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EDITOR Kelly Gibson DESIGNER Shelly Bryant COPY EDITOR Leslie Andres SR. ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Ariele Erwine | (785) 832-7109 AD DESIGNERS

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Jenni Leiste Amanda Nagengast CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

It might be that I spent a lot of time in school and around schools throughout my life, but something about fall’s return triggers a need to organize and set goals. In the way that spring welcomes new life, fall brings a renewed sense of energy. This issue focuses on different ways to work and learn. New contributor Abriana DelTufo sheds light on remote learning opportunities through K-State’s Global Campus, Lucas Shivers reports on Manhattan Public Library’s new series on “adulting,” and Kimetris Baltrip provides insight regarding a new workplace trend in her feature story on coworking spaces. We hope this issue inspires you to reach some new goals (or some old ones you’ve been mulling over for some time). Maybe it’s time to take a class or learn a new skill. Perhaps you take this time to develop healthy habits. Wherever your path takes you this fall, we hope it is enriching and brings you joy. Happy reading!

Kelly Gibson

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Michael Henry David Mayes Luke Townsend CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kimetris Baltrip Anna Binder Maria Childs Megan Saunders Lucas Shivers Abriana DelTufo PRODUCTION MANAGER Shelly Bryant SUBSCRIPTIONS $25 (tax included) for a one-year subscription to Manhattan Magazine FOR SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: Manhattan Magazine 645 New Hampshire St. | P.O. Box 888 Lawrence, KS 66044 (800) 578-8748 | Fax (785) 843-1922 Or e-mail comments to manhattanmagazine@sunflowerpub.com Manhattan Magazine is a publication of Sunflower Publishing, a division of Ogden Publications, Inc. sunflowerpub.com


VASCULAR

INTERVENTIONS

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BEFORE

Do you have leg ulcers or skin discoloration from venous or arterial disease? PLEASE CALL OR EMAIL WITH ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE.

AFTER

JEFFREY A. LEICHTER, MD • Attended prestigious University of Missouri, Kansas City 6 year combined BA/MD program and Penn State University for his Cardiovascular Interventional Radiology fellowship • Board certified in both Vascular Interventional Radiology and Diagnostic Radiology • Practicing Vascular and Interventional Radiology in Manhattan for 5 years.

MANHATTANRADIOLOGY.COM / Contact Stephanie B. at 785-539-7642 Ext. 2 for office appointments.


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w h a t ’ s

i n s i d e . FEATURED

42 | Reworking the Work Space

“When you come to this coworking space and you are a member, you are an equal.”

Coworking environments create community for Manhattan small business owners and entrepreneurs

50 | From Heart to Home

–DARIN MILLER, IRON CLAD

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Veterans receive more than just aid from local caregivers


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LIFESTYLE

10 | Adulting 101

New classes at the Manhattan Public Library encourage younger generations to get involved

14 | Against All Odds

w h a t ’ s

Million to 1 Club founder helps turn dreams into reality

18 | Making Time for You

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DEPARTMENTS

Set small goals to prioritize your health

IDENTITY

20 | Accessible Education

KSU’s Global Campus has provided classes for remote degree seekers across the world for more than half a century.

24 | It Takes a Village

Through Tandem, foster teens find support, guidance and a welcome reprieve

26 | Artist Focus

Meet Tara Dean, painter

EXPERIENCE

29 | Return of the Hibachi Hut

A longtime Manhattan staple makes a comeback

33 | Humans of Manhattan

20

Meet the folks of MHK

DIALOGUE

38 | Q&A with Susan Jackson Rodgers

How Manhattan inspired Rodgers’ new book This Must Be the Place

THE LAST WORD

58 | Little Apple Reports

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ON THE COVER Josh and Shelby Hicks, co-owners of The Fellow, are examples of how Manhattan is embracing the idea of collaborative coworking environments. Photograph by David Mayes

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Manhattan Magazine introduces five junior reporters for a day.


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Adulting 101 New classes at the Manhattan Public Library encourage younger generations to get involved

STORY BY Lucas Shivers

PHOTOGRAPHY BY Michael Henry

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ttending to adult responsibilities leaves some millennials with an “I can’t even” attitude and approach. To help overcome the stress and struggle, Manhattan Public Library offers Adulting 101 workshops targeting 16–30-somethings. The workshops offer help with practical skills to make life a little easier. “When you’re young, grown-ups seem to have it figured out,” says Jared Richards, adult services librarian and “Adulting” co-coordinator. “Then as an adult, you learn most people don’t have any idea of what they’re actually doing.” The series of fall classes is geared toward helping people become informed, functioning adults without needing to text their parents for help. “We’re collaborating with the teen librarian to get ideas to help teens and young adults with evening workshops they may not have in school like home economics or shop,” Richards says. “We see a Time void, and there’s a lack of these skills.” 7:00–8:30 p.m. The 2017 classes range from financial advice—such Topics as setting a budget and filing taxes—to healthy low-cost Alternative Facts—9/19 cooking, to basic mechanical work on vehicles. “There are a lot of other libraries working Mental & Physical on projects like this,” Richards says. “It’s an Wellness—10/3 acknowledgment of larger trends. Adults don’t need Healthy Cooking to play along anymore. Now we can say that we don’t Basics—10/17 know what we’re doing… It’s really just taking that first step. I overthink everything. When I finally do it, it’s not that scary. It’s taking the first step and being an adult about something.” Adulting 101 opens the library to a demographic that traditionally uses its services less often than other age groups. “At the library, we have a lock on older members of our community and lots of families with younger kids, but we’d like to focus on emerging adults and 30-somethings who need practical life skills,” he says.

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OPPOSITE Jared Richards helps a student during one of the Manhattan Public Library’s new “adulting” classes. The free courses are meant to help young adults learn practical life skills they might not have learned in school.


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Students attend a free workshop hosted by the Manhattan Public Library. Library staff members hope the courses will encourage young adults to use library resources more often.

The workshops, which aim to have between 15 and 20 participants, are hosted at the library but feature a number of community partnerships. The first session collaborates with Housing and Credit Counseling Services, Inc. to teach participants “The Top 15 Things You Need to Know When You Leave Home.” “Personal finance was one of the first topics I thought of,” Richards says. “I think it’s a struggle for anyone nowadays. It can seem so daunting but doesn’t have to be.” Additional topics include car maintenance (with help from Manhattan Area Technical College), information and media literacy with K-State librarians to counter fake news, mental and physical wellness with Pawnee Mental Health Services, and healthy cooking from K-State Research and Extension. “Personally, I’m looking forward to the car talk,” says Rachael Schmidtlein, teen librarian and co-coordinator of the program. “I can’t wait to learn from a professional mechanic to do a full overview beyond change a tire.” With these classes as an entry point, the hope is that young adults will also learn about countless other benefits provided by the public library network and related community. “I’m looking forward to introducing younger people to the library,” Richards says. “We have more than just books; we have information in every form.” “It amazes me that people don’t know all of the services we offer,” says Vivienne Uccello, public relations coordinator. “We have so many resources to find new jobs and pass career advancement tests. We can save people thousands of dollars.”

In prior technology classes Richards taught at the library, participants not only worked on basic computer skills but also practiced programming with video games and robots. “People were surprised that libraries are more than just a house of books,” Richards says. Some perceive that there’s not a lot for younger adults to do in Manhattan outside of Aggieville, but the Manhattan Public Library and others are seeking to offer more. “We want programming that is not just entertainment to pass the time. We want people to walk away with useful skills,” Uccello says. “There’s so many opportunities for basic entertainment, but these opportunities actually enrich the participants.”

A Few Manhattan Public Library Resources • Lynda.com premium membership. An online library of video courses on topics ranging from improving your memory to creating textures for 3D animation is available for free to all cardholders. • Learning Express Library. Practice tests and study guides for the GED and MCAT as well as for the U.S. citizenship test. • Mango Languages. A program that offers more than 60 language courses as well as ESL taught in the user’s native language. • Ancestry.com. An online database that helps users track ancestry documents.

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Exciting Related Events Free to the Public

Thursday, October 12, 2017, 5:30 p.m. Film screening Stations of the Elevated, on graffiti on NYC subway trains, presented by Enrico Isamu Ōyama, 101 Thompson Hall, Kansas State University.

Saturday, October 7, 2017, 12 – 4 p.m. Art in Motion, a celebration of art (museum parking lot) - Live painting performance. - GraficoMovil, a mobile printmaking studio/gallery. - Demos and action art activities.

Thursday, October 26, 2017, 5:30 p.m. Film screening Dark Progressivism, documentary about Los Angeles graffiti, presented by co-director/producer Rodrigo Ribera d’Ebre, 101 Thompson Hall, Kansas State University.

FREE admission and parking – 14th & Anderson | 785.532.7718 beach.k-state.edu | Tues., Wed., Fri. 10-5 | Thurs. 10-8 | Sat. 11-4 /BeachMuseumofArt |

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Against All Odds Million to 1 Club founder helps turn dreams into reality STORY BY Megan Saunders

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t may be a stretch to say Sylvester Stallone changed the course of Carmen Schober’s life. However, there’s no doubt that her Rocky obsession planted a seed that would change how hundreds of people approached goal setting. “I saw Rocky when I was 10, and I had a weird epiphany,” Schober says. “Up until that point, I quit at the first struggle whenever I attempted something new, but Rocky is all about a guy who gives his best shot even when he loses. I loved it.” Schober used this fighter mentality to excel through college at Kansas State University, then as an instructor and, later, as a learning assistant. Schober enjoyed the work but struggled to find an outlet for her creativity. “It was a challenge to go to work from nine to five, then go to bed and do it all over again,” she says. “I didn’t have any grand plans to move on.” Then, Rocky saved the day, again. In February 2015, Schober’s husband brought home his wife’s favorite movie. When she went to bed, Schober says she felt weird and melancholic—but also driven. “It was the birth of this idea of pursuing something passionately,” she says. “I knew if I was passively working through my life day by day, I wasn’t going to be satisfied. I needed goals.” Schober researched and compiled everything she could about setting goals, eventually creating a combination workbook/journal that helped her stay accountable. As she applied these techniques to her own goals—fitness, spirituality and writing— she began to see progress. She knew she was onto something. Soon after, the Million to 1 Club was born. “It’s a running joke in society that we set goals and don’t achieve them,” says Schober. “I’d found a way that worked and helped me stay on track, and I knew it might work for others.” Schober developed the Million to 1 Club, a program featuring a 4- or 6-week class that meets once a week and helps students identify their true passions and craft a personal identity claim. The first class was offered in September 2015 at the Manhattan

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One-two punch: Real-life Students Knocking Out Goals Stephanie Kiersey “Everyone is attracted to the idea of selfbetterment and becoming our best selves. I felt like the Million to 1 Club was viable because writing down my goals helped influence my dayto-day decisions and prioritize my time, money and efforts. My ‘holy goal’ was to be debt-free by 2020, and since taking the class in August 2016, my husband and I have reduced our debt by half. I still meet with my ‘goal buddies,’ and Carmen asked me to be her director of sustainability, so I get to advocate for our alumni and design events to keep them invested in the Million to 1 Club. The community of goal-getters is welcoming and inclusive—there’s nothing to lose!” Miranda Cook “When I started Carmen’s Million to 1 Club class a year ago, I didn’t know much about the strategy, but I was excited to see where it took me. It was a life-changer—since taking the class, I’ve started a blog, read the Bible chronologically, developed a Bible study, lost weight and built a community of fellow goal-setters. I always had this list of things I wanted to do and no method to do them, but now I’ve been able to start conquering goals I never thought possible. I’m now a mentor for the Million to 1 Club, and I love being part of a support network for people who want to make their goals happen.” Take your shot Connect with the Million to 1 Club and learn more about getting your goal-setting in gear, plus discover upcoming events like meal-prep workshops and fitness classes. Millionto1club.com Facebook.com/millionto1club


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Public Library. There were five people—including Schober’s mom. Today, the Million to 1 Club has grown to more than 100 students in the Manhattan area and is now expanding to other cities and states, as well as to online courses. “We’re not necessarily teaching anything super profound, but we’re providing a framework to find success,” says Schober. “From simple goals to big, abstract ideas—‘this is what I love, this is who I am, and this is the kind of life I want to live.’” For some students, this means intense fitness challenges, saving for a trip or reading the Bible in a year. A nurse took the Million to 1 class in hopes of becoming a full-time beekeeper. “Within five minutes of talking to her, it was obvious she should be a beekeeper—she was so passionate,” Schober says. “That was a year ago, and now she’s quit her job and works fulltime at a bee shop.” No matter the goal, Schober says it all starts in the “dream stage.” Students explore both what they loved as children and what they love today. From there, they write out their ideal day in as much detail as possible—everything from what time they wake up to what they eat for dinner. “We ask, ‘what is absolutely necessary from that list, and what is a bonus?’” Schober says. “For me, it’s necessary to be around my family, and it’s a bonus to get a massage.” These ideas are separated into five domains of goal setting: Self/spirituality, relationships, health and wellness, finance, and experiences/recreation. Through a variety of exercises, class participants identify one big goal and two smaller goals to work toward. “[Students] tell me that even if they didn’t make huge strides in the class, they are more confident in their goals and more driven,” Schober says. “They build a community of support and encouragement with their classmates, which also drives them to achieve.” Schober hopes the Million to 1 Club is alleviating anxiety surrounding goals. She leads most Million to 1 Club classes, but class graduates also have begun to lead their own sections. Classes are between four and eight people and are a lowpressure situation with a relatively low expense (between $45 and $85). The small class size and affordability lower the stakes without compromising motivation. It’s this tactic that Schober says gives her the most satisfaction. “I love the feeling of watching someone achieve something after a lot of hard work,” she says. “Everyone is passionate about something, but it’s easy to let what you love fall low on your list. Million to 1 Club helped me rearrange my priorities, and now I get to do that for others. I’m flying by the seat of my pants, and I love it.” Cue “Eye of the Tiger.”


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Making Time for You Set small goals to prioritize your health

STORY BY Anna Binder

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ife is busy. You have meetings to attend, projects to complete, meals to prepare and a house to clean. So, you go into survival mode and prioritize tasks that seem to be the most important: a good grade on an assignment or the project you’ve devoted yourself to for the last month. But somewhere in the shuffle, you forget about the person at the center of the chaos—you. When you don’t take time for yourself, the result is higher stress and anxiety levels, more reliance on convenience foods and less time for exercise. Fortunately, change is possible … if you make the choice to start prioritizing your health. An easy place to start is to set aside time each day to take an intentional break. Often, people stop long enough only to use the restroom or grab a quick bite to eat because we feel these activities justify a break. While you should break to eat when you’re hungry, eating just to take a break is not a healthy choice. Recognizing the difference between true hunger versus the need to step away from your desk for a few minutes will help you make healthier choices. A small break to recharge is likely to make you more productive when you return to the task at hand. If you’re too busy for a break, try scheduling one into your calendar. The key is to make this protected time without letting meetings or other events interfere. It’s important not to change your entire day all at once. Focus on making a few small changes and forget about the rest. A researcher at Cornell University, Brian Wansink, has found that we make more than 220 food decisions every day. Am I going to have breakfast? Am I going to have yogurt or toast for breakfast? Should I put granola on my yogurt? And so on. When most people decide they want to focus on their health, they choose a diet or lifestyle that requires changing all 220 food choices at once. That approach is both overwhelming and completely unnecessary.

Instead, pick one to three small things to commit to each day like having a piece of fruit with breakfast, packing a lunch to take to work or school, or taking a 10-minute walk for the simple goal of clearing your mind. These small actions can have a profound impact. For example, packing a quick lunch each day helps you cut back on eating out and keeps you on track for the day. These small action items now become your goals for the week and the most important items to focus on. Forget the other 217 possible changes you could make and just focus on these priority items. To turn these into goals, define your expectations in order to hold yourself accountable and to assess whether you’ve met them. For example, let’s say you choose to focus on packing lunch. Be very specific about your goal: Pack a lunch to take to work all five days this week. Now plan the course of action for this goal. Maybe you’ll need to pack it the night before and leave yourself a reminder note on the bathroom mirror so you remember to grab it on your way out the door in the morning. With both a clear intention and a plan of action, your chance of making a real change is high, and you’ll be able to look back at the end of each day and see your progress. Still need help moving yourself up on the priority list? Partner with a coworker or friend to stay accountable. He or she needs the support as much as you do, and it’s more fun to share these goals. With a partner, you can take turns packing a lunch for two. You’re also more likely to take a walk around the block when you’re counting on one another. Life is stressful when your rope is unraveling at both ends and you have nothing to hold onto. Give yourself permission to take care of you. Schedule a break in your day just for you and set at least one goal this week to improve your nutrition and experience the difference small, positive changes can make in your life.

A Recipe for Stress Relief Here are a few of our favorite stress relief techniques that you can turn to instead of food. • 10 count breathing—Breathe deeply for five full seconds in—counting the seconds in your head as you go—and five full seconds out. The act of counting the seconds keeps your mind from wandering. • Theme music—Your surroundings influence your mood. Put on quiet, relaxing music while you work or study. Look for calming meditation stations on streaming music services such as Pandora and Spotify. Music without lyrics is the most effective. • Journaling—It’s easy to focus on the things that went wrong in your day. Practice the art of gratitude by writing down three things, big or small, that you’re grateful for at the end of each day.

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Accessible Education

KSU’s Global Campus has provided classes for remote degree seekers across the world for more than half a century.

STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY Abriana DelTufo

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here are many reasons people do not pursue higher education— for Sandra Stewart, it was war. The sounds of shelling and violence of warfare began during her senior year of high school in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the spring of 1992. “Our teachers were speeding up the process of finals,” Stewart says. “My sister and I left soon after and were refugees for 9 months. When we came back, I wanted to go to college in the next town, but I couldn’t. I had to postpone my dream of an education because I needed to work to support my family.” For Stewart, the journey to complete a university education would take more than 20 years. With hard work and perseverance, she accomplished her dreams through the K-State Global Campus. What Is the K-State Global Campus? The program began in 1966 as the K-State Division of Continuing Education. It has a rich history in developing and delivering courses outside the traditional campus setting: instructors rented cars to teach on location in the 1960s, telecommunication allowed faculty to communicate with individuals in other towns across Kansas in the 1970s and ’80s, and course materials were even recorded on VHS tapes in the 1990s. Today, the program includes courses for more than 70 online

OPPOSITE Jennifer Davidson, a K-State Global Campus student, works on an assignment. The program offers remote learning services to students who seek to complete degrees but might be unable to attend school in traditional classrooms.

programs in a wide variety of fields. Several bachelor’s and master’s degrees are offered, in addition to one PhD program. Students may also take classes for professional licensing or enroll in a certificate program. “We extended K-State’s intellectual arm by reaching out to adult learners around the world as an opportunity to obtain a higher degree or to advance in their career,” says Sue Maes, dean of K-State Global Campus. Associate Dean Long Huynh explained that the Global Campus is always trying to improve and looks for trends in the workplace to provide students with the same diploma, faculty and accreditations. “We want to make it as easy as possible to help our students with different needs to start and finish their educations,” Huynh says. “We attract active military students and their spouses, adults working full time and students who live across the world. We want to best assist them in their academic endeavors in whatever ways are most convenient for them.” “With Determination, It Can Be Done” After the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Sandra Stewart knew that she wanted to earn a bachelor’s degree. She just didn’t know when or how it would happen. Stewart worked as a translator for the U.S. Army in Bosnia to continue supporting her family. She married a U.S. soldier and

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was able to start her associate’s degree in West Point, New York. Stewart completed the degree while her family was stationed in Leavenworth. Then, the Stewarts were stationed at Fort Riley and lived in Manhattan for four years. “For someone who was born in another country, the people in Manhattan were so welcoming,” Stewart says. With her love for Manhattan and newly found devotion to K-State’s purple, she hoped to obtain a bachelor’s degree from K-State. However, with her husband’s back-to-back deployments and two young children at home, her dream remained just that. Once her husband was stationed in Canada and both of her children began to attend school, Stewart started her bachelor’s in business online through the K-State Global Campus. “We looked at different options, but Kansas State was really where I wanted to go,” Stewart says. After five years, with moves to Germany and Atlanta and other life interruptions, Stewart completed her degree. She returned to Manhattan in May 2017 to receive her diploma. “You think that college is just a given, but for someone with my background, it’s harder,” Stewart says. “But with determination, it can be done.” Growing Skills While some students are looking to earn an undergraduate degree, others are looking to advance in their fields. For Amy Martens, the

stability that comes from working for the same company for 22 years and being able to advance has been a tremendous opportunity. “When you love where you work and what you do, then you don’t want to leave,” Martens says. “Being able to advance my career and learn new skills while staying in the same place has been wonderful.” Martens began her career at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas in Topeka as an intern in 1994. Once she graduated from K-State with an engineering degree, she decided to work there full-time. After working for Blue Cross for three years, Martens was interested in returning to school in 1998 to pursue a master’s degree in engineering management. “Back then, there weren’t many options for distance learning, but the quality of the education and faculty were the same that I had when receiving my bachelor’s at K-State,” Martens says. Martens would receive lectures from K-State on VHS tapes. Once a week, she would gather with two other students so they could all watch the tapes together in the comfort of her home. “Watching and learning from the tapes as a group helped with our motivation and accountability,” Martens says. Martens took one class per semester to help her both focus on the material and maintain balance in other parts of her life. She received her degree in 2001 and still praises the program. “My degree has helped me at work, but it has also helped me in so many other ways, in just becoming a better professional.”

P A G E ABOVE Jeremy Davidson graduated from K-State Global Campus. He is one of many students who took advantage of remote learning to complete a degree.

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It Takes a Village Through Tandem, foster teens find support, guidance and a welcome reprieve

STORY BY Megan Saunders


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“Most teens can fall back on their parents for guidance or when they’re struggling, but these kids can’t.” – KELLY CARMODY

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Currently, Tandem serves 12 teens; that number is intentionally low oster parents endure many of the same struggles as biological so mentors can provide high-quality, individualized attention. Tandem’s parents, with the added strains of uncertain situations and youth funding goes toward making sure these foster teens feel comfortable in with potentially troubled backgrounds. school and social settings, so purchases include items such as new school “I became a foster parent at 26 without knowing much about it,” says supplies and tennis shoes, and even trendy haircuts. Tandem volunteers Kelly Carmody, who has fostered 23 children throughout her 11 years as also take their mentees to dinner, to the movies or just out for a cup of a foster parent. “My first placement was a girl half my age with a baby. I coffee—anything that helps forge positive bonds and teach social skills. really wanted to help these kids, but I was all by myself for a long time; it’s “As teenagers, they really want to blend in and not be known as kind of a lonely island. These kids are often the ones who get in trouble, ‘foster kids,’ so we help them do that,” Carmody says. “I so it’s hard to find a support system.” remember being 18 and wanted desperately to get out of She found a way to provide that system by creating my parents’ house, but we’ve had kids fail their senior year Tandem, a nonprofit that supports both foster children on purpose. They just want to stay in a stable home.” and the adults who care for them. Want to donate to Tandem, Carmody says Tandem’s main goal is to help these Tandem serves youth ages 12–18 who are in the or even become a mentor? kids focus and stay on track. The state will pay for college custody of the Kansas Department for Children and Visit the Tandem website, or other higher education if a youth is in foster care after Families by offering a network of encouragement and tandemmhk.com, or the the age of 16, but Carmody says only about 1 percent take wisdom between foster parents, as well as mentorship group’s Facebook page for advantage of the opportunity, and of those, few graduate. and guidance for foster children. Carmody serves as the more information. “Often, no one is there to hold them accountable,” program’s executive director, but she formed a “dream she says. “They often don’t know how to make team”—local foster parents Lindsey Curtis, Dave Cook decisions and solve problems because the system has always done and Emily Selby—to bring different areas of expertise to this mentorshipit for them. Tandem offers mentors who help bring clarity to their focused program. decisions and outcomes.” “We saw this huge need for teens, especially,” Carmody says. Tandem’s leaders—Carmody, Selby, Curtis and Cook—are unpaid and “Most teens can fall back on their parents for guidance or when they’re rely on fundraisers and donations to help the youth they serve. Ultimately, struggling, but these kids can’t. We partner teens with volunteer mentors, Carmody says they would love to have a physical space for Tandem, but for people who aren’t their therapist or foster parent, to build trusting, safe now, they’re satisfied with making a difference one child at a time. and supportive relationships.”

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Tara Dean INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY Kelly Gibson

PHOTOGRAPHY BY Michael Henry

PAINTING IS a business, an emotional obligation, a source of frustration, and occasionally a lot of fun. ONCE I COMPLETE A PAINTING I FEEL excited to show it and sell it! This is when the quest begins to get it in front of an audience and find its new home. I tend to enjoy most of what I create and place a priority on finding buyers who feel the same about the work. I FIND INSPIRATION IN mentally abstracting lines from nature. When I look at a frog, for example, my brain is rearranging the contours to find an interesting new way to see the concept “frog.” If I’m sufficiently inspired, I will sketch and paint this frog. Abstracting the ordinary is how I share my artistic vision with the world. I STILL WANT TO see Picasso’s Guernica in person. I NEVER PAINT WITHOUT developing a sense of intentionality about a piece. It’s okay to start painting without having a clue as to what it will become, but at some point I have to gain traction with a concept that makes itself visible to me as I work. Although mark-making is critical to an artist’s development and making a mess is fun and emotionally freeing, if there’s no thought to drive a piece forward, it shows. Even my highly non-representational paintings are usually something, whether or not the viewer sees it, and the sense of completion and resolution of the driving idea will create a connection with the audience. This is what causes people to say, “I don’t know why I love it, but I do!” which is a great response to artwork. TO IMPROVE, I collaborate with other artists. This allows me to learn from their strengths, let go of my preconceived notions about outcomes, loosen up, socialize and try new materials.

WORKING WITH PAINT IS a constant wrestling match because it never seems to move the way I want it to. In the past, I’ve felt locked in a battle to conquer my acrylics, which has led me to explore new media, such as watercolor, gouache and oil. CONNECTING WITH THE VIEWER is one of the most important aspects of my art. My goal is to elicit an emotional response. This requires me to constantly challenge myself in the studio to figure out how to achieve this. Color choice, composition, and the creation of tension are all tools that I use to try and connect with people I’ve never met. MY FAVORITE MANHATTAN LOCATION IS the stretch of K-18 between the viaduct and K-99 that takes you through Wabaunsee, where my mentor and friend, George Preuss, lived for many years. It has a lot of sentimental value for me and my art when it was at a fledgling phase. WHY AM I AN ARTIST? This is a tough question, because I’m never really sure why other than to say I can’t not be an artist. I’ve been expressing myself creatively for almost 30 years, and drawing and painting are the forms of art making that constantly challenge me in a positive way. Each creation forms a building block for me as an artist in my trajectory towards making better and bolder work. Two years ago, I went full time with my art as a way to rejuvenate my life. Although the ride has been far from smooth, I am seeing solid returns for my efforts, including being able to provide an improved portfolio for my current and future clients. After 24 years of life in the Flint Hills, I recently moved to Garden City to expand my reach as an artist in Kansas and to have easier access to cities such as Denver, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, and Amarillo, all while still serving my clients in Manhattan. I feel this change will incorporate a new energy into my work and allow me to build a broader network.

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Tara Dean WEBSITE ladydean.com BLOG ladydeanart.blogspot.com FACEBOOK & INSTAGRAM LadydeanArt EMAIL ladydeanart@gmail.com

Ann Warren delicately traces a flower with henna onto a client’s hand. The impermanent dye is commonly used in Middle Eastern countries to decorate skin.


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ith Manhattan’s diverse food scene, it’s no surprise that the town boasts a rich history of townie favorites. While other favorites may come and go, Bud Cox has been part of that history since the 1980s and hopes Hibachi Hut’s return to its roots will keep it going for a long time. Before he took the reins of the hometown mainstay, Bud was cooking all of his Cajun favorites in New Orleans. His friends convinced him to move away from the Gulf of Mexico to help them open a Creole restaurant in Topeka. One of Bud’s best customers, John Heritage, was the owner of the Hibachi Hut at the time. On weekends, Bud would come to Manhattan to help Heritage with the restaurant. Bud loved the restaurant so much that he decided to buy it from him. “I bought the Hibachi Hut in 1986 because I

loved my consistent trips to Manhattan and wanted to bring the flavors to this town,” Cox says. Cox convinced his brother Bobby to come over from Denver to help him with the restaurant’s operations. “Our place in Aggieville was so popular,” Bobby says. “We constantly had people lining out of the door.” But after 10 years in business, the Cox brothers sold the restaurant. Fast forward 20 years and several different owners later, and the Cox brothers own the Hibachi Hut once again. The new downtown location boasts their traditional flavors and décor inspired by many aspects of the original restaurant: A bayou photograph from the first restaurant is located in the same spot as its former Aggieville counterpart, a giant structure of musical instruments reflects the owners’ passion for jazz, and the

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“…we’re very blessed to be able to do this type of cooking in Manhattan.” – BUD COX

hot sauce shelf in the middle of the restaurant is available for all adventurous lovers of spice. The Cox brothers are proud to bring the authenticity of New Orleans cooking to Manhattan. “Our kitchen is always in production because these dishes take days to prepare,” Bobby says. “The methods that we use in our kitchen are antiquated. It’s hard to produce this food.” The Cox brothers do a lot of research to provide Hibachi Hut customers with the best flavors and products they can find. Blue crab is flown in from the Gulf of Mexico. Andouille sausage is delivered fresh from Texas. “This Creole cooking is a cuisine that is very unique for this part of the country,” Bud says. The Hut offers a variety of Creole dishes like red beans and rice, jambalaya and blackened fish. Hibachi Hut even provides Sunday brunch with everything from southern fried chicken to Cajun bubble and squeak—potato cakes topped with fried eggs, cabbage and rich gravy. Overall, the Cox brothers are thankful to be a part of the food scene in Manhattan. They are grateful for all the hands that helped return and revitalize a Manhattan classic. “The food speaks for itself, but we’re very blessed to be able to do this type of cooking in Manhattan,” Bud says. P A G E

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Humans of Manhattan Meet the folks of MHK PHOTOGRAPHY BY Luke Townsend

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n a world where social media tends to dominate so much of our time, it’s easy to sequester ourselves from the folks walking down the street. But everyone has a story, and we aimed to learn a little bit about the humanity that surrounds us in Manhattan. We set up on Poyntz Avenue for one afternoon and got to know our neighbors, face to face. Here is a bit of insight into why Manhattan residents love their town and how they spend their days. P A G E

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Jay and Barbara Nelson with Artemesia, or “Arty” the art dog A lot of us live downtown, more all the time. Downtown is a small town with in Manhattan. There are always people downtown walking. Manhattan is our roots. This is the longest I’ve lived any place in my life. I went to 12 different schools—three in one year. I went to high school in Alma but I’m from Oklahoma. Manhattan is home. Artemesia is a real downtown urban girl. – Jay Nelson

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Emily Pender

Kaden Beilman

I’m going to school now, studying biology. I only have one more semester. I’m really interested in water quality, and I want to work in a developing country one day. I spend a lot of time at the Konza Prairie doing work out there. It’s a nice place to go and get out of town.

Manhattan is a melting pot of people and culture. [Emily and I] wouldn’t have met if it weren’t for college. We’re taking a walk to get chocolate. It’s such a nice day, we thought we’d go for a walk.

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Lili Wilson

I just got back from Afghanistan. Sometimes I miss it, but sometimes it’s nice to be back. Afghanistan was too cold. I liked Arizona a lot. It was beautiful, but too hot. I’m from New Jersey originally. Manhattan is nice because you get away from the city, and K-State makes it interesting. It’s cool to get away from the Army and hang out with students occasionally.

[My husband and I] are celebrating our anniversary—18 years. So we’re eating at Harry’s. The chef is great. There’s more stuff to do here than Junction City, so we come here for date nights.

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Susan Jackson Rodgers How Manhattan inspired Rodgers’ new book This Must Be the Place

INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY Kelly Gibson What’s your history with Kansas? And Manhattan? I moved to Manhattan from the east coast in my early twenties. I had family living there, and a boyfriend who was attending graduate school at K-State. The boyfriend didn’t work out, but Manhattan did: I ended up earning a master’s in English/Creative Writing at KSU, and eventually meeting my husband. Our kids were born in Manhattan and consider it their hometown (we moved to Oregon in 2008, when they were 10, 12 and 14). When I drove out to Kansas at 23 years old, I expected to be there for maybe six months. I ended up staying 25 years. It was home to me, and still feels like home when I go back. The book is an engaging hat tip to The Wizard of Oz. Have you always been a fan of the classic? What drew you to tell Thea’s story through the Oz lens? The Oz parallels developed by accident. I wrote the first draft of the novel many years ago, as a kind of test. I’d only written short stories, mostly very short, and I wanted to see if I could sustain a longer narrative. I wrote 150 pages in one summer. At that point I was thinking about Boccaccio’s The Decameron, where ten characters flee the Black Plague and stay in a mansion in the countryside, and each character tells his or her story. The early version of Place was told by a first-person narrator (an early iteration of Thea), and involved a series of guests at a country house in Kansas.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY Michael Henry I read Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, took notes, and read some background information. Then I put all that stuff away and rewrote the whole book. I wasn’t thinking in terms of retelling the Oz story, as Jane Smiley did with King Lear and her novel A Thousand Acres, but instead used aspects of the plot as scaffolding for my own story, hitting a few familiar tropes: a storm; a pair of red and silver shoes (red in the Oz movie, silver in the book); a figurative field of poppies. It helped to have these plot points as toeholds. I played with names too: Thea’s father is named Lyman—the “L” in “L. Frank Baum”; Amira is a play on “Almira Gulch,” the bicycle-riding meanie in the Oz movie, who is also the Wicked Witch; in the Oz books, the Tin Man was originally an ordinary man named “Nick Chopper,” so I used the name Nick for my character. I put that draft away for, literally, years. I’d go back to it here and there, tinkering, but writing a novel is scary. You can put a ton of time into it, knowing it might never see the light of day. Finally, I decided to give it one more good shot. I restructured the book all over again, revised, rewrote, polished, and began sending it out to small presses in 2015. I was always hopeful about Switchgrass Books, because they specialize in novels about the Midwest, so I was thrilled when they were interested. It’s taken two and a half years, from the time I submitted the manuscript to the August publication date. You can’t be in a hurry in this business!

I didn’t look at the draft again until the following summer, and that’s when I noticed similarities to the Oz characters that I hadn’t intended. The Amira character (named Daisy, in that draft) was a witchy antagonist; Wendy watched over Thea (then Jeannie) like a good witch; her loving but stern best friend (then Martha) was an Auntie-Em-type; there were male characters who in some way lacked brains/heart/courage; and of course, there was this lost girl at the center of the story, looking for home. It seemed like a fun idea to mine some of these similarities and to flip the notion of Oz on its head— the adventure happens in Kansas, not away from it.

I’ve had readers and editors not even notice the Oz elements, and frankly, I’m glad. I want the book to stand on its own, and it’s definitely intended for an adult audience. But attentive readers will hear the echoes. What elements of Manhattan really inspired you as you wrote about the town of Merdale? I’ve definitely drawn on elements of Manhattan and the surrounding landscape. Merdale (which is an anagram…) is modeled loosely on

P A G E OPPOSITE Author Susan Jackson Rodgers discusses how her book, This Must Be the Place, was in part inspired by Manhattan. The book is available in bookstores now.

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Manhattan, though Merdale is a smaller town, and Merdale College is a small private college, not a big state university. The Merdale Town Park is modeled after Manhattan’s City Park, around which I have run or walked hundreds of miles, and where I spent hundreds of hours with my kids when they were little. Thea and Jimmy attend outdoor concerts there, much like the Arts in the Park concerts. “Campus Corner” is similar to Aggieville; Julie’s bookstore is like Dusty Bookshelf. And Thea’s initial arrival in Merdale is definitely inspired by the approach to Manhattan on Highway 177.

Harry’s Restaurant holds a place in my heart—many special occasions were held there over the years, including my 40th birthday party and our wedding reception—as well as countless Happy Hours in the bar. The Manhattan Arts Center, my kids’ grade school (Theodore Roosevelt), Sunset Cemetery (beautiful place to walk), our house on South Delaware (my dream house), the Konza, the Beach Museum, the Linear Park Trail, Coco Bolo’s, Strecker-Nelson Gallery, Eastside & Westside Markets—I could go on and on!

I noticed several female characters had their own interests and apprehensions about motherhood throughout – Julie giving up on that option early in the book, Wendy pushing for a child with a boyfriend of one year, Thea stuck between solid/sure and wild/free/ unstable and not strongly attached to her own mother—was this intentional? Discuss the importance of motherhood in the book. Hmmmm… Interesting. Alison Lurie has described Oz as a world where women and girls rule, and none of the characters live in “traditional” families. That reading appealed to me, but I don’t think I was doing anything intentional with the motherhood theme. Thea is distanced from the idea of motherhood, in part as a function of her youth. She’s been perennially left to her own devices; her own parents are distracted and flaky and self-absorbed, and she never really had any adults in her life to help her out. She’s raised herself. It’s hard for her to imagine being responsible for someone else—what that would look like. But I think it’s also a function of her personality. Motherhood just doesn’t occur to her, except as a very distant possibility in a very distant future.

Do you identify with any of the characters? Which characters were most fun to write or kept you most engaged while you wrote them? Why? Thea was fun to write because she’s very different from me, but I still “get” her. I understand why she does what she does, even when she’s making stupid choices or being dishonest or impulsive, or behaving like the saucy little tart she is. Her voice was quite clear to me, too, and I think it’s the main thing that carries the novel. Amira was fun to write because she’s a villain, but also (I hope) more than just a villain. She has her own story, her own desires and mistakes and disappointments. I enjoyed discovering layers to her character over the many drafts of the novel.

What are (or were) your favorite spots in Manhattan? I love the houses in the historic area south of campus—Denison, Fairchild, Laramie—and I imagine the lecherous Professor Pierce living in one of those neighborhoods. Dusty Bookshelf was a favorite spot. (I was so sad to hear about the fire at the store last spring and hope Diane can reopen soon.) In the old days, I spent many hours writing at the Espresso Royale coffeeshop in Aggieville, with one baby or another asleep in the stroller; when it became Radina’s, I remained a loyal, daily customer. It’s been fun to see how Radina’s Coffeehouses have sprouted around town and campus. I remember the aftermath of the December 2007 ice storm, when many Manhattan residents were without power for a week, and Wade Radina came to the rescue, delivering thermoses of coffee to his neighbors. A true hero!

Anything else you’d like to add about the book? Or Manhattan connections? Anything I’ve missed that you think is important to share with our readers? It was freeing to write a book that takes place before technology was such a huge factor in our daily lives. In the 1980s, pre-Internet, precell phones, pre-social media, I lived in an old limestone farmhouse outside Manhattan. That locale inspired some of the descriptions of the landscape around Jimmy’s house. I didn’t even have a TV for a lot of that time. Even my mailbox was located miles away, at the Manhattan Post Office. I read constantly and wrote a lot. My attention span was far superior to what it is now! Plot-wise, I had to put Thea in a different era—in order for the story to work, she can’t be reachable. But it was also lovely to revisit that time, when devices weren’t constantly intruding on every social interaction and conversation and waking moment. And if you wanted to disappear for a while, you could.

Where your

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Reworking the STORY BY Kimetris Baltrip

PHOTOGRAHY BY David Mayes

Work Space two Coworking environments create community for Manhattan small business owners and entrepreneurs


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he space of a car was all the room Josh Hicks needed to conceptualize his big idea. During a drive home after a double date to see Star Wars: The Force Awakens with his wife, Shelby Hicks, her brother and his wife, Josh learned that his vision to create a shared space for small businesses was not a new concept. His brother-inlaw was already a member of a coworking company in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. “It was like the sun came out for the first time in six months,” Josh says, realizing that he and Shelby didn’t have to “create this whole animal.” The couple received keys to The Fellow, their new coworking space in Manhattan, about 12 weeks after Josh’s epiphany. They drove to Sioux Falls that same day to participate in a 12-hour think-tank workshop with other owners of coworking startups. “We were still developing our idea that we didn’t know existed,” he says. Josh, Shelby, co-founders Derek Richards and Caleb Amundson, and co-owner Allyn Weddle, enlisted a crew of volunteers to stage an eight-week renovation of The Fellow’s building at 1125 Westport Drive to make it “modern, clean and open.” Concurrently, they pre-sold memberships and prepared for a launch party in April 2016 to beat the exodus that occurs during the summer vacation season. Fast forward. Today, The Fellow’s six sold-out private offices have a waiting list, and its 3,000 square feet of co-working space are shared by half of up to 60 members—small business owners who are 21 or older—who can use it as an office away from home, particularly when no office exists. It’s a small membership fee to use the space, or interested parties can purchase day passes to try it out.

the fellow The Fellow has served as more than a shared working environment, however. Art shows, live music, non-profit events, and even church services are held in the building’s gathering spaces, which include a consultation nook, a conference room and a café— each furnished with technology. Josh and Shelby’s personal experiences as small business owners served as their inspiration for opening The Fellow. “My wife and I are also photographers, so we were working from home and coffee shops,” Josh says. “We finally hit that rut of working from home.” Josh’s rut formed in his bedroom, which doubled as a home office replete with a piece of plywood that lay across his dresser to support his computer. Shelby, who was then his fiancée, conducted business from her home with a similar setup. The lack of a true work environment and the distraction of everyday duties began to cripple the couple’s morale. They created their new business venture to avert such a struggle for small business owners like themselves. “The Fellow is for anyone who works from home, coffee shops or remotely,” Josh says. “It is a space, but it has members … It’s its own community.” P A G E

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n immigration attorney, who was conducting business in Russia, pressed the 10 digits of a phone number listed for Iron Clad, a coworking space with locations in Manhattan and Wamego. “I received this frantic call,” says Darin Miller, Iron Clad’s co-owner. “All I heard was I need a meeting and Russia.” He learned that the immigration attorney had recently moved to Kansas and was desperate to find a coworking space after growing accustomed to using them on the West Coast. The next day, the attorney appeared at Iron Clad in full business attire and set up a temporary office there for a three-hour meeting over a laptop. “To see that happen, that is exactly our vision,” Darin says. “We want to offer a worldclass alternative for people to work.” Iron Clad, which is co-owned by Darin’s wife, Heather, opened in Wamego in May 2016. The couple expanded to Manhattan’s downtown the following March after renovating part of a historic building at 407 Poyntz Avenue. “We purchased the Wamego space purely for people to meet face to face … We saw coworking as something happening around the world and it wasn’t here yet,” he says. Darin and Heather wanted to satisfy what they identified as a real need locally for such spaces, especially in Manhattan’s downtown where there’s a vortex of entrepreneurs. Darin says opening a Manhattan location became increasingly important after Iron Clad’s Wamego members consistently reported that they always travel to Manhattan to conduct business. “We would not be here in Manhattan unless we were in downtown Manhattan,” he says. “We wanted to find a place downtown next to all the amenities. We wanted to be in walking distance in both cities to local establishments.”

iron clad The nostalgic character of Iron Clad’s Manhattan site, which dates back to 1910, also attracted the Millers, who use the location’s storefront visibility to tout their members’ businesses through a scrolling digital billboard. In Manhattan, members of Iron Clad share a 2,600-square-foot room that includes technology in each of three spaces: a main area, back area and mezzanine. In Wamego, the company occupies a 5,200-square-foot space. Along with coworking areas, the sites can be rented for semi-private and private events, and the company’s members have access to both locations. Iron Clad currently has about 30 members, ages 16 to 74, with a capacity for about 120 more between the two buildings, Darin says. His 27-year experience as a mechanical engineer in the “corporate cubicle world” offers a contrast that inspired him and his wife to foster what he calls a “hugs and high-fives culture” among Iron Clad’s members. The “shared economy concept” of a coworking space, he says, tends to promote support more than competition among its members, who become a part of a community of accountability. “It’s a sense of community that you really can’t describe on a website or in pictures,” Darin says. “When you come to this coworking space and you are a member, you are an equal.” P A G E

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3.8 M 3,900 11,100

The number of coworking spaces in the U.S.

The number of coworking spaces worldwide in 2016

The estimated number of coworking members worldwide by 2020

26,000 coworking by the

The estimated number of coworking spaces available worldwide by 2020

numbers 976,000 Source: A 2016 coworking report by Emergent Research, a research and consulting firm that tracks the future of small businesses and “solopreneurs.�

The number of coworking members worldwide in 2016


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Editor’s Note: Due to privacy concerns, we’ve identified veterans and caregivers in this story by first names only.


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Seventeen years, one month and 15 days. That’s how long Greg served his country in the United States Army. He did three tours in Germany and one in Korea, and he was deployed in support of Operation Desert Storm. Now a resident of Manhattan, Greg spends most of his time sitting on his apartment balcony in a lawn chair. From this view, he can see the cars driving by and the five American flags honoring his country he has attached to the railing. Every Wednesday, Greg shares his view. He receives in-home care from Molly, a certified nursing assistant who works with At Home Assisted Care, located in downtown Manhattan. With the door to the balcony open, he sits outside and talks with Molly as she completes her tasks. To Molly, Greg is a unique client. He is Molly’s only client in Manhattan, but as she puts it, “he’s probably the most sarcastic client I’ve ever had, by far.” “I think he knows he can get away with it,” she adds. “He’s told me before he thinks of me as his daughter or granddaughter.” Molly always greets Greg with a smile as she arrives at his apartment. She clocks in and immediately begins her chores. “She knows when she gets here on Wednesday, she walks in that door, she calls and clocks in, and she goes right into my bedroom and changes my bedding,” Greg says. “She does that, she gets it right into the laundry, and she gets it all done before she leaves. She folds it and everything.” Part of her responsibility is taking care of Addy, Greg’s cat. Molly says it’s the little things about taking care of Greg and his cat that make her smile—including when she is doing the dishes and steps in Addy’s treat dish. Molly always picks it up and puts it on the counter to avoid stepping in it, but Greg always makes comments about it. “If I wouldn’t pick on her when she comes here, she would leave here heartbroken because she would think I was mad at her,” Greg says. Molly is one of about 18 caregivers who work with At Home Assisted Care. She has worked there for about a year and half, helping dozens of clients with basic needs. The business is owned and operated by Woody Shoemaker, a Vietnam veteran himself, who bought the business shortly after his wife passed away. Home care is close to his heart because he and his adult children cared for his wife at home through her terminal illness several years ago. According to the business website, Woody purchased At Home Assisted Care in his wife’s honor, wishing to continue “helping those who have helped us,” as he puts it. To Shoemaker, this business is all about the caregivers being a companion to those they visit.

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“It’s about keeping you independent by involving you in what she’s doing,” Shoemaker says. “If we come in and take over and someone just sits in a chair, they decline.” It’s a business of engagement. Shoemaker says he particularly enjoys knowing he is helping people stay healthy and remain at home longer before going to a retirement home. Through a partnership with the Veterans Administration, Shoemaker can offer assistance to veterans in need. He says about half of his clients are veterans. “A lot of people just need strategic hours of help, and they will stay at home a lot longer,” he says. Salute to Service As Molly cleans the apartment, Greg wears his veteran hats proudly. One is labeled “Operation Desert Storm Veteran” and the other “Disabled Veteran.” Greg joined the Army in 1975. He was injured toward the end of 1979 or beginning of 1980 while in Korea; he can’t quite remember the specifics. “I pulled my back out of whack,” he says. “I was lifting a heavy generator with one of my soldiers, and his side slipped and he let it slam into the ground, which bent me way down.” Surgery was not an option to fix it. He left the service in 1992 with an honorable discharge. “I got out of the military. I said I was taking a year’s vacation and that’s what I did,” he says. “When the year was up, it was time for me to go to work, and I went to work at Walmart.” He ended his career in the military as a self-propelled field artillery system mechanic. Now 61 years old, Greg cannot bend over to do everyday household chores. Through the Veterans Administration, he used to receive two hours of care through this program, and was recently entitled to three. “I can’t bend down because I will fall down,” he says. “With me getting three hours, now Molly can get the laundry done.” “And he’s added more to my list,” Molly jokes. But Greg appreciates Molly’s hard work. “She gets it done,” he says. “There might be a week she doesn’t get the dusting done, and I tell her to do it the next week. As long as she gets the laundry and dishes done.” With a boyfriend in the military, Molly shares stories with Greg about his service, too. “Every week, he says ‘how was [his physical training]’ and then laughs about it because he knows how hard it is,” she says. Greg says he spent his fair share of time doing PT in the mornings and can empathize with what Molly’s boyfriend is going through.

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Paying Tribute Vietnam War veteran makes a ‘Run for the Wall’ By Maria Childs On any given afternoon,Woody Shoemaker can be found sitting in his office at the corner of 4th Street and Poyntz Avenue in Manhattan. But over Memorial Day weekend this year, Shoemaker was part of something much larger than “The Little Apple,” and he was nowhere near his office. Shoemaker was one of 900,000 people who gathered at theVietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington D.C. after riding motorcycles across the country to raise awareness of those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice. Run for the Wall is an annual national campaign that promotes healing among all veterans and their families by remembering all prisoners of war and those missing in action and honoring the memory of those killed in action during any conflict. According to the Run for the Wall website, the organization strives to guide all participants safely across America to theVietnam Veterans Memorial in D.C. and to educate future generations about the importance of accountability during wartime, emphasizing that no one should ever be left behind. Shoemaker said these intentions rang true as they visited each town along the route. “Everywhere we went, we were heroes,” he says. Though this was Shoemaker’s first adventure with Run for the Wall, he soon realized the impact of the organization in the town of Rainelle,WestVirginia. He and the other motorcyclists donated $22,000 to Rainelle Elementary School. “When we rode in with 400 motorcycles, the principal rode in with us,” he says.“They had autograph books and they want you to sign it.We’re like the heroes every year … I didn’t realize what a big deal it was.” Shoemaker served in the U.S. Navy for four years. He was part of Navy SEAL Team 1. He said he felt like this was the welcome home that many did not receive when they came home from theVietnam War. “Everywhere we went, people welcomed us like we won the war or something,” he says.“We were back fromVietnam at least 30 years after the war ended; no one said a word, not even family.We weren’t treated like World War II vets having won the necessary war to win. Family members didn’t even say anything.” Although Shoemaker did not personally experience bitter comments and gestures coming home, he witnessed others who did. “They would tell the regular Army guys to put on civilian clothes before you fly home. So they stopped in Hawaii and put on civilian clothes before they flew into Los Angeles or San Francisco so they didn’t get treated poorly in the airports,” Shoemaker says.“We felt sorry for

the young Army guys who were minimally trained. A lot of the 19- or 20-year-olds, they’d seen bad stuff. As a young guy, you think ‘I’m gonna get over there and kill the bad guys who are trying to kill us and hurting other people and take over our country,’ but war doesn’t work like that.” Like most things in life, the value of actions taken is usually not tangible.While on this journey, Shoemaker encountered people who showed a great appreciation not only for the military and its lifestyle but also for the specific actions he took while serving his country. “So we’re at the wall and this gal walks up to me and another guy and says,‘Thank you for your work inVietnam. Because of you I am an American citizen. I came here when I was four fromVietnam, and now I have two kids and live in Atlanta,’” he says.“It was an amazing trip.” At the memorial, docents assist visitors with making graphite rubbings of names etched on the memorial. Shoemaker was able to get the name of his buddy who trained with him, and he displays it in his office as a continuous reminder of those he was honoring on this journey. “It was a wonderful trip with some amazing people,” he said.“It was amazing.”

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A Caregiver’s heart To Greg, Molly is unique because of her attentiveness. “She actually sits and listens, believe it or not,” he says. “She’s very interested … How many 20-year- olds want to listen to a 60-year-old man? And she just sits and listens to me.” During the last six or seven months of Molly and Greg’s flourishing companionship, Greg left town for one week and called the office manager, Stacy, to arrange Molly’s visits. Stacy and Greg worked out an agreement, and Molly visited the apartment on her usual schedule. “She says it was really weird cleaning without me,” Greg says. Molly visits eight clients in the Flint Hills area, most of whom are in Junction City. Half of her clients are VA clients, including Greg. “They’ve done so much for our country,” she says. “I’ve noticed every [story] is so different too. This job is so cool, how I get to know each and every one of my clients.” Previously, Molly worked in retirement homes and realized it wasn’t the kind of work she wants to do. “This job gives me the opportunity to get to know [clients] better,” she says. Molly even knows Greg well enough to know he is going to try to feed her every week. “I’ve had Maggie, Savannah and Molly. I can’t complain about any of them,” he says. “They come in here and she has been here long enough, I go out on the balcony and smoke my cigarettes … and she’s in here doing her job. She knows where everything is. She does not need supervised, and at the end of day, she can say ‘Greg’ and I’ll say ‘yes’ and when she’s done, I offer her a sandwich and she says she’s not hungry.” “He offers me food all the time,” she says. The companionship will soon end for Greg and Molly, who has been working on furthering her education. In May, she completed a degree at Kansas State University, and soon she departs for Kansas City to attend KU Med. “I keep telling her she cannot switch from being a Wildcat fan to being a Jayhawk fan,” Greg says. But Greg has faith in At Home Assisted Care and the VA program. “Woody is going to send me someone just as good …,” he says. “I have faith in him.” At the end of Molly’s shifts, she spends the remaining time sitting with Greg and talking with him about his military career or her hobbies. “Molly is not only a house caregiver, but she’s also a companion because I have someone to talk to,” Greg says. “I said to Woody a long time ago, ‘What if she gets done early?’ And he says, ‘let them sit down and relax, I don’t have a problem with that.’ She doesn’t get done early every week, but when she does I sit here and she sits in the recliner and it lets her wind down. I’m very pleased with this home care. It’s very good that the VA entitled me to this.”

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N o S toNe U NtUrNed No Stone Unturned Therapeutic Learning Center provides a multidisciplinary and team-based approach to pediatric therapy services for the Manhattan, Fort Riley and surrounding areas. No Stone Unturned, TLC is a non-profit clinic that offers pediatric Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Applied Behavioral Analysis Therapy (ABA) and Autism Diagnostic Testing with our partner facility, Katie’s Way. We now have more staff to meet your needs and our waitlists are minimal to none.

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Little Apple

Reports Manhattan Magazine introduces our junior reporters and illustrator for a day.

REPORTERS Asher, Avery, Nicolas, Zeanise

ILLUSTRATION BY William

PHOTOGRAPHY BY Michael Henry


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Our Little Apple reporters went behind the scenes at Sunset Zoo to get a taste for what it’s like to be a zookeeper. They helped Jessie, the zookeeper, feed a bobcat and learned a bit about the animals cared for at the zoo. Asher: How many bobcats are here? Jessie (zookeeper): We currently have one bobcat in this enclosure. She’s in the den right now. The other is shut off from the exhibit, so they don’t have access to this one. That’s why we’re able to go in here because there is no one in here. Zeanise: Is that where they drink their water or what is that? Jessie: Their pool is right there, but it has a leak, so we’re using this giant tub as their water pool thing. But our male bobcat really enjoys pooping in there. So that is what he has done today. That will make this super fun. We’re going to have you guys make enrichment toys for the bobcats. Let’s go get the stuff and come back up to the enclosure. That way you guys can start making something while we’re cleaning. Zeanise: Is that dead meat? Jessie: That is special zoo meat—zoo hamburger. So it’s a mixture of horses and cows. Nicolas: That just sounds like meat! Jessie: It’s basically just meat but for the animals. Today we’re making an animal enrichment toy for the animal. We’re making a peacock head, basically! Asher: Why do we make animal enrichment toys?

Jessie: The reason we do enrichment is because these animals are going to spend their entire lives right here. So if you guys had to spend your entire life in your living room… Zeanise: That would not be good. Jessie: You’d get kinda bored wouldn’t you? You wouldn’t have a TV, you wouldn’t have books. Just some furniture. If you don’t have anything it gets really, really boring. Avery: Where do you guys get animals for the zoo? Jessie: The bobcats, specifically… their parents were shot by hunters when they were very small. At that age they aren’t able to fend for themselves or learn how to be a bobcat. So humans rescued them. Once humans help raise an animal, you can’t release it back into the wild. They wouldn’t know how to hunt or take care of themselves and they’d be too used to people, so they would be in danger. That’s why the bobcats are in here. And that’s why the turkey vultures are here, too. She was injured out in the wild, and she couldn’t survive or provide like she is supposed to, so she’s here with us. Asher: Do all vultures eat dead stuff? Like when things die? Jessie: For the most part, yes. So, pretty much anything dead they find they will eat. But that’s how road kill disappears. So if animals get hit by a car and left on the side of the road, they take care of those for us.

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Asher: How many years do peacocks live? Jessie: Currently we have a couple of peacocks who are in their late 20s or early 30s. Asher: Is that old? Jessie: Yes, that’s old for a bird. Asher: It’s not old for people. Jessie: No! It’s not old for people, no. Say if you were a bald eagle, it’s not that old. And we have two peachicks currently. Nicolas: What’s a peachick? Jessie: They are baby peacocks. Little baby birds. Asher: So it was the size of a pea? Jessie: It was a little bigger than a pea. They have to be able to survive pretty quickly so they are a little bigger. Avery: Would the toy we’re making look like a peacock to them? Jessie: It probably does not, but it will smell like a peacock. Asher: It would be creepy if that was a real peacock. Jessie: Yes, we would not want to put a real peacock in there. Nicolas: I don’t think you want to put anything real in there except the bobcat. Wait, are bobcats named Bob? Jessie: No, these are not named Bob. The girl is named Millie and the male is named Mittens. Zeanise: You said Mittens?


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Jessie: Yep. We had a naming auction and that is the name the family chose. Zeanise: What’s your favorite animal? Jessie: It depends on the day! I like cats, so any I work with are my favorite. Big cats are similar to small cats in their attitude. So if a small cat doesn’t want to do something, it’s not going to. Well, if a big cat doesn’t want to do something, it’s not going to. Avery: Why did you want to become a zookeeper? Jessie: I really love animals. I like pretty much everything about animals. When I was in preschool I was at the Topeka Zoo and there was a giraffe named Jessie, and that’s my name. So that was pretty awesome, and I really wanted to work with an animal like that. Asher: Would most zookeepers say they like animals if they were asked a question like that? Jessie: Yeah, you really have to like animals to work with animals every single day. Zeanise: If you could be any animal, what would you be? Jessie: I think maybe one of the most fun animals here is the red panda. Avery: What’s the hardest part of your job? Jessie: I think that’s usually if one of my animals gets injured, and I can’t get them to take medicine or they don’t get better. That’s the hardest part. Avery: How old is the zoo? Jessie: Well it was founded by the vet school back in the 1930s. It’s been around quite a long time. Zeanise: Have you ever had an animal escape? Jessie: If an animal escapes, it’s a zookeeper error, so if someone leaves a gate unlocked, that’s pretty much the only time that happens.

Zeanise: What animal was it? Jessie: I think it was the red panda. She was brand new, and there was a branch at the top of her enclosure. It was too big for the male to jump it, but she jumped it. She was only on the outside of the enclosure, so it wasn’t too bad. We got her back in. Zeanise: Where do you get the animals from? Do you take them from the wild? Jessie: No, we never do that. Most of our animals are bred in zoos. They are part of the SSP, or species survival plan. It makes sure the different animals survive so that when you are my age there will still be a whole bunch of different animals around. Nicolas: Why do leopards go side to side? Jessie: Why is he pacing? Well there could be multiple reasons why he’s pacing. He just ate his breakfast a little while ago, but there could be a bunch of tour groups up there. That gets them active and agitated. And it could be that this time of day he likes to get a little exercise so he walks around and then he lays down. Avery: Wasn’t there an exhibit where you had a dog? Jessie: Yes! They were in the wolf enclosure over there. The little baby wolf ’s mom couldn’t care for him anymore. We tried to find a facility where he could go and be raised with another wolf puppy, but we couldn’t find one so we got a yellow lab—a big dog about the same size as a wolf—so if they were playing they could get along and be friends and learn to be canines together. But the puppy learned more to be a wolf. Asher: Can we see what happens when the bobcat comes back?

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Jessie: Absolutely. I’m sure she’s in there waiting for us to open the door. She’s going straight for your toy. She’s sniffing, figuring it out. That’s the challenge for her. The point is to stimulate her while she’s in the enclosure. Asher: Do cats in the big cat family only eat raw meat? Jessie: If they really wanted to they could eat cooked meat, but it isn’t very nutritious for them. Zeanise: Can we go in there? Jessie: The reason we don’t go in there is because Millie has claws and teeth. She was hand-raised, but she’s fairly unpredictable. She’s focused on her meatballs. I don’t think she knows you’re here right now. Zeanise: How old is she? Jessie: She’s five years old. Zeanise: Will she get bigger? Jessie: Nope, she’s fully grown but the male is a bit bigger than she is. Avery: Why do you hide the meat? Why can’t you just pile it up? Jessie: We hid it so she can find it. It stimulates her, so she can basically hunt. We try to make sure enrichment is a natural behavior they would do in the wild, like stalking prey. Asher: Do all big cats like water? Jessie: Depends on the cat bobcats for the most part like water. Cheetahs don’t like water at all. Leopards are okay with it. Tigers love water. Zeanise: What about lions? Jessie: Lions don’t really like water. But hyenas love water. So we have a swimming pool for our hyenas.


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Star-Spangled Saturday

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oc t ober

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Family Fun Day

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Little Apple Glow Paddle

FLINT HILLS DISCOVERY CENTER

WEFALD PAVILION IN CITY PARK

MANHATTAN PARKS AND RECREATION

September 16, 10 a.m.–3 p.m.

September 24, 5:30–8 p.m.

October 28, 6–8 p.m.

Celebrate 100 years of the Big Red One with patriotic activities and immersive exhibits, including a “training camp” for children alongside Rags, the 1st Infantry Division’s mascot during WWI.

Take advantage of early fall weather with free games, lively music and family-friendly activities. Free food available while supplies last.

Paddle two miles from Fairmont to Manhattan on the Kaw. Sure, it sounds pretty easy, but this trip is in the dark with glow sticks to light the way! For more information on registration, call (785) 587-2768.

Science on Tap

Canteen and Cocktails: A Night in the 1940s

TALLGRASS TAP HOUSE September 20, 7–8 p.m.

FLINT HILLS DISCOVERY CENTER

Talk science over a drink with Sunset Zoo and KSU’s Graduate School and Center for Engagement and Community Development. Hosted every third Wednesday of the month between August and April, this relaxed event welcomes enthusiastic conversations about scientific topics. Free and open to all.

November 4, 7:30–10:30 p.m.

In continued celebration of the Big Red One’s 100th anniversary, come enjoy cocktails, dessert, live jazz and 1940s-style dance instruction at the Flint Hills Discovery Center. Tickets are $40 for members and $45 for non-members. Price of admission includes custom dessert, two drink tickets and full access to exhibits.

Aggieville Mini-Maker Faire AGGIEVILLE, MORO STREET September 23, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

The 4th annual Mini-Maker Faire, held on Moro St. in Aggieville, aims to “entertain, inform, connect and grow this community.” All are welcome to experience the work of scientists, creators, artists, crafters and more. This is a free event.

Little Apple Optimist Chili Crawl

Manhattan Fire Department Open House

For only $15, you can enjoy some wickedly good chili and support a great cause! The 16th annual Optimist Chili Crawl includes more than 10 different chili samples and the opportunity to rate your favorites. Proceeds benefit youth activities in Manhattan. Purchase tickets at littleappleoptimists.com/2017-chili-crawl/

November 11

HEADQUARTERS FIRE STATION - 2000 Denison October 15, 11 a.m.–3 p.m.

Take a ride on Old Engine 1, try using a fire hose and practice your fire escape skills at the annual MFD open house. This is a free event, open to all residents interested in a chance to learn more about the fire department.

AGGIEVILLE, MORO STREET September 23, 3:30–6:30 p.m.

Veterans’ Day

SPOOKtacular SUNSET ZOO October 28-29, noon

Trick or treat with your favorite animals at Sunset Zoo! For $5 per child, visitors can enjoy activities, a costume contest, and pumpkinpalooza.

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McCain Home Holiday Tour SUNSET ZOOLOGICAL PARK December 3, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.

Help support the arts while celebrating the holiday season! McCain Auditorium’s annual Holiday Home Tour includes a wide variety of homes decorated with different holiday themes. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. They are available at several area business outlets. For more information, contact Julie at koenigkeenan@gmail.com.


Manhattan Magazine • Fall 2017  

Coworking Spaces | Caregivers for Veterans | Adulting 101 | Return of Hibachi Hut

Manhattan Magazine • Fall 2017  

Coworking Spaces | Caregivers for Veterans | Adulting 101 | Return of Hibachi Hut