop strategies to enable and direct their own learning, which is the ultimate goal of education.

course projects. Students will communicate and present solutions to their peers and members of a professional community of engineers and architects. This course is designed for 11th and 12th grade students. *College credit is dependent on school certification and passing the end-of-course exam.

CONSTRUCTION AND WOODS PROGRAM

Successful POE students are also taking math and science classes while taking POE. Students will employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. Students will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to their peers and members of the professional community.

GENERAL WOODWORKING Course 8403TED Elective .5 Credits Course fee: $25.00 for safety materials This course offers a gateway into the world of woodworking. Introductory woodworking techniques will be taught and students will be given opportunities to create projects using the skills. Students will learn how to operate the machinery commonly used by woodworking businesses. Although students will be able to use the skills learned in this class, the class will serve as a gateway for students to build upon their woodworking skills by taking more advanced classes in woodworking or building construction.

The course applies and concurrently develops secondary level knowledge and skills in mathematics, science, and technology. The course of study includes:  Mechanisms  Energy Sources  Energy Applications  Machine Control  Fluid Power *College credit is dependent on school certification and passing the end-of-course exam.

CIVIL ENGINEERING ARCHITECTURE

In the next 10 years, it is predicted that 25% of the laborers in the skilled trades will be leaving due to retirement. However, the demand for employees in such fields is rising. Many entering into the skilled trades do not have a good knowledge base in the skilled trades, or have had little experience with them, and therefore require more training before they can perform to their fullest potential. To allow students to be gaining knowledge of woodworking and the other trades at the high school level puts them in a better position to gain employment in the skilled trades.

AND

Course 8311TED CEA 1 8312TED CEA 2 Elective 1 Credit Recommended: Introduction to Engineering Design Note: Dual-Credit Course* Students will learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture and apply their knowledge to the design and development of residential and commercial properties and structures. In addition, students will use 3D design software to design and document solutions for major 91


CABINETRY AND WOODWORKING

opportunity to construction.

ADVANCED

many

areas

of

Students will receive skills in framing, drywalling, roofing, siding, finishing and masonry. Students will also be introduced to the skilled trades and construction project management. The course will be a mix of classroom work and work done in the shop. Professionals from the building industry will be invited to come in and give presentations to the students.

Course 8404TED Service Learnin Elective .5 Credits Prerequisite: General Woodworking Course fee: $25.00 for take home project In Cabinetry and Advanced Woodworking, students will be offered the opportunity to expand upon the skills gained in General Woodworking. The first part of class, students will learn how to layout, design and build a cabinet system for usage in a residential household. Students will learn from a variety of styles including lecture, hands-on activities and guest speakers. The second part of the class will be devoted to teaching advanced woodworking concepts and skills, and allowing students the ability to use them. Students will be responsible for proposing a design idea, estimating the amount of materials necessary, purchasing the material and creating the project.

CONSTRUCTION SKILLS

study

HOME CONSTRUCTION*

Service Learnin

1.5 credits/semester Course 8405TED (Semester One) Course 8406TED (Semester Two) Elective Prerequisite: General Woodworking or Cabinetry and Advanced Woodworking or Construction Skills, and completion of application. Course fee: $10.00 for safety materials This course will allow students to acquire knowledge and skills needed to construct a single-family home. The purpose of this course is to expose the student to several aspects of Residential and Light Commercial Construction and to prepare the student for entry-level employment in the Industry. Emphasis will be placed on, but not limited to: safety skills; knowledge and the use of common tools, materials, and components; teamwork, punctuality; jobsite demeanor; and problem-solving. Students will be encouraged to: learn home design and cad; solicit, review and award bids; work with and critique subcontractors; project reporting and record keeping; work on and lead student crews; assist fellow students and visiting students; act as program liaisons; develop community service projects; develop public and school publicity/awareness projects; involvement in trade organizations; and other Construction Industry related projects/programs. Several field trips will be taken and many guests from the Construction Industry will be on site to provide information and inspiration.

Service Learni

Course 8210TED and 8211TED Elective 1 Credit *This class can be taken for just one semester as well for .5 credit. Prerequisite: Algebra I and Introduction to Technology and Engineering or Fundamentals of Technology and Engineering (Recommended: Completion of General Woodworking) Course fee: $10.00 for safety materials "The construction industry is experiencing growth and business that exceeds the ability of the industry to fulfill the needs of those who need things built. Competent laborers are desperately needed, and companies are willing to pay good money to those who can perform well at their jobs. Through this class, students will receive the knowledge necessary to walk into any construction job and perform well. Students will receive classroom training in modern construction techniques, be given lab time to get hands on experience practicing these techniques in a learning environment and have the 92


CONSTRUCTION AND SUPERVISION*

different ways for work and recreation. The need for service and repair has grown as the industry has grown. Now there is a great need for trained service technicians in many different areas of small engines.

MANAGEMENT

Course 8407TED (Semester One) Service Learni Course 8408TED (Semester Two) ng Elective 1.5 Credits/Semester Prerequisite = A grade of “C� or better in Home Construction Course fee = $10.00 for safety materials

CONSUMER AUTO Course 8806TED Elective .5 Credits Course fee: $20.00 for classroom projects

This course will allow students to apply knowledge and skills acquired during Home Construction Class and to gain Construction Management and Supervision experience. The course will prepare the student for entry-level employment in the Construction Industry. Areas that will be covered include: safety management, advanced construction techniques and problem-solving, home design and cad, review and award bids, work with and critique subcontractors, distribution of resources, project reporting and record keeping, work on and lead student crews, assist fellow and visiting students with assignments, act as program liaisons, develop community service projects, develop public and school publicity/awareness projects, involvement in trade organizations; and other construction industry related projects/programs.

This course is designed for anyone wanting to learn how to take good care of their vehicle. A vehicle can be the second largest investment you make, behind purchasing a home. Most of us will need a vehicle to get to work, but vehicles can get very expensive if we have large repairs to pay for. This course will teach you the basics of how vehicles work and show you how you can do some basic maintenance with common hand tools to keep your car in good working condition. This will make your vehicle last longer and help you to avoid expensive repairs. If you have no knowledge of how vehicles work, this course is for you. The course consists of classroom instruction and many hands-on labs. The knowledge you gain will serve you for a lifetime.

Several field trips will be taken and many guests from the Construction Industry will be on site to provide information and inspiration.

AUTO MECHANICS I Course 8804TED Elective 1.0 credit (2 period block) Course fee - $20.00 for classroom project

AUTOMOTIVE PROGRAM

This is a class designed to prepare students for entry-level jobs or to help them on their way to further training in this field. Industry professionals have professed the dire need for technical and skilled labor to maintain, service, and repair the constantly evolving automobile. Using classroom and lab activities, this class will provide students with entry-level knowledge of automotive service and repair. The class will use classroom knowledge to service and repair vehicles and provide students basic skills that they can utilize to gain immediate employment or enroll in technical training after high school. This one semester course

POWER MECHANICS Course 8801TED Elective .5 Credits Course fee: $20.00 for classroom projects This is a course that primarily focuses on the operation, service, and repair of small engines. Students will be disassembling, measuring, refurbishing, and reassembling small engines successfully. The class has hands-on approach to learning with most of the time being spent in lab learning using step-by-step instruction and problem solving. Small engines are used in many 93


will cover the systems of a car and maintenance/repair of each system.

MANUFACTURING PROGRAM

Upon completion of both Auto Mechanics I and Auto Mechanics II with a C or better, passing the ASE tests in Engine Performance, Brakes, Steering & Suspension, and Electrical & Electronic Systems, and completing the NATEF tasks, students will receive advanced standing in the Madison College automotive program and be on track for early graduation.

WELDING I Course 8030AGR Elective .5 Credits Course fee: $27.00 for safety equipment The semester course in welding will include work in all of the common procedures of welding with arc and Oxyacetylene processes. It will include AC and DC Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Plasma Arc Cutting (PAC), and introductory Oxyacetylene cutting and fusion welding. Safety glasses are required.

AUTO MECHANICS II Course 8805TED Elective 1.0 Credit (2 period block) Prerequisite: Auto Mechanics I Course fee - $20.00 for classroom projects Auto Mechanics II is the continuation of Auto Mechanics I, designed to prepare students for entry-level jobs or to help them on their way to further training in this field. Industry professionals have professed the dire need for technical and skilled labor to maintain, service, and repair the constantly evolving automobile. Using classroom and lab activities, this class will provide students with entry-level knowledge of automotive service and repair. The class will use classroom knowledge to service and repair vehicles and provide students basic skills that they can utilize to gain immediate employment or enroll in technical training after high school and reinforce the skill learned in the Auto Mechanics I course. This one-semester course will cover the systems of a car and maintenance/repair of each system and is the continuation of the Auto Mechanics I course.

WELDING II Course 8036AGR Elective .5 Credits Prerequisite: Welding I Course fee: $27.00 for safety equipment Welding II is an advanced course in welding for students who have demonstrated excellence in the basic welding processes. Students will be challenged with out of position welding in both Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) and Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) processes and introductory assignments in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) welding. Students will review Oxyacetylene cutting and fusion welding and complete a sheet metal project using Resistance Welding (RW) and specialized hand-tools.

Upon completion of both Auto Mechanics I and Auto Mechanics II with a C or better, passing the ASE tests in Engine Performance, Brakes, Steering & Suspension, and Electrical & Electronic Systems, and completing the NATEF tasks, students will receive advanced standing in the Madison College automotive program and be on track for early graduation.

94


TRAFFIC SAFETY EDUCATION TRAFFIC SAFETY EDUCATION Elective Credit: .25 (classroom only) Prerequisite: Students must be 15 years old to be enrolled in the classroom (15 ½ for behind the wheel). Students not taking the summer school class should sign up based on the below listed guidelines. Course Fee: Current fee for the 2013-2014 school year Behind the Wheel portion of the class is $200.00 Suggested classroom dates and corresponding course number: Quarter 1 – Tr. Safety Ed./Study Hall #7501DRE – Any student 16 years of age between October 31, 2014 & January 31, 2015. Quarter 2 – Tr. Safety Ed./Study Hall #7502DRE - Any student 16 years of age between February 1, 2015 & April 30, 2015. Quarter 3 – Tr. Safety Ed./Study Hall #7503DRE - Any student 16 years of age between May 1, 2015 & July 31, 2015. Quarter 4 – Tr. Safety Ed./Study Hall #7504DRE – Any student 16 years of age between August 1, 2015 & October 31, 2015. Summer School – All students 15 before August 1, 2014 (Class may be capped at 85 students). The classroom portion of Traffic Safety is also offered during the summer. This option is open to any student who is 15 years of age. Credit (.25) is still earned. This is recommended for anyone that may find it difficult to work Traffic Safety into the regular school year schedule. Students planning to take this during the summer should not sign up for the fall class. Please contact Mr. Olson for more information at 834-6816. Traffic Safety Education is a course built around the philosophy of defensive driving. Wisconsin law states that, beginning September 1, 1968, all applicants for a Wisconsin driver's license under the age of eighteen must first satisfactorily complete both the classroom and behind-thewheel program in Traffic Safety. Students failing the classroom phase of Traffic Safety Education will have the opportunity to be rescheduled in succeeding quarters, with the consent of the Traffic Safety instructor if there are openings available. In the event that the succeeding quarter enrollments are filled, they will have the opportunity to make up the classroom phase the following school year. The first Behind the Wheel lesson will be scheduled within 60 days of receiving a temporary license. Other lessons will take place either upon completion of the classroom portion or concurrently with the classroom phase. Instruction is provided on automatic transmission cars. The fee for Behind the Wheel is $200.00. There is no fee for the Traffic Safety course. **Students are eligible for their temporary license as soon as they turn 15 ½ regardless of when they take the classroom course. Contact Mr. Olson for temporary license testing information.** 608-225-3601

95


WORLD LANGUAGES In our global community, World Languages are essential and all SPHS students are encouraged to investigate World Language study. At Sun Prairie High School, all students have the opportunity to study French, German, Spanish, and Chinese. The courses are designed to make learning a World Language an enjoyable experience, to develop international interest and understanding, to provide a useful communication tool and thereby distinguish the student in a competitive job market, and to aid the student to better use and understand English. The World Languages student is expected to complete a full year of the course and is encouraged to continue study of that language to develop skills to a workable level. Some postsecondary schools require between 2-3 years of World Languages for entrance. Sun Prairie High School language courses are, however, for all interested students. By completing a sequence of World Languages study, students may receive college credit and World Languages exemptions. Students who enter and successfully complete an upper level or intermediate college course may receive college credit for previous World Language courses (ie. retroactive credits). Students should contact the Student services staff and research various colleges to find out specific World Languages requirements. A service learning opportunity will be offered for all levels of all four languages. AP tests are available for all languages.

World Languages Mission Statement The mission of the World Languages Department is to inspire our students through the learning of other languages to become lifetime learners in a global society, respecting the culture, values, and beliefs of all people.

96


World Languages Course #

6011 FOR 6012 FOR 6013 FOR 6014 FOR 6015 FOR 6016 FOR 6017 FOR 6018 FOR 6019 FOR 6020 FOR 6131 FOR 6132 FOR 6133 FOR 6134 FOR 6135 FOR 6136 FOR 6137 FOR 6138 FOR 6139 FOR 6140 FOR 6211 FOR 6212 FOR 6213 FOR 6214 FOR 6215 FOR 6216 FOR 6217 FOR 6218 FOR 6221 FOR 6222 FOR 6251 FOR 6252 FOR 6253 FOR 6254 FOR 6255 FOR 6256 FOR

Title

Grades

Prerequisites

Length of Course/Credits Earned

Spanish I

10-12

none

Year/ 1

Spanish II

10-12

Spanish 1

Year/ 1

Spanish III

10-12

Spanish II

Year/ 1

Spanish IV

10-12

Spanish III

Year/ 1

Advanced Placement (AP) Spanish French I

10-12

Spanish IV

Year/ 1

10-12

none

Year/ 1

French II

10-12

French I

Year/ 1

French III

10-12

French II

Year/ 1

French IV

10-12

French III

Year/ 1

Advanced Placement (AP) French V German I

10-12

French IV

Year/ 1

10-12

none

Year/ 1

German II

10-12

German I

Year/ 1

German III

10-12

German II

Year/ 1

German IV

10-12

German III

Year/ 1

Advanced Placement (AP) German Chinese I

11-12

German IV

Year/ 1

10-12

None

Year/ 1

Chinese II

10-12

Chinese I

Year/ 1

Chinese III

10-12

Chinese II

Year/ 1

97


SPANISH I Course 6011FOR, 6012FOR Elective Course 1 credit

Prerequisite: None

SPANISH III Course 6015FOR, 6016FOR Elective Course 1 credit

Service Learni ng

Service Learni ng

Prerequisite: Spanish II

Spanish I is an introductory course in Spanish listening, speaking, reading, and writing with an emphasis on the listening and oral skills. This is open to all students who would like to learn about Spanishspeaking countries, the language and the culture. Students should expect homework everyday outside of class. Students will learn to speak, read, and write in Spanish. In order to be successful, it is recommended that students be proficient English readers.

Spanish III is a continuation of Spanish II with listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills practiced on a more advanced level. The structure of the Spanish language is further studied. Aspects of Spanish and Spanish-American civilizations are studied. The class is conducted in Spanish as much as possible.

SPANISH IV Course 6017FOR, 6018FOR Elective Course 1 credit

Service Learni ng

Prerequisite: Spanish III Course fee: $26.00 for student workbook Spanish IV is a continuation of Spanish III. The reading skill is given further emphasis and contributes to the other goals of this course: to further student understanding of Spanish culture and to stimulate free discussion in Spanish. Grammar is studied via a reference grammar workbook. The student continues developing awareness of Spanish culture, ability to understand rapidly spoken Spanish and reading. In the spring semester, Spanish artists are studied prior to a field trip to the Art Institute of Chicago. This course is most appropriate for students planning to attend a four-year college or university

SPANISH II Course 6013FOR, 6014FOR Elective Course 1 credit

Service Learni ng

Prerequisite: Spanish I Spanish II is a continuation of Spanish I with emphasis on the development of listening and oral skills and additional emphasis on reading and writing. Vocabulary building, idiomatic usage and sentence construction is emphasized in the process, and an awareness of Hispanic culture is developed through a variety of classroom activities. Students should expect homework everyday outside of class. Spanish is used in class as much as possible. Students will learn to speak, read, and write in Spanish. In order to be successful, it is recommended that students be proficient English readers.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) SPANISH LANGUAGE Course 6019FOR, 6020FOR Elective Course Service Learni 1 credit ng AP Contract Required Prerequisite = Spanish IV Course fee : $45.00 for student workbook AP Spanish Language is the final year of Spanish available at the high school level and is geared towards using the language 98


to speak, read, write, and listen. Grammatical constructions are reviewed and vocabulary is expanded. There is an emphasis on creating with the language and applying the language and culture concepts learned in previous years, versus simple memorization and recall. Works by famous Hispanic authors are read and analyzed. Students taking this course are also prepared to take the AP exam in the spring if they so choose. Classes are conducted entirely in Spanish.

activities. The class is conducted largely in French. Students will learn to speak, read, and write in French. In order to be successful, it is recommended that students be proficient English readers.

http://www.collegeboard.com/student/tes ting/ap/sub_spanlang.html?spanlang

FRENCH III Course 6135FOR, 6136FOR Elective Course 1 credit Prerequisite = French II

FRENCH I Course 6131FOR, 6132FOR Elective Course 1 credit Prerequisite = None

Service Learni ng

French III builds on the skills acquired in French I and II. Speaking and listening skills continue to be important, as the class is conducted in French as much as possible. Writing is improved through a variety of exercises, including original paragraphs. Cultures of French-speaking countries are studied throughout the course. In the spring semester, French artists are studied prior to a field trip to the Art Institute of Chicago.

French I is an introduction to the language and culture of French-speaking countries. The primary emphasis is on speaking and understanding basic conversational French. Vocabulary and grammar points are introduced through oral classroom work. A variety of activities help expand the student’s knowledge. French I is open to any student who is interested in learning about another language and culture. Students will learn to speak, read, and write in French. In order to be successful, it is recommended that students be proficient English readers.

FRENCH IV Course 6138FOR, 6137FOR Service Elective Course Learni 1 credit ng Prerequisite = French III Course fee - $35.00 for student workbook (for courses French IV and V)

FRENCH II Course 6133FOR, 6134FOR Elective Course 1 credit Prerequisite = French I

Service Learni ng

French IV is a continuation of French III. Students work on strengthening reading, writing, speaking and listening skills as they review the grammar and vocabulary from the previous levels of French. The class is conducted largely in French, with an emphasis on the culture of francophone countries, and it introduces many of the topics that are covered in AP French.

Service Learni ng

French II is a continuation of French I. The students’ speaking and listening skills are further developed through class discussion activities. There is increased work on reading and writing French. Students are exposed to French culture and geography through videos, and a variety of classroom 99


German language and culture. Students will develop a basic proficiency in spoken and written German.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE Course 6139FOR, 6140FOR Elective Course 1 credit AP Contract Required Prerequisite = French IV

Service Learni ng

AP French Language and Culture is an advanced placement class taken by students who want to continue expanding their knowledge of the French language, literature and culture. The class is entirely conducted in French so students are expected to speak in French with both the teacher and classmates at all times. The materials used in this course are authentic. The curriculum is based on francophone literature, newspapers, radio broadcasts, and films within which grammar, culture, and vocabulary are taught. In order to reinforce and refine their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills, students are asked to work on individual and group projects, do research on selected topics, write essays and prepare oral presentations. This class helps students become proficient in French, and prepares them to take the AP Exam in the spring. A good result on this exam may result in college credits. Taking the AP exam is not mandatory, but it is highly recommended. http://www.collegeboard.com/student/tes ting/ap/sub_frenchlang.html?frenchlang

GERMAN II Course 6213FOR, 6214FOR Elective Course 1 credit Prerequisite = German I

German II is a continuation of German I. Greater emphasis is placed on spoken communication in accurate, comprehensible forms. Vocabulary, cultural background and conversational ability are further enlarged and developed. Greater emphasis is also placed on grammar, with application in basic reading and writing skills. A variety of activities, films, etc. give further exposure to German. Students will become more confident and further develop spoken and written German language through the integration of more authentic materials.

GERMAN I Course 6211FOR, 6212FOR Elective Course 1 credit Prerequisite = None

Service Learni ng

Service Learni ng

German I is an introduction to the language and culture of German-speaking countries. The emphasis in the course is on the spoken word. Students concentrate on learning to speak and understand basic conversational German. Students learn vocabulary, elementary grammar principles, and learn about German culture. Extra activities provide additional insights into 100


taught completely in the target language and focuses on all four communication skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. AP German Language and Culture is open to juniors and seniors who have successfully completed German IV. In this immersion experience, students develop the confidence to express their own ideas in German through responding to and analyzing authentic materials. This class strives to promote fluency and accuracy in language use without overemphasizing grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. Students will be engaged in an exploration of authentic culture – in both contemporary and historical contexts. Taking the AP exam in the spring is highly recommended. College credit may be awarded for a qualifying score on this exam.

GERMAN III Course 6215FOR, 6216FOR Elective Course 1 credit Prerequisite = German II

Service Learni ng

German III emphasizes both oral and written communication and comprehension. The course is taught as much in German as the subject matter will allow. Reading selections are used to enlarge vocabulary, stimulate discussion and provide a cultural background. Students also work with the spoken word via films, class presentations and reports. Writing skills are developed through systematic grammar exercises, diaries, and short writing assignments. German artists are studied prior to an optional field trip to the Art Institute of Chicago in the spring.

CHINESE I Course 6251FOR, 6252FOR Elective Course 1 credit

GERMAN IV Course 6217FOR, 6218FOR Elective Course 1 credit Prerequisite = German III

Service Learni ng

Chinese I is an introductory course in Mandarin Chinese, incorporating listening, speaking, reading and writing skills into a standards-based approach. Students will be able to engage in conversations on topics of everyday interests, successfully engage in targeted listening activities based on stories, authentic materials and movies. They will be able to experience, identify and discuss various patterns of behavior and interactions of Chinese culture, and understand underlying cultural perspectives.

German IV includes a thorough grammar review and further development of reading and writing skills. Students read and discuss short stories including a unit on the fairytales of the Grimm Brothers. Since the course is taught primarily in German, listening and speaking skills are exercised daily. The use of compositions further develops writing ability. Purchase of German/English – dictionary strongly recommended.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) GERMAN LANGUAGE AND CULUTURE Course 6221FOR, 6222FOR Elective Course 1 credit AP Contract Required Prerequisite = German IV

Service Learni ng

Service Learni ng

AP German Language and Culture is our highest level German course, which is 101


CHINESE II Course 6253FOR, 6254FOR Elective Course 1 credit Prerequisite: Chinese I

Service Learni ng

Chinese II develops and expands the fundamental skills introduced in Chinese I. Aural comprehension, pronunciation, and speaking exercises facilitate oral communication in authentic contents. Additional vocabulary and grammar are introduced to lead to more advanced reading and writing. Authentic reading materials, fun stories, and audio/video recordings enrich the instruction. The course is aligned to national standards for foreign language education. Chinese I is a prerequisite for this course.

CHINESE III Course 6255FOR, 6256FOR Elective Course 1 credit Prerequisite: Chinese II

Service Learni ng

In this course, students will engage in conversation, provide and obtain information, and exchange opinions on various topics including current and historical events. Chinese III will address language applications, problem solving and higher-order thinking skills. Students will demonstrate an understanding of Chinese culture at a higher thinking level. They will demonstrate their ability to express themselves in written and spoken Chinese using complex sentence structures and increasing vocabulary appropriate to the third year. Students will work toward speaking, listening, reading and writing through story reading and writing, conversation, discussion, and oral presentations.

102


SPECIAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES Students may pursue special studies beyond the regular curriculum. Students, in consultation with their counselor, may arrange a contract with a teacher who will supervise. The faculty or staff supervisor will assist the student in drafting a specific project or duty description. The project must be approved by the parents, the administration and the department chairperson for the department in which the project or duty description will be submitted for credit. Procedures, requirements and application forms may be obtained in the Student Services Office.

Course #

See Counselor for Course number See Counselor for Course number See Counselor for Course number

Title

Grades

11/12 Teacher Assistant High School 11/12 Teacher Assistant Elementary School 12 Independent Study

103

Prerequisites

See requirements in course outline. Junior or senior standing only. See requirements in course outline. Junior or senior standing only. See requirements in course outline. Senior standing is required.

Length of Course/Credits Earned .5

.5

.5


teacher assistant. Students may pick up application in the Student Services Office before the beginning of the semester. The application seeks parent, teacher, counselor and Assistant Principal approval for this special studies offering. The assistantship must be taken in place of a study hall and students must provide their own transportation. This TA opportunity is only scheduled for 1st or 7th hours.

TEACHER ASSISTANT: HIGH SCHOOL Course Number TBD Elective Course .5 Credits Prerequisite = Junior Standing & 2.0 minimum GPA Students interested in assisting a teacher with classroom needs may apply to be a teacher assistant. Students may pick up an application in the Student Services Office before the beginning of the semester. The application seeks parent, teacher, counselor and Assistant Principal approval for this special studies offering. The assistantship must be taken in place of a study hall.

INDEPENDENT STUDY Course Number TBD Elective Course .5 Credits Prerequisite = Senior Standing & 2.0 minimum GPA The Independent Study Program allows a student to work closely with a teacher on an academic project that is not possible through our regularly scheduled classes and/or has exhausted the curriculum options available. Students may pick up application and program guidelines in the Student Services Office before the beginning of the semester. The application seeks parent, teacher, counselor and Assistant Principal Approval for this special studies offering.

TEACHER ASSISTANT: ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Course Number TBD Elective Course .5 Credits Prerequisite = Junior Standing & 2.0 minimum GPA Students interested in assisting an elementary school teacher with classroom needs, work with younger students and gain insight into the teaching field, may apply for to be a

104


Course # See Counselor for course number See Counselor for course number See Counselor for course number See Counselor for course number See Counselor for course number See Counselor for course number

Title

Grades

Prerequisites Length of Course/Credits Earned Consent of Up to 1 year / Not for credit instructor

Alternative Study Hall

10-12

Outreach Monitor

10-12

Consent of instructor

Up to 1 year / Not for credit

Outreach Credit Recovery

10-12

Consent of instructor

Up to 1 year / Credit varies with number of courses completed

Outreach Proficiency

10-12

Consent of instructor

Up to 1 year / Credit varies with number of courses completed

Outreach Work Experience GEDO2

11-12

Consent of instructor

12 only

Consent of instructor

Up to 1 year / Up to 2.0 credits – varies with number of hours worked and completed portfolio Up to 1 year / Varies with number of tests completed.

Outreach Monitor Course Number TBD Elective Course Not for Credit Prerequisite = Consent of Instructor

Outreach Credit Recovery Course Number TBD Elective or Required Course(s) Credits determined by number of courses completed Prerequisite = Consent of Instructor. Junior or Senior standing; must be two or more credits deficient.

Periodic check-ins with outreach staff, who view grades on Infinite Campus and discuss academic progress and/or social/emotional/behavioral issues with students.

Students who must recover credits may enroll in place of a study hall for one hour of scheduled day. Courses are mostly taken in an online format. Daily student progress/effort in the course must average at 70% of class period, and attendance must be at least 80% to remain in program.

Alternative Study Hall Course Number TBD Elective Course Not for Credit Prerequisite = Consent of Instructor Study hall in a smaller environment where the teacher can check in daily with students and offer additional assistance. Access to computers and instructional materials provided.

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Outreach Proficiency Course Number TBD Required Course(s) only Credits determined by number of courses completed Prerequisite = Consent of Instructor. Sophomores only - must be three or more credits deficient.

GEDO2 Course Number TBD Elective or Required Course(s) Not for credit Prerequisite = Consent of Instructor. Senior standing; must credit deficient. Completion of GED test(s) preparation, post-secondary plans, and successfully completing the off-site GED test(s). Students must be concurrently enrolled in at least one elective course while completing the program. Students must have ninth grade reading level and eight grade math level.

Opportunity to earn credits in core classes (English, Math, Social Studies, and Science). Work during a two hour block with a goal to earn credits back through the completion of standards based coursework.

Outreach Work Experience Course Number TBD Elective Course(s) Credits determined by number of courses completed Prerequisite = Consent of Instructor. Junior or Senior standing; must be two or more credits deficient. Students who are looking to recover credits may enroll in 8th hour class. Completion of portfolio (SCANS skills) and work progress represented by payroll earnings statement.

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Earn COLLEGE CREDIT while still in high school through AP (Advanced Placement) or Advanced Standing courses.

What is the difference between Advanced Standing (AS) and Advanced Placement (AP)?

ADVANCED STANDING (AS) COURSES http://matcmadison.edu/credit-prior-learning-advanced-standing High school students are eligible to receive technical college credit if they successfully complete a course wherein the high school and the technical college have aligned curriculum competencies and developed an ―Articulation Agreement‖. Students are asked to consult with course instructors to insure that all requirements are met for fulfilling the articulated agreement. Upon enrollment in a technical college the student is awarded credit(s) for course(s) taken in high school. All Wisconsin technical colleges will accept advanced standing from another technical college if the course is comparable to competencies and credits awarded at the second technical college. Following are Sun Prairie High School courses articulated with Madison Area Technical College: AS Child Development/Assistant Childcare Teacher

DUAL CREDIT A course that is noted as offering ―dual credit‖ means that when a student at SPHS successfully completes that course, s/he will receive credit simultaneously from the high school and the technical college (Madison College/MATC). A trained SPHS instructor teaches the course. Upon successful completion of the course, grades are posted to the high school and college and tabulated in the student’s high school and college GPA. When a student earns dual credit, s/he can save hundreds of dollars and a great deal of time. Currently, the following courses have dual-credit options with Madison College/MATC. Dual-credit option opportunities can change from year to year as the contract between SPHS and MATC is on a yearly basis. These courses provide a wonderful opportunity for our students. Certified Nursing Assistant Accounting I Algebra Concepts for Transcripted Credit (ACTC) Marketing Education I Medical Terminology Fashion Analysis IT Essentials Networking Essentials

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) COURSES http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/about.html The Advanced Placement Program (AP) gives students an opportunity to take college-level courses and exams while they are still in high school. Through this, they may earn credit, advanced placement, or both for college. There are many benefits for students who participate in AP --- studying interesting and challenging things, discovering new interests, and getting a head start on their future! Why is AP so valuable? Find out what you can really do … Challenge yourself and see what you are capable of achieving. Prove you can master college-level material, and discover the satisfaction of reaching your goals and knowing you have been successful. Prepare for college work … AP courses and exams represent the beginning of your journey through college-level academic challenges. Once you’re used to being challenged, you’re more likely to continue with advanced studies, AP is not just a test; it’s an experience. AP courses motivate you to work hard, and you can improve the quality of all your courses based on the skills you gain in one AP course. The work you do in an AP course will help you develop skills and study habits that will be vital in college. You’ll learn how to analyze problems effectively, improve your writing skills, and prepare for exams. Students who take AP courses and exams are more knowledgeable about the demands of college work, and they understand what is needed to succeed at the college level. Improve your chances of getting into a competitive college … Colleges and universities recognize that applicants with AP experience are much better prepared for the demands of college courses. Admissions officers are well aware of the difficulty of AP courses and exams, and sending them your AP Exam grades can only be a positive step toward potential admission into competitive colleges. Get good value for your money … The cost of an AP Exam can be a concern for some students. But put this into perspective --- how much do you spend on the latest video game, or a couple of compact discs? Given how hard you work in and out of school, isn’t it time you put something into yourself and your future? Have more time for yourself at college … Gaining credit or advanced standing in college can give you time for other interests that you might not have otherwise been able to pursue --- time abroad, extra classes, independent studies. This is the fun stuff that most college students just don’t have the time or money to do. Get a head start … Every year, hundreds of students achieve sophomore standing by earning qualifying AP grades. More than 1,400 institutions in the United States alone grant a full year’s credit to students who present satisfactory grades on enough AP exams. Write to the colleges you are interested in attending to get the most up to date information about their AP policies. Increase your options … Earning AP credit has allowed thousands of students to take a double major in college, move into upper-level courses in their field of interest, or complete their undergraduate and graduate degrees in four years.

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Improve your self-esteem … By succeeding in an AP course and exam, you will know in advance that you have the ability to succeed in college. Students who have this confidence are less likely to go for the easy options in college, and are more likely to specialize in majors with tougher grading standards. They are also more likely to take a greater course load and complete a greater number of higher-level courses. The payoff … When you ask yourself ―Is it worth it?‖ consider the potential payoff. The AP experience is rich and rewarding. You work hard but you get back much in return. Most colleges view any AP experience as a plus, and AP gives you tools that serve you well throughout your college career. Sun Prairie High School offers the following Advanced Placement courses: AP Art History AP Studio Art: Drawing AP Studio Art: Photography AP Biology AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC AP Chemistry AP English Literature AP Environmental Science AP European History AP French Language AP German Language AP Macroeconomics AP Microeconomics AP Music Theory AP Physics C: Mechanics AP Physics 1 AP Spanish Language AP Psychology AP Statistics AP U.S. Government & Politics AP U.S. History

However, Advanced Placement testing is offered to all students whether or not they are enrolled in a course designated as Advanced Placement. Information from the AP teacher assists students preparing for the national Advanced Placement tests given in May of 2014. The tests are optional and are for those students who wish to earn college credits. By March, the students must register for testing through the Student Services Office. In 2013-2014, the cost was $89.00 per test. Wisconsin Statutes 120.12(22) requires the Sun Prairie Area School District to pay the exam fee for students who qualify for free and/or reduced priced lunches. Other students not qualifying for free or reduced lunches must pay their own exam fees. (See respective departments for course descriptions.)

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SUN PRAIRIE HIGH SCHOOL SCHOOL-TO-WORK OPPORTUNITIES

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION OPTIONS Each year the Sun Prairie School District offers career and technical education programs at Sun Prairie High School. These programs are designed to prepare youth for a broad range of employment and training opportunities and are offered under the guidance of certified teachers and counselors. The following is a list of career and technical programs offered at the high school: Agriculture Business Education Health Science Marketing Family and Consumer Science Technology and Engineering Education

SKILLS FOR THE FUTURE What is Wisconsin’s ―Skills for the Future?‖ Wisconsin’s School-to-Work educational initiative opens the door to all students to develop their potential in life. By combining rigorous school-based and work-based learning with greater career exploration and guidance, our educational system will develop students with stronger skills--whether students plan to go directly into the workforce, enter a technical college, or enroll in a university. Enhanced academic and technical skills are what Wisconsin’s business and educational leaders have deemed critical Skills for the Future. Students who are considering enrollment in one of the youth apprenticeship programs are required to attend an informational open house in the spring. Information will be mailed home. In addition, students must also complete an application that is available from the School to Work Coordinator or a school counselor. Only those students who are ―on track‖ for graduation and have a good attendance record will be considered for this type of program.

What is Work-Based Learning at SPHS? Work-based learning includes quality-learning experiences such as: Youth Apprenticeship Cooperative Education Work Experience Job Shadowing

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YOUTH APPRENTICESHIP Wisconsin Youth Apprenticeship is a unique opportunity for juniors and seniors to start preparing for a career while still in high school. This program provides the opportunity for workbased learning, occupational instruction, and academic education. As a youth apprentice, students will earn an hourly wage while learning from skilled professionals. Upon successful completion of the program, students will be awarded a Certificate of Occupational Proficiency from the Department of workforce Development, and up to a total of twelve advanced placement credits at Madison Area Technical College. Students are required to provide their own transportation to class and the worksite during the day. Note: Youth apprenticeships were originally set up for juniors as a two-year program. However, changes in funding at the state level mean that qualified seniors can also participate in the youth apprenticeship program, which will give students a head-start on their technical training upon graduation from high school. Sun Prairie High School offers apprenticeships in a variety of different areas including: Accounting, Automotive Technology, Biotechnology, Finance, Health Occupations, Information Technology, Introduction to Veterinary Technology, and Tourism.

TIMELINES FOR PROSPECTIVE YOUTH APPRENTICES:

 

  

Be in good standing with your local school district √ Be on target for graduation √ Have a good attendance record Attend one of the Youth Apprentice Information Meetings in March. (Information will be mailed home in February to all current sophomores and juniors with specifics.) Complete the application and return to Student Services no later than March 30. (Note: Just completing the application form does NOT mean that you are automatically accepted into the program.) Applications for Youth Apprenticeship Program (YAP) are available on the Dane County Consortium website: dcsc.org As part of the application process, students are required to submit three recommendations (two from faculty and one from the community). Recommendation forms are included with the application. Sign up for a regular load of classes for next year. If you are accepted into the program and employment is secured, your school counselor will be notified. At that time, you can change your schedule to accommodate your work schedule. While teachers may become aware of available positions, finding a job is ultimately the responsibility of the student/parent/guardian.

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AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY APPRENTICESHIP

Education, and the Credit Union National Association, Inc.

The curriculum is designed to provide students with the technical skills and onsite, work-based training for entry-level employment. The student will develop skills required to perform vehicle services and repair in four ASE identified specialty areas:

Units of study include: - Customer Service: Teller Functions - Customer Service: New Accounts and Customer Service Functions - Accounting and Customer Support Functions - Consumer Lending Related Functions

Electrical/Electronics, Brakes, Suspension and Steering, and Engine Performance. The student will become familiar with the operation of an automotive service business, its personnel, and the related businesses that support it.

HEALTH OCCUPATIONS APPRENTICESHIP The curriculum is designed to present a broad overview of the health care industry. It is competency based (task-based) with defined skill levels that students must master through combined classroom and work-based instruction provided at the job site. Students will begin by earning their Certified Nursing Assistant Certification, and will continue on to explore health care services.

THE BIOTECHNOLOGY APPRENTICESHIP The curriculum is designed to provide training in the fundamental knowledge and technical skills necessary for career development in the biotechnology industry. Students will be expected to master a set of competencies through instruction in the classroom and hands-on experience at the job site. Units of study include: -

Units of study include: - Health Facility Operations and Fundamental Client Care - Direct Hands-On Care - Therapeutic Services - Diagnostic Services

Introduction to Biotechnology/Basic Laboratory Skills Laboratory Skills II Laboratory Skills III Laboratory Skills IV

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY APPRENTICESHIP The curriculum is designed to present a broad industry overview. It is competency (skill) based with defined skill levels that students must master through combined classroom and work-based instruction. Students will experience business-based courses that tie directly to specific tasks at their work site. Students will earn one credit per year for the classroom experience and two credits per year for the workbased experience. Units of study include:

FINANCE APPRENTICESHIP The curriculum will focus on competencies required in banking, credit unions, and savings and loans institutions (i.e. depository institutions). All curriculum is competency based (task-oriented) and will be taught using a combination of classroom instruction and work-based instruction on the job. Instructional materials have been drawn from the American Institute of Banking, the Institute of Financial

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-

Safety Computer Fundamentals PC Hardware and Troubleshooting the System A + course work Program Management Networking Fundamentals Programming Fundamentals SCANS skills (general employability skills)

their hire ability. It also provides valuable experience in marketing, public relations, marketing/conference planning, sales and data base management. Units of study include: - Customer Service/Marketing/Sales/Public Relations - Human Resources/Public Relations - Management Operations/Fiscal Resources - Specialized Training (Special Events/Recreation Services/Motorcoach Services/Member Services/Banquet & Convention Services)

TOURISM APPRENTICESHIP Tourism is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. It ranks second only to health services in terms of employment. The Tourism Youth Apprenticeship Program broadens student abilities and enhances

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. Sun Prairie Cooperative Education programs involve high school seniors in learning experiences that combine school-based and work-based learning. Students are paid at least minimum wage and earn credits toward a high school diploma. Students must complete an application to be considered for acceptance into the program. This program offers: Paid work experience with a mentor for a minimum of 10 hours per week Career planning and placement based on student interests There are currently six co-op occupational areas to choose from: Agriscience Business and Information Technology  Construction Skills  Family and Consumer Education/Health Science Education and Child Care Marketing Technology and Engineering

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WORK-BASED LEARNING TRAINING AGREEMENT REQUIREMENTS Sun Prairie High School students enrolled in School-to-Work programs are required to: 1. Obtain a work permit before starting work if under the age of 18. 2. Submit a log of hours worked, signed by the supervisor/mentor, to the teacher-coordinator each week. A minimum of 90 hours is required to earn a half credit. A maximum of two (2) credits may be earned for work experience during the student’s high school career. 3. Maintain a class schedule with a minimum of five classes. These five do not include work release hours. 4. Cooperate with the training sponsor, observe business etiquette, and obey all safety rules. The student may not perform any task or run any equipment without prior safety instruction and employer’s permission. 5. Not be on school grounds during work release hours unless prearranged with one of the student’s teachers. 6. Notify the school office, teacher-coordinator, and training sponsor in advance when an absence is unavoidable. 7. Not report to the training station on days when not attending school, unless prearranged with the teacher-coordinator. Good attendance and good grades are very important. One unexcused absence from any class will result in a warning. A second unexcused absence will result in probation. A third unexcused absence may result in removal from the program. Student will be ineligible for work credit for that semester, however, may reapply for consideration for the work program the following semester. 8. Not terminate employment at the training site without prior approval of the teachercoordinator. 9. Respect and treat in a professional manner all confidential information concerning the training station. 10. Discuss all work-related problems with the teacher-coordinator in order to resolve them. 11. Maintain a 1.67 GPA each quarter and have received no F’s from the previous quarter grading period. A student may be placed on probation at any time during a quarterly grading period if it is determined they are failing any course. When placed on probation students have ten (10) school days to raise a failing grade(s) to a passing level. If still failing after ten (10) days students may be considered academically ineligible for a work program. 12. Work at a training site that is approved by the teacher-coordinator and school-to-work coordinator or building principal. The student may not work for, or be supervised by, their parent, guardian, or any other family member. Working in the same company as a parent, guardian, or other family member is not encouraged and, in most cases, will not be allowed. 13. Follow all child labor laws as well as all school rules and regulations. Violation of these rules and regulations will jeopardize participation in the work-based learning program. 114


14. Complete an application and meet with the cooperating teacher in their particular area.

JOB SHADOWING This program offers students an opportunity to spend time on-the-job with a person in the community, observing, participating, and discussing his/her career. This experience provides students with a realistic picture of the world of work and the chance to explore a potential career. Students interested in a job shadowing experience should contact the School to Work Coordinator.

STATEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION All students attending Sun Prairie Area School District schools may participate in all programs and activities, including career and technical education, regardless of creed, race, color, national origin, ancestry, religion, marital status, parental status, pregnancy, homelessness, emotional, physical, mental or learning disability or handicap, sexual orientation or sex. (SPASD District Policy JB) CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION OPTIONS Each year the Sun Prairie School District offers career and technical education programs at Sun Prairie High School. For general information about these programs, contact: Nancy Everson, School-to-Work Coordinator Sun Prairie High School 888 Grove St Sun Prairie, WI 53590

(608) 834-6734 Inquiries concerning equal opportunities for the handicapped should be directed to: Lisa Heipp, Principal Sun Prairie High School 888 Grove St Sun Prairie, WI 53590 (608) 834-6717

YOUTH OPTIONS PROGRAM http://dpi.wi.gov/youthoptions/ Allows 11th and 12th grade students to enroll in one or more nonsectarian courses at a UW campus or center, a vocational/technical school, or a private college located in the state.  Provides that post-secondary admittance be contingent on meeting entrance requirements and the availability of space.  Must meet ―good standing‖ criteria: 2.0 Cumulative GPA, not truant (defined as 5 or more unexcused absences in a semester), and no Level 4 behavior referrals. 115


Requires that transportation be the responsibility of the parent/guardian and student.  Requires a student application and notification process so that school district planning and reporting may take place. Applications for enrollment for obtaining high school credit in these courses must be made by March 1, for the fall semester and by October 1, for courses to be taken during the spring semester. 

Requires the school district to determine whether the course satisfies state graduation requirements and what, if any, high school credits are to be awarded to the student. If high school credit will be awarded, the local school district is responsible for the cost of tuition and textbooks. Please contact your counselor for further information GUIDELINES FOR INDEPENDENT STUDY PROGRAM The Independent Study Program provides students with a unique learning experience beyond what is usually provided in the classroom environment. Independent Study occurs in the high school setting with a high school teacher serving as faculty advisor. Independent Study projects will be approved through the students' counselor and administrator after being approved by the department’s CLC leader. Independent Study credit is awarded only after satisfactory completion of the Independent Study project. Each Independent Study program proposal shall contain the following information when it is proposed to the counselor and administrator. Complete written outline of the project, including criteria of judgment being used to assess the project, the name of the faculty advisor, and the name of the student. a. The faculty advisors should formulate the Independent Study proposal with the student and submit it to the department CLC leader for consideration. Once it is approved at the department level, the ―approval of Independent Study‖ form must be completed and necessary signatures obtained. The faculty advisor then will oversee the student's progress, provide ongoing feedback regarding student performance, and evaluate the final project. Guidelines and general regulations for Independent Study programs are as follows: a. Students may take the program as a 6th subject. b. The program is for 1/2 credit per semester and cannot be in lieu of a required course. c. Because the student is eligible to earn 1/2 credit per semester for an Independent Study project, the project must require at least 90 hours of class work on the part of the student. d. The Independent Study program is for seniors. e. All programs must be completed two weeks prior to the end of the semester. The advisor would then assign the grade. f. The application, outline of the project, and the summary report will be housed in the guidance office with other grade records upon completion of the semester. 116


g. A progress report will be sent to the parent whenever they are due by the teacher advisor. h. Periodical progression steps, with mandatory deadlines order to continue with the program are arranged with the advisor. If students have serious school problems such as truancy or disciplinary problems their continuation in the program will be reviewed by the CARE team. Modifications may be made to these guidelines to accommodate students with disabilities through the IEP process or through a 504 Plan.

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APPENDIX I Forms

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SUN PRAIRIE HIGH SCHOOL 888 Grove Street Sun Prairie WI 53590 Telephone: 608-834-6730 Fax: 608-834-6707 www.spasd.k12.wi.us

2014-2015 Advanced Placement Contract Name:______________________________________

Grade________________

The Advanced Placement Program at Sun Prairie High School is a rigorous program that allows students to take college level courses while they are still in high school. AP courses can improve a student's chances of getting into college as well as help students to be better prepared for college. Research has shown that students who take Advanced Placement courses and exams are much more likely than their peers to complete a bachelor’s degree in four years or less. AP courses requested for the 2014-2015 school year: ________________________________________ _______________________________________ Student Responsibilities Students who are interested in taking an Advanced Placement course(s) for the 2013-2014 school year must adhere to the following:

I understand that each AP course may have a minimum of 1½ hours of homework each night as well as summer assignments and/or projects. I also understand the rigor, difficulty, and pace of the course.

I am committed to enrolling in an AP course(s) for the entire year as my schedule will not be changed.

I have read the descriptions of the AP course(s) and I understand the workload that it will entail. I have also considered my extra-curricular activities, community service obligations and other commitments to ensure that I have registered for the appropriate number of AP courses.

I have consulted with my parents, school counselor and/or teachers to ensure that I am registered for the appropriate number of AP courses.

I am committed to work hard and to utilize the resources that are available to help me to be successful in any given AP course(s). Resources may include asking the AP teacher for help, study groups with classmates, online resources, SPHS AP website, etc.

I understand that I may not audit an AP course for any reason.

___________________________________

___________________________________

Student Signature

Parent Signature 119


Sun Prairie High School INDEPENDENT STUDY APPLICATION INDEPENDENT STUDY provides students with a unique learning experience beyond what is provided in the regular classroom environment. Student:

ID Number:

Academic Area:

Title of Project:

School Year:

Semester:

Credit: (1/2 credit per semester)

Previous credits earned in INDEPENDENT STUDY

Period:

If this project takes you out of Sun Prairie High School, include details of destination and method of transportation.

APPROVAL OF INDEPENDENT STUDY Advisor/Teacher Name:

Outline has been submitted, reviewed and approved

Date:

Curriculum has been reviewed and approved

Date:

Progress toward graduation requirements have been reviewed

Date:

Attendance and discipline considerations have been reviewed

Date:

Permission is granted for the student to participate in the INDEPENDENT STUDY

Date:

Permission is granted for the student to be involved in any pertinent off-campus activities in connection with this INDEPENDENT STUDY

Date:

Signature: Curriculum Leader (CLC) Name: Signature: Counselor Name: Signature: Assistant Principal Name: Signature: Parent(s) Name: Signature:

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FINAL EVALUATION Independent Study Project Teacher INDEPENDENT STUDY project has been completed successfully by the student

Name:

Date:

Signature: YES

or

NO

Student Name: Signature:

I am aware of the evaluation of my INDEPENDENT STUDY project and agree with the evaluation.

A copy of the summary report and this document will be kept in the Student Services Office. Attach all relevant documentation regarding student’s performance and proficiency.

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GUIDELINES FOR TEACHER ASSISTANT RECOGNITION OF CREDIT The teacher assistantship allows students a distinct learning experience and is particularly beneficial for those students interested in a career in education. The assistantship may be taken at the high school or elementary level. Students assisting in elementary must provide their own transportation. Elementary assignments are only made for 1st or 7th hours, so student schedules must be able to easily accommodate this option. I.

Guidelines and general regulations for Teacher Assistant Credit: A.

B.

C.

D.

E. F.

G. H.

I.

J.

K.

Students being considered for approval and continuation as a teacher assistant must meet Sun Prairie High School’s attendance and behavior expectations. Students being considered for approval and continuation as a teacher assistant must have received (and maintain) a ―C‖ grade or better in courses from the same department in which he/she would be assisting. The student must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 and be enrolled in their 3rd or 4th year of high school. The assistantship must be taken in place of a study hall and must be scheduled during the supervising teacher’s designated period of course instruction. A student may earn up to 1.00 elective credit toward graduation requirements as a teacher assistant. This means that a student can only TA twice. The assistantship requires the equivalency of 90 hours of academic work/service on the part of the student. A Sun Prairie Teaching Assistant Service Log must be completed daily by the student and verified weekly by the supervising teacher. The log must be available for review by an administrator if requested. The supervising teacher may have no more than one teacher assistant per period. The supervising teacher may have no more teacher assistants than the number of course periods in which the teacher is contracted to teach. A grade of pass/fail will be given for an approved teacher assistant credit that is completed. The pass/fail grade will be transcripted onto the student’s record. The teacher assistant may check/correct assignments under the supervision of the supervising teacher. The teacher assistant must not enter grades in the gradebook or computer, nor have access to students grades (i.e. computer generated grade sheets). The teacher assistant must have a pass from the supervising teacher when traveling through the halls. The teacher assistant must not have access to areas of the building designated for faculty and staff only (i.e. faculty mailboxes). 122


II.

Requests for teacher assistant credit(s) will be processed, approved/denied and documented under the following guidelines. A.

B.

C. D.

III.

Request for a teacher assistantship must be made in writing by completing the Application for Teacher Assistant. Applications are available in the Student Services Office. Completed applications must be submitted to the student’s school counselor. An application must include supporting materials (List of Student Responsibilities, Learning Objectives/Academic Standards, Evaluation Method/Criteria). Applications will be approved/denied through the CARE Team at the high school. Applications denied by the CARE Team at the high school may be appealed to the Assistant District Administrator of Instructional Programs.

Modifications may be made to these guidelines to accommodate students with disabilities through the IEP process or through a 504 plan.

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Application for Teacher Assistant Student Name: ______________________________ Grade: ________ Student ID Number: _____________________ School Year: ________________ Sem 1 _____

Sem 2 _____

Both ____

Period: _________

Teacher’s Name: ______________________________

Room # __________

High School ___ Elementary School ____ Subject Area/Grade Level ________ Have you been a TA before? No ____ Yes ____ If yes, with whom and when: ________________________________________ Attach supporting information:  List of Student Responsibilities  Learning Objectives/Academic Standards met through this TA  Evaluation Criteria/Method (include completion of Service Log)

_______________________________ Parent/Guardian Signature

____________________ Date

_______________________________ Parent/Guardian Signature

____________________ Date

_______________________________ Teacher Signature

____________________ Date

_______________________________ Counselor Signature

____________________ Date

_______________________________ Assistant Principal Signature

____________________ Date

Comments:

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Computer Entry On: ___________________

Entered by: ___________

Date

Initials

Sun Prairie High School Teaching Assistant Service Log

Student Name_______________ Teacher Name_______________ Period: ____ Semester: I

Day of Week

II

Student Service Log

School Year:

Student comments

Monday _______

Tuesday _______

Wednesday _______

Thursday _______

Friday _______

Teacher Weekly verification ___________ Initials

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Room#:____

Teacher comments


STATEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION No student may be discriminated against in any school programs, activities or in facilities usage because of the student's sex, color, religion, profession or demonstration of belief or non-belief, race, national origin, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status, homelessness status, sexual orientation or physical, mental, emotional or learning disability. Harassment is a form of discrimination and shall not be tolerated in the district. It is the responsibility of administrators, staff members and all students to ensure that student discrimination or harassment does not occur. (SPASD District Policy JB)

If a student or parent/guardian would prefer to have this information translated into Spanish, please contact us at 834-6655. Si un estudiante, padre 贸 guardian prefiere tener esta informaci贸n traducida en Espa帽ol, por favor contactenos en el 834-6655. * * * * * * * * If a student or parent/guardian would prefer to have this information translated into Hmong, please contact us at 318-8087. Yog tus me nyuam lub xiv los yog niam thiab txiv/tus neeg muaj cai saib xyuas tus me nyuam xav tau qhov ntawv ntawm no ua lus Hmoob, thov hais rau peb paub rau ntawm 318-8087.

Course fees are under consideration by the Sun Prairie Area School Board and are subject to change for the 2014-2015 school year. 126


SPHS 2014-15 Course Guide