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Topeka FOURSQUARE

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Winter’ 12 | sunflowerpub.com

$5


Winter ’12

Vol. VIi / No. I

Editor Nathan Pettengill designer/Art Director

Jenni Leiste

chief Photographer

Jason Dailey

COPY EDITOR

Christy Little

advertising Kathy Lafferty representative (785) 224-9992

Ad Designer

contributing Photographer

Jenni Leiste Bill Stephens

Contributing Writers Melinda Briscoe Meredith Fry Jeffrey Ann Goudie Kim Gronniger Carolyn Kaberline Susan Kraus Karen Ridder Christine Steinkuehler Debra Guiou Stufflebean GENERAL MANAGER

Bert Hull

Subscriptions $22 (tax included) for a one-year subscription to Topeka Magazine. For subscription information, (800) 578-8748 please contact: Fax (785) 843-1922 topekamagazine@sunflowerpub.com

Topeka Magazine is a publication of Sunflower Publishing, a division of The World Company. www.sunflowerpub.com Please contact us at topekamagazine@sunflowerpub.com for all comments, subscription and editorial queries.

F ollow us on twitter @TopekaMagazine find us on facebook: facebook.com/topekamag

from the editor t began much more modestly. The initial idea for our cover story on an architectural tour of Topeka was to ask writer Christine Steinkuehler to identify perhaps seven homes and buildings with distinct styles—we wanted to approach houses specifically from their architectural features, a change from our usual emphasis. In our six years of publishing, our approach to writing about homes has primarily focused on the relationship that owners have had with their homes, the stories of the renovations, the choices made in decorating and customizing—all the things that make a house a home. But we’ve also always touched on a house’s style, on how the structure attracted an owner, on how the layout affected a resident’s life. And we realized that there are distinct types of people: You’re either a Queen Anne woman or you’re not; you love Unisonian, or you don’t. So we thought it was time to focus a story specifically on architectural styles in Topeka. Then Christine wondered: “Well, what if we found a style for every letter of the alphabet?” Great idea. Big logistical headache.

Then Christine wondered: “Well, what if we found a style for every letter of the alphabet ?” Even though the English alphabet has only 26 letters, architectural styles aren’t necessarily conceived in alphabetical order. Nonetheless, Christine lined up 26 homes (including subjects for the troublesome X, Y and Z) across the city with an additional three buildings (the 1, 2, 3 to go along with our A-Z) to highlight the details that can define a particular style. In fact, once we were well into our selection of homes, the difficulty became deciding which of many styles for each letter of the alphabet and which particular home to feature for each style. We were a bit surprised at the amount of choices we had—but we shouldn’t have been. Topeka has always provided a treasure of subjects, stories and features in any theme we’ve chosen to explore. We hope you’ll enjoy this tour of Topeka’s architectural styles as well as the customized pullout poster we’ve designed to commemorate the city’s architectural wealth, from A-Z. And as much as we’ve enjoyed the survey of the city’s architecture, our conversations with the home owners in arranging the photo shoots have also led us back to where we began. Regardless of any home’s style, there will be people inside them who have stories of their own connection to the house, their bonds to one another, and their connections to the people and places around them. A structure can be architectural, but a home is architecture with attachment. So whether you’re more Bungalow than International, or whether you’re a bit French Eclectic with a dash of Vernacular—we hope your home is filled this holiday season with plenty of style and, most importantly, the people and things you love.

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TCTA Presents:

A Christmas Story

A classic holiday comedy November 23 – December 23, 2012

Love, Sex, and the IRS

A hilarious farce January 18 – February 9, 2013

Hairspray

The Broadway musical sensation March 1 – March 30, 2013

For tickets and information call 785-357-5211 or visit www.TopekaCivicTheatre.com

ToPeKa arT Guild and Gallery A great place to shop for unique gifts by local Kansas artists. Open 11 am-5 pm Wed. - Sat. Join us every First Friday from 5 pm-8 pm for 10% off

May featured artist: Ye Wang Serving Our Artists and Supporting the Local Arts Community 5331 SW 22nd Place | Fairlawn Plaza | Topeka, KS 66614

first friday evening of every month

December 7 January 4 February 1

The Collective Art Gallery Celebrating 25 Years! Join us on the First Friday Art Walk! (and during our regular business hours)

Wednesday-Friday 12-5 • Saturday 10-3 We’re On Facebook! 3121 SW Huntoon, Topeka, KS 66604 • 785-234-4254 www.thecollectiveartgallery.com


First Friday

Marco Polo Designs The SolSTice collecTion See The enTire collecTion

visit our website to get Exhibit Information

Shop EArly!

Topeka. A Great Arts Town.

Gift Wrap available The gifT of glass is Timeless

www.artglassexpressions.com

Look for us on Facebook search “Art Glass Expressions”


Your Smile Your Health Your Choice

The healTh of your body can be seen Through your mouTh. The mouth is a window that can show signs of systemic disease or infection before they are visible anywhere else. Dr. Michael Michel is trained to recognize these signs. We have all heard a lot about the importance of healthy teeth and gums. Regular dental visits help you maintain healthy teeth and gums. But, now regular dental visits may help you prevent serious health conditions and maintain optimal overall well being. Dr. Michael Michel practices Total Health, beyond the mouth. Total Health is an integrated wellness and education program that informs patients of the integral link between oral health and total health. Each patient is given a questionnaire to determine current conditions and identify potential problems. Dr. Michel and his staff takes the time with each and every patient and may recommend further testing and/or a medical evaluation if necessary. New patients are always welcome. Call us today and ask us about our Total Health program. Your smile‌your health‌.your choice

Providing complete dental care for the whole family!

785-273-0801 Michael E. Michel, DDS, PAv 2951 SW Wanamaker Dr ive Topeka, Kansas Email micheldds@yahoo.com w w w.micheldental.com


features TOPEKAMAGAZINE

Winter ‘12

26 topeka homes: an a-z guide The city’s rich variety of houses provides architectural archetypes for every letter of the alphabet This home in the College Hill region of Topeka is an excellent example of transitional Victorian style architecture.

about the

writer

Christine Steinkuehler currently lives in a Topeka Queen Anne, though she has been known to cast her eye on a Tudor or a Prairie style home. In general, she considers herself a treehouse type of person.

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departments TOPEKAMAGAZINE

Winter ’12 The living room of Edie and Stephen Smith takes advantage of the best aspects of Topeka lofts: wide spaces, central locations and historical heritage.

home life

notables

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tree house For Christmas trees at this home, it’s a simple case of the more, the merrier

The Boyle House Drink Santa gets eggnog, but for the rest of the Boyle family there’s kefir year-round

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Home Tour with Edie and Stephen Smith Work space and home life intersect at the city’s central street for one professional couple

She Really Did It By tapping the city’s resources and experience of previous ventures, Joanne Morrell helped Topeka create a treasure for children

Meet&Greet The Dog Professionals

60 Jennifer Walker 63 mose HUGGHIS 64 julie castANEDA

what’s happening?

A band plays at The Spotted Cat, one of New Orleans’ many live jazz clubs. Photograph courtesy New Orleans Convention & Visitors Bureau.

22 the Nutcracker Leads Lineup of Holiday Concerts

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Big Events for a ‘Big Read’

Drink the Great Gatsby You can read fiction, and you can imbibe in it

58 The Santa Legacies For Jennie Rose, holiday figurines symbolize a friendship of Christmases past

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66 Beyond Bourbon Street Search through New Orleans to discover the best foreign city you’ll ever see without a passport (even if you don’t eat the bunny)

Magazine

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Cinematic Royalty with the Kansas Silent Film Festival

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Topeka’s architectural styles in an A-Z format, illustration by Lana Grove with design by Jenni Leiste. Illustrations based on photographs by Bill Stephens.


William A. Bailey, M.D • Ryan M. Stuckey, M.D. • Richard G. Wendt, M.D. • Jeffrey C. Randall, M.D. Neal D. Lintecum, M.D. • Sean A. Cupp, M.D. • Stephan L. Prô, M.D. • Douglass E. Stull, M.D.


Photography by Bill Stephens Story by Kim Gronniger

Tree House

For Christmas trees at this home, it’s a simple case of the more, the merrier about the Above: A Christmas tree greets visitors near the entrance of the TallenTorrence home.

writer

Kim Gronniger decorates her tree with homemade Santas, travel mementos and a treasured assortment of wooden cutouts featuring her kids’ Catholic school photos.

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A decorated Christmas tree is the centerpiece for many holiday celebrations, but for Steve Tallen and Mary Ann Torrence, a single spruce bedecked with baubles won’t suffice. The past few years, these grandparents of four have put up six themed trees throughout their home to delight family and friends. Last year they even extended their hospitality to visitors on the CASA of Shawnee County Holiday Homes Tour. The couple begin their labor-intensive treetrimming tradition around Veterans Day each year, following a decoration theme for each of their trees. They hang ballet slippers and Barbie ornaments on the boughs of a pink girls’ tree and fill the branches of a boys’ tree with ray guns, airplanes and trucks. The couple place antique ornaments on the angel tree, arrange a beautiful assortment of cut-glass treasures on a silver tree and display Santa decorations on the main tree. Another tree holds a colorful, whimsical collection of “goofy things,” including Santa astride a flying pig.

“The best part of all this is seeing people enjoy the trees.” — Mary Ann Torrence Steve and Mary selectively add to their collections each year, finding irresistible pieces through catalogs like Department 56, specialty shops and serendipitous vacation stops, including a crystal factory in Nova Scotia. Some of Mary’s favorite ornaments include creations made by her children. She also purchased hippos, elephants and other animal-themed decorations through the World Wildlife Fund. Steve’s special collection includes ornaments his mother made. Steve and Mary grew up in big families where holidays were special, but the hall-decking duo have taken it up a notch since their early years together. “Our first house had a big picture window, perfect for a Christmas tree,” recalls Steve, a retired information technology professional who works as a technical researcher for BNSF.

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TOPEKAMAGAZINE

Winter ’ 12

TOP Mary Ann Torrence and three of her grandchildren play with a train set that the Tallen-Torrences set up in their home during the holidays. CENTER The Tallen-Torrences mix handmade and mass-produced decorations on their trees, but most of them have some particular meaning for the couple. BOTTOM Steve Tallen and Mary Ann Torrence buck the tradition of scaling back on holiday decorations for empty-nest homes.


They filled that view with a single Christmas tree and continued decorating only one tree each year while the their two children, Holly and Aaron, were growing up. Although some people start scaling back holiday bric-a-brac when their children leave home, Steve and Mary did the opposite, widening their wonderland for adults and children alike. This year, for example, soft, stuffed ornaments will dangle from the bottom branches of one tree so a new grandson can experience the festivities. Each grandchild has an ornament with his or her name on it. Although the grandchildren don’t yet participate extensively in the decorating tasks, they do have frequent opportunities to bask in front of the sparkling trees and play with a large train set throughout the holiday season.

ABOVE In addition to trees, the Tallen-Torrences decorate their home with crèche sets, wreaths and other holiday décor.

In addition to the trees, Steve and Mary’s home showcases a collection of Christmas tea sets and a floor crèche. But the trees are the main attraction. “The best part of all this is seeing people enjoy the trees,” says Mary, who works as the Kansas revisor of statutes. “Everything looks wonderful when the house is decorated.” The couple host a holiday party every year and also entertain family, friends and colleagues throughout December. Eventually, the holiday merriment ends, and the careful process of dismantling the trees and wrapping and storing the precious treasures begins. “It’s a much slower process to take the trees down, and my goal each year is to have everything put away by the Super Bowl,” Steve says, laughing.

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Photography by Jason Dailey Story by Carolyn Kaberline

Home Tour with Edie and Stephen Smith Work space and home life intersect at the city’s central street for one professional couple about the

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writer TOPEKAMAGAZINE

Winter ’ 12

Carolyn Kaberline’s freelance-writing career began in 2006 when she wanted to show her journalism students that she wasn’t asking them to do anything


Fine Arts Unique • Affordable • Functional Featuring the original handmade works of local, regional and national artisans. • Pottery • Blown Glass • Jewelry • Woodwork • Textiles and much more

While many of today’s photographers work out of their homes, Stephen Smith and his wife, Edie, have reversed the trend by moving their home to his photo studio in the 900 block of South Kansas Avenue. In doing so, they used as many existing materials as possible to create what Edie refers to “as the ultimate green project.” Originally built in 1890 and sandwiched between two existing buildings, the structure has seen a variety of uses through the years, even housing a meat market and a bank at different times. Today, however, the loft apartment bears few traces to any of those former businesses or the storage area they found upstairs when Stephen moved his business to the building in 1978.

she couldn’t do. Since then her articles have appeared in local, regional and national publications. A full-time high school teacher, she enjoys reading and working with her horses.

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The Smiths have called their loft apartment home for the past year and a half. While the idea of living above the studio had taken root sometime in 2004, it had only been a dream while their son, Matt, and daughter, Andrea, were still at home. However, after the departure of their children and the sale of their home in the Lake Sherwood area within three hours of putting it on the market, the Smiths began the remodeling project in earnest by bringing Dargal Clark Builders on board as the general contractor for the job. Since all power had been removed from the upstairs area and the space had been broken into little rooms, one of the first tasks was to reverse that. A baseboard was soon added to house electric outlets and a vacuum system. Walls were removed to open up the space, leaving only those around the bedroom intact; those around the kitchen were halved to provide easy passage. Although the original intent had been to cover the beams in the ceiling, “once we saw how beautiful they were, we had them cleaned and sealed,” Edie says, adding that most of the floor is original. Where new boards were needed, they were skillfully blended with those already there. The inspiration for the apartment’s color scheme came from a tapestry the couple had purchased in Turkey in 2000 while on a photo shoot; that tapestry now hangs over the stairs. Modern vintage furniture and items from the Smiths’ private art collection not only show the couple’s eclectic taste but also give the loft its distinctive look.

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Winter ’ 12


Since the Smiths had spent increasingly longer hours downtown prior to their move—Steve because of his photography business and Edie as director of marketing and membership for Downtown Topeka Inc.—they had come to enjoy an urban-centric life. “It took all of twenty-four hours of adjustment after we moved here to really fit in,” Edie says, noting that they have joined approximately 800 other people who live downtown.

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The Smiths feel that the layout of their 1,400-square-foot apartment allows privacy where needed with storage areas strategically placed in room dividers and under their custom bed. While the apartment is located along one of the city’s busiest streets, the thick walls provide a buffer to the outside world, while the natural lighting highlights the apartment’s features.

Perhaps one of the loft’s most unique features is the rooftop patio outside the apartment’s back door. For those who don’t mind heights, a spiral iron staircase leads to an upper level that provides a view extending southeast to Lake Shawnee and south to the water tower by Frito Lay. “I’m not sure how much of a ‘wow’ it is,” says Steve, “but the wide range of views giving us a glimpse of a downtown main street, a large city collection of tall buildings, a corporate office park view, and a view of suburbia to the east is nice to us.” Also nice is the metallic garden of flower blooms along the upper level that requires no watering or care. “Steve really dislikes yard work,” Edie says, adding that this all metal “urban garden” needs no maintenance, which is perfect for their city lifestyle.

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What’s Happening?

Holiday

Performances The Nutcracker Leads Lineup of Holiday Concerts

ABOVE The two lead female dancers for Ballet Midwest’s The Nutcracker, from left, Alexandria Brant and Jenna Meyer, review their costumes backstage.

The holiday season kicks off in Topeka with a variety of concerts. One longtime tradition includes two teens playing the lead role of “Dream Clara” in the all-local The Nutcracker performed by Ballet Midwest. For the 36th year, the studio will put together two complete casts—with a total of 215 dancers—to perform the show. Each cast does two performances with an additional benefit performance for local schoolchildren. Artistic Director Barbara Ebert says the goal is to provide an opportunity for young dancers to take on these classic parts. “We want to give everyone as much experience as we can,” says Ebert. Ballet Midwest’s The Nutcracker is scheduled December 7-9 at the Topeka Performing Arts Center.

Ballet Midwest’s “Dream Clara” Performers

Alexandria Brant, a junior at Topeka West Age: 17 Years dancing: 10 What is the most challenging part about dancing Clara’s part? “The most challenging thing about being Clara is that there are a lot of hard lifts with the Nutcracker Prince. They are things we are learning along the way.” Jenna Meyer, a senior at Washburn Rural High School Age: 17 Years dancing: 10 What do you like about The Nutcracker? “I love that everybody is incorporated, and everybody gets a chance to have their chance. You develop into lead roles.”

Additional holiday concerts on Topeka stages: Story by Karen Ridder

Photography by Bill Stephens

A Christmas Story – Topeka Civic Theatre, November 23-24, then, Thursday through

Sunday November 29 until December 23 The Nutcracker by the Metropolitan Ballet of Topeka, TPAC, December 1, 2, 3 A Gilbert & Sullivan Christmas Carol by Washburn Opera Studio, Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library, December 2 Capitol Federal Holiday Concert by the Topeka Symphony – White Concert Hall Washburn University, December 5. Great Spaces with Organist John Walker – Grace Cathedral, December 7 Madeline’s Christmas – Topeka Civic Theatre, December 7, 8, 9 and 14, 15, 16 The Santaland Diaries – The Break Room, December 8, 14 & 15, 21 & 22 Washburn Vespers – White Concert Hall, Washburn University, December 9 Glad Tidings by Topeka Festival Singers – White Concert Hall Washburn University, December 17 Noon Noels – First Presbyterian Church, 817 SW Harrison, December 5, 12 and 19

about the

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writer TOPEKAMAGAZINE

Winter ’ 12

Karen Ridder has lived in Topeka with her family for the past eight years.


What’s Happening?

Big Events for a ‘Big Read’ Cars, dances, jazz, lectures and—of course— one great book are at the center of this year’s Great Read events.

The Topeka Shawnee County Public Library brings the glitz and glamour of the 1920s to town for this year’s Big Read. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is the center of a community effort to encourage reading, a habit on the decline. “We’re trying to turn around that trend and raise awareness that reading is a good leisure time activity,” explains Lisa Coble-Krings from the library’s media office.

At a slim 200 pages, the book is short and widely appealing. It deals with the super-rich dabbling in dreams of glamour and money. Since there are a lot of adult themes in the book, younger readers are encouraged to pick up the title Wonderstruck, also set in the Roaring ’20s. The library will host a variety of nonreading events and discussion groups to get people excited about the book. Events start February 1 and go through March 2; a full listing of events will be posted at the library and through the library’s websites, but here is a sampling from the Gatsby-filled month.

Art and Culture: A self-guided tour of art and ABOVE Randy Austin will participate in a classic cars display that is part of this year’s Great Read program on The Great Gatsby.

Story by Karen Ridder

Photography by Bill Stephens

She writes for a variety of publications, including the state’s official travel blog, www.travelks.com.

architecture gives readers an excuse to get out and about. It features Art Deco architecture from the Gilded Era in Topeka and Shawnee County. Car lovers will also enjoy a display of classic cars from the 1920s on display at the Fairlawn Plaza Mall throughout the month. Also featured at the mall is 1920s-themed art

work from local artists.

Music: Three big music events feature local and regional jazz musicians. KC vocalist Angela Hagenbach performs with her own book club in costume February 24 at the library. Local high school jazz bands and dance teams rule over a dance party at the Great Overland Station on March 1, and on the following day the Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site will feature a live performance by Kansas City Jazz performer Queen Bey.

Talk: The keynote speaker for this year’s Big Read is Kirk Curnutt. The expert on Fitzgerald’s life and works will talk at 1 p.m. February 17 in the library’s Marvin Auditorium about American culture during the time of The Great Gatsby. Several other discussion groups will be hosted during the month at bars and restaurants throughout the county.

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2012-2013

McCain

Gift certificates now available!

P E R FOR M ANC E S E R I ES

A Leahy Family Christmas

Joe Goode Performance Group

7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 5

Gorgeous, emotional and accessible modern dance theater.

A triple threat whirlwind of fiddledriven music, dance and song. Disney’s

Beauty and the Beast

The most beautiful love story ever told comes to life! 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 11

A Chorus Line

One singular sensational show for anyone with a dream. 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 29

Sweet Honey In The Rock

Stirring vocals inspire love, justice, hope and peace. 7:30 p.m., Friday, Feb. 1

The Rambler

7:30 p.m., Friday, Feb. 22

Mummenschanz

Whimsical world where ordinary becomes extraordinary. 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, March 12

The Celtic Tenors

Classical, folk, Irish and pop harmonies just in time for St. Patty’s Day. 7:30 p.m., Saturday, March 16

Alison Balsom and the Scottish Ensemble

Trumpet superstar performs Vivaldi, Albinoni and more. 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 9

DRUMLine Live

A show-style marching band extravaganza.

Itzhak Perlman

McCain Student Showcase

4 p.m., Sunday, April 21

7:30 p.m., Friday, Feb. 8

4 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 10

Shrek The Musical Believe all ogre again.

Russian National Ballet Theatre

Swan Lake

A timeless tale of love and betrayal. 4 p.m., Sunday, April 28

Rock of Ages

7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12

Hold on to That Feelin.’

Laughter and Reflection with Carol Burnett

Dinosaur Petting Zoo

A Conversation with Carol where the Audience Asks the Questions 3:00 p.m., Sunday, February 17

7:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 14 Presented by Erth — Visual and Physical Inc.

Get up close and personal with lifelike dinosaurs! 7 p.m., Monday, June 10

McCain box office 785-532-6428

k-state.edu/mccain

McCain Auditorium

K-State students and kids 18 and under half price. K-State faculty/staff and military discounts available. Dates and artists are subject to change.

K-State students show off their talent.

The undeniable reigning virtuoso of the violin.

mccainksu


What’s Happening?

Cinematic Royalty with the Kansas Silent Film Festival Big stars make a (silent) splash at this year’s events

Drama, comedy, history … the Kansas Silent Film Festival has featured it all in the past 17 years, with rarely a repeat performance. The celebrations February 22-23 will headline the king and queen of the Silent Era, Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford. Event organizer Bill Shaffer calls Fairbanks the world’s most dashing swashbuckling hero. “No single ’20s star had been associated so much with costume pictures.” Fairbank’s 1927 movie, The Gaucho, is Saturday night’s big feature. Equal in legend to Fairbanks is Pickford, who had a littlegirl image on the big screen that stayed with her throughout life. Friday night will feature her starring role in the movie Sparrow. All films are shown free of charge and with live accompaniment in Washburn’s White Concert Hall.

Prehistoric Pictures: Saturday morning will bring several movies with a prehistoric theme featuring other big names from the Silent Era. On the schedule are Laurel and Hardy’s Flying Elephants, Charlie Chaplin’s His Prehistoric Past and Buster Keaton’s spoof of intolerance, Three Ages.

Westerns: A big part of the 1920s cinema, Story by Karen Ridder

Photography by Bill Stephens

Westerns will have a large presence in Saturday afternoon’s lineup, which includes

ABOVE Kansas Silent Film Festival director Bill Shaffer has cast the stage with several big names of the Silent Era for the 2013 program.

The Narrow Trail, starring William S. Hart, a Hoot Gibson short, The Man with a Punch, and Hands Up! with comedian Raymond Griffith.

Keystone: Special guest Paul Gierucki is the California-based man in charge of restoring the Keystone Kops films airing on Turner Classic Movies. He will bring samples of these movies that will run in each session.

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Story by Christine Steinkuehler

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Photography by

Bill Stephens & Jason Dailey

TOPEKA

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The city’s rich variety of houses provides architectural archetypes for every letter of the alphabet

Over the past six years of publishing Topeka Magazine, we’ve been able to discover, write about, photograph and share some wonderful homes across the city. But even after all these encounters, we were still amazed at the rich variety of homes and buildings that writer Christine Steinkuehler gathered for this article, an A-Z field guide of Topeka architecture with an additional, in-depth examination of three structures. All of these houses and buildings—and others like them—can be found in Topeka. We hope this article will inspire you to search out the range of styles and rich history of architecture in our capital city.

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Arts & Crafts Transitional “Transitional” is a label for a combination of styles, with the name reflecting the dominant theme. This home’s second-story brackets are Victorian in styling, but the front columns are vintage Arts and Crafts style.

is for …

Bungalow Easily identified by their broad front gables and squared porches, bungalows are known for their built-in bookcases and oak woodwork.

is for …

Colonial Revival Distinguishable by their exterior symmetry, Colonial Revival homes also feature fan lights and front doors, often with decorative pediments.

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Deco (Art Deco) Featuring geometric forms and stucco, Art Deco emerged in the 1920s and was popular through World War II.


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Eclectic These type of Eclectic homes, French Eclectic, are characterized by steeply pitched hipped roofs. They also often have an asymmetrical brick exterior.

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Foursquare These 2- or 2½-story boxshaped homes feature four-room floor plans and often reflect Craftsman or Queen Anne influences. Foursquare plans were popular kit homes found in Garlinghouse, Sears and Montgomery Ward catalogs.

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Georgian Revival Commonly constructed of red brick, Georgian Revivals have a symmetrical facade with a pedimented entry and classical details around the windows and doors.

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Highland Park neighborhood St. Matthew’s Rectory, originally known as “Pinehurst,” was the home of the Topeka Daily Capital owner/publisher Frederick Popenoe. The mansion features stone columns made from the same stone as the low wall on the north side of Washburn University.

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International Multiple level, flat roofs and floor-toceiling windows characterize International-style homes, which also reflect an appreciation of technology and materials.

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Japanese-Influenced Bungalow Wide, overhanging eaves; broad, horizontal lines; simple, elegant moldings and detail work reflect the Japanese design esthetic popularized by Greene and Greene of California.

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Lustron Designed to “maximize pleasure and minimize work,” Lustron homes were made of pre-fabricated, enameled steel, which could be assembled quickly in order to meet the rush of GIs returning home at the end of World War II.

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Knollwood neighborhood Perched on the hilltop like a treehouse, this contemporary, A-frame style house takes full advantage of this neighborhood’s tree-filled topography.

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Mediterranean Revival Inspired by Italian Renaissance architecture of seaside palaces and villas, Mediterranean Revival was popular in the 1920s and 1930s. It features smooth stucco and wrought iron ornamentation.

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Neoclassical Reflective of the architecture of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as the Italian architect Andrea Palladio, neoclassical buildings are usually symmetrical with a pediment and a full-height front porch.

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Oakland neighborhood Characterized by its bungalows, Oakland was home to many Santa Fe employees as well as aviation pioneers such as Albin K. Longren and Philip Billard. is for …

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Prairie Often called the “prairie box,” this style of architecture emphasizes low, horizontal lines and wide eaves. It was popularized by Frank Lloyd Wright and the Chicago school of architecture.

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Ranch Originating from California in the 1940s, ranch-style homes are usually asymmetrical, one-story homes with low-pitched roofs. The style shifted the home’s outdoor emphasis from the front porch to private backyard areas.

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queen anne Synonymous in most people’s minds with the Victorian period, Queen Annes are known for their decorative detailing, with multiple kinds of shingles, gingerbread details and extensive porches.

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Spanish Mission Revival Courtyards, tile roofs and smooth plaster walls are all defining elements of the Spanish Mission Revival style.

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Tudor Tudors are often defined by combinations of half-timbering with stucco, brick, stone or wood, casement windows. They are also prominent with wide, interior moldings.

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Usonian Usonian was the name coined by Frank Lloyd Wright to describe homes that feature cantilevered overhangs for passive solar heating/cooling, flat roofs and, often, a carport.


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Vernacular Any house built with locally available materials and construction techniques is referred to as Vernacular, one of the most wide-ranging and disparate styles.

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Ward Meade Built by Anthony Ward in the 1870s, this colonnaded painted brick mansion has the original beveled glass front doors and pressed cardboard wainscoting.

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Xeriscaping A gardening/landscape style that reduces the use of irrigation, xeriscaping taps native plants and is well-suited to areas where there is limited fresh water.

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Yellow Why not? Yellow is a marvelous house color!

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Zoo Function and comfort. Tropical building’s dome allows birds to soar and provides armadillos warm nap spots.

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The Crosby Mansion The Crosby Mansion is one of the last of the elegant mansions that flanked Topeka Boulevard (then Topeka Avenue) in the early part of the 20th century. Built for William and Delora Crosby, part-owners of the popular downtown department store Crosby’s, in 1910, this is also one of the few examples of Italian Renaissance Revival in Topeka. Local architect Frank Squires designed the home, and David Scott was the builder. The building permit filed for the yellow brick mansion was for $17,000 with an additional $1,000 for the garage, in a day when the average annual salary was $538. The home’s blockish gravitas is somewhat softened by quoins accenting the corners, detailed windows and double porch columns. The hipped clay tile roof features substantial brackets and wide eaves to set off the home, with terra cotta medallions and corbels as architectural icing on the decorative cake.

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In 1927, at the height of the Roaring ’20s and Prohibition, Charles Johnson, general receiver for State Banking Department, and his wife, Hassie, bought the lot where this elegant Italian palazzo-style home stands on. They commissioned W.E. Glover, who would come to be known as the quintessential architect of the Westboro neighborhood, and commissioned him to design the home with Tinkham Veale and M. Roy Linscott acting as the general

contractors. The Italian palazzo style of architecture, literally meaning the “little palace,” is unusual in this area. An offshoot of the Italian Renaissance style it is reminiscent of centuries-old palaces that line the canals of Venice. Recognizable details of this style include Mediterranean-style clay roof, pediment windows, decorative roof brackets and the application of gracefully curving decorations often done in plaster.

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The Longacre Home Topeka builder Frances Longacre is said to have been inspired to create this picturesque house by a model home display in the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair. Longacre brought back the plans and began construction of the transitional Victorian in 1906. Due to financial problems, the house sat unfinished until 1909. Only nine years later it was pressed into service as a temporary hospital for victims of the Spanish flu pandemic whose victims overran the capacity of local hospitals. During the Prohibition years, Kappa Sigma and then the Alpha Delta fraternities called this location home. Neighbors told stories of shenanigans, such as a horse being coaxed up the front stairs to the second floor, maybe even to the third. By the 1930s, the house returned to a single-family dwelling until the Depression took its toll and the homeowners were forced to tighten their belts and rent the third floor to boarders, the Washburn football team. It returned to being a single-family home after World War II. If walls could talk, then we might realize we have only scratched the surface of the history behind this location.

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Sometimes, the toughest subjects are the most important. Dealing with changes that occur as people age can be challenging for everyone involved. That’s why so many people count on us to help them understand retirement living and how it can help their loved one live a more fulfilled life. Taking the next step usually starts with a question. We welcome yours. Just ask. Call today for our free brochure. Together, we’ll find the answers.

Contact Marsha Anderson at 785.272.6510 for more information or to schedule a tour of the community.

4712 South West Sixth St Topeka, Kansas 66606 www.justaskpresbyterianmanors.com


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notables TOPEKAMAGAZINE

Winter ’ 12

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THE BOYLE HOUSE DRINK

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SHE REALLY DID IT

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DRINK THE GREAT GATSBY

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THE SANTA LEGACIES

Meet&greet

THE DOG PROFESSIONALS 60........................... JENNIFER WALKER 63..................................MOSE HUGGhIS 64............................ JULIE CASTANeDA

ABOVE A young visitor to the Kansas Children’s Discovery Center explores a portion of the exhibit gallery.

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Photography by Jason Dailey Story by Meredith Fry

The Boyle House Drink Santa gets eggnog, but for the rest of the Boyle family there’s kefir year-round

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o get to Erin Boyle’s rural Shawnee County home, you first have to pass Rosina—the fuzzy, white-fur Great Pyrenees who is super-friendly to visitors but vigilant in watching over the family’s livestock that graze in the pastures surrounding their home.

about the ABOVE Erin Boyle raises a glass of kefir smoothie at her home outside of Topeka.

writer

When Meredith Fry isn’t studying at Washburn University School of Law, she can be found in the garden growing her own food, testing out healthy recipes or peddling her bike through Topeka.

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Because Rosina does her job so well, Erin—along with husband Terry and their six children—can raise cattle, sheep, goats and chickens, fulfilling her dream of producing much of their own food and buying the rest from local growers. “It’s important to me to know where my food comes from, so you know the quality of the food,” says Boyle. “And it’s also important to me to support our local farmers, because they need our help.” Boyle is the final step in the process of delivering fresh food to her family’s table. She spends much of her time in her colorful, sun-drenched kitchen with large windows on three sides, allowing her to view the open pastures and tree lines surrounding the family’s land. Spacious, but cozy at the same time, the kitchen holds a large bookshelf filled with cookbooks, worn with use, with many bookmarks poking out of their pages. Boyle’s favorite cookbook, Sally Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions, is lying open to a page about kefir, today’s project. A fermented, or cultured, dairy drink, kefir is similar to a thin yogurt but contains different microorganisms and does not bother people who are lactose intolerant. Originally from Russia, kefir has gained recognition due to its health benefits. Kefir has a mucous-forming quality that coats the lining of the digestive tract, allowing a place for beneficial bacteria to colonize.

“Kefir is very quick and easy to make.” — Erin Boyle To make her kefir, Boyle uses a base of raw goat milk since it is not homogenized, a process that would kill off enzymes necessary for digestion and prevent the kefir from forming properly. She then ferments the milk with kefir grains—gelatinous, whitish, popcorn-sized particles that are made from a mixture of bacteria and yeast. It’s a process that takes from 12 hours to two days, but one in which nature does all the work. She only has to pour the mixture through a plastic strainer when it is ready. “Easy. Really easy,” is Boyle’s verdict. “Kefir is very quick and easy to make.” Boyle has a constant supply of kefir fermenting since she drinks a kefir smoothie daily along with the rest of the family. Only two people in the family are not kefir fans—one of the children and Santa Claus, who is provided regular eggnog for his yearly visit. Eggnog from kefir, explains Boyle, would just be “too sour” for anyone’s taste. Boyle’s daily standby can also be transformed by adding seasonal fruit for a tasty, healthy smoothie. Over the years, she has experimented with various fruits and combinations and has learned to freeze berries to ensure a stock of fresh produce for the winter, with some variations for the cold season. “One thing I like to do in the winter is add muesli to kefir the night before, to let it sit overnight. The next morning, I add honey or coconut to make for a hearty winter drink.”

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Erin’s Kefir

Fruit Smoothie

Ingredients: 2 cups finished kefir 1/3 cup strawberries 1/3 cup blueberries ½ a banana 1 tablespoon honey Instructions: Blend together and enjoy.

CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT Boyle pulls out the kefir grains from a batch of kefir. The kefir grains sit in a bowl at the Boyle home. Boyle shows her fruit smoothie, one of many kefir smoothie variations she makes for her family throughout the year. Boyle strains the kefir through a plastic strainer before serving it.

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Photography by Jason Dailey Story by Jeffrey Ann Goudie

She Really Did It By tapping the city’s resources and experience of previous ventures, Joanne Morrell helped Topeka create a treasure for children about the

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Winter ’ 12

ABOVE Joanne Morrell, with encouragement from supporters and her family (in background), rallied the community to open the Kansas Children’s Discovery Center.

writer Jeffrey Ann Goudie published her first piece in


J

oanne Morrell, executive director of the Kansas Children’s Discovery Center, is quick to credit others. The mother of 14-year-old Blake and 11-yearold Alyssa will talk about her mentors, the center’s steering committee, its founding board and its current board of directors. She’ll compliment her hardworking staff. She’ll enthuse about the widespread, grassroots support the children’s museum has received in the form of volunteers who dream up, then carry out, special projects. But she also has a compelling story to tell about her own involvement. During the spring of 2004, her family visited the Wonderscope Children’s Museum of Kansas City. On the drive home, Morrell’s husband, Noble, suggested she start a children’s museum in Topeka. She thought about it for 10 minutes and cautioned him, “Are you serious? Because I’ll really do this.”

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“It has been go, go, go, go, go for seven years.” — Joanne Morrell Morrell says she might be corny in saying it, but she feels her whole life had been leading to that “aha” moment. During college and right after, she worked for Junior Achievement of Northeast Kansas, then St. Francis Hospital’s Children’s Miracle Network, then Partners in Philanthropy, doing fundraising consulting, among other tasks. She founded her own firm, Impact! Marketing Group, in 2001 to work with startups as well as established businesses. Besides her background in nonprofits, fundraising and marketing, Morrell’s early years pointed her toward her entrepreneurial bent. She was born in Washington, D.C., in 1968. Her father’s work as a professor of trumpet took her family to the University of Kansas. Morrell’s father eventually became a fine arts administrator with Bales Recital Hall, the Lied Center of KU and then at Eastern Illinois University. Her mother, a social worker, also ran a catering business. Morrell earned a bachelor’s degree in business from KU and an MBA from Washburn University before opening her own consulting business.

Topeka Magazine in 2007. She enjoys profiling Topekans who are making a positive impact on their community.

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Her husband suggested she would have to give up 10 of her marketing clients to start the ball rolling on the children’s museum. She thought she could do it on the side, but after a year, he was proven correct. Morrell spent seven years working with new volunteers and donors and tapping the experience of like-minded Topekans who had gone before her. Morrell points out that the initial movement to create a children’s museum in Topeka came from the Junior League, whose members worked in the 1990s on a plan to incorporate a children’s museum as part of Topeka’s downtown redevelopment. Morrell contacted the former committee members, who were generous with research and lessons learned from the earlier attempt. Like the Junior League, Morrell and her founders initially looked at downtown as a possible location. Then she met with Howard Fricke, the secretary of the Kansas Department of Commerce at the time. The seasoned businessman looked at her materials and suggested constructing a new building on a site with a natural flow of 5-year-old traffic, such as Gage Park by the zoo.

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ABOVE AND OPPOSITE The Kansas Children’s Discovery Center contains up to eight separate indoor galleries including, clockwise from top left: the Grain Gallery, the Careers Gallery, the Build Gallery and the Grow Gallery.


The Morrell twist on

“If you build it …” Alice Eberhart-Wright, an infant and early childhood mental health specialist involved with the Kansas Children’s Discovery Center from the very beginning, says Executive Director Joanne Morrell possesses a unique ability to share her own passions and put other people’s to work. Eberhart-Wright volunteers weekly, working with babies and toddlers and their parents. In snowball fashion, she recruits other volunteers. While exercising at a local gym, she told an occupational therapist about the Discovery Center who then donated ribbons for the ribbon house in the gated toddler area. Another woman she met at the gym made beautiful overstuffed floor pillows that look like large pincushions. The first group of core volunteers created the center’s founding board and included B. Kent Garlinghouse, Bill Anderson, Michael Orozco, Stewart Entz, Joanne Harrison, Missy Hiestand, Albert Lei, Jason Newell, Lambert Wu and Craig Yorke. But the entire roster of volunteers who have donated time, materials, labor or ideas for the center is lengthy and impressive. The KCDC stretches the concept of “If you build it, they will come” to “If you build it, they will come and make it even better.” The Outdoor Learning Environment, in particular, has benefited from the efforts of many. From Martha Patterson and Susan Garlinghouse’s donation of Kansas bird windsocks to the Custom Tree Care crew that did $10,000 worth of tree trimming free of charge, volunteers have been attracted to the outdoor area like butterflies are attracted to its garden. A recent addition is an impressive, sleek treehouse designed by Topeka native Chris Yorke, an architect and son of Mary Powell and Craig Yorke, who served on the center’s founding board. Called Treetop Treehouse, it was built of recycled wood donated by the Westar Green Team. Constructed around a catalpa tree, the treehouse attracts children clambering on the structure, looking through plastic telescopes and swinging in colorful hammocks.

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The very next week, as luck would have it, Morrell was seated next to Lisa Stubbs, then on the Topeka City Council, at a luncheon at Washburn. She described her project, and Stubbs suggested approaching the city for a donation of land in Gage Park. The park won hands-down as the most appealing location for the facility in a communitywide survey, and three unanimous votes later, the City Council donated the acreage. Luck, determination and energetic volunteers propelled Morrell along the way. She had approached Susan and Kent Garlinghouse, founders of Topeka Collegiate School, who enthusiastically recruited other volunteers. An oversight committee transitioned to the founding board, which kicked off a fundraising campaign that finished raising money in 2009. Ground was broken in March 2010, leading to the opening of the 15,000-square-foot museum on June 1, 2011, and the opening of the 4 1/2acre outdoor site exactly a year later. “So it has been go, go, go, go, go for seven years,” says Morrell. Open just a year and a half, the Kansas Children’s Discovery Center has welcomed visitors from all 50 states and over a dozen foreign countries. In fact, the center was visited by residents of 49 states in the first six months alone. Ironically, Delaware, The First State, was the last. Sitting in her office in the sunny, modern center, Morrell skillfully turns questions about herself to the larger enterprise she has guided. As such, she shyly downplays the honor of being only the third female named Executive of the Year by the Sales and Marketing Executives of Topeka, in 2011. But she is proud of her staff of four fulltime and 10 part-time employees, as well as the 250 volunteers who, starting at age 14 and up, come as often as every week and as little as once a month. Susan Voorhees, a board member of the KCDC, volunteers at the front desk Saturday mornings. The psychologist says of Morrell: “She’s very concerned about not stepping on people’s toes, but on the other hand, she doesn’t let people stand in her way.” Morrell says her husband jokes that when he suggested she start a children’s museum, he meant help with, not do it herself. But the tenacious Morrell, with the help of a small army of volunteers, made it happen.

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TOP The Bike Shed, like many sections of the Discovery Center, was built through donations. In this case, Topeka-based The Builder Bee’s supplied labor and materials. Bottom Morrell and her daughter test out the riding path for visitors. The center has hosted more than 112,000 visitors since opening in June 2011.


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Story by Karen Ridder

Photography by Jason Dailey

Ashia Ackov as Daisy Buchanan

Drink the Great Gatsby You can read fiction, and you can imbibe in it

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ach year, Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library selects one book for a citywide reading program called “The Big Read.” This year’s selection recalls a time of rich indulgences, high living, deceit and passion. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, is set in the early 1920s, during Prohibition, but none of his fictional characters seem to notice. From highballs to Gin Rickeys and straight whiskey, the drinks rarely stop flowing in this award-winning work of fiction. We asked a group of talented Topeka drink specialists to create original drinks based on the characters of The Great Gatsby. They’re perfect for drinking as you read this American classic, or simply as an introduction to the book’s memorable characters. Because, after all, this great work of fiction demands some great drinks.

about the

writer

Karen Ridder says a drink to describe her life would be slightly less glamorous and would definitely include coffee. When she is not writing for local publications, she often escapes into books of all kinds and enjoys discussing them with the Boswell Book Club.

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Daisy’s Green Light Gimlet: “Fresh” is the first impression given by the mix of melon and citrus in this drink. It is an illusion created by a sweet rim with lime zest that hides a tart reality in the glass. “It’s a sweet, sweet, sour, sour,” says creator Danny Estrada. Just like its namesake.

Ingredients for Daisy’s Green Light Gimlet: 8 ounces lowball rocks glass 2 ounces of Absolute Citron 2 ounces of Midori melon liquor 2 whole limes 2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar 1 tablespoon sugar Cut one lime in half. Run the edge of a lime wedge around the rim of the glass. Combine sugars on a plate. Turn the glass upside down in sugar mixture to line the rim of the glass. Fill the glass with ice. Zest skin of the lime on the edge and top of the ice. Squeeze full juice of the second lime in a metal tin shaker. Add remaining sugar from plate to taste. Fill shaker half full with ice. Add Absolute Citron and Midori Melon Liquor. Give 6 hard shakes. Strain over ice. Garnish with a lime wheel.

Creator:

Danny estrada

from aj’s ny pizzeria

Daisy Buchanan as described in The Great Gatsby: Her face was sad and lovely with bright things in it, bright eyes and a bright passionate mouth, but there was an excitement in her voice that men who had cared for her found difficult to forget: a singing compulsion, a whispered “Listen,” a promise that she had done gay, exciting things just a while since and that there were gay, exciting things hovering in the next hour.

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Tom Buchanan as described in The Great Gatsby: “He was a sturdy, straw haired man of thirty with a rather hard mouth and a supercilious manner. Two shining, arrogant eyes had established dominance over his face and gave him the appearance of always leaning aggressively forward.”

Hot Tom Buchanan: Steamed milk and honey hidden at the bottom of this espresso and Creator: whiskey drink give a nod Holly Bastin to the golden sweetness of PT’s Flying Monkey of Tom Buchanan’s money that drew Daisy in. Mix it in, and it is easy to forget the dark side of this drink.

Ingredients for Hot Tom Buchanan: 8 ounce Irish coffee glass 2 ounces Sin Fire (cinnamon whiskey) 2 ounces espresso 1 cup steamed milk 1 tablespoon honey NOTE: Concentrated coffee and hot milk may be used as a substitution for the espresso and steamed milk Andrew Entsminger as Tom Buchanan and Jennifer Whedon as Myrtle Wilson

Squeeze or spoon 1 tablespoon of honey in the bottom of the glass. Add the Sin Fire whiskey. Add the hot espresso. Fill to the top with steamed milk. Serve with a spoon.


Gatsby’s Martini: Rich, simple and a little mysterious—this drink mixes an old color with a modern sleekness. “It has that bite in the back of your palate that shows it’s strong and manly, but it goes down easy,” says creator John Branch. Served chilled and meant to be sipped, the taste of this drink hardens as it sits and collects the flavor of Gatsby’s complicated figure.

Ingredients for Gatsby’s Martini:

Standard Martini Glass 2 ounce Disaronno Amaretto 1 ounce Grand Marnier orange- flavored brandy liqueur 2 lemon wedges

Fill a mixer half full with ice. Place two lemon wedges in the mixer on top of the ice. Add the amaretto and orange cognac. Shake hard for 10 seconds until the pulp of the lemon is released. Pour into a chilled glass; allow the pulp of the lemon to sit on top of the drink. Serve without garnish.

Creator:

John Branch

of The Burger Stand

James Gatz, “The Great Gatsby,” as described in The Great Gatsby: It was a testimony to the romantic speculation he inspired that there were whispers about him from those who found little that it was necessary to whisper about in this world.

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Thanks to Jayhawk Tower, Jayhawk Java Coffee Shop, The Office, The Burger Stand, AJ’s NY Pizzeria and PT’s Flying Monkey for providing photo shoot locations. Models provided by Theatre Department of Washburn University and Mismatched Misfitz. Costuming provided by Mismatched Misfitz and Topeka Civic Theatre & Academy.


Creator:

Marie Brandyberry of PT’s Flying Monkey

Convenient Medical Care. . . Convenient Location. . . Convenient Hours. . . Cool Jordan Baker:

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The athletic and dubious Jordan Baker requires a drink that’s fresh with a bite. The heavy whipping crème and cinnamon flavor provides a deceptively pure impression, hiding the hard reality of the whiskey behind its light taste.

Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00am-8:30pm Saturday 9:00am-5:30pm, Sunday 9:00am-5:00 pm

Ingredients for Cool Jordan Baker: 8 ounce standard rocks glass 1 ounce Sin Fire cinnamon whiskey 1 ounce Copa De Oro coffee liqueur 2 ounces heavy whipping crème 1 cinnamon stick

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Mix all liquid ingredients in a shaker filled with ice. Strain over ice. Garnish with a cinnamon stick.

Jordan Baker as described in The Great Gatsby: The bored haughty face that she turned to the world concealed something—most affectations conceal something eventually…she was incurably dishonest. She wasn’t able to endure being at a disadvantage and given this unwillingness I suppose she had begun dealing in subterfuges when she was very young in order to keep that cool, insolent smile turned to the world and yet satisfy the demands of her hard jaunty body.

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Photography by Bill Stephens Story by Debra Guiou Stufflebean

The Santa Legacies For Jennie Rose, holiday figurines symbolize a friendship of Christmases past about the

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writer TOPEKAMAGAZINE

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Debra Guiou Stufflebean is the author of four novels and the director of the Shepherd’s Center of Topeka. She and


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ach year as Christmas approaches, Jennie Rose decorates her home with dozens of hand-crafted Santa figurines, symbols of the holiday, but more importantly, reminders of a dear friend. Barbara “Babs” Mock is that friend. And though she and her husband now live in Colorado, for many years they played an important role in the lives of Jennie and her family as neighbors in the Briarwood region of Topeka. “Babs was like a little elf,” says Jennie. “She had a key to our house, and things would magically appear.” Sometimes Babs would leave treats for Jennie, her husband and their children. Sometimes Babs would leave behind one of her soft-sculptured Santas made from a tree ornament, recycled material and wood. “Babs was into recycling before it was significant to do recycling. She never wasted anything – not a scrap of wood, not a fabric remnant, not a tiny piece of metal that could be twisted and repurposed,” says Jennie. Santa’s hood, cuffs or coat trim may be made from pieces of an old mink coat, rabbit’s fur or sheep’s wool. The garments might be pieces of tapestry, chair upholstery or scraps from a satin party dress. The Santas held sacks of tiny toy ornaments, baskets of mistletoe or sometimes door wreaths. Each of Babs’ repurposed-material Santas was a one-of-a-kind treasure. “I just kind of knew what was right and what was wrong,” says Babs about her process of assembling the materials for each Santa based on the personality she saw in each ornament head. These Santas also remain symbols of the spirit of friendship that united the two families and the many connections that brought the neighbors together. Babs’ husband, Carroll, taught John, Jennie’s son, to drive stick-shift. Babs made Katie, Jennie’s daughter, doll dresses when she was younger. And when Katie made the cut as a Topeka High cheerleader, Babs presented her with a small doll in a matching outfit to celebrate the achievement. And the Rose children, despite having their own church, went to youth group at the Mocks’ church simply because Babs was the leader.

Each of Babs’ repurposed-material Santas was a one-of-a-kind treasure.

TOP These are four of the many customized Santa figurines created by Barbara “Babs” Mock. ABOVE Jennie Rose stands near some of Mock’s Santa figurines, several of which were given to her family as gifts and are now cherished as a reminder of a close friendship between two families.

husband Mike live in the College Hill neighborhood with their four dogs and can be found cheering at their grandchildren’s ballgames.

Becoming neighbors brought together two women who may have not otherwise met. Jennie, a native of Spokane, Washington, has worked in the office of the Kansas Senate president and later was on Governor Bill Graves’ staff. Over her 39-year marriage to Jim, Jennie has lived in California, Colorado, Florida and Kansas. Babs, a native of Texas, managed rental homes and was a mentor at Topeka High. By chance, the two women became neighbors—but they cultivated their random connection into a long friendship. “When family is that many miles away,” says Jennie, “you tend to bond with people in similar circumstances.” This year, neither of the families will be in Briarwood. Approximately nine years ago, Babs and Carroll moved to Estes Park, Colorado. For the past seven years. Jennie and her husband, Jim, have lived in Clarion Woods. But whenever Jennie unpacks her Santas for the coming season, memories come flooding back of those earlier years when she and Babs were neighbors.

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Jennifer walker

meet&greet The Dog Professionals

Owner of Topeka Area Grooming Shuttle

Barkground: Jennifer Walker, owner of Topeka Area Grooming Shuttle (TAGS), has been in the pet industry since 1997, starting out as a dog trainer and becoming a groomer. A mobile groomer, to be exact. In July 2011 she opened an onsite mobile grooming service, taking her salon to the homes of her clients—and their dogs. The Approach: “I think pets know when they are clean and looking good. It affects their behavior in a positive way,” says Walker, who adds that getting a dog to beautiful can often be a hard job. Dogs, says Walker, can quickly be overwhelmed by bright lights, noise, people and other animals. That’s why she feels her method of coming to the dogs’ homes for onsite grooming allows her clients to be more comfortable. Walker believes that regular grooming, whether it is done by professionals or by family members, can improve a dog’s disposition. She says that regularly groomed dogs look at the procedure as part of their routine life, like being fed at a particular time each morning, for example. Dog Wisdom: “Dogs are into everything, and then they crawl into bed with us, they lick our faces—and we only let them get a shower every four to six weeks?” says Walker, making the case for regular grooming. In Walker’s world, pampering is for pooches. She and her team provide two different types of facials for dogs, a service Walker says is “extra important because many times dogs get food and debris matted in their facial fur.” TAGS’s grooming products are pH-balanced with all-natural lines available for pets with sensitive skin. But grooming shouldn’t be done just for the sake of grooming, says Walker. “There is such a thing as bathing a dog too frequently, especially if you are using the wrong products. It’s really important that you research any product you might use and talk it over with your vet before using it.”

Story by Melinda Briscoe Photography by Jason Dailey

about the

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above Jennifer Walker holds two of her grooming clients, from left, Max and Kiyu.

writer

Self-described as a “mom, writer, thinker and occasional bum,” Melinda Briscoe is a freelancer who also works a 9-5 for the government.


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meet&greet

Mose Hugghis

The Dog Professionals

Owner, K-9 OTC

Barkground: “I trained my first dog when I was 14,” recalls Mose Hugghis, “and my friends used to ask me to train their dogs, which I gladly did.” A Memphis transplant, Hugghis has been professionally training dogs since 1996 and works with all ages and breeds. “We can start training puppies from 10-12 weeks, and no breed is too big or too small.” The Approach: Hugghis trains dogs in basic obedience and advanced obedience, but K-9 OTC’s specialty is personal protection. “We can train your dog to act as a protector to you without being ‘loaded’ all the time,” says Hugghis, who says he realizes the importance of a guard dog not constantly being aggressive. “Dogs that go through our personal protection training are able to be socialized as well. The owner will know that their dog can go out in public, can be around other people, can be in a crowd and be stable and even-tempered. At the end of the day, the dog is still a pet, and affection is a good thing, too.” Dog Wisdom: Hugghis believes the proof of his work is in the showing. Currently, he’s working with star pupil Dasco, a 2-year-old German shepherd, in preparations for obedience competitions. “He’s a smart and wonderful dog,” says Hugghis. “We still have work to do, but I think he can go all the way.”

Story by Melinda Briscoe Photography by Jason Dailey

TOPEKAMAGAZINE above Mose Hugghis prepares Dasco for obedience competition.

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meet&greet

Julie Castaneda

The Dog Professionals

Owner of Dog Day Afternoon

Barkground: When people would ask Los Angeles-born Julie Castaneda what she wanted to do when she grew up, she’d say, “Play with dogs!” For some reason, no one took her seriously. But they should have. “I meant it when I said it. So I did training and grooming, and I worked at a pet store—whatever I had to do to be able to work with dogs.” In 1999 she became proprietor of Topeka’s Dog Day Afternoon, which she describes as a “doggie dude ranch.” The Approach: Dog Day Afternoon includes 12 play yards spread across 5 acres of land with indoor playrooms, a TV room and lots of toys. Castaneda, along with her staff of 16 employees, takes care of, on average, 70 dogs each day. “In many ways we treat our business like a day care center for children. We build relationships with the pet parents and the pets,” says Castaneda. “We want to make sure the dogs are safe and happy and all tired out from playing at the end of the day.” Dog Wisdom: Castaneda takes in dogs for a day or extended stays. And the dynamics of each group are important, says Castaneda. “We put our dogs in different groups,” she explains. “First we go by size, then by temperament, then by play style. We even have an area for the geriatric dogs.” After all, Castaneda explains, people seek out like-minded friends to spend their days with, so why would an easy-going 14-year-old standard poodle want to hang out with a super-energetic 9-month-old Jack Russell terrier?

Story by Melinda Briscoe Photography by Jason Dailey

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above Julie Castaneda plays with several of her client dogs.


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Beyond Bourbon Street Search through New Orleans to discover the best foreign city you’ll ever see without a passport (even if you don’t eat the bunny)

Story by Susan Kraus

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above Canal Street in the Warehouse District is one of the city’s many attractions beyond the wellknown Bourbon Street attractions. Photograph courtesy New Orleans Convention and Visitors Bureau. ABOVE INSET Bicycle tours offer one of the best ways to sample the architecture and distinctly different neighborhoods of New Orleans. Photograph courtesy New Orleans CVB.


S

o we’re pedaling along on those comfy, wide-seat, fat-tire cruisers. We pass shotgun houses, double gallery homes, American-style townhouses and Creole townhouses. After 20 minutes I can tell you the difference between a Creole cottage and a raised centerhall (it starts with the roof pitch and columns) thanks to Jeff, our know-it-all guide whose knowledge and love for New Orleans run deep. He’s spoon-feeding us architecture and history along with the anecdotal tidbits that make history come alive. We learn about neighborhoods, natural disasters, ethnic conflict, monuments and churches. Who would have guessed, for example, that there was a Catholic church where slaves, free men of color and whites all worshipped together in the mid-1800s? We stop at Marie’s Bar, a dive that Jeff claims has the best Bloody Marys in New Orleans. He is spot-on. He also comments that there are no laws prohibiting drink-and-pedal. As we hop back on our bikes to continue the tour with “Confederacy of Cruisers” (no, nothing to do with the Civil War Confederates—this is a reference to the novel set in New Orleans, A Confederacy of Dunces), I realize that this pedal-powered cruise is one of the best ways to open up a different lens in appreciating this city’s heritage. Sure, every spring-break college student knows New Orleans. The party town. The epicenter of Mardi Gras. Beads, balconies and crowds. But New Orleans shouldn’t be left to the frat boys. It’s a vibrant city with a range of attractions for adults and families. You can’t do New Orleans in a few days. I could barely scratch the surface in a week. But you can have a rich, satisfying travel experience in a weekend, one that will make you want to return. This is a city where you look down a street and think you’re seeing it all, when, actually, the best is probably hidden away down alleyways or behind wrought-iron gates, in the courtyards. You can learn a lot about New Orleans by seeking out courtyards, by poking around and letting loose from a tight agenda. And you can learn the most about New Orleans by approaching it as an exotic, foreign country. Try this: New Orleans is not the southernmost port city of the United States, but the northernmost port city of the Caribbean.

about the

writer

Susan Kraus is a therapist and award-winning travel writer who believes that travel can be the best therapy. She enjoys helping people create their own “travel therapy” by writing about journeys that anyone can replicate.

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Bourbon Street …

AND THEN SOME

New York City has Broadway, and New Orleans has Bourbon Street, the best-known, most-discussed roadway that draws in all tourists on their first day. Bourbon Street hosts a raucous, exuberant and generally happy crowd, most ambling along holding drinks in plastic cups. There are no restrictions on drinking in the streets here, and you can buy anything, from beer to margaritas to Hurricanes, at convenient streetside bars. Live music flows from open doors and windows, and revelers may even toss beads from balconies. You don’t need a reason to party on Bourbon Street. Just show up and you’re part of the party. At New Orleans Musical Legends Park (a small courtyard right on Bourbon Street, with tables, chairs and fountains), you can sit all evening, listen to live music and not pay a cent, although servers will approach you from concession stands asking if they can fetch you a drink, and the musicians will pass a hat. But too many tourists get stuck-on-Bourbon syndrome, returning night after night. And for anyone over 30, there are much better scenes. Focus on Bourbon Street and you’ll miss the best—in music, food and ambiance—of New Orleans. Like Frenchman Street. It’s just a few walkable blocks away, in Faubourg Marigny. Here, we strolled in and out of multiple clubs: jazz at The Spotted Cat Music Club; dancing at the Blue Nile; rowdy blues at The Three Muses… and the list could go on. Or try Treme, the neighborhood to the northwest of Bourbon Street. Treme was regarded as a “don’t go there” zone, but the Treme is rising. Grab a cab to Kermit’s Treme Speakeasy for soul food and local music (Kermit Ruffins played himself on the HBO drama Treme.) It’s on Basin Street, just around the corner from the Mahalia Jackson Theatre, which has some fine shows, and Louis Armstrong Park, where there are often free evening concerts. The Warehouse District is now walkable, with famous chef restaurants, cafes, museums and galleries. The Graden District offers familiar New Orleans staples, like the blue-striped awnings of the Commander’s Palace, as well as dozens of tasty upstarts along Magazine Street. Check local papers and fliers for other music venues, because they change daily, and they aren’t all on Bourbon Street.

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Food

IS KING

New Orleans loves its food. Do not expect bland, Midwestern meat-andpotatoes fare. Here you’ll find gumbo, jambalaya and etouffee, fresh oysters and soft-shell crab, shrimp and grits, andouille sausage and boudin, red beans and rice. Sure, you can get steak and chicken, or a dynamite burger, but it’s listed alongside cracklin’ crusted duck or crab cakes. (I swoon for the crab cakes.) There’s also alligator and rabbit. (But I passed. I couldn’t eat the bunny.) I’ll recommend a few places, but I advise getting some guidebooks in advance … and not to waste a single meal. New Orleans by Laura Martone (Moon Guide, 2012) and The Food Lovers Guide to New Orleans by Becky Retz and James Gaffney (Morris, 2012) make a good combo. We enjoyed Acme Oyster House for chargrilled oysters that melt, heaping platters of fried seafood and sweet potato fries. The restaurant’s Oyster Rockefeller Soup had me drooling, but carnivores will appreciate the “10 Napkin Roast Beef” poboy. Acme has been a local legend since 1910 and at the same location, 724 Iberville St., since 1924. Just as good, and even easier on the wallet, is Café Maspero, 602 Decatur. You may share a table, but that’s part of the fun. It’s a tourist requirement to down a Hurricane at Pat O’Brien’s, 718 St. Peter. The drink dates back to the 1940s and got its name from being served in a glass shaped like a hurricane lamp. It’s sweet-with-a-zing. Choose from the Main Bar, Piano Bar or, my personal favorite, the Patio Bar with the flaming fountain. I also enjoyed the more recent addition: Pat O’Brien’s Courtyard on Bourbon Street. Jazz brunches are big in the Big Easy. If you have a very healthy appetite, tackle the lunch buffet at The Court of the Two Sisters, 613 Royal St. Plan to stay 2-3 hours and pace yourself for creative salads, pates, pastas, Creole staples and slabs of roast beef. It’s enough food for a day, and the ambiance— attentive staff, beautiful historic courtyard and live music—makes it memorable. Ask about the history of the building as it dates from 1726, and the namesake two sisters were an integral part of New Orleans history. Over on Frenchman Street, we took a break from the music to taste a selection of “starters” at the Marigny Brasserie: barbecue shrimp and grits, baked oysters, crawfish cakes. Next trip we’re going back for their crabmeat au gratin and baby back ribs.

above ACME’s Fried Oyster Poboy is a New Orleans specialty, but the restaurant’s Oyster Rockefeller Soup is also a must-try dish. Photograph courtesy New Orleans CVB.


Uncertainty aboUt the fUtUre? Post Election Jitters? Pending financial cliff? The economy? Changing markets?

Antique

HEAVEN

The Visitors Center offers a comprehensive antique-store guide with maps and descriptions for both the French Quarter and Magazine Street. But you don’t need a guide for antiquing in New Orleans, unless you’re the serious type. Start (or end) with a drink at the Carousel Bar in the Hotel Monteleone on Royal Street, because the lobby of the Monteleone is truly beautiful. I could lie on the floor and stare at the ceiling, and if I ever get wicked-rich, I’m going to stay there. For a month. For the French Quarter, just stroll Royal Street between Iberville and St. Peter, then cut over a block for more shops on Chartres Street. To get to the many shops along Magazine Street, buy a $3 Jazz Pass, which provides all-day hop-on-and-off bus and trolley access. Don’t miss the Louisiana State Museum’s Madame John’s Legacy house (built in 1788) in the French Quarter and the current exhibit of Newcomb pottery (female artists, 1890s-1940s). It’s the first show being held there since Katrina.

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Kids

LOVE

The Audubon Aquarium of the Americas; Audubon Insectarium (eat in the cafeteria where the glass-topped tables hold live bugs); French Market for souvenirs and all the touristy shops along Decatur; Blaine Kern’s Mardi Gras World, where you can watch the creation of massive floats; Audubon Zoo (the Louisiana Swamp exhibit may be better than most swamp tours; there are lots of monkeys, and the Jaguar Jungle rocks); at least one cemetery—the crypts are creepy, and it’a fun to find the oldest ones or pretend to get lost; the St. Charles Steetcar to the end, or to the zoo; the ferry across the Mississippi; City Park Carousel Garden Amusement Park, which is old-fashioned fun, and Storyland, with 26 fairy-tale sculptures, ghost walking tours and horse-drawn carriage tours.

above The Audubon Zoo, along with the related aquarium and the insectarium, is one of New Orleans’ many attractions for children. Photograph courtesy New Orleans CVB.

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Get back in shape & enjoy the new year!!!

Fitness classes for all levels now forming at your nearby community center.

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What

TO SEE

Sit in Jackson Square and peoplewatch. Sip chicory coffee and nibble beignets smothered in powdered sugar at Café Du Monde. Visit some of the too-many-tolist historic homes—start with The Historic New Orleans Collection on Royal Street. See St. Louis Cathedral, the Old Ursuline Convent and the New Orleans Historic Voodoo Museum. The National WW II Museum is outstanding; spend a few hours or a few days, there is that much to see. Take a Cemetery Tour with a historian. Stroll the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden outside the New Orleans Museum of Art, which is also a must-see. Walk City Park and the Botanical Garden. I’ll stop now, but this is really the short list.

Post-Katrina

NOLA

This is a city that has come back from the brink, has endured much, has experienced a communal case of PTSD… and is filled with tenacious survivors. There is beauty and a dark side. Take the time to look, to listen, and you may feel the spirit that permeates New Orleans’ history, music, food and culture. New Orleans has seen very bad times, which is why its people know how to savor the good. And, really, it just feels good to be there.

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TOP The interior of the St. Louis Cathedral inspires feelings of magnificence and contemplation. Photograph by Susan Kraus. CENTER Café Du Monde is one of many locations offering the chance to eat and enjoy the city’s bustling, colorful street scenes. Photograph courtesy New Orleans CVB. BOTTOM The balconies of New Orleans are one of the city’s noncommercial delights. Photograph by Susan Kraus.



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