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2018

RESOURCE GUIDE

lawrence

SENIOR The Rising Stars of

+ Nelson Krueger: 7 Decades in the Air

+ Senior Travel:

Slower, Smarter … Simply Better

+ Ted Johnson:

Beyond Stop Day

+ Resource Listing

Essential Contacts for Seniors


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• Take trips to see the gorgeous fall foliage • Enjoy Five Star service and I love the Arbor! My mom has been fine dining through every step at Brandon Woods at Alvamar.and She started in Independent Relax enjoy every day, Living, then Assisted Living, then the while our caring takes Arbor for Memory Care. We staff have been happy with and the people care of each thelevel rest that care for her. I have never had a bad experience. I tell everyone that I have been through it all. The people have always been very good. I couldn’t have asked for more.

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Your Hometown Team

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lawrence

SENIOR EDITOR Nathan Pettengill ART DIRECTOR Jenni Leiste DESIGNER Amanda Nagengast

We hope you enjoy and benefit from this special edition of Lawrence Magazine, the 2018 Lawrence Senior resource guide. This publication began several years ago as a collaboration with regional senior agencies and has since grown into an annual stand-alone publication focusing on senior life and opportunities for Lawrence-area residents. As with all Lawrence Magazine publications, we take pride in bringing original and independent stories focusing on local issues, told by and about Lawrence-area residents. We have no editorial or commercial interest above bringing you authentic stories and information. Whichever birthday you celebrate this year—whether it’s your 27th, 72nd, 39th or 93rd—we wish you the best and hope this publication plays a small part in making the year a better one for you.

MARKETING EXECUTIVE Joanne Morgan

Nathan Pettengill, editor

AD DESIGNERS Jenni Leiste Amanda Nagengast COPY EDITOR Leslie Andres WRITERS Frank Barthell Suzanne Heck

Toni Dixon Susan Kraus

PHOTOGRAPHERS Brian Goodman Susan Kraus Nick Krug Michael C. Snell

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PUBLISHER Bill Uhler

06

The ‘Airport Kid’

12

Masters of the Granny Shot

18

Senior Travel

22

A Project for Life

25

Resource Listings

DIRECTOR Bob Cucciniello PRODUCTION MANAGER Shelly Bryant

Lawrence Senior is a special annual publication of Lawrence Magazine, part of Sunflower Publishing, a division of Ogden Publications.

ON THE

COVER Michele Clark plays for the Kansas Grayhawkers, a Lawrence-based Granny Basketball team.; photograph by Nick Krug 2018

RESOURCE GUIDE

lawrence

SENIOR The Rising Stars of

+ Nelson Krueger: 7 Decades in the Air

+ Senior Travel:

Slower, Smarter … Simply Better

+ Ted Johnson: Beyond Stop Day

+ Resource Listing

Essential Contacts for Seniors

Sunflower Publishing 645 New Hampshire St. | Lawrence, KS 66044 (888) 497-8668. | sunflowerpub.com

Nelson Krueger’s head is usually in the clouds, but he’s about as grounded as a person can be

Meet the new basketball legends who sport middy collars and rule the passing game

Traveling as a senior requires some adjustment, but it can also lead to the best trips of your life

The professor know for his Stop Day tours discusses learning at all stages of life

Essential numbers and quick facts about retired living in Douglas County


Nelson Krueger stands in a hangar at Lawrence Municipal Airport on his 70th birthday.

2018

LAWRENCE SENIOR


story by Suzanne Heck

photography by Brian Goodman

7

THE

‘AIRPORT KID’ Nelson Krueger’s head is usually in the clouds, but he’s about as grounded as a person can be

I

t is a September morning, and Nelson Krueger is planning to celebrate his 70th birthday in typical fashion … by piloting a flight over Lawrence. For Krueger, preparing a flight means more than just checking out his craft. He’s giving particular attention to some of his first-time passengers, briefing them on what to expect, how the craft works and what they can expect to see him do with the rudder and other equipment. “My grandfather and father always told me that people might not always remember what you said, but how you made them feel. You should treat people as you would want to be treated,” Krueger explains, taking the Golden Rule into the skies. Seated in the pilot’s chair of a Cessna 172-S, Krueger scans the console as he prepares to guide it onto the runway. He turns to his passengers to make sure everyone is comfortable, prepared for the ride and ready to hear just one more quip from their captain. “We go nice and slow,” he assures the group of first-timers, “so that if something happens, it happens slowly.” But they need not worry. The plane, after all, is in good hands. As a veteran pilot, Krueger has vast and impressive accomplishments. Not once, in over 50 years, has he been cited for a single airplane accident or flaw in his piloting. He has flown everything from two-seater planes to Boeing 747s. Originally from Natoma (near Hays), Krueger got the bug for learning to fly when he was 13 years old. Known around town as the “Hays Airport Kid,” he learned to pilot from Kenny Woodruff, who managed the airport and taught lessons. Krueger began calling Woodruff “Pappy,” and in return, Woodruff called his young protégé “Pup.” Using money he had earned as a carry-out boy at Dillon’s to pay for his lessons, Krueger took his first solo flight at 16 in a Cessna 172-A. By the time Krueger turned 18, he had his commercial pilot’s license, and at 21 was selected out of a group of 20 to be one of the first pilots to fly for TWA. At that

LAWRENCE SENIOR

time, TWA was headquartered in Kansas City, and Krueger flew TWA jets for the next 30 years. One of his proudest achievements was piloting U.S. soldiers back and forth from Desert Storm in Saudi Arabia in 18 missions as part of the civilian force, the Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF). Over the course of his career, he has logged 665 Atlantic and 154 Pacific crossings, and in 2014 the FAA recognized his contributions and service with the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award for practicing pilot safety. Krueger is also proud of being a pilot on the flight crew that transported Pope John Paul II when he toured the U.S. in 1979 in a Boeing 727. Krueger has good memories of his time with the pope and holds dear the family’s Bible that the pope signed. Krueger explains these achievements with modesty and a story of his father. “My dad told me when I was a boy that I was born smart enough to be lucky,” he says. “And looking back on it all, I know he was right.” On the ground, Krueger’s affiliation with Lawrence began in 1967 when he applied for an instructing job with University of Kansas’ ROTC program and also became a flight instructor at the Lawrence Municipal Airport. Krueger is still teaching flying lessons there and has played an instrumental part in its success. Daily operations are handled by Hetrick Air Services, which has managed the airport for more than 30 years. Krueger is proud that for a mid-size city airport, the facility has full aeronautical services that provides fuel, hangar space, tie-down, parking, aircraft rental and maintenance. The airport also hosts the Lifestar medical transport helicopter and KU’s jet that takes the chancellor and other KU leaders to and from Lawrence. In the air above Lawrence, Krueger points out the city’s landmarks—the wetlands, the oxbow of the Kaw River, the historic buildings and the current construction projects. He knows who is working on each project, the funding behind it and a few factoids for each miniature object below.

2018


8

LEARN

TO FLY NELSON KRUEGER’S GUIDE TO EARNING A PILOT’S LICENSE

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

2018

Krueger guides his Cessna 172-S for a flight over Lawrence.

SOLO-INTRODUCTORY FLIGHT INSTRUCTION: Takes 10 hours of ground training and must pass written exam, physical exam, and first solo flight. PRIVATE PILOT RATING: Minimum 20 hours of ground training, 20 hours of primary flight instruction and 20 hours of solo time, including two destination flights with one to an airport with a control tower. Must demonstrate ability to perform primary flight maneuvers under visual and instrument conditions. Will receive a training kit and must pass a flight physical, written exam and a FAA check ride exam with a designated examiner. INSTRUMENT PILOT RATING: Minimum 20 hours of ground training and 40 hours of primary flight instruction operating the aircraft under a “hood,” or vision-limiting device. Will receive a training kit and must pass written exam and a check ride exam with a FAA examiner. COMMERCIAL PILOT RATING: Minimum of 250 hours of primary flight instruction with satisfactory completion of specific conditions and flight maneuvers, including “lazy eights.” Must pass written exam, oral exam and flight check ride with an FAA examiner. AIRLINE TRANSPORT PILOT RATING: Minimum 1,500 hours of primary flight instruction and must pass written exam and check ride exam. Rating is followed by regular six-month medical reviews and check rides. Currently, all airplane captains and first officers (co-pilots) are required to have an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) certificate.

LAWRENCE SENIOR


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And the area he knows best is the airport. Krueger calls the airport his “wheelhouse” because it is where he spends almost 300 days a year. His affection for the place is obvious; he guides tours of the facility, which he has adorned with several photo collages put together through the years. Some of the displays document the airport’s history, such as the day Rupert Murdoch’s $65 million Gulfstream 650 jet stopped in for service and to pick up a passenger. Other photos are of well-known Kansas celebrities and airport visitors such as Bill Self, David Booth, Phil Anschultz, Alan Mulally and Danny Manning. Krueger has also been a strong advocate of teaching women to fly. At TWA he was involved in training the first five women to become pilots for the airline and has encouraged and trained women to fly in the years since. In 2011, he was recognized for his efforts by the Ninety-Nines, an international group of over 5,000 women pilots that was founded by Amelia Earhart in the 1930s. Krueger was honored by being inducted into the International Forest of Friendship, an arboretum memorial park located in Earhart’s hometown of Atchison. During layoffs in the 1970s, when Krueger was not flying for TWA, he worked as a legislative assistant for Senator Bob Dole, whom he met when he was young. He was also a White House appointee from 1981–86, serving as a secretary’s representative for the U.S. Department of Labor for 10 states. Considered an expert in grass-roots coalition building, he has also been an adviser and consultant LAWRENCE SENIOR

to various corporate boards and at one time acted as chairman of the TWA Employment Committee, which consisted of over 38,000 workers. Presently, he is using his past experience and knowledge as founder and CEO of Leading Edge, Ltd., a consulting and lobbying firm that he operates with his wife, Judy, who was on the legislative team during Governor Bill Graves’ tenure in Kansas, and the pair provides services public relations advice and legislative lobbying on regulatory issues at all levels. Back in the plane, on his birthday, Krueger takes his passengers above the University of Kansas, to the edge of Clinton Lake, and back to North Lawrence. It is the area that this boy from Hays has shared his knowledge and enthusiasm with a new generation of pilots and community leaders, and the area whose future he hopes will remain bright. “We debate and debate about plans in Lawrence, and some people criticize that, but I like all of that discussion. Lawrence has successfully managed growth, and it has been structured,” says Krueger, relying on his decades of involvement in the community and his regular bird’s-eye perspective of it. “I want to continue to fly over Lawrence as I do each Saturday and see a busy farmers’ market, to see Downtown continue to be preserved, to see the Jayhawk Sports Pavilion continue to grow, to see the K-10 crossing emerge. We have such a wonderful marriage of town and gown, the community and university, and my dream is to see that continue.”

TOURS LAWRENCE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT offers sightseeing airplane tours of the Lawrence area, including Clinton Lake, Baker Wetlands, KU campus and Downtown Lawrence. Two tours available: 30 minutes for $105 and 60 minutes for $170. Plane seats three people and comes with pilot guide who offers information about Lawrence and flying an airplane. Call Hetrick Air Services at 785-842-0000 for details.

2018


10

2010s

Celebrating 7 decades in the air.

THE LIFE AND FLIGHTS OF NELSON KRUEGER 2000s Meeting with Chuck Yeager. Having dinner with Captain Chesley Sullenberger.

1990s Looking out the top of a 747. Piloting 18 missions in Desert Storm.

1980s Working as Kansas Administrative Assistant for Senator Bob Dole. Serving as U. S. Secretary of Labor Regional Representative for President Ronald Reagan from 1983-1987.

1970s Piloting Shepherd One for Pope John Paul II. Receiving the TWA Tillinghast Award of Excellence.

1960s Piloting at age 18 in Piper Twin Comanche 7199Y. Then flight instructing in Piper Cherokee at age 18. 2018

1950s Overhauling my first engine at age 9. LAWRENCE SENIOR


& Crematory

Locally owned & operated funeral home & crematory since 1920. 6TH & INDIANA, LAWRENCE • 785-843-5111


M AS T E R S O F T H E

GRANNY SHOT Meet the new basketball legends who sport middy collars and rule the passing game


story by Toni Dixon

G

ayle Sigurdson had never played basketball in her life. In fact, she says she didn’t particularly care for sports. But that was before Granny Basketball. Now—sporting the number 451 as a tribute to author Ray Bradbury—Sigurdson regularly suits up with the Grayhawkers, one of the city’s two competitive Granny Basketball teams, part of a growing national league of senior-aged dribblers and highscorers in throwback sportswear. Granny Basketball is a six-on-six game adapted from the rules and style of women’s 1920s basketball teams. Each six-woman team includes two forwards, two guards and two centers who are assigned and must remain in sections of the court (divided into thirds). The running clock counts out eight-minute quarters, at the end of which players typically rotate between court positions or the bench. The rules forbid touching an opponent or running, though “hurrying” is permissible. Only the two forwards may shoot the ball, and all players are limited to two dribbles per possession. Jumping is also forbidden, so there are no slam-dunks, but players can score a three-pointer by shooting the ball in the game’s signature style—the “granny shot.” Sigurdson explains that these rules dictate the style of play. The limited dribbling results in a passing-game strategy. Speed and physical strength are less important than strategy, coordinated play and teamwork. No one person can run the court. And the limited physical contact nearly eliminates all collision injuries. Granny Basketball is not a lesser version of the standard game, but an entirely different standard. “The style is really different,” says Sigurdson. “Spectators may come, at first, because they think this game is gimmicky, but in five minutes they see that this is a real game, competitive and skillful,” she says. Of course, that doesn’t mean the league doesn’t bend toward gimmicky when it wants to. Case in point, the retro uniforms, probably the first thing that grabs a spectator’s attention: bloomers, sailor tops, a sash, long sleeves and a middy collar with the player’s

LAWRENCE SENIOR

number on the back, and very colorful socks pulled way up. After all, those socks have to cover up any skin. “You can’t have any flesh showing other than your face, neck, hands and forearms,” says player Dee Bisel, “otherwise, you get a technical—a ‘flesh foul.’ That call from the referee gets the spectators riled up, hooting and cheering,” she adds with a laugh. Bisel, who now plays center for Lawrence’s second team, the Gray Tornadoes, grew up shooting hoops in the driveway then played basketball in junior high and high school. That background might explain why she found herself hooked so quickly. “I saw a newspaper article that women were looking to start a second team. I went to a practice, and the next thing I knew, they had us out on the court,” Bisel recalls. “One of the funny things about Granny Basketball is that you’re not allowed to run or jump, but there’s no position that stands still. Let’s just say we hurry a lot. Your heart is pumping by the end of the game.” Other players, such as Arlene Marshall, were slower converts to the sport. “I went to one of their practices, and I didn’t think it looked very interesting, but now I can hardly wait until the next one,” says Marshall, who now plays for the Grayhawkers. Marshall is no stranger to sports. As a kid, she played softball with her brothers. At age 12, she was playing basketball with adult women. She’s one of very few women of her era to make a profession out of basketball. At 21, she got a call from the Harlem Globe Trotters and was invited to join the Hollywood Queens, the all-female team that traveled the world with the famous men’s basketball team. “And,” Marshall notes, “that was before Title IX,” the 1972 federal law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in federally funded education programs and activities and opened the door for women’s collegiate sports. “I’m a little cocky. I thought this would be easy, but it’s a challenging game,” laughs the 80-year-old former professional and, now, emerging Granny Basketball star.

photography by Nick Krug

13

TOP: Toni Martin BOTTOM: Teresa Miller OPPOSITE: Michele Clark, Gayle Sigurdson and Ruby Brumley play for Lawrencebased Granny Basketball teams.

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14

THE

LEAGUE

TOP: Granny Basketball players, from left, Toni Martin, Dee Bisel, Teresa Miller and Pat Conner strike a pose inspired by 1920 women’s basketball team photographs. BOTTOM: Kathleen Ramonda OPPOSITE (CLOCKWISE): Members of the Lawrence Granny Basketball teams include, back row from left, Mary Pat Pellet, Michele Clark, Teresa Miller and Llynde Lacey as well as, front row, Kathleen Ramonda; Arlene Marshall; Eileen Schreiber; the combined Grayhawkers and Gray Tornadoes squads; Colette Winkelbauer.

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The Granny Basketball League began in Iowa as a one-off, fundraising exhibition match in 2005. It then grew to four teams in Iowa and has since grown into a mostly-Midwestern association of three divisions and nearly 30 teams. In Kansas, there are four squads: the Olathe Sunflowers, the Louisburg Tonics, and the Gray Tornadoes and the Grayhawkers of Lawrence. The Lawrence teams scrimmage against each other on Sundays at the Lawrence community centers and sometimes combine forces to form the Kansas Prairie Storm for away games in Iowa, Oklahoma and Missouri. In the past year, the Lawrence teams brought their game to some big basketball venues—the halftime of a KU game in Allen Fieldhouse and a Washburn Ichabods game in Topeka. In Kansas, the sport entered as an official event for the 2017 Kansas Senior Games, and Lawrence is set to host the league’s national tournament in July 2019.

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Spectators may come, at first, because they think this game is gimmicky, but in five minutes they see that this is a real game, competitive and skillful …

–GAYLE SIGURDSON

LAWRENCE SENIOR

2018


16

WHO YOU CALLING “GRANNY”? YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE A GRANDMOTHER to join either of the Lawrence Granny Basketball squads. The league is open to women 50 years and older who are looking for fitness and fun. “Health to me is not just running up and down the court. It’s having fun, and being a little competitive, there’s no doubt about that,” explains player Dee Bisel. “I’m playing basketball with women I would never have come across otherwise, and I’ve developed these great friendships.” Player Arlene Marshall assures anyone interested in joining that you don’t have to have the experience she brings to the game. “Come out and do it because you get to move around a lot. You don’t have to have a lot of skill. We’ll teach you how to play. It’s an easier game to learn than real basketball.” And, she adds, “No one is grouchy. We’re all friendly.”

CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT: Denise Johnston, Diane Knowles, Pat Conner, Ruby Brumley

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LAWRENCE SENIOR


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story and photography by Susan Kraus

SENIOR

STATUS

Traveling as a senior requires some adjustment, but it can also lead to the best trips of your life

W

hen my 91-year-old mother recently expressed a desire to travel overseas, I had to be the bad daughter and explain that, metaphorically speaking, that ship had sailed. I know she feels disappointed, but I console her with the memories of her many trips, many adventures. She has lived a “well-traveled” life. We may squeeze out one more cruise, but even navigating a ship at this time would be a challenge. While I’m just 67 (I have no idea how this happened … I was only 42 last week), I’m aware that my window for travel, international travel especially, could slam shut with one health crisis. Impaired mobility, impaired cognition, chronic health issues—any or all could make travel, especially solo travel, impossible. This is why I’m a cheerleader for carpe diem when it comes to travel. Once we hit 60, it’s time to stop procrastinating. It’s too easy to get bogged down in routine, work, concern about money for retirement, plus a litany of other priorities. So, keep saving, sure, but spend a little while you’re still healthy and fit enough to enjoy it. I believe that travel really is the best therapy at any age. It both challenges and comforts. Travel takes us mentally, emotionally and physically out of our element. The best travel reconnects us to a childlike curiosity and excitement. Travel offers us a different perspective and can change how we see the world and our lives.

2018

As a senior, choose from a variety of locations for travel such as the mountains of Fiji, the farmers market of Fairfield, Iowa, or a dude ranch near Grand Lake, Colorado.

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HELPFUL

TRAVEL WEBSITES There are a thousand travel websites, and you could spend days sorting through them. If you’re interested in small-group travel that caters to the over-60 crowd and focuses on the experience and learning, check out roadscholar.org (chatting with one of their agents/counselors will guide you to the best fit). For some deals, try smartertravel.com. Look at ricksteves. com or oattravel.com for group travel options for the fit and active. Transitionsabroad.com offers travel with an international focus. Or check out tripstodiscover.com or the AARP travel site (which markets their own products but also has a lot of useful info), travel.aarp.org.

Mackinac Island in Michigan is a wonderful summer resort for seniors to enjoy with grandchildren or on their own.


Going slower as a senior can mean taking time to enjoy guided tours, such as this guided horse ride in the Rocky Mountains.

With that in mind, here are some suggestions for enjoying the best travel opportunities in our senior years: 1) Try some s-l-o-w travel. Slow travel is more about experiences and less about the sights. Lose the schedule. Delete the list. Unpack and settle in. Slow travel doesn’t mean moving slowly, but usually requires more walking (not looking down from a tour bus window). Go somewhere for a week, or a month, and stay put. Meet some locals. Practice a language you don’t know. Sit in a café with a novel and a drink for two or three hours without guilt. You don’t have to see the Mona Lisa on your first day. She isn’t going anywhere and, if she does, you can look at a picture to see what you missed. (Really, thousands of people who wait in lines to check it off their lists mutter “That’s it?” before rushing off to the Eiffel Tower.) You can slow travel in the busiest of cities or in a backwoods parish of Louisiana. Slow travel is ideal for seniors as it allows us to savor the moment and also savor an afternoon nap. 2) Study guidebooks. Thick ones. Use

2018

a highlighter. Make notes in the margins. Select a few “A” list options but seek out more of the “B” or “C” list. My favorite museums are the smaller ones—less crowded, less touristy, more local flavor. Ask locals where they like to eat out, or where their families go for a special occasion. 3) Read books, fiction or nonfiction, set in the location you have picked. Then seek out the places in the books, walk the streets, inhale the smell of rain on pavement (or whatever image permeated the books you read). Before I went to Chile, I read Isabel Allende, Gabriela Mistral and Pablo Neruda. For Germany, it was Thomas Mann (it took a while—his were very long books, but that only extends my “travel” time). The perspectives of these local authors informed mine. Where do you want to go? Start reading the writers who live there as a way to prepare. 4) Heed your bliss. If music makes your heart happy and your feet tap, then search for music wherever you go. If gardens soothe your soul, look over every gate (and visit the serious gardens as well).

Choose destinations for their great music or exceptional gardens. Only you can say what makes you happy, and these personal favorites rarely show up on a list of popular tourist attractions. Just writing this makes me realize that I have to take my mom on a road trip. Maybe just a drive through the Flint Hills, with a stop in Cottonwood Falls. Or to Lindsborg to stay in a B&B and eat Swedish pancakes, meatballs and pastries. Maybe head north around spring break to Grand Island, Nebraska, to see the migration of the sand hill cranes (which can make you feel like you’re in Africa). Maybe surprise her with a night at Hedricks B&B in Nickerson, where she can kiss a camel and play with kangaroos. We’ll head out together, go slowly and enjoy the time. But to all seniors under 90 reading this … get going! Now! You can’t do at 90 what you can do today. Stop waiting for the perfect time for the perfect trip. Carpe diem now! LAWRENCE SENIOR


21

10 SMART

SENIOR TRAVEL MUSTS 1) Put all medications in your carry-on bag, in original prescription containers. Once you get there you can divvy up into a week-at-a-time dispenser. Bring a copy of each prescription, with generic as well as brand name, and an extra week of meds.

7) Go easy on the dairy, spices, fatty and fried foods—what’s fine for locals can surprise your intestines. Prepare for every affliction you have ever endured. Carry anti-diarrhea meds, plus meds for pain and muscle spasms (and, like an umbrella, you may not need it if you carry it).

2) Pack light. Then take out half. Bring laundry powder or liquid for sink washes. Invest in a few pieces of quick-dry clothing. Limit to one spinnerroller suitcase, preferably a smaller size, and a shoulder bag.

8) Lose the bling. Bring only the watch and

3) Bring 2–3 pairs of prescription eyeglasses,

plus sunglasses. Bring the prescription for your glasses and a small magnifying glass for maps. (Order maps from Amazon and study before you go. Yes, you can use the maps on your phone, but studying paper maps in advance helps you orient yourself more confidently once you arrive.)

4) Book any support services available for free

from airlines (wheelchairs, rides between gates, accommodations for security lines, etc.). If your back will ache from standing for an hour, don’t be a martyr. Plus, zipping through the airport on one of those handy carts is stress relief in action.

5) Investigate the senior discounts where you are headed. Many countries have rail passes, flight discounts, and discounted entrance to museums and attractions (the British call such discounts “concessions”). Research in advance and then always ask. Bring your AARP card. 6) Check on your vaccinations and get boosters (tetanus, pneumonia, flu, MMR). Travel smart: know which hospital is closest to your hotel, what to dial for emergencies, a few lines in the local language (or have them written out on a card) like “Help. We need an ambulance. My spouse has a heart condition.” This is not being a worrywart; it’s being prepared. LAWRENCE SENIOR

jewelry, etc., that you can lose without worry. Go minimal. It’s the same with cameras; these days, your phone or a small, pocket-sized camera with some fancy features will meet your needs. You’ll be surprised at the outcome. Keep a credit card and cash in two locations (a little in a small wallet or purse and more in a money belt).

9) Make copies of your passport, driver’s license, travel insurance card with emergency number. Laminate on bright paper for easy retrieval. Make copies of your itinerary and credit cards with contact data so you can cancel if lost or stolen. Have copies of all of the above in your suitcase, your carry-on, and also leave with friends or relatives at home.

10) Do not walk out the door without travel insurance. Medical evacuation insurance is most essential. If you take more than two trips a year, look into annual policies vs. per-trip options. Medicare does not extend overseas, so make sure you have a supplemental on your Part B or C (call and ask about travel coverage). Talking one-onone with an agent at insuremytrip.com will help sort through the options and find the best fit.


interview conducted, transcribed and condensed by Frank Barthell

A PROJECT

FOR LIFE

The professor known for his Stop Day tours discusses learning at all stages of life

photography by Michael C. Snell

Traditions fill the University of Kansas. One recent tradition from 1992 is the Stop Day Walking Tour led by professor emeritus Theodore “Ted” Johnson. Stop Day at KU happens the Friday before exams begin, at the end of the fall and spring semesters. On this day, no classes or events are scheduled, and students are encouraged to take a break. Some students even use the time to prepare for exams. On this day, for the past 15 years, Johnson has invited students, faculty and the entire Lawrence community to join him on the Hill and literally stop “all business,” as the Greeks did on the ancient Acropolis, the high city, where only ideas were exchanged. Johnson’s tours are slow-moving rambles through the center of the university with ample discussion and reflection within the group. In the early years, Johnson referred to the tours as “perspectives on the monuments of Mount Oread.” Each tour is different, depending on the comments and queries of the group, but architecture and an open spirit of inquiry continue to play a large role in framing every tour’s philosophical discussions. The tour route has remained fixed for many years as well. It begins at 9 a.m. outside the Natural History Museum and continues to 6 p.m., when it ends outside Spooner Hall. Everyone is invited. Participants arrive and leave at will. No one is required to have any background in the areas that the talk might draw from, a rich heritage of liberal arts, Greek and Roman history and mythology, art history, paleontology, horticulture or astronomy. Only two things are necessary: One, to show up; two, to take notice. Taking notice of the world around us is a recurring theme for Johnson. He was born in New York City in 1936. His parents, John and Barbara, were artists. John painted. Barbara was, for a time, a fashion designer. They met in France, which maybe explains both Johnson’s eye for detail and his love of all things French. Between receiving his BA in French (minoring in German and art) from San Jose State College in 1958 and beginning his teaching career at the University of Kansas ten years later, Johnson spent two years in France as a Fulbright student, earned a MA and PhD in French (with a minor in art history) both from Wisconsin, and spent several years teaching at Princeton, with intermittent study and bicycling in France. An avid interest in photography led to meeting his wife, Mary. Together, they have two children: Stephen, a noted illustrator and artist, and Anne, a senior consultant for the Aspen Leadership Group, a placement agency that works with public institutions such as symphonies and universities.


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Johnson’s university career led to numerous teaching and publication honors. Since retiring in 2001, he continues to read, philosophize and travel. Just three days after returning from a two-week tour of Ireland and Scotland, Johnson met with Lawrence Senior to discuss his Stop Day tours and his perspective on learning at all ages. Johnson says the tour’s physical demands, the planning and promotional work are forcing him to weigh an actual stop date for the Stop Day tour. For now, he has no specific plans to end the tour and will be on the hill for this school year’s Stop Days, ready to engage and discover with a new group of inquisitive, itinerant philosophers. Lawrence Senior (LS): You cover a lot of KU real estate and plenty of high ideas on your Stop Day tour. How do you begin conversations to get people engaged? Ted Johnson (TJ): The idea is to just stop and make people notice. Then I ask, “What do you make of this?” And then they have to articulate. And they do and we’re off and running. The goal is always dialogue. But I never ask a direct question because that would LAWRENCE SENIOR

frame it. A lot of what I do is to remove the frame, so seeing is direct. I maybe should prepare what I say, but I never do because I don’t want to be the authority. LS: How did the campus walking tours begin? TJ: It started when professor of art Marilyn Stokstad had a program in the Spencer Museum of Art when it first opened. It was called “A Humanist in the Art Museum,” and I was one of the lucky people to get chosen for that. We began in front of an 18th-century marble statue of the Magdalene. The facilitator asked the simple question, “Is she comfortable?” From there, bit-by-bit, I started taking my humanities classes out to actually use the campus. I did that because the campus is not reduced, or framed. It’s just there. Students stand in front of these buildings and statues and articulate what they see. They’re fresh, they’re focused, and I find that to be an exciting kind of teaching. LS: How did this transform into a Stop Day event? TJ: During my sabbatical in 1991, I discovered that it was fun to go up on the campus and just hang out. I met a student near the Natural

History Museum, and we talked, the student and I, for about four hours. We finally realized that the sun had changed enormously, the shadows were different, the campus had changed. I thought that was pretty exciting, so I talked to some colleagues and students, about using the university campus as a place for a forum of ideas. The word “school” comes from the Greeks meaning “leisure.” So I said, “We’ve got to do this on Stop Day, when all business on campus stops.” LS: Do senior citizens participate? TJ: Yes. They do. We don’t talk much about mortality, but instead vitality. This past marathon nine-hour Stop Day tour, two out the ten participants did the entire tour. They were seniors in their late sixties or seventies. I also do starlight equinox tours. They begin at 5 in the morning. It’s amazing what I learn from them. I had a woman explain and sing a song called “Follow the Drinking Gourd.” It was a coded song that helped slaves escape from the South and find their way north thanks to the Big Dipper ever turning around the North Star.

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I’m not really concerned with age. The inner lights are in a person and they are ageless.

–TED JOHNSON

LS: I sometimes think enough people in the Lawrence community, particularly seniors, don’t take advantage of what’s available on The Hill. TJ: Over the years, parents have joined classes when they came to visit their children. They enjoyed this very much. The entire city of Lawrence is a great place to grow old. You have so many opportunities to play with the mind. The Spencer Art Museum has so many high-minded toys. You can’t touch them, but you can play with them. Same for the Natural History Museum, Downtown, the Arts Center, the locally owned shops. LS: What does the word “senior” mean to you? TJ: I’m not really concerned with age. The inner lights are in a person and they are ageless. I remember a wonderful French culture class I taught in the afternoon. There were two women who were on in years and auditing the class. One of them was soon celebrating her 80th birthday. I always do interactive things with my students, so to celebrate we went down to the dance studio. And they 2018

took off their shoes and started moving with the students and dancing. Both of them wrote beautiful notes about what it was like to be involved and seeing the younger students move too. Dance is extraordinary that way because nobody owns the floor. It doesn’t matter what course, my major goal is always to allow the students to develop an individual, authentic, and authoritative voice. That for me is really, really important. And it’s a project for life. It doesn’t matter if you’re young or old. LS: You received a teaching award from KU in 1993. It’s called the HOPE award, an Honor for the Outstanding Progressive Educator. What is your most lasting memory of that award? TJ: The selection interview was one of the most exciting experiences I had at KU. It was in the Union. There were about 30 students there. They fired questions at me. One in particular: What it meant to be a professor. Well, a professor ought to be able to stand in front of a class and profess. And it also occurred to me for the first time—that a professor allows the students, themselves, to profess. I had just given birth to a new idea. I left the room, and

I was in tears. I think for me the most beautiful thing at the university is to help an idea be born. And the integrity of the students’ questions, then having to answer them, was stunning. LS: You speak of learning from young children as often as learning from college students. What do they have in common? TJ: My children have mentored me from the earliest ages. Much more recently, there was a show my son had at a local art gallery. The owner has a daughter age 7. And she and I had the most wonderful conversation about the works at this exhibition. What do you think of this? And that? It went back and forth. It was amazing to see the works through her eyes. I think that students, children and dogs are passports to reality. They allow us to see reality we can’t normally see. A child gets us down on our knees so we see things from an entirely different perspective. I see no difference between kindergarten and university except in kindergarten, everything’s in one room. But as a growing place kindergarten and university allow us to grow. And growing is a lifelong process. LAWRENCE SENIOR


RESOURCES 26 | LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS, STATE AND NATIONAL RESOURCES Abuse/Neglect/Exploitation and Fraud/Discrimination Aging Advocacy and Support Services Useful Toll-Free Health and Services Numbers 27 | COMMUNITY RESOURCES Caregiver Resources Disability Services Education/Recreation Emergency Services/Utility Assistance Employment Resources Farm and Rural Assistance Financial Assistance Programs and Information Food Resources • Congregate Senior Dining Centers • Congregate Dining Centers • Home Meal Delivery • Food Banks Information and Referral Grief and Loss Support Legal Services Public Libraries Tax Assistance Transportation Veterans Affairs Volunteer Opportunities Referral Services Weatherization 31 | HOUSING 32 | HOME SERVICES Assistive Technology/Medical Equipment Help at Home Home Repair Programs Hospice Resources for Independent Living Therapy Services (in Home) 33 | HEALTH SERVICES Adult Day Care Deaf and Hard of Hearing Resources Dental Assistance Health Insurance Counseling/Medicare/Medicaid Hospitals and Clinics Mental Health Services Services for the Visually Impaired Therapy/Rehabilitation Services

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LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS SENIOR RESOURCE CENTER FOR DOUGLAS COUNTY (SRC) 2920 Haskell Ave, Lawrence (785) 842-0543 (877) 295-3277 www.yoursrc.org JAYHAWK AREA AGENCY ON AGING Head office: 2910 SW Topeka Blvd, Topeka, KS 66611 Lawrence branch: 2001 Haskell Lawrence, KS 66046 (785) 235-1367 or (800) 798-1366 www.jhawkaaa.org Local-based nonprofit resource centers dedicated to providing customized and objective information, referrals, and consultations for seniors, their caregivers and their family members.

STATE AND NATIONAL RESOURCES ABUSE/NEGLECT/EXPLOITATION AND FRAUD/DISCRIMINATION ADULT CARE COMPLAINT PROGRAM (800) 842-0078 ADULT PROTECTIVE SERVICES (800) 922-5330 KANSAS ABUSE/NEGLECT ANSWERING SERVICE (800) 922-5330 Calls answered 7 a.m. – 11 p.m.

KANSAS DEPARTMENT FOR AGING AND DISABILITY SERVICES (KDADS) Adult Care Home Complaint Program (800) 842-0078 KANSAS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT HOTLINE (888) 363-2287 KANSAS ELDER LAW HOTLINE (888) 353-5337 KANSAS LONG TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN (Institutional concerns, questions or concerns about residents’ rights, transfer and discharge rights or other care issues) Topeka (785) 296-3017 or (877) 662-8362 AGING ADVOCACY AND SUPPORT SERVICES AGING AND DISABILITY RESOURCE CENTER (ADRC) (855) 200-2372 www.kdads.ks.gov ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION HEART OF AMERICA CHAPTER (913) 831-3888 (800) 272-3900 (Phone answered 24 hours) ELDERCARE LOCATOR US Administration on Aging referral resource (800) 677-1116 www.eldercare.gov

KANSAS ADVOCATES FOR BETTER CARE (800) 525-1782 www.kabc.org

KANSAS DEPARTMENT FOR AGING AND DISABILITY SERVICES Publishes statewide Aging and Disability Resource Guide (785) 296-4986 (800) 432-3535 www.kdads.ks.gov

KANSAS ATTORNEY GENERAL Topeka (785) 296-2215 (888) 428-8436 Consumer protection division (800) 432-2310

KANSAS DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE Taxpayer Assistance (785) 368-8222 Kansas Taxpayer Advocate (316) 651-2100

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KANSAS FOUNDATION FOR MEDICAL CARE, INC. Topeka (785) 273-2552 (800) 432-0770 www.kfmc.org NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Non-commercial resource for health and wellness information (800) 222-2225 TTY: (800) 222-4225 www.nia.nih.gov USEFUL TOLL-FREE HEALTH AND SERVICES NUMBERS AARP KANSAS (866) 448-3619 ADULT ABUSE AND NEGLECT In the community (800) 922-5330 In an adult care home (800) 842-0078 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (24-HOUR HELP LINE) (785) 842-0110 AL-ANON (FOR FRIENDS AND FAMILIES OF ALCOHOLICS) (888) 425-2666 ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION (800) 272-3900 AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION (800) 342-2383 AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION (800) 242-8721 AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION (800) 586-4872 ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION-GREATER KANSAS CHAPTER (913) 262-2233 AUDIO READER (800) 772-8898 LAWRENCE SENIOR


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CONSUMER HOTLINE (ATTORNEY GENERAL’S OFFICE) (800) 432-2310

KANSAS FOUNDATION FOR MEDICAL CARE (800) 432-0770

DISABILITY RIGHTS RESOURCE CENTER (877) 776-1541

KANSAS GUARDIANSHIP PROGRAM (800) 672-0086

ELDERCARE LOCATOR (800) 677-1116

KANSAS INSURANCE DEPARTMENT (800) 432-2484 KANSAS RELAY CENTER (TDD) (800) 766-3777 LEGISLATIVE HOTLINE (800) 432-3924 LONG TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN (877) 662-8362 MEDICAID FRAUD HOTLINE (800) 432-3913 MEDICARE INFORMATION 1-800-MEDICARE (800) 633-4227 NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS HELPLINE (816) 531-2250 PALM PARTNERS HEALTHCARE (800) 314-8174

HOUSING AND CREDIT COUNSELING, INC (800) 383-0217 KANSAS COMMISSION FOR THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING TDD: (800) 432-0698 KANSAS COMMISSION ON VETERANS’ AFFAIRS (785) 843-5233 KANSAS DEPARTMENT FOR AGING AND DISABILITY SERVICES (800)432-3535 KANSAS DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE TAX REFUND STATUS LINE (800) 894-0318 KANSAS ELDER LAW HOTLINE (888) 353-5337

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POISON CONTROL (800) 222-1222 SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Lawrence office (866) 698-2561 TALKING BOOKS SERVICE (800) 362-0699

COMMUNITY RESOURCES CAREGIVER RESOURCES ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION HEART OF AMERICA CHAPTER Prairie Village (800) 272-3900 answered 24 hrs www.alz.org/kansascity DOUGLAS COUNTY SENIOR SERVICES, INC. Caregivers Support Group Lawrence (785) 842-0543 www.dgcoseniorservices.org DISABILITY SERVICES COTTONWOOD, INC. Lawrence (785) 842-0550 www.cwood.org DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN AND FAMILIES Lawrence (785) 832-3700 TTY/TDD 1-800-766-3777 www.dcf.ks.gov KANSAS AGING AND DISABILITY RESOURCE CENTER Topeka (855) 200-2372 www.ksadrc.org

W arren -M C E lWain Mortuary and Cremation Services

TELEMARKETERS (NO CALL LIST) (888) 382-1222 VETERANS AFFAIRS REGIONAL OFFICE (800) 827-1000 Owned and operated by Eudora and Lawrence families since 1904

www.warrenmcelwain.com Phone: (785) 843-1120 Lawrence, KS (785) 542-3030 Eudora, KS

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Questions about your hearing? We look forward to answering your questions and treat you like we’ve been treating your neighbors for more than 30 years.

Call 785.841.1107 or visit us online at www.lawoto.com INDEPENDENCE, INC. Lawrence (785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org EDUCATION/RECREATION

INDEPENDENCE, INC. (Computer classes, independent living skills training) Lawrence (785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org KAW VALLEY BRIDGE CLUB Lawrence (785) 838-3196 www.kawvalleybridge.wordpress.com KAW VALLEY QUILTERS GUILD Lawrence www.kawvalleyquiltersguild.org LAWRENCE ARTS CENTER Lawrence (785) 843-2787 www.lawrenceartscenter.org LAWRENCE CIVIC CHOIR Lawrence www.lawrencecivicchoir.org

ADULT LEARNING CENTER Lawrence (785) 832-5960 www.usd497.org/Schools/AdultLearning

LAWRENCE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL Education Department Lawrence (785) 840-3072 www.lmh.org

BALDWIN CITY RECREATION COMMISSION Baldwin City (785) 594-3670 www.baldwinrec.org

LAWRENCE PARKS AND RECREATION Lawrence (785) 832-7920 http://lawrenceks.org/lprd/home

DOUGLAS COUNTY EXTENSION OFFICE Lawrence (785) 843-7058 www.douglas.ksu.edu DOWNTOWN TUESDAY PAINTERS 745 Vermont St., Lawrence, KS 66044 (785) 842-0543 EUDORA PARKS AND RECREATION Eudora (785) 542-3434 www.eudoraparksandrec.org

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LUMBERYARD ARTS CENTER Baldwin City (785) 594-3186 www.lumberyardartscenter.org NEW HORIZONS BAND Lawrence (785) 865-3519 OLDSTERS UNITED FOR RESPONSIBLE SERVICE (OURS) Lawrence (785) 842-8034 (785) 843-3782 OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE Lawrence (785)864-5823 (877)404-5823 www.osher.ku.edu SENIOR RESOURCE CENTER FOR DOUGLAS COUNTY (785) 842-0543 UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS CONTINUING EDUCATION Lawrence (785) 864-5823 (877) 404-5823 www.kuce.ku.edu EMERGENCY SERVICES/UTILITY ASSISTANCE AMERICAN RED CROSS Lawrence (785) 843-3550 www.redcross.org/ks/lawrence BALLARD COMMUNITY CENTER Lawrence (785) 842-0729 www.ballardcenter.org ECKAN Lawrence (785) 841-3357

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RESOURCES HEADQUARTERS DOUGLAS COUNTY 24-Hour Community Information Lawrence (785) 841-2345 Baldwin City (888) 899-2345 www.headquarterscounselingcenter.org PENN HOUSE Lawrence (785) 842-0440 SALVATION ARMY Lawrence (785) 843-4188

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FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION (AREA MEDICAID MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN AND FAMILIES Lawrence (785) 832-3700 TTY/TDD 1-800-766-3777 www.dcf.ks.gov HOUSING AND CREDIT COUNSELING, INC Lawrence (785) 749-4224 www.hcci-ks.org

EMPLOYMENT RESOURCES LAWRENCE WORKFORCE CENTER Lawrence (785) 840-9675 www.workforcecenters.com/lawrence

DOUGLAS COUNTY CONSERVATION DISTRICT OFFICE Lawrence (785) 843-4288 www.douglasccd.com FARM SERVICE AGENCY Lawrence (785) 843-4260 http://www.fsa.usda.gov KANSAS AGRICULTURAL MEDIATION SERVICES (800) 321-3276 www.oznet.ksu.edu/kams KANSAS RURAL FAMILY HELPLINE At Kansas Agricultural Mediation Services (866) 327-6578

CONGREGATE SENIOR DINING CENTERS (Reservation required) BABCOCK PLACE Lawrence (785) 842-6976 BALDWIN CITY SENIOR CENTER Baldwin City (785) 594-2409 LAWRENCE SENIOR CENTER (SRC) Lawrence (785) 842-0543 PINE CREST II Eudora (785) 760-2102 CONGREGATE DINING CENTERS (all ages)

OLDER KANSANS EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM (OKEP) (785) 296-7842 FARM AND RURAL ASSISTANCE

FOOD RESOURCES

If you or a loved one needs Home Health, Rehabilitation, Hospice or Help at Home care, trust in our 48-years of experience providing excellent patient care.

INDEPENDENCE, INC. Fiscal Management Services for Frail/Elderly Medicaid Waiver Lawrence (785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org SOCIAL SECURITY Lawrence (800) 772-1213 (800) 325-0778 TTY www.ssa.gov

JUBILEE CAFÉ (Tue. & Fri., 7-7:45 a.m.) First United Methodist Church 946 Massachusetts Lawrence (785) 856-9521 L.I.N.K. (LAWRENCE INTERDENOMINATIONAL NUTRITION KITCHEN) (Tue., Thu., Sat. & Sun., 1-2 p.m.) 221 W. 10th St. Lawrence (785) 331-3663 www.linklawrence.org SALVATION ARMY (Mon., Wed. & Fri., 1-2 p.m.) 946 New Hampshire St. Lawrence (785) 843-4188

USDA RURAL DEVELOPMENT Topeka (785) 863-2587

LAWRENCE SENIOR

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HOME MEAL DELIVERY (Reduced Price) DOUGLAS COUNTY SENIOR SERVICES SENIOR MEALS 745 Vermont Lawrence (785) 842-0543 www.dgcoseniorservices.org LAWRENCE MEALS ON WHEELS Lawrence (785) 830-8844 www.lawrencemow.org FOOD BANKS BALDWIN CITY FOOD PANTRY First United Methodist Church 704 8th Street, Baldwin City (785) 594-6612 BALLARD COMMUNITY CENTER 708 Elm Street, Lawrence (785) 842-0729 CORNERSTONE FOOD PANTRY Cornerstone Baptist Church 802 W. 22nd Street, Lawrence (785) 843-0442 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 1330 Kasold Drive, Lawrence (785) 843-0020

HEARTLAND COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER 1 Riverfront Plaza, Suite 100, Lawrence (785) 841-7297 www.heartlandhealth.org JUST FOOD 1000 East 11th Street, Lawrence (785) 856-7030 NEW LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 118 5th Street, Baldwin City (785) 594-3045 PENN HOUSE 1035 Pennsylvania, Lawrence (785) 842-0440 THE SALVATION ARMY 946 New Hampshire St., Lawrence (785) 843-4188 ST. PAUL’S UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 738 Church St., Eudora (785) 542-2785 STULL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH FOOD PANTRY 1596 E. 250 Rd., Lecompton (785) 887-6521 TRINITY INTERFAITH PANTRY 1027 Vermont St., Lawrence (785) 843-6166 GRIEF AND LOSS SUPPORT GRACE HOSPICE Lawrence (785) 841-5300 www.gracehospicellc.com MIDLAND CARE Lawrence (785) 842-3627

& Crematory

Your locally owned funeral home & crematory

RUMSEY-YOST FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY Lawrence (785) 843-5111 www.Rumsey-Yost.com

WARREN MCELWAIN MORTUARY Beyond Loss Support Workshop Lawrence (785) 843-1120 INFORMATION AND REFERRAL CENTRO HISPANO RESOURCE CENTER Lawrence (785) 843-2039 INDEPENDENCE, INC. Lawrence (785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org LAWRENCE/DOUGLAS COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT Lawrence (785) 843-3060 www.ldchealth.org LEGAL SERVICES DOUGLAS COUNTY LEGAL AID SOCIETY Lawrence (785) 864-5564 www.lawrenceks.org/attorney/legal_aid KANSAS ATTORNEY GENERAL Consumer Protection Line Topeka (785) 296-3751 or (800) 432-2310 www.ag.ks.gov KANSAS ELDER LAW HOTLINE (888) 353-5337 KANSAS LEGAL SERVICES Topeka (785) 233-2068 (800) 723-6953 www.kansaslegalservices.org PUBLIC LIBRARIES BALDWIN CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY Baldwin City (785) 594-3411 www.baldwincitylibrary.org

6th & IndIana, Lawrence • 785-843-5111

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VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES REFERRAL SERVICES

EUDORA PUBLIC LIBRARY Eudora (785) 542-2496 www.eudora.mykansaslibrary.org

ROGER HILL VOLUNTEER CENTER Lawrence (785) 865-5030 www.volunteerdouglascounty.org

LAWRENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY Lawrence (785) 843-3833 www.lawrence.lib.ks.us

VOLUNTEER MATCH www.volunteermatch.org

TAX ASSISTANCE

WEATHERIZATION AARP TAX AIDES Senior Resource Center for Douglas County Lawrence (785) 842-0543 www.dgcoseniorservices.org VITA Ballard Community Center Lawrence (785) 842-0729 www.ballardcenter.org VITA PENN HOUSE Lawrence (785) 842-0440 TRANSPORTATION AT HOME, INC. Lawrence (785) 856-1714 www.athomeks.com DOUGLAS COUNTY SENIOR SERVICES, INC. Senior Wheels Lawrence (785) 865-6925 www.dgcoseniorservices.org

INDEPENDENCE, INC. Lawrence (785) 841-0333 (785) 841-1046 TDD www.independenceinc.org LAWRENCE TRANSIT SYSTEM Lawrence (785) 864-4644 (785) 312-7063 TDD info@lawrencetransit.org www.lawrencetransit.org

ECKAN Lawrence (785) 841-3357 www.eckan.org

HOUSING (*) Subsidized

MTM (ACCEPTS MEDICAID) (888)240-6497

ARBOR COURT AT ALVAMAR Lawrence (785) 841-6845 www.arborcourt-lawrence.com

TRINITY IN-HOME CARE Lawrence (785) 842-3159 www.trinityinhomecare.com

(*) BABCOCK PLACE Lawrence (785) 842-8358 www.ldcha.org

VETERANS AFFAIRS

BRANDON WOODS AT ALVAMAR Lawrence (785) 838-8000 www.brandonwoods.com

A HELPING HAND HOME CARE Lawrence (785) 856-0192 www.ahelpinghandhc.com

KANSAS COMMISSION ON VETERANS AFFAIRS Lawrence (785) 843-5233 www.kcva.ks.gov

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE Lawrence (785) 856-8181 www.homeinstead.com/584

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (800) 827-1000 www.va.gov

LAWRENCE SENIOR

CITY OF LAWRENCE NEIGHBORHOOD RESOURCES DEPARTMENT Lawrence (785) 832-7700 www.lawrenceks.org/pds/housing_programs

(*) CLINTON PLACE Lawrence (785) 841-1000 www.ldcha.org DRURY PLACE AT ALVAMAR Lawrence (785) 841-6845 www.druryplacealvamar.com

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(*) EDGEWOOD HOMES Lawrence (785) 842-8110 www.ldcha.org (*) ORCHARD LANE LEISURE LIVING AND JERSEY STREET APT. SUITES Baldwin City (785) 594-6996 (*) HILL CREST APARTMENTS Eudora (785) 542-1755 LAWRENCE PRESBYTERIAN MANOR Lawrence (785) 841-4262 www.lawrencepresbyterianmanor.org MEADOWLARK ESTATES Lawrence (785) 842-2400 www.seniorlivinginstyle.com MONTEREY VILLAGE Lawrence (785) 227-9101 www.americareusa.net (*) PETERSON ACRES & PETERSON ACRES II Lawrence (785) 842-8358 www.ldcha.org (*) PINECREST I AND II Apartments Eudora (785) 542-1020 PRAIRIE COMMONS Lawrence (785) 843-1700 www.prairiecommonsapts.com (*) PRAIRIE RIDGE PLACE Lawrence (785) 841-8660 (*) SIGNAL RIDGE Baldwin City (785) 594-3794

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SILVERLEAF RETIREMENT VILLAGE Baldwin City (785) 979-4039 MEDICALLODGES OF EUDORA Eudora (785) 542-2176 www.medicalodgeseudora.com

for your complete medical equipment needs • Home Oxygen • Sleep Apnea Equipment • Beds • Walkers • Wheelchairs • Canes • Seat lift chairs • Bath items • Aids to daily living

Tell your doctor, “I Choose Criticare”

(*) VERMONT TOWERS Lawrence (785) 841-6026 VILLAGE COOPERATIVE Lawrence (785) 330-5041 www.villagecooperative.com/lawrence-ks WYNDAM PLACE Lawrence (785) 749-4646 www.beacon-mgm.com

HOME SERVICES ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY/MEDICAL EQUIPMENT ADVANCED HOME CARE, LLC Lawrence Breathe Oxygen and Medical Supply (785) 841-2200 www.advancedhomecarekansas.com CRITICARE HOME HEALTH SERVICES, INC. Lawrence (785) 749-4878 www.criticarehhs.com INDEPENDENCE, INC. Lawrence (785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org KNOLL PATIENT SUPPLY APRIA Lawrence (785) 842-5587 Apria.com

1006 W. 6th Street, Lawrence 785-749-4878 • 800-527-9596 www.criticarehhs.com Locally owned & operated for over 30 years.

HELP AT HOME CAREGIVER’S HOME HEALTH AGENCY Lawrence (785) 749-0300 GENTIVA HEALTH SERVICES Kindred at Home Health Services (913) 422-1576 www.gentiva.com www.kindredathome.com GRACEFUL HOME HEALTH CARE Lawrence (785) 424-2785 www.gracefulhealthcare.com A HELPING HAND HOME CARE Lawrence (785) 856-0192 www.ahelpinghandhc.com PROFESSIONAL SITTERS HOME HEALTH Lawrence (785) 842-3301 www.prosittershomehealth.com VISITING NURSES Lawrence (785) 843-3738 www.kansasvna.org

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WINDSOR PLACE AT-HOME CARE Lawrence (785) 843-4800 www.windsorplace.net

GRACE HOSPICE Lawrence (785)841-5300 www.gracehospicellc.com

HOME REPAIR PROGRAMS

MIDLAND CARE CONNECTION Lawrence (785) 842-3627 www.midlandcareconnection.org

CITY OF LAWRENCE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (785) 832-7700 www.lawrenceks.org INDEPENDENCE, INC. (ACCESSIBILITY MODIFICATIONS) (785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org HOSPICE ASERACARE HOSPICE Lawrence (785) 840-0820 www.aseracare.com CROSSROADS HOSPICE (913) 850-7500 www.crossroadshospice.com GENTIVA HOSPICE Kindred Hospice (913) 541-0266 www.gentiva.com www.kindredathome.com

SOUTHERN CARE HOSPICE At Avalon in Topeka (785) 246-6520 www.southerncareinc.com VISITING NURSES Lawrence (785) 843-3738 www.kansasvna.org RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING HELPING HAND HOME CARE Lawrence, (785) 856-0192 www.ahelpinghandhc.com KANSAS ELDER CARE Lawrence (785) 856-5555 www.kseldercare.com PROJECT LIFESAVER Douglas County Sheriff ’s Department (785) 832-5204 www.dgso.org THERAPY SERVICES (IN HOME) BALDWIN THERAPY SERVICES Baldwin City (785) 594-3162 www.lawrencetherapyservices.com CAREGIVER’S HOME CARE Lawrence (785) 749-0300

GENTIVA HEALTH SERVICES Kindred Health Services (913) 422-1576 www.gentiva.com www.kindredathome.com VISITING NURSES Lawrence (785) 843-3738 www.kansasvna.org

HEALTH SERVICES ADULT DAY CARE ALLIE’S VILLAGE MEMORY CARE HOMES, LLC Lawrence (785) 856-4181 www.alliesvillagehome.com BALDWIN HEALTH CARE AND REHABILITATION CENTER Baldwin City (785) 594-6492 www.baldwinhealthcare.com COOPER’S HOME CARE Lawrence (785) 865-2525 MIDLAND CARE CONNECTION Lawrence (785) 842-3627 www.midlandcareconnection.org NEUVANT HOUSE Lawrence (785)856-7900 www.neuvanthouse.com THE WINDSOR OF LAWRENCE Lawrence (785) 832-9900

CAREGIVER’S HOME HEALTH AGENCY Lawrence (785) 749-0300

LAWRENCE SENIOR

2018


RESOURCES

34

Find it before you feel it.

GET A MAMMOGRAM

ONCE A YEAR. C a l l t o d ay f o r an appointment.

785.505.3300

DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING RESOURCES Provides information, referral resources and products which serve those individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. AUDIENT (HEARING AID ASSISTANCE FOR LOW INCOME INDIVIDUALS) (866) 956-5400 www.audientalliance.org INDEPENDENCE, INC. Lawrence (785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org KANSAS COMMISSION FOR THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING (KCDHH) Topeka (785) 368-8034 (800) 432-0698 TTY www.dcf.ks.gov/services/RS/Pages/ KCDHH.aspx LAWRENCE HEARING AID CENTER 4106 W. 6 SUITE E Lawrence KS 66049 (785) 749-1885 www.neighborhoodhearing.com

HOSPITALS AND CLINICS

LAWRENCE OTOLARYNGOLOGY ASSOCIATES, LLC Lawrence (785) 841-1107 (888) 729-1107 www.lawoto.com

FIRST MED, PA 2323 Ridge Court (785) 865-5300 www.firstmedpa.com

MARSTON HEARING CENTER, LLC Lawrence (785) 843-8479 www.marstonhc.com

HASKELL HEALTH CENTER (NATIVE AMERICAN PATIENTS ONLY) 2415 Massachusetts Street (785) 843-3750

NUEAR HEARING Lawrence (785) 727-1319 www.allamericanhearing.com

HEALTH CARE ACCESS, INC. 330 Maine Street (785) 841-5760 www.healthcareaccess.org

SCHIEFELBUSCH SPEECH – LANGUAGE – HEARING CLINIC 2101 Haworth Hall, Lawrence (785) 864-4690 www.splh.ku.edu

HEARTLAND COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER 1 Riverfront Plaza, Suite 100 (785) 841-7297 www.heartlandhealth.org

STARKEY HEARING FOUNDATION HEAR NOW PROGRAM (800) 328-8602 www.starkeyhearingfoundation.org

LAWRENCE COMMUNITY BASED OUTREACH CLINIC Primary care service for veterans 2200 Harvard Road, Lawrence (800) 574-8387, x54650

DENTAL ASSISTANCE (*) Accepts Medicaid) AFFORDABLE DENTURES (800) 336-8873 www.affordabledentures.com (*) DOUGLAS COUNTY DENTAL CLINIC (reduced fees sliding scale) Lawrence (785) 312-7770 www.dcdclinic.org HEALTH INSURANCE COUNSELING/ MEDICARE/MEDICAID DOUGLAS COUNTY SENIOR SERVICES, INC. Senior Health Insurance Counseling for Kansas (785) 842-0543 (877) 295-3277 www.dgcoseniorservices.org

LAWRENCE-DOUGLAS COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT CLINIC 200 Maine Street (785) 843-0721 www.ldchealth.org LAWRENCE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL (MAIN CAMPUS) 325 Maine, Lawrence (785) 505-5000 www.lmh.org MEDEXPRESS URGENT CARE 3420 West Sixth St., Lawrence (785) 841-3123 www.medexpress.com PROMPTCARE 3511 Clinton Pl., Lawrence (785) 838-1500 www.urgentcarelawrenceks.com

JAYHAWK AREA AGENCY ON AGING (785) 235-1367 www.jhawkaaa.org 2018

LAWRENCE SENIOR


RESOURCES WALGREENS TAKE CARE HEALTH CARE CLINIC SM 3421 W. Sixth, Lawrence (785) 841-9000 www.takecarehealth.com MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES Programs that help treat mental health disorders in older adults. BERT NASH COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENTER Lawrence (785) 843-9192 www.bertnash.org HEADQUARTERS COUNSELING CENTER 24 Hour Community Information Lawrence (785) 841-2345 Baldwin City (888) 899-2345 www.headquarterscounselingcenter.org

My mom has been through every step at Brandon Woods at Alvamar ... I couldn’t have asked for more. - Glenna Jones Independent Living Memory Care = = Assisted Living = Skilled Nursing = = Rehab to Home =

=

1501 Inverness Drive, Lawrence, KS 785-838-8000 www.BrandonWoods.com SERVICES FOR THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED AUDIO-READER NETWORK Lawrence (785) 864-4600 (800) 772-8898 www.reader.ku.edu

LAWRENCE SENIOR

35

INDEPENDENCE, INC. Lawrence (785) 841-0333 www.independenceinc.org TALKING BOOKS (620) 341-6280 (800) 362-0699 www.kslib.info/153/Talking-Books THERAPY/REHABILITATION SERVICES BIRD PHYSICAL THERAPY Lawrence (785) 331-0106 www.birdpt.com ADVANTAGE MEDICAL GROUP Lawrence (785) 749-0130 www.admedgroup.com BALDWIN THERAPY SERVICES Baldwin City (785) 594-3162 www.lawrencetherapyservices.com BLOOM AND ASSOCIATES THERAPY Serc Physical Therapy 218 E. 20th Ste A Eudora KS 66062 (785) 542-3333 www.bloompt.wix.com/bloom-associatesphysical-therapy www.bmrp.com/clinic/serc CAREGIVER’S HOME HEALTH AGENCY Lawrence (785) 749-0300 www.kronostm.com/midwesthealth VISITING NURSES Lawrence (785) 843-3738 www.kansasvna.org LAWRENCE MEMORIAL THERAPY SERVICES Lawrence (785) 505-2712 www.lmh.org

• Light Housekeeping • Meal Assistance • Local Transportation • Personal Care • Bathing and Self-care Support • Caregiver Respite Services • Community Activity Support • 24-Hour and Overnight Care Douglas County’s hometown, nonprofit in-home support provider.

842-3159

www.tihc.org

LAWRENCE MEMORIAL SOUTH THERAPY SERVICES Lawrence (785) 505-3780 www.lmh.org LAWRENCE MEMORIAL EUDORA THERAPY SERVICES Eudora (785) 542-3344 www.lmh.org NEU PHYSICAL THERAPY Baldwin City (785) 594-4100 NEU PHYSICAL THERAPY Lawrence (785) 842-3444 THERAPY WORKS Lawrence (785) 749-1300 www.therapyworks.org www.therapyworkansas.com QUANTUM SHIFT PHYSICAL THERAPY Lawrence (785) 856-7389 www.quantumshiftpt.com

2018


W arren -M C E lWain Mortuary and Cremation Services

Lawrence, KS

Owned and operated by Eudora and Lawrence families since 1904

Eudora, KS

www.warrenmcelwain.com Phone: (785) 843-1120 Lawrence, KS (785) 542-3030 Eudora, KS

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Lawrence Senior | 2018  

Kansas Granny Ball | The flights of Nelson Krueger | Senior Travel Essentials | The Non-Stop Stop Days of Ted Johnson and more | a special a...

Lawrence Senior | 2018  

Kansas Granny Ball | The flights of Nelson Krueger | Senior Travel Essentials | The Non-Stop Stop Days of Ted Johnson and more | a special a...