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2020 RESOURCE GUIDE

global entry

THE SAVVY CHOICE FOR SENIOR TRAVELERS

the greens A LEGACY OF LOVE, SCIENCE AND SPIRITUALISM

senior bowlers

THE COMPETITIVE AND FRIENDLY YEAR-ROUND LEAGUE

wynne mihura LAWRENCE’S HORSESHOES LEGEND

JOAN MARTIN AN ARTIST THROUGH ALL STAGES OF LIFE


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EDITOR Nathan Pettengill

DEAR READERS,

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Alex Tatro ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE Joanne Morgan jmorgan@sunflowerpub.com

COPY EDITOR Leslie Andres

Welcome to the 2020 edition of Lawrence Senior magazine, an annual publication of Lawrence Magazine dedicated to exploring and sharing resources and opportunities for senior living in Lawrence, Kansas. The concept of senior living has changed drastically in the eight years that we have published this magazine, but I think the most important change has been our culture’s gradual understanding that the “senior years” are a vastly more diverse age classification than teenage years, young adult years or middle-age years. Now used widely to describe the time period from 55–115 years of life, the all-encompassing senior years represent people at vastly different stages, with different priorities and possibilities. One common theme, however, is the self. In general, it’s during the senior years when people have a chance to focus on their own lives. For many, this freedom comes about with an empty nest at home and then retirement from work. For others, it might arrive as an intentional choice after having reached career goals and deciding to focus on doing more of what one enjoys. In our pages, we bring stories of bowling groups, horseshoe groups, a health professional who was able to fully focus on painting and hints for making travel easier as a senior. Other stories, such as the article about the legacy of Elmer and Alyce Green’s response to Alzheimer’s, convey how the focus on oneself might come through an inevitable physical or mental decline, a forced opportunity to assess what has been good in life and to define priorities for one’s final years. We also include several resource pages with contact information for senior-focused nonprofits, agencies and businesses in the community to help you familiarize yourself with opportunities available in Lawrence. We hope this publication, both its stories and its resource pages, serves you in some way as you think about how you want to reward, challenge or simply focus on yourself. We’ll return with a new edition next fall. Until then, we wish you one of the best years of your life.

WRITERS Haines Eason Marsha Henry Goff Suzanne Heck Susan Kraus PHOTOGRAPHERS Jason Dailey Brian Goodman

DIRECTOR Bob Cucciniello PRODUCTION MANAGER Jenni Leiste

PUBLISHER Bill Uhler

ON THE

COVER Joan Martin sits in her Lawrence home that doubles as her studio for creating watercolors and other works of art. Photograph by Brian Goodman.

2020 RESOURCE GUIDE

global entry

THE SAVVY CHOICE FOR SENIOR TRAVELERS

the greens A LEGACY OF LOVE, SCIENCE AND SPIRITUALISM

Nathan Pettengill, editor

senior bowlers

THE COMPETITIVE AND FRIENDLY YEAR-ROUND LEAGUE

wynne mihura LAWRENCE’S HORSESHOES LEGEND

J OAN MARTIN AN ARTIST THROUGH ALL STAGES OF LIFE

Lawrence Senior is a special annual publication of Lawrence Magazine, part of Sunflower Publishing, a division of Ogden Publications. Sunflower Publishing 1035 N. Third Street, Suite 101-B | Lawrence, KS 66044 (888) 497-8668 or (785) 832-7264 | sunflowerpub.com


TABLE OF CONTENTS 08

12

Life in the Fast Lane Lawrence’s recreational (but competitive) senior league attracts bowlers with a range of skill levels

I Am Not Going to Sit Down In a club dominated by seniors, the Lawrence horseshoe pitchers include one athlete vying for the national title—again

18

A Natural Feeling Joan Martin has retired from her medical profession, but she has never parted with her work as an artist

22 The Enduring Legacy of Alyce and Elmer Green

The work of an Ozawkie-based couple left a scientific legacy in biofeedback and a challenging work that continues to push the boundaries of how we understand and respond to Alzheimer’s

26

Trusted Traveler

29

Resource Guide

For seniors planning to travel, a government pre-approval program can reduce the hassles of crossing the U.S. border or through airport security

Essential numbers and quick facts about retired living in Douglas County.


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LIFE IN THE FAST LANE

Lawrence’s recreational (but competitive) senior league attracts bowlers with a range of skill levels Rusty Moore, who has been bowling since 1985, plays with the Lawrence Senior Bowling League. 2020

LAWRENCE SENIOR


9 STORY BY Suzanne Heck

PHOTOGRAPHY BY Jason Dailey

W

ith team names like “Strike Chasers,” “Spare Us,” “Oops,” and “Just Missed It,” Lawrence’s Senior Bowling League might seem like an organization dedicated purely to fun. While the creative bowlers behind these team names point to the camaraderie and enjoyment of their gatherings as some of their sport’s main attractions, their league also includes serious players who know their stats and standings. Getting into the league is simple: participants must pay a $10 weekly fee and qualify by being 50 years or older. If those requirements are met, then a player can join a team (the most recent winter league had 17 teams) and compete in a weekly Monday afternoon match at Royal Crest Lanes, where they receive a data sheet of game scores, league standings, weekly top scores, season high scores and averages. Each member of every four-person team is listed with individual total pins, number of games played and handicap averages to date. Vincent Mrykalo, 68, is one of these bowlers who enjoys the mix of cordial companionship and competitive play. “I’m a serious bowler,” Mrykalo says, “so being able to bowl year-round and meet new people works well for me.” Mrykalo came to Lawrence five years ago from Utah and works as a piano technician in the University of Kansas School of Music. He notes the game has changed through the years; balls are made of new materials and oiled lanes alter the curve of the ball down the lane. These modifications have required the veteran player to find new ways to swing and release the ball.

I’m a serious bowler, so being able to bowl year-round and meet new people works well for me.

– Vincent Mrykalo

Mrykalo is one of the league’s year-round players, and he is joined in the summer and winter leagues by Roger Powell, 66, who, at the time of this writing, had posted the league’s highest average score. Powell, a navy veteran, retired five years ago as a customer service engineer for IBM. He and his wife of 46 years, Jill, 64, play on a team called “Still Bob’s Buddies.” Jill says bowling is a sport that the couple can do together to keep active during the winter.

LAWRENCE SENIOR

2020


10

LAWRENCE SENIOR BOWLING LEAGUE Winter and summer leagues House balls and shoes provided Lockers available Electronic scoreboards League data sheet weekly $10 per week Call Royal Crest Lanes for more details/questions

ROYAL CREST LANES 733 Iowa St. (785) 842-1234 royalcrestlanes.com

2019

Another married couple that bowls together is Mike and Barbara Miller, who are on the “Misfits” team. Barbara, 67, says she likes meeting new people and that the league is a friendly and welcoming group. “I love it because everyone is accepted,” she notes. “There are people who come in with their oxygen tanks on and some with canes, but when it is their turn to bowl, they remove their apparatus and roll a ball down the lane. The nice thing about bowling is it allows people to take a short breather in between their turns and it is not a vigorous sport.” Mike, 69, says he likes the competitive structure of the league within its informal and relaxed atmosphere. Other bowlers join the league for seasonal play. Rusty Moore, 96, and Chuck Allen, 76, band together as teammates on the “Oops” winter-league team. In the summer they both play golf. Chuck also plays horseshoes in the summer, joining fellow winter-bowler Wynne Mihura (see related story on page 12). Mihura, 92, who joined the winter bowling league in her late 80s, plays on the “Scatterpins” team. She has brought in other horseshoe players such as Edith Farrell, 81. Royal Crest Lanes hosts other leagues throughout the year, such as the Average Joe Bowling league, a youth league, a family and friends league and more. So if you don’t yet qualify for the senior league, there are ample opportunities to up your game before stepping into the friendly, competitive atmosphere of the seniors.

LAWRENCE SENIOR


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Members of the Lawrence Senior Bowling League include, clockwise from top: Chuck Allen, Jill Powell, Mike and Barbara Miller, Jesse Bauer (manager of Royal Crest Lanes), Wynne Mihura, Vincent Mrykalo and Roger Powell. LAWRENCE SENIOR

2020


12

“I AM NOT GOING TO SIT DOWN”

2020

LAWRENCE SENIOR


13 STORY BY Suzanne Heck

PHOTOGRAPHY BY Jason Dailey

In a club dominated by seniors, the Lawrence horseshoe pitchers include one athlete vying for the national title—again

F

or a top-class athlete, the drive to win never ends. Not at any level. Not at any age. When Wynne Mihura took second place at the National Senior Horseshoe Tournament in July 2019, she vowed to return and take gold. After all, the title had been hers for 26 years, and she won the World Championship in 2000. Now 92, Mihura has her sights set on the 2020 event. “As long as I can keep moving, I am not going to sit down,” says the member of the Kansas Horseshoe Pitchers Association Hall of Fame. “I do therapy everyday at home to strengthen my body and do all of my own yard work.” She also practices regularly at the Broken Arrow Park horseshoe court, which was officially named the Mihura Horseshoe Court in 1991. Mihura has lived in Lawrence since 1951, working at Hallmark and as a cosmetologist in town before she retired. She said she always loved sports and played basketball and softball when she was younger, but horseshoes is something she began later in life— embracing fully and with tremendous success. Besides being a top athlete, Mihura is an ambassador for her sport. Along with Ken Martin, she codirects the Lawrence Horseshoe Club, and most members joined the club because of Wynne. The youngest member, Brian Johnson, 37, met Mihura about 10 years ago when they were neighbors and has been a member for about two years. They lost touch but reconnected, and he decided to give horseshoes a try. He quickly found that his age was not necessarily an advantage. “I may be the youngest player in the group, but I haven’t won a game yet,” he says. Johnson says he hasn’t reached the level to compete at tournaments yet, but he has set himself smaller competitive goals such as beating his friend Chuck Allen. That won’t be easy. At 76, Chuck Allen has years of life experience in his favor, even though he got into horseshoes only about two years ago after meeting Wynne through the Senior Bowling League (see story on page 8). “I like it because it is a summertime sport and competitive,” says Allen of the Lawrence horseshoes group. “I’ve played in a few of the Kansas sanctioned

LAWRENCE SENIOR

TOP: Former Senior World Champion Wynne Mihura practices at Lawrence’s horseshoe court, which is named in her honor. ABOVE: Lawrence Horseshoe Club members include, from left: Chuck Allen, Edith Farrell and Wynne Mihura.

2020


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Chuck Allen makes a toss at the Mihura Horseshoe Court in Broken Arrow Park.

THE GAME OF HORSESHOES Horseshoe pitching is a great family sport requiring little equipment—just two metal stakes placed forty feet apart in the ground and a pair of horseshoes. Pits (where the stakes are placed) can be marked off by chalk to measure 31x43 inches, enclosed by three sideboards and filled with sand or clay. Chalk or permanent lines mark the official throwing distances. In competitions, men throw from 40 feet, women from 30 feet, and teens and children at 20 feet. 2020

tournaments that our club belongs to, and, let me tell you, they are serious about the rules. Throws are measured for points by a measurement tool, and other rules and regulations are strictly enforced.” Edith Farrell, 81, has a few more years of play on Allen. She has been pitching shoes for seven years. In that time, she has represented Lawrence at several regional and national tournaments and competed in a couple of world tournaments through the National Horseshoe Pitchers Association (NHPA). Her takeaway from years of play is that the sport is not as easy as it looks.

As long as I can keep moving, I am not going to sit down.

– Wynne Mihura

“One horseshoe weighs three pounds and 40 shoes are thrown per game, so, with five games per day at a two-day tournament, you are throwing 200 shoes a day,” Farrell explains. “You get a good workout, which I need. I had heart bypass surgery in 2004. My doctor warned me to begin exercising and to take my medicine, and I’ve been fine ever since.”

LAWRENCE SENIOR


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Ruth Osburn climbed to the top of a staircase at home to ask her mother a question. Standing at the top, she suffered a seizure and fell backwards. Her injury was catastrophic. Ruth’s back was broken “like a backwards Z,” doctors told her, in three different places, and she was unlikely to ever walk again. Ruth spent months confined to a wheelchair in the hospital and a local rehabilitation facility. She dealt with severe pain and a number of other health conditions that complicated her recovery. Months after her injury, she told her father she remembered a presentation she’d heard some time ago, when a staff member from Midland Care came to her apartment building to talk about a Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly, or PACE. “When she came here for the first time, she was still in a wheelchair” explains Roberta Stauffer, Midland Care Adult Day Coordinator. “She had a hard time regulating emotions, she was in pain, and she was living in a nursing home. What she’s achieved has been amazing.” In spite of major obstacles, Ruth was motivated to heal. “One day I told [Midland Care Physical Therapists]: ‘I think it’s about time to get me out of this wheelchair. Help me walk.’ I didn’t want to go backwards. It was hard. I wanted to quit so many times,” said Ruth. With the help of Midland Care occupational and physical therapies, a year after her injury, Ruth walks between two and four laps each day around the PACE Center. She has stopped smoking. She has lost weight. Staying with family members until recently, she has now moved into her own home, living independently with her two cats. She tells people she feels better and stronger. “I tell new people when they come here that this is a good place. I want people to hear my story, especially people with injuries, people who don’t want to do anything. This place, it’s healing me.” For more information about the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly, contact Midland Care PACE intake at 785-842-3627 or 1-800-726-7450.

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For more information about Thrive at Home or Home Health call Midland Care at 785-232-2044 or 1-800-491-3691.


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THE LAWRENCE HORSESHOE CLUB • Meets every Thursday from April to October at 6:30 p.m. at Wynne Mihura Horseshoe Court in Broken Arrow Park. New members, even young ones, are encouraged to join. Call 785.832.7920 for information. • Court is fenced and has 36 clay pits with cemented outside walkways, night lights with a shelter house maintained by the city of Lawrence Of all the Lawrence pitchers, Ken Martin, 86, has been playing the longest—he estimates that he has been playing for 75 years. Martin retired from the State of Kansas and bought a farm in Vinland in 1971 that got him to the Lawrence area. Here, he recalls pitching shoes in a horseshoe court in South Park before it moved to Broken Arrow Park. But he has also researched the history of sport in Lawrence going back long before he arrived. Martin says it was first played in Lawrence during the Civil War and was at its peak of popularity in the 1920s. Kansas has a long association with the sport as well; the first world championship for horseshoes was held in Bronson, Kansas, in 1909. President of the Kansas Horseshoe Pitchers Association from 1993–2005, Martin has also played well beyond Kansas and pitched in 10 national tournaments. Tournament competitors are categorized by age and sex, and prize money can range from about $100 to $4,000. “I wasn’t in it for the money,” Martin says, “but I did place enough sometimes to win.” With horseshoe pitchers who play for the love of the sport, competitions remain intense. So, if you drive by Broken Arrow Park, listen for the sound of Wynne Mihura’s horseshoes clanging against the stakes—that’s the sound of a veteran champion and her imminent comeback.

2020

• $10 annual membership fee allows individuals to become a Kansas Pitchers Association Club member who can participate in all National Horseshoe Pitchers Association (NHPA) tournaments across the nation • Lawrence hosts three sanctioned tournaments a year at the Wynne Mihura Horseshoe Courts • The NHPA has 54 charters in the United States, each divided with various club affiliates and individual members. Players are categorized by men, women, elders, girls, boys, and cadets

LAWRENCE SENIOR


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A NATURAL FEELING Joan Martin has retired from her medical profession, but she has never parted with her work as an artist Joan Martin holds up one of her recent watercolors. 2020

LAWRENCE SENIOR


19 STORY BY Marsha Henry Goff

PHOTOGRAPHY BY Brian Goodman

A

rt has been important to Joan Martin for as long as she can remember. And as long as she remembers goes back to magical Sunday afternoons in Lawrence of the 1930s. “As a little kid, I would lie on the floor on my stomach at our house in the 1900 block Most all of my painting are from images of Tennessee and would draw with a pencil on tablet paper while my grandparents were visiting with company from the AME in my head, like from a movie. Church,” Martin recalls. Growing up in Lawrence, she continued to study art at public schools, where her talent It seems strange, and it is hard to describe, was recognized and nurtured by teachers, including a Liberty Memorial art teacher – Joan Martin who asked Martin to help paint a Christmas but for me it is very natural. mural at the school. By that time, Martin already was seeking out other projects, such as helping one of the black sororities at the University of Kansas by painting backdrops for their fashion shows. After she graduated from Liberty Memorial in 1950, Martin left for Omaha to briefly live with an aunt who was going to help her settle into Chicago and enroll in art school. But other plans emerged. Instead of going to Chicago, Martin accepted a marriage proposal from a boyfriend who had enrolled at KU, so she returned to Lawrence. She and her new husband moved to Kansas City in the early 1950s where he took a job with the postal service, and they began to raise a family. They had a daughter, then a son, and Martin began a new career, working as an OB technician at St. Luke’s Hospital. But through the moves, the new family and the new job, Martin continued painting. “I never gave up my painting,” she says. “I always painted.” Though she had experimented with different media in her art Martin gravitated to watercolors, a preference she retains to this day. She would find her materials where she could, stopping in at art stores after work or on her days off, between all her other obligations, and she would continue to paint. By 1977, Martin and her first husband had divorced and her Martin’s work includes numerous landscapes, such as these watercolors. children were away at college, so she relocated to California, taking a job at Rothman Memorial Hospital in Los Angeles and continuing are from images in my head, like from a movie. It to create watercolors. Although she worked full shifts at the seems strange, and it is hard to describe, but for me hospital, she took formal painting lessons at a college while giving it is very natural.” private lessons and teaching group classes at churches and through Martin continued to paint in her time away community organizations. from work, bringing new creations to galleries for Martin says her time in California exposed her to new colors and shows, one of which led to a tremendous boost in beautiful scenery, but it didn’t necessarily affect the style of her work. her identity as an artist. She says the landscapes, the still-life work and everything she creates Preparing to show a work that she called Sweet with watercolors are not based on any real imagery, but on vignettes Pear at a gallery on Wilshire Boulevard, Martin she composes in her head and allows to emerge in the brief seconds stopped by the frame shop to pick it up for the that the watercolor runs onto her canvas. showing and was greeted by the frame artist “I like to go places. I like to see the ocean and the mountains, and telling her, “Sweetheart, that painting is going to then I go home and paint,” says Martin. “Most all of my paintings do something for you.” Initially, she dismissed this

LAWRENCE SENIOR

2020


HER COLLEAGUE QUINN A successful though largely amateur artist, Joan Martin would often visit galleries and absorb the work of other artists in her free time. On a trip to Hawaii in the 1980s, she discovered a gallery featuring the work of two well-known actors, Red Skelton and Anthony Quinn. A conversation with the gallery owner led to an unexpected invitation to meet Quinn at a showing of his art in Beverly Hills a few weeks later. Of course, Martin accepted. She dressed for the event in the most beautiful dress she owned and wore a fox stole that her second husband bought for her. “I just thought I was fabulous,” she laughs, recalling the evening. “I walked through those big doors, and after a while, those doors opened again, and Anthony Quinn came in wearing a white suit. Waiters were serving champagne and hors d’oeuvres. I felt like I had made it.” Martin had admired Quinn as an actor, but she recalls

him that night as being an engaging colleague, a formidable artist who graciously discussed his work that included watercolors, sculptures and oil paintings. “I couldn’t touch his oils,” recalls Martin, “but I have to say I felt I had an edge on him in watercolors.” The meeting with Quinn wouldn’t be Martin’s only brush with stardom. After all, she was still young, talented and in California. In the late 1980s, she was commissioned to sketch several of the celebrities who performed in the legendary “We Are the World” ensemble. But for Martin, that reception with Anthony Quinn continues to be a highlight, an evening that brought together glamor and art. Martin, who has kept nearly every significant document that came into her life, regrets to this day that she lost her invitation to that reception. “I’d give anything to have it,” she says.


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as a nice, but empty, compliment and simply enjoyed the atmosphere at what was then her biggest show. “There were three floors and some 500 works of art: sculptures, oil and watercolors. It was a grand affair and I enjoyed talking to people. At the end, they gave out the prizes, and the prize for the watercolor was given last. When the lady announcing them said, ‘Will Joan Martin please come up to the stage,’ I was dumbfounded. My legs were so weak I could hardly make it up there.” Sweet Pear was a source of immense pride for Martin. Because it reinforced her identity as a talented artist, it was no surprise that she held on to it until it seemed to have a new purpose. “It was the first work that I really felt like I had accomplished something; it was special to me,” she recalls. “I didn’t want to turn it loose, but something came to me one day and said, ‘let it go.’ I realized that only by letting it go could I replace it with something new. And I knew something else would come into my life.” In fact, several works of art came into her life after she took a job as a private cook to Lucy and Paul Whittier. Known widely for their philanthropy and the fortune that Paul had created with his financial company, the Whittiers supplied Martin not only with a good salary and a chance to travel but also with something she regarded as equally important—a place to paint in her free time and compartments for storing her work. They did this without never really knowing the quality of Martin’s work until one day Lucy asked to see her paintings and then brought Paul in to view them. “He came into the kitchen where I was working and said, ‘I didn’t know that you painted like that,’” Martin recalls. “I told him I loved to paint. He asked if I would sell one, and when I consented, he asked if I would take a thousand dollars for it. I almost fainted. That was the first thousand-dollar painting I sold.” Though Martin would go on to sell other paintings, she now works on a smaller scale. In 2006, she returned to Lawrence to be near her son. Until 2018, she gave private lessons and taught in churches, through parks and recreation department classes and at the senior center. She delighted in working with students though she described the time as more of sharing art than instructing people in it. Art requires skill, says Martin, but it also requires something she describes as “a natural feeling.” That feeling has been with Martin all her life, and it continues to be with her to this day as she enjoys being at home doing exactly what she loves, and exactly how she loves doing it. “I don’t paint large paintings anymore, but my art hasn’t changed,” says Martin. “I paint at home with watercolors, and I turn on the television and watch sports: the NFL, basketball, the Jayhawks. I paint and watch; I paint whatever I feel like painting.”

LAWRENCE SENIOR

PAINTING IN LAWRENCE Though Joan Martin has retired from teaching classes, there are still opportunities in Lawrence to learn painting at any age. Senior Resource Center Tuesday Painters Artists of all levels are welcome to join this group of seniors each Tuesday from 9 a.m.–noon at 745 Vermont Street. Call 785.842.0543 for more details. Lawrence Arts Center The nonprofit center for Lawrence art offers several classes at different levels each season; there are enrollment fees, but financial assistance/waivers are available for those on a set income. Call 785.843.2787 for more information. Osher Lifelong Learning Institute Affiliated with the University of Kansas, the Osher Institute offers a range of classes for seniors that concentrates on the enjoyment of learning without homework. Most of the art classes tend to be introductions to artists and styles of art rather than studio-art classes, but specific offerings vary each season. Financial assistance is available for the course enrollment fees. Call the Edwards Campus office at 913-897-8530 for more information.

2020


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A detail from the cover of the three-volume Ozawkie Book of the Dead captures the book’s theme of romantic love and spiritual exploration. Image copyright Philosophical Research Society / Elmer E. and Alyce M. Green Foundation.

THE ENDURING LEGACY OF ALYCE AND ELMER GREEN 2020

LAWRENCE SENIOR


23 STORY BY Haines Eason

The work of an Ozawkie-based couple left a scientific legacy in biofeedback and a challenging work that continues to push the boundaries of how we understand and respond to Alzheimer’s

A

t the University of Kansas Medical Center, Dr. Sebastiano “Yano” Procopio helps some of the nation’s future health professionals take care of themselves and their own mental well-being. “At KU Med, with health science students, graduate level, professional level, you can imagine that academic-related anxiety can be a big part of the experience for some folks,” Procopio says. A licensed staff psychologist in the center’s Counseling & Educational Support Services department, Procopio calls on a range of techniques to assist students in responding to their high-pressure and emotionally draining environment. Among those is biofeedback, an approach focusing on selfawareness and partial self-regulation of involuntary body functions such as muscle tension, heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature. “People can learn breathing techniques, and they may not necessarily need biofeedback to see that [their breathing] is shifting what’s happening physiologically in the heart and other connected systems in the body, like baroreceptors for blood pressure and respiratory systems, as well as the brain. They can learn [breathing] and can feel relaxed, and that’s the feedback they get. They feel better—they feel calmer, maybe their mood starts to shift,” Procopio says. “But when it comes to biofeedback, why it’s helpful is you actually get concrete data, realtime data, to see, not only is this working, but if you are shifting your body into a balanced or optimal physiological state.” In their work, Procopio and colleagues use a HeartMath machine, a device made by a company of the same name that monitors heart rate and provides feedback to encourage the user to find an optimal state, or “coherence.” “These are devices that are available to the public,” Procopio adds. “You don’t have to be a health professional to purchase them. They’re user friendly; they’re relatively affordable.” The use of biofeedback at KU Medical Center, its integration with hi-tech applications and its possibility as an accessible home treatment approach likely would have intrigued Elmer Green. Known as one of the fathers of biofeedback, Elmer pioneered the practice during his research in Kansas and helped move it into the mainstream with his studies and writing. But for Elmer, biofeedback was only part of a lifelong exploration of human

LAWRENCE SENIOR

consciousness at the margins of standard practices and thought. Late in his life, as his wife and lifelong collaborator, Alyce Green, began to succumb to Alzheimer’s, Elmer focused on facilitating Alyce’s transition to death with dignity and full spiritual awareness. The result of this exploration is The Ozawkie Book of the Dead: Alzheimer’s Isn’t What You Think It Is, a threevolume work that is both a love letter to his wife and a means to honor her memory. Overlapping biography, psychology, spirituality and procedures for care, it is a work whose premises of consciousness, afterlife and the ascension of the soul are probably on the periphery of American religious thought. Still, nearly two decades after the book’s 2001 release, it remains a universal work of love and an unflinching response to the loss and possibilities of living with a partner who fades, day by day, from the effects of Alzheimer’s.

Early Awakenings

As he describes in the first volume of Ozawkie Book of the Dead, Elmer Green was born in Oregon in 1917 and moved with his family to Minnesota when he was five. It was there, at the age of six, that he experienced his first dream vision, an altered state of consciousness in which he traveled back in time—in this case, to the founding of the United States—and awakened with a profound emotional impact that would leave him open to spiritual exploration throughout his life. Though he would have an otherwise typical upper-midwestern childhood, Elmer encountered the concept of meditation in his teens; through a spiritual mentor he would explore past lives, work on astral projections of his soul and delve into more obscure aspects of spirituality. His mentor also introduced Elmer to Alyce, a former schoolteacher and actor and a mother of two young children. Though 10 years his senior, Alyce shared Elmer’s interest in spirituality. Writing decades later in Beyond Biofeedback, an examination of the spiritual aspects of biofeedback, Alyce describes first meeting Elmer at Erwood’s meditation center and encountering not the body of a young man, but a luminous outline of a person. In June 1941, the couple married and were planning their lives around Elmer’s studies and their new family—plans that would be upended by America’s entry into World War II only six months later.

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24

The Weapon Years

Though Elmer was able to graduate in 1942 with a degree in physics, the war effort soon swept Elmer and his family into its orbit as Elmer took jobs producing telescopic gun sights, working on autopilot and bombsight stabilizers, and assisting with ground maintenance for bomber missions. Elmer and Alyce would emerge from the war years with four children and travels that had taken them together and separately to military postings in Idaho, California, Nevada, British Columbia, Kansas and Tinian (a Pacific Ocean island now part of the U.S. commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). Elmer continued as a physicist, developing weapon systems for the Navy after the war. Based at the Naval Ordnance Test Station in China Lake, California, he worked on rocket guidance systems and attempted to develop a mind-activated on-off switch. That switch never came to fruition, but it represented Elmer’s continued interest in the possibilities of the mind as both he and Alyce continued their spiritual explorations. Eventually, after prophetic dreams and soul searching, the couple decided to pursue additional studies; Elmer earned a PhD in biopsychology, and Alyce trained as a client-centered therapist.

Kansas and the Menninger Clinic

In 1964, the couple’s careers took them to Kansas, where they bought a home in Ozawkie and where Elmer established a psychophysiology laboratory at Topeka’s prestigious Menninger Clinic. Here, Elmer began to make his mark as a researcher while devoting his professional and personal life to expanding the concept of biofeedback. In 1969, Elmer co-founded the Biofeedback Research Society and, in the same year, Alyce and Elmer co-founded an annual spiritual-scientific retreat known as the Council Grove Conference to explore states of consciousness and spiritual development without the aid of mind-altering substances. For some thirty years, the Greens would plunge into biofeedback and spirituality, Elmer through research at Menninger and the couple together in their explorations of breaking down barriers between the physical and spiritual dimensions. Peter Parks, Elmer’s former research associate and now a board member of the Elmer E. and Alyce M. Green Foundation (a nonprofit dedicated to preserving and expanding the Greens’ work), describes the Greens as motivated by a lifelong hope that there would come a time when “motivated by a lifelong vision of a future science in which mind and matter were not separated.” He says his work at the Menninger Clinic under Elmer allowed him to observe a scientist who was also a seer, dreamer and intuitive

2020

thinker, who, though extremely learned, perceived his way through life. Elmer developed his two best-known research projects—“Physical Fields and States of Consciousness” and the “Copper Wall”—after studying Indian yogi Swami Rama and Dutch philosopher and naturopath Jack Schwarz. Both men were reputed to possess the skills of an “adept,” a term referring to someone who has learned to control their autonomic physiological processes. The Greens traveled to India in the mid-1970s, as related by the Greens’ foundation’s website, “to document the physiologic skills of yogis, using a portable psychophysiology lab that Dr. Green designed.” Together, Alyce and Elmer would lecture in Australia, Canada, Great Britain, Holland, the Philippines and the Soviet Union, but they maintained their home in Ozawkie. While the Menninger Clinic left Topeka for Houston in 2003, the Greens’ legacy was not abandoned in the departure. Nancy Trowbridge, the current director of communications for Menninger, worked alongside the Greens and says their spirit lives on in an organization that reflects the Greens’ values of “holistic and person-centered approach to wellness.”

Alzheimer’s

But for the Greens, perhaps their most important collaboration came at the end of their careers, as Alyce developed Alzheimer’s and lived in a state that Elmer defined as a transition between two worlds. Elmer, who believed that every person contained an immortal and a mortal soul, believed the onset of Alzheimer’s subverted a natural transition to death—where a person’s mind allows the mortal soul a chance to see “a complete overview of the previous life” and prepare for its full transition to an immortal soul. For Elmer, this created the danger of leaving someone with Alzheimer’s “stuck” between two worlds. For Alyce, this transition was further complicated by her background as a therapist. During her career, she concentrated on healing through mindfulness of the “here and now,” yet she recognized that her mind was gradually closing her off from the immediacy of life. The second volume of the Ozawkie Book of the Dead is devoted largely to Alyce’s Alzheimer’s condition; Elmer recorded many aspects of their life in a diary from 1989 to 1994, when Alyce went through what she described as “the big goodbye.” In many ways, the first and third books, which contain personal spiritual biographies, scientific interpretations, lessons from workshops and meditations on the future, provide frameworks for understanding and responding to Alyce’s state of mind. The Ozawkie Book of the Dead—with its mélange of personal biography, technical acronyms and fragmented

LAWRENCE SENIOR


25

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Elmer and Alyce Green, shortly after their marriage in 1941. Photograph used with permission from the Elmer E. and Alyce M. Green Foundation.

synopses—is not a particularly easy read. In his introduction and asides, Elmer acknowledges that his spiritual quest and beliefs might seem outside of mainstream American religious thought. Unlike the Greens’ work in biofeedback, their exploration of Alzheimer’s does not have a direct integration into common medical practice. But however Elmer’s speculations about our souls might strike any one particular reader, he speaks to us—and particularly to anyone accompanying a loved one on the journey through Alzheimer’s—with a touching account of the gradual loss of Alyce as a chronicle of separations and loving responses. Above all, Elmer’s work is a combined intellectual and heartfelt response to recognize and assist the spiritual transition of a person with Alzheimer’s. His work reminds us that the disease—even as it frightens and drains us—also illustrates our ability to recognize the presence, as Elmer describes, “of God on Earth” through the legacy of love for one another.

Call today to be in the next publication! H EALT m a g a z i n e RCES F

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Websites For more information on the work of Elmer and Alyce Green, visit their foundation’s website: elmergreenfoundation.org. To learn about the Menninger Clinic as it exists today, visit menningerclinic.com/about/ research. Information on HeartMath can be found at their website: heartmath.com. Books The Ozawkie Book of the Dead is a somewhat difficult book to find. Locally a copy can be loaned out through interlibrary loan at the Lawrence Public Library, checked out at the Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library or read on the grounds of the Kansas State Historical Society. The three-volume work also can be ordered online the through partners of the Elmer E. and Alyce M. Green Foundation: elmergreenfoundation. org/green-references

• Light housekeeping • Personal Care • Meal assistance • Local errands and transportation • Community integration • Caregiver support Douglas County’s hometown, nonprofit in-home support provider. Sliding scale available to those who qualify.

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26

TRUSTED TRAVELER

Travelers rush through Chicago O’Hare Airport. Shutterstock.

LAWRENCE SENIOR

2020


27 STORY BY Susan Kraus

For seniors planning to travel, a government pre-approval program can reduce the hassles of crossing the U.S. border or through airport security

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’m not sure if there was an exact moment when I realized just how frustrated I was with the hassles of air travel. Maybe it was when I dragged out my laptop and quartsize bag of mini-bottles of liquids, took off my shoes, emptied my pockets, removed my sweater—all those tedious demands of airport screening. Maybe it was when I finally got to board my flight and realized I had left my sweater at screening. Or perhaps it was when, with a tight connection to make, I entered the massive customs “welcome” hall at O’Hare and saw lines twisted so far back that I couldn’t count the rows. Or perhaps it was when I made it halfway to the front of these lines and realized I had two minutes at most to make it to a bathroom. Oops. Or maybe it was simply turning 69. This is a time of life when I want to travel more but have to face that my energy levels and patience (like after flying 12 hours from Barcelona via Heathrow to O’Hare) have limits. Flying is no longer fun. And I want to have more fun. One answer is to become a “Trusted Traveler,” the term U.S. government officials use for people pre-approved for shorter lines at borders and boardings. Becoming a Trusted Traveler is not that complicated and does provide big benefits for the cost. Here are the steps to become one.

1.

Find the official website. If you search for “Trusted Traveler” online, you will likely find an assortment of professionallooking websites popping up. They will help assemble your application and charge a hefty fee, but they are not official. The official sites have acronyms like ttp, cbp or dhs (translation: Trusted Traveler Programs, Customs & Border Patrol and Department of Homeland Security) and end in the domain “gov.” The one most commonly used is ttp.dhs.gov.

2.

Select the program that best fits your travels. There are a range of Trusted Traveler programs. The NEXUS program, for example, is directed at travelers who make regular trips into Canada. The SENTRI program is for travelers going into Mexico and Canada; the FAST program is for commercial truck drivers. The option that fits most tourists from Kansas would be the TSA Pre Check or the Global Entry programs. TSA Pre Check costs $85 and simplifies departure for all flights. Once you’re

LAWRENCE SENIOR

approved, you can keep on your shoes, leave your laptop and quart-size baggie of liquids in your carry-on bag, wear your jacket, etc. Just walk through the machine and smile. The Global Entry program, with its $100 fee, includes all the benefits of TSA Pre Check but also gets you expedited reentry into the United States after traveling overseas. Many airports have special kiosk lines for Global Entry travelers where you slide in your passport, place your finger on a scanner, complete a customs form and then exit to collect your luggage. Other entries have designated booths with very short lines for Global Entry travelers. At land border crossings, there are usually “fast lanes” for Global Entry travelers.

3.

Complete the application. This looks simple but can get tricky. For example, first you fill out a Profile Page. I put down my name as Susan (first) Jane (middle) Kraus (last). But, when they asked for my passport info, my name is Susan Jane Kraus, with Jane not listed as a “middle name” because the birth certificate I used 56 years ago to first apply for a passport did not define it that way. Until I realized that, I could not figure out why my application kept getting rejected on grounds that the information did not match the data. Suggestion: Passport information always trumps other ID. However, this isn’t true when they ask for driver’s license information. On this section, you just fill it out as the license reads, middle initial and all. Another hurdle comes with the address information, where the form requests your address for the last five years. Since I moved into my home in 1991, I entered August 1991 and ended with September 2019 (when I was completing the application). It was rejected. Turns out that when they ask for “Five Years” they want that exactly. Start with 5 years prior to the application (month and year) until current month and year. So, for me it was September 2014 to September 2019. On the employment section, use the same protocol. Start with exactly 5 years prior to application and end with month of your application.

4.

Make payment. Once the system accepts your application, you pay the fee. It’s nonrefundable, but the payment of $85 for TSA Pre Check and the payment of $100 for Global Entry both last for five years.

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OFFICIAL WEBSITES FOR TRUSTED TRAVELER PROGRAMS 5.

Schedule the interview. Within a week of submitting my application, I received an email that my application for the Trusted Traveler program had been “conditionally approved.” Then I was told I had 365 days to schedule an interview. The interview location closest to Lawrence is the Kansas City International Airport (Terminal C). So I logged on to schedule an appointment and was told “None available at this time.” I tried again a few days later and found a few slots listed for three months later. The government describes the interview procedures on the website: they cross-check ID, take a photo, take fingerprints, and then validate your passport with its new status. It is possible to bypass months of waiting for an interview if you are taking an international trip in the near future. “When arriving in United States on an international flight, conditionally approved Global Entry applicants can complete their interview without an advance appointment at any of the 52 airports with a Global Entry Enrollment on Arrival program,” explains Jeffrey Quinones, with Customs and Border Patrol (CBP). You can find more information about this on the CBP’s website. So that’s it. If you follow these steps at your leisure, you should have approval for five years of fast-track status as you go through screenings and customs. And every time that happens, you will likely be glad that you made the effort in advance.

2020

Entry portal for all Trusted Traveler options, including TSA Pre Check, Global Entry, NEXUS, SENTRI and FAST. https://ttp.dhs.gov Information on applying for conditionally approved applicants to finalize Global Entry application at international entry point: https://www.cbp.gov/travel/ trusted-traveler-programs/globalentry/enrollment-arrival/locations.

PROCESSING DELAYS Because Trusted Traveler is a government program, it is affected by any government shutdown. As of writing this article, the official site continues to have a “significant delays” notice from the previous government shutdown. Keep this in mind when planning your travel and application process.


RESOURCES

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30 | LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS, STATE AND NATIONAL RESOURCES • Abuse/Neglect/Exploitation and Fraud/Discrimination • Aging Advocacy and Support Services • Useful Toll-Free Health and Services Numbers 31 | COMMUNITY RESOURCES • Caregiver Resources • Disability Services • Education/Recreation • Emergency Services/Utility Assistance • Employment Resources • Farm and Rural Assistance • Financial Assistance Programs and Information • Food Resources • CHAMPSS Meal Programs • Congregate Senior Dining Centers • Congregate Dining Centers • Home Meal Delivery • Food Banks • Grief and Loss Support • Information and Referral • Legal Services • Public Libraries • Tax Assistance • Transportation • Veterans Affairs • Volunteer Opportunities Referral Services • Weatherization 34 | HOUSING 35 | HOME SERVICES • Assistive Technology/Medical Equipment • Help at Home • Home Repair Programs • Hospice • Resources for Independent Living • Therapy Services (in Home) 36 | HEALTH SERVICES • Adult Day Care • Deaf and Hard of Hearing Resources • Dental Assistance • Health Insurance Counseling/ Medicare/Medicaid • Hospitals and Clinics • Mental Health Services • Services for the Visually Impaired • Therapy/Rehabilitation Services LAWRENCE SENIOR

2020


RESOURCES

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LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS

KANSAS ELDER LAW HOTLINE

SENIOR RESOURCE CENTER FOR DOUGLAS COUNTY (SRC)

KANSAS LONG TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN

745 Vermont St, Lawrence (785) 842-0543 www.yoursrc.org

JAYHAWK AREA AGENCY ON AGING 2001 Haskell Lawrence, KS 66046 (785) 235-1367 or (800) 798-1366 www.jhawkaaa.org

STATE AND NATIONAL RESOURCES ABUSE/NEGLECT/EXPLOITATION AND FRAUD/DISCRIMINATION

ADULT CARE COMPLAINT PROGRAM (800) 842-0078

ADULT PROTECTIVE SERVICES (800) 922-5330

KANSAS PROTECTION REPORT CENTER (800) 922-5330

KANSAS ADVOCATES FOR BETTER CARE (785) 842-3088 www.kabc.org

KANSAS ATTORNEY GENERAL Topeka (785) 296-2215 (888) 428-8436 Consumer protection division (800) 432-2310

KANSAS DEPARTMENT FOR AGING AND DISABILITY SERVICES (KDADS) Abuse, Neglect or Exploitation Hotline (800) 842-0078

KANSAS CRISIS HOTLINE

(888) 353-5337

(785) 296-3017 or (877) 662-8362 AGING ADVOCACY AND SUPPORT SERVICES

AGING AND DISABILITY RESOURCE CENTER (ADRC) (800) 432-3535 www.kdads.ks.gov

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION HEART OF AMERICA CHAPTER (800) 272-3900

ELDERCARE LOCATOR

US Administration on Aging referral resource (800) 677-1116 www.eldercare.acl.gov

KANSAS DEPARTMENT FOR AGING AND DISABILITY SERVICES Publishes statewide Aging and Disability Resource Guide (785) 296-4986 or (800) 432-3535 www.kdads.ks.gov

KANSAS DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE

Taxpayer Assistance (785) 368-8222 Kansas Taxpayer Advocate (844) 545-5640

KANSAS FOUNDATION FOR MEDICAL CARE, INC.

(785) 273-2552 or (800) 432-0770 www.kfmc.org

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Non-commercial resource for health and wellness information (800) 222-2225 TTY: (800) 222-4225 www.nia.nih.gov USEFUL TOLL-FREE HEALTH AND SERVICES NUMBERS

AARP KANSAS (866) 448-3619

ADULT ABUSE AND NEGLECT

In the community (800) 922-5330 In an adult care home (800) 842-0078

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (24-HOUR HELP LINE) (785) 842-0110

AL-ANON (FOR FRIENDS AND FAMILIES OF ALCOHOLICS) (888) 425-2666

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION (800) 272-3900

AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION (800) 342-2383

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION (800) 242-8721

AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION (800) 586-4872

ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION GREATER KANSAS CHAPTER (913) 369-4247

AUDIO READER (785) 864-4600

(888) 363-2287 2020

LAWRENCE SENIOR


RESOURCES CONSUMER HOTLINE (ATTORNEY GENERAL’S OFFICE) (800) 432-2310

DISABILITY RIGHTS CENTER OF KANSAS (877) 776-1541

ELDERCARE LOCATOR (800) 677-1116

HOUSING AND CREDIT COUNSELING, INC (800) 383-0217

KANSAS COMMISSION FOR THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING Toll-free: V/TTY: (866) 213-9079 Voice: (785) 368-7471 TTY: (785) 246-7478 www.dcf.ks.gov

KANSAS COMMISSION ON VETERANS’ AFFAIRS

31

LEGISLATIVE HOTLINE (800) 432-3924

LONG TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN (877) 662-8362

MEDICAID FRAUD HOTLINE MEDICARE INFORMATION

EDUCATION/RECREATION

1-800-MEDICARE or (800) 633-4227

SUBSTANCE ABUSE HOTLINE POISON CONTROL

BALDWIN CITY RECREATION COMMISSION

(800) 662-4357

(800) 222-1222

SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

Lawrence office (800) 772-1213

TALKING BOOKS SERVICE TELEMARKETERS (NO CALL LIST)

KANSAS FOUNDATION FOR MEDICAL CARE

(888) 382-1222 TTY: (866) 290-4236

VETERANS AFFAIRS VA CLINC

(800) 766-3777 LAWRENCE SENIOR

DOWNTOWN TUESDAY PAINTERS

745 Vermont St., Lawrence, KS 66044 (785) 842-0543

EUDORA PARKS AND RECREATION

INDEPENDENCE, INC.

SENIOR RESOURCE CENTER FOR DOUGLAS COUNTY (SRC) Caregivers Support Group Lawrence (785) 842-0543 www.yoursrc.org

KANSAS RELAY CENTER (TDD)

(785) 843-7058 www.douglas.ksu.edu

COMMUNITY RESOURCES

KANSAS GUARDIANSHIP PROGRAM

(800) 432-2484

DOUGLAS COUNTY EXTENSION OFFICE

(800) 574-8387 x54650

CAREGIVER RESOURCES

KANSAS INSURANCE DEPARTMENT

Baldwin City (785) 594-3670 www.baldwinrec.org

Eudora (785) 542-3434 www.eudoraparksandrec.org

(800) 432-0770

(800) 672-0086

ADULT LEARNING CENTER (785) 832-5960 www.usd497.org

KANSAS DEPARTMENT FOR AGING AND DISABILITY SERVICES

(888) 353-5337

INDEPENDENCE, INC.

Lawrence (785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org

(888) 657-7323

KANSAS ELDER LAW HOTLINE

(785) 296-4986 www.kdads.ks.gov

(866) 551-6328

(785) 296-3976

(800) 432-3535 TTY: (785) 291-3167

KANSAS AGING AND DISABILITY RESOURCE CENTER

DISABILITY SERVICES

COTTONWOOD, INC. (785) 842-0550 www.cwood.org

(785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org

KAW VALLEY BRIDGE CLUB

(785) 838-3196 www.kawvalleybridge.wordpress.com

KAW VALLEY QUILTERS GUILD www.kawvalleyquiltersguild.org

LAWRENCE ARTS CENTER (785) 843-2787 www.lawrenceartscenter.org

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RESOURCES

32

LAWRENCE CIVIC CHOIR

www.lawrencecivicchoir.org

LAWRENCE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL (785) 840-3072 www.lmh.org

LAWRENCE PARKS AND RECREATION

ECKAN

SOCIAL SECURITY

HEADQUARTERS DOUGLAS CO.

FOOD RESOURCES

(785) 841-3357 www.eckan.org

Lawrence (785) 841-2345 www.headquarterscounselingcenter.org

800) 772-1213 or (800) 325-0778 TTY | www.ssa.gov

CHAMPSS MEAL PROGRAMS

(785) 832-7920 www.lawrenceks.org/lprd/home

SALVATION ARMY

LUMBERYARD ARTS CENTER

EMPLOYMENT RESOURCES

JAYHAWK AREA AGENCY ON AGING 2001 Haskell Lawrence, KS 66046 (785) 235-1367 www.jhawkaaa.org

LAWRENCE WORKFORCE CENTER

CONGREGATE SENIOR DINING CENTERS (RESERVATION REQUIRED)

Baldwin City (785) 594-3186 www.lumberyardartscenter.org

NEW HORIZONS BAND (785) 865-3519

OLDSTERS UNITED FOR RESPONSIBLE SERVICE (OURS) (785) 842-8034 or (785) 843-3782

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE

(785) 864-8356 or (877) 404-5823 www.osher.ku.edu

SENIOR RESOURCE CENTER FOR DOUGLAS COUNTY

(785) 843-4188

(785) 840-9675 www.workforcecenters.com/lawrence FARM AND RURAL ASSISTANCE

DOUGLAS COUNTY CONSERVATION DISTRICT OFFICE (785) 843-4288 www.douglasccd.com

FARM SERVICE AGENCY (785) 843-4260 http://www.fsa.usda.gov

BABCOCK PLACE (785) 842-6976

BALDWIN CITY SENIOR CENTER Baldwin City (785) 594-2409

PINE CREST II

Eudora (785) 542-1020 CONGREGATE DINING CENTERS (ALL AGES)

JUBILEE CAFÉ

KANSAS RURAL FAMILY HELPLINE

(785) 842-0543 www.yoursrc.org

At Kansas Agricultural Mediation Services (866) 327-6578

First United Methodist Church 946 Massachusetts (785) 841-7500

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS CONTINUING EDUCATION

USDA RURAL DEVELOPMENT

L.I.N.K. (LAWRENCE INTERDENOMINATIONAL NUTRITION KITCHEN)

(785) 864-5823 or (877) 404-5823 www.kuce.ku.edu EMERGENCY SERVICES/UTILITY ASSISTANCE

AMERICAN RED CROSS

(785) 843-3550 www.redcross.org/local/kansas

BALLARD COMMUNITY CENTER (785) 842-0729 www.ballardcenter.org

2020

Topeka (785) 863-2587

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

221 W. 10th St. (785) 331-3663 www.linklawrence.org

HOUSING AND CREDIT COUNSELING, INC

SALVATION ARMY

(785) 234-0217 www.hcci-ks.org

INDEPENDENCE, INC.

Fiscal Management Services for Frail/Elderly Medicaid Waiver (785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org

946 New Hampshire St. (785) 843-4188 HOME MEAL DELIVERY (REDUCED PRICE)

LAWRENCE MEALS ON WHEELS (785) 830-8844 www.lawrencemow.org

LAWRENCE SENIOR


RESOURCES FOOD BANKS

BALDWIN CITY FOOD PANTRY First United Methodist Church 704 8th Street, Baldwin City (785) 594-6612

BALLARD COMMUNITY CENTER 708 Elm Street, Lawrence (785) 842-0729

CATHOLIC CHARITIES 1330 Kasold, Lawrence (785) 856-2694

CORNERSTONE FOOD PANTRY Cornerstone Baptist Church 802 W. 22nd Street, Lawrence (785) 843-0442

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

1330 Kasold Drive, Lawrence (785) 843-0020

HEARTLAND COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER

33

ST. PAUL’S UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST

738 Church St., Eudora (785) 542-2785

STULL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH FOOD PANTRY 1596 E. 250 Rd., Lecompton (785) 887-6521

TRINITY INTERFAITH PANTRY 1027 Vermont St. (785) 843-6166

GRIEF AND LOSS SUPPORT

MIDLAND CARE

(785) 842-3627 (800) 766-7450 www.midlandcareconnection.org

RUMSEY-YOST FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY (785) 843-5111 www.Rumsey-Yost.com

LEGAL SERVICES

DOUGLAS COUNTY LEGAL AID SOCIETY

(785) 864-5564 www.lawrenceks.org/attorney/legal_aid

KANSAS ATTORNEY GENERAL

Consumer Protection Line Topeka (785) 296-3751 or (800) 432-2310 | www.ag.ks.gov

KANSAS ELDER LAW HOTLINE (888) 353-5337

KANSAS LEGAL SERVICES Topeka (785) 233-2068 www.kansaslegalservices.org PUBLIC LIBRARIES

BALDWIN CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY Baldwin City (785) 594-3411 www.baldwincitylibrary.org

EUDORA PUBLIC LIBRARY Eudora (785) 542-2496 www.eudorapubliclibrary.org

346 Maine, Suite 150, Lawrence (785) 841-7297 www.heartlandhealth.org

WARREN MCELWAIN MORTUARY

HERITAGE BAPTIST CHURCH

INFORMATION AND REFERRAL

(785) 843-3833 www.lplks.org

CENTRO HISPANO RESOURCE CENTER

TAX ASSISTANCE

1781 East 800th Road , Lawrence (785) 887-2200

JUST FOOD

1000 East 11th Street (785) 856-7030

NEW LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 118 5th Street, Baldwin City (785) 594-3045

PENN HOUSE

1035 Pennsylvania (785) 842-0440

Beyond Loss Support Workshop (785) 843-1120

(785) 843-2039

INDEPENDENCE, INC.

(785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org

LAWRENCE/DOUGLAS COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT (785) 843-3060 www.ldchealth.org

LAWRENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY

AARP TAX AIDES

Senior Resource Center for Douglas County (785) 842-0543 www.yoursrc.org

VITA

Ballard Community Center (785) 842-0729 www.ballardservices.org

THE SALVATION ARMY 946 New Hampshire St. (785) 843-4188 LAWRENCE SENIOR

2020


RESOURCES

34

TRANSPORTATION

AT HOME, INC.

(785) 856-1714 www.athomeks.com SENIOR RESOURCE CENTER FOR DOUGLAS COUNTY (SRC) 745 Vermont St (785) 842-0543 www.yoursrc.org

A HELPING HAND HOME CARE (785) 856-0192 www.ahelpinghandhc.com

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE (785) 856-8181 www.homeinstead.com/584

INDEPENDENCE, INC.

(785) 841-0333 or (785) 841-1046 www.independenceinc.org

LAWRENCE TRANSIT SYSTEM

(785) 864-4644 or (785) 312-7063 info@lawrencetransit.org www.lawrencetransit.org

MTM (ACCEPTS MEDICAID) (888)240-6497

TRINITY IN-HOME CARE (785) 842-3159 www.tihc.org

VETERANS AFFAIRS

KANSAS COMMISSION ON VETERANS AFFAIRS (785) 296-3976 www.kcva.ks.gov

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (800) 827-1000 www.va.gov

2020

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES REFERRAL SERVICES

HILL CREST APARTMENTS

ROGER HILL VOLUNTEER CENTER

LAWRENCE PRESBYTERIAN MANOR

(785) 843-6626 www.volunteerdouglascounty.org WEATHERIZATION

CITY OF LAWRENCE NEIGHBORHOOD RESOURCES DEPARTMENT (785) 832-7700

www.lawrenceks.org/pds/housing_programs

ECKAN

(785) 841-3357 www.eckan.org HOUSING

ARBOR COURT AT ALVAMAR (785) 841-6845 www.arborcourt-lawrence.com

BABCOCK PLACE (785) 842-8110 www.ldcha.org

Eudora (785) 542-1755

(785) 371-0577 www.lawrencepresbyterianmanor.org

MEADOWLARK ESTATES

(785) 842-2400 www.seniorlivinginstyle.com

MEDICALLODGES OF EUDORA Eudora (785) 542-2176 www.medicalodgeseudora.com

MONTEREY VILLAGE (785) 227-9101 www.americareusa.net

MORNINGSTAR CARE HOMES

(785) 594-2603 www.morningstarcarehomes.com

NEUVANT HOUSE

(785) 856-7900 www.neuvanthouse.com

BRANDON WOODS AT ALVAMAR

ORCHARD LANE LEISURE LIVING & JERSEY STREET APT SUITES

BRIDGE HAVEN

PETERSON ACRES & PETERSON ACRES II

(785) 218-4083 www.mybridgehaven.com

(785) 842-8110 www.ldcha.org

CLINTON PLACE

PINECREST I AND II

(785) 838-8000 www.brandonwoods.com

(785) 842-8110 www.ldcha.org

DRURY PLACE AT ALVAMAR

Baldwin City (785) 594-6996

Eudora (785) 542-1020

PIONEER RIDGE

(785) 841-6845

(785) 741-8233 www.pioneerridgelawrence.com

EDGEWOOD HOMES

PRAIRIE COMMONS

(785) 842-8110 www.ldcha.org

(785) 746-4064 www.liveatprairiecommons.com

LAWRENCE SENIOR


RESOURCES PRAIRIE RIDGE PLACE (785) 841-8660

SIGNAL RIDGE

Baldwin City (785) 594-3794

VERMONT TOWERS (785) 841-6026

35

A HELPING HAND HOME CARE (785) 856-0192 www.ahelpinghandhc.com

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE (785) 856-8181 www.homeinstead.com/584

MIDLAND CARE CONNECTION

SOUTHERN CARE HOSPICE At Avalon in Topeka (785) 246-6520 www.southerncareinc.com

VISITING NURSES (785) 843-3738 www.kansasvna.org

VILLAGE COOPERATIVE

(785) 232-2040 or (800) 491-3691 www.midlandcareconnection.org

RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING

VINTAGE PARK AT BALDWIN CITY

(785) 856-0192 www.ahelpinghandhc.com

(785) 594-4255 www.vintageparkassistedliving.com

PROFESSIONAL SITTERS HOME HEALTH (785) 842-3301 www.prosittershomehealth.com

WINDSOR OF LAWRENCE

TRINITY IN-HOME CARE

(785) 330-5041 www.villagecooperative.com/lawrence-ks

(785) 330-5885 www.legendseniorliving.com

(785) 842-3159 www.tihc.org

HOME SERVICES

VISITING NURSES (785) 843-3738 www.kansasvna.org

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY/MEDICAL EQUIPMENT

HOME REPAIR PROGRAMS

CRITICARE HOME HEALTH SERVICES, INC.

CITY OF LAWRENCE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

(785) 749-4878 www.criticarehhs.com

(785) 832-7700 www.lawrenceks.org

INDEPENDENCE, INC.

INDEPENDENCE, INC. (ACCESSIBILITY MODIFICATIONS)

(785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org

KNOLL PATIENT SUPPLY APRIA (785) 842-5587 Apria.com

(785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org HOSPICE

KANSAS ELDER CARE (785) 727-4338 www.kseldercare.com

PROJECT LIFESAVER

Douglas County Sheriff’s Department (785) 832-5204 www.dgso.org THERAPY SERVICES (IN HOME)

BALDWIN THERAPY SERVICES Baldwin City (785) 594-3162 www.lmh.org

CAREGIVER’S HOME HEALTH AGENCY (785) 749-0300

VISITING NURSES (785) 843-3738 www.kansasvna.org

GRACE HOSPICE

HELP AT HOME

(785)841-5300 www.gracehospicellc.com

CAREGIVER’S HOME HEALTH AGENCY

MIDLAND CARE CONNECTION

(785) 749-0300

HELPING HAND HOME CARE

(785) 232-2040 www.midlandcareconnection.org

GRACEFUL HOME HEALTH CARE (785) 424-2785 www.gracefulhealthcare.com LAWRENCE SENIOR

2020


RESOURCES

36

HEALTH SERVICES ADULT DAY CARE

BALDWIN HEALTH CARE AND REHABILITATION CENTER Baldwin City (785) 594-6492

COOPER’S HOME CARE (785) 865-2525

MIDLAND CARE CONNECTION (785) 232-2044 www.midlandcareconnection.org

NEUVANT HOUSE

(785)856-7900 www.neuvanthouse.com

THE WINDSOR OF LAWRENCE

LAWRENCE OTOLARYNGOLOGY ASSOCIATES, LLC (785) 841-1107 www.lawoto.com

MARSTON HEARING CENTER, LLC (785) 843-8479 www.marstonhc.com

SCHIEFELBUSCH SPEECH – LANGUAGE – HEARING CLINIC 2101 Haworth Hall (785) 864-0630 www.splh.ku.edu

STARKEY HEARING FOUNDATION HEAR NOW PROGRAM (800) 328-8602 www.starkeyhearingfoundation.org DENTAL ASSISTANCE

(785) 832-9900

DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING RESOURCES

AUDIENT (HEARING AID ASSISTANCE FOR LOW INCOME INDIVIDUALS) (866) 956-5400 www.audientalliance.org

INDEPENDENCE, INC.

(785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org

KANSAS COMMISSION FOR THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING (KCDHH) Toll-free: V/TTY: (800) 432-0698 Voice: (785) 368-8034 TTY: (785) 368-8046 VP: (785) 246-5077 www.dcf.ks.gov

LAWRENCE HEARING AID CENTER 4106 W. 6 SUITE E. (785) 749-1885 www.neighborhoodhearing.com 2020

DOUGLAS COUNTY DENTAL CLINIC (785) 312-7770 www.dcdclinic.org

HEALTH INSURANCE COUNSELING/ MEDICARE/MEDICAID

DOUGLAS COUNTY SENIOR SERVICES, INC.

Senior Health Insurance Counseling for Kansas (785) 842-0543 www.yoursrc.org

JAYHAWK AREA AGENCY ON AGING

HASKELL HEALTH CENTER (NATIVE AMERICAN PATIENTS ONLY) 2415 Massachusetts Street (785) 843-3750

HEALTH CARE ACCESS, INC. 330 Maine Street (785) 841-5760 www.healthcareaccess.org

HEARTLAND COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER

346 Maine St Suite 150, Lawrence (785) 841-7297 www.heartlandhealth.org

LAWRENCE COMMUNITY BASED OUTREACH CLINIC Primary care service for veterans 2200 Harvard Road, Lawrence (800) 574-8387, x54650

LAWRENCE-DOUGLAS COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT CLINIC 200 Maine Street (785) 843-0721 www.ldchealth.org

LAWRENCE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL (MAIN CAMPUS) 325 Maine (785) 505-5000 www.lmh.org

MEDEXPRESS URGENT CARE

(785) 235-1367 www.jhawkaaa.org

3420 West Sixth St (785) 841-3123 www.medexpress.com

HOSPITALS AND CLINICS

PRECISION CANCER CARE

FIRST MED, PA

2323 Ridge Court (785) 865-5300 www.firstmedpa.com

(785) 749-3600

PROMPTCARE

3511 Clinton Pl (785) 838-1500 www.urgentcarelawrenceks.com

LAWRENCE SENIOR


RESOURCES WALGREENS TAKE CARE HEALTH CARE CLINIC SM 3421 W. Sixth (785) 841-9000 www.takecarehealth.com

MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

BERT NASH COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENTER (785) 843-9192 www.bertnash.org

HEADQUARTERS COUNSELING CENTER

37

INDEPENDENCE, INC.

(785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org

TALKING BOOKS

(620) 341-6280 or (800) 362-0699 www.kslib.info/153/Talking-Books

ADVANTAGE MEDICAL GROUP

NEU PHYSICAL THERAPY

(785) 749-0130 www.admedgroup.com

BIRD PHYSICAL THERAPY

SERVICES FOR THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED

(785) 749-0300 www.caregiverskansas.com

LAWRENCE SENIOR

LAWRENCE MEMORIAL EUDORA THERAPY SERVICES Eudora (785) 542-3344 www.lmh.org

(785) 331-0106 www.birdpt.com

(785) 864-4600 www.reader.ku.edu

(785) 505-3780 www.lmh.org

THERAPY/REHABILITATION SERVICES

24 Hour Community Information (785) 841-2345 (800) 273-8255 www.headquarterscounselingcenter.org

AUDIO-READER NETWORK

LAWRENCE MEMORIAL SOUTH THERAPY SERVICES

CAREGIVER’S HOME HEALTH AGENCY

LAWRENCE MEMORIAL THERAPY SERVICES

Baldwin City (785) 594-4100

NEU PHYSICAL THERAPY (785) 842-3444

SERC PHYSICAL THERAPY 2108 W 27th St Ste K. (785) 856-0160

VISITING NURSES (785) 843-3738 www.kansasvna.org

(785) 505-2712 www.lmh.org

2020


It’s a great place to call

HOME!

Restaurant style dining ~ Gracious living Full range of care & services to meet various needs & preferences

Downtown. Open daily. Yarns. Patterns. Classes.

321 Crimson Ave. | Baldwin City, Kansas 785-594-4255 www.vintageparkassistedliving.com

karena schmitendorf real estate

Is a move in your future? Let’s talk!

785.813.1851 | karenahomes@kw.com

YARN BARN 930 Massachusetts Street

IT’S YOUR HOME

KW INTEGRITY


2019–20 Season Highlights See complete season online!

The King’s Singers

Tue • 7:30

OCT 29

One of the world’s oldest and best a cappella ensembles

The story of Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons

Sat • 7:30

NOV 2

Wed • 7:00

DEC 11

Tony Award-winning revival with a Grammy-winning score

Thu • 7:30

JAN 23

Siberian State Symphony Orchestra with Vladimir Lande, Music Director and Chief Conductor

Russian National Ballet:

Don Quixote

Sun • 2:00

FEB 16

Tue • 7:30

MAR 3

Samuel Ramey:

An Intimate Evening of Music & Storytelling World-renowned operatic bass-baritone

Fri • 7:30

APR 3

A Tony and Grammy Award-winning Broadway hit

Wed • 7:30

APR 22

Seniors (age 62+) save 10% off adult tickets for Lied Series’ shows in the auditorium.

Profile for Sunflower Publishing

Lawrence Magazine Senior 2020