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2018/HORSES/BOAT RACES/PRAIRIE CHICKEN Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism


Sherman County, Kansas KANORADO ~ GOODLAND ~ EDSON

Sherman County Convention & Visitors Bureau director@visitgoodland.com www.visitgoodland.com 785-890-3515 or 888-824-4222

City of Goodland Economic Development/C of C suzanne.mcclure@cityofgoodland.org www.gogoodland.org 785-890-3743

Dog friendly hotel rooms. Come to Sherman Co. for quality upland bird hunting. HUNT TURKEY, DEER, BUFFALO, ANTELOPE AND MORE.


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letter

Sam Brownback Governor

Robin Jennison

KDWPT Secretary

Linda Craghead

KDWPT Assistant Secretary

Keith Sexson

KDWPT Assistant Secretary

Todd Workman

KDWPT Assistant Secretary

Andrea Etzel Editor

SUNFLOWERPUB.COM / LAWRENCE, KANSAS

DESIGN & PRODUCTION

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escribing Kansas, its citizens, the land and the wildlife, with one word is possible, but it took considerable thought. Kansans are tough, hardworking, friendly, resourceful, independent, stubborn and loyal. Our land is fertile, productive, unforgiving, beautiful, and accommodating. The wildlife and natural resources are abundant, unique, persistent, vulnerable, hardy, and resilient; that’s the word: RESILIENT. All the words mentioned above are accurate, but if I had to boil it down to one word for everything Kansas, it would be resilient. And this year is a perfect example of that. As I write this, we are heading into the 2018 fall hunting seasons, and the forecast is very good. Three years of severe drought destroyed habitat and impacted many wildlife populations. The drought also made life difficult for farmers, ranchers and their livestock. But we endured. The drought broke in some parts of the state in 2014, rains returned across a large portion of the state in 2015, and last year we saw amazing habitat recovery in many areas. With ample precipitation, habitat conditions, especially for upland bird nesting and broodrearing, was excellent last spring and summer. Quail and pheasants responded, as well as other wildlife, and we’re anticipating much improved hunting this fall and winter. That’s life on the prairie. Native Americans and our ancestors enjoyed times of amazing bounty and survived grueling conditions – drought, prairie fires, tornados, and blizzards. Those who toughed out the hard times have

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always been rewarded when our resilient state came back stronger than ever. For farmers, hunters, anglers – anyone who works and plays outdoors in Kansas – I think optimism goes hand in hand with resilience. I don’t know whether it’s genetic or learned, but I know it’s necessary. It gets easier for those of us who’ve been here for a few decades and experienced the ups and downs. The ups are always worth it. Enjoying the outdoors in Kansas has never been easier or better than it is today. We have fantastic turkey, deer, pheasant quail and waterfowl hunting, and we’ve tripled the amount of land open to hunting with the WalkIn Hunting Access program. Anglers chase walleye, wipers, white bass, largemouth and smallmouth bass, and the slab-sized crappie found in Kansas reservoirs are legendary. Our state parks are better than ever, offering hiking, biking, horse trails, a long list of special events each summer, and more than 120 rental cabins, which are hugely popular. Thanks to the department’s dedicated staff and the staunch support of Kansas citizens, the quality and diversity of today’s outdoor recreation opportunities are unprecedented. And that diversity does more than keep outdoor enthusiasts busy – it smooths out the ups and downs. Whatever the conditions, there’s always something going on in the Kansas outdoors. I’m proud to be a Kansan and proud of our resilience. I’m also looking forward to enjoying time outdoors this year. —Robin Jennison

Nathan Pettengill Editor

Shelly Bryant

Production Manager

Joanne Morgan Advertising Sales

Bill Uhler Publisher

Bob Cucciniello Director

MCAPRINT.COM / WICHITA, KANSAS

PRINTER

Cheryl Wells

Account Executive Kansas Outdoors is published by the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism 1020 S. Kansas Ave., Suite 200, Topeka, KS, 66612, (785) 296-3479 TTY Hearing Impaired: (785) 296-3487. Periodical postage paid at Topeka, KS,  and at additional mailing offices. Please address publication inquiries to: Toll-free: (800) 678-6424 Kansas Outdoors, 1020 S. Kansas Ave., Suite 200, Topeka, KS, 66612 Website: ksoutdoors.com Please mail all editorial inquiries to: Kansas Outdoors, 1020 S. Kansas Ave., Suite 200, Topeka, KS 66612 e-mail: ksmagazine@sunflowerpub.com The articles and photographs that appear in Kansas Outdoors may not be broadcast, published or otherwise reproduced without the express written consent of Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism or the appropriate copyright owner. Unauthorized use is prohibited. Additional restrictions may apply.


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F E AT U R E S

D E PA R T M E N T S

10 Cycling

A two-wheel state with plenty of paths

12 Water Sports

Options for families and sport enthusiasts

14 Fishing

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A TOP 10 FOR 2018 Here’s our take on the best Kansas outdoor experiences for the coming year

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SAILING KANSAS Classes at Cheney Reservoir launch thousands of sailors

A land-locked state, but with lakes of potential

17 Wildflowers

Discover the natural power of prairie flowers

18 Hunting

An overview of game, locations and seasons

20 Hiking

Stroll through the woodlands, climbs and expanses

22 Parks & Trails

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BIRDING IN KANSAS From backyard sightings to rare encounters, Kansas offers opportunities to spot and appreciate a range of bird species

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HAVE HORSE, WILL KANSAS Riding the trails or hills of Kansas is one of the best ways to experience the state’s history and beauty

Options for natural getaways across the state

Disc Golf & 24 Geocaching

Two family-friendly sports, taken seriously

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Kansas is committed to providing residents and visitors genuine and accessible encounters with the outdoors. The Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism believes strongly that some of our state’s greatest riches are the land and our opportunity to explore it. The opening section of this publication is dedicated to some of the core aspects of enjoying natural Kansas. You can find more information on each of these activities as well as directions and contact listings at the department’s website, ksoutdoors.com.

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outdoors in kansas


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YES, KANSAS! Cycling in Kansas introduces riders to scenic vistas, woodlands, lakeshores and wide, open skies. We have made cycling opportunities a core part of our public lands: All state parks and many wildlife areas and fishing lakes have trails available for cyclists. There is a growing list of railsto-trails projects for recreation and an extensive network of trails for mountain bikes.

RESOURCES To learn about all of the state’s official bike trails, go online at ksoutdoors.com and look for the “Hiking-Biking-Horseback” tab. Learn more about the networks of Kansas cycling trails, from railsto-trails paths to challenging mountain bike excursions, online at kansascyclist.com/trails or kansastrailscouncil.org. For the events mentioned in this section, go online at bak.org (Bike Across Kansas) and dirtykanza.com (Dirty Kanza).

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GIVE THIS A TRY! CASUAL History and wonderful scenery welcome riders on the 7-mile trail encircling the lake in Historic Lake Scott State Park, taking riders through an unexpected woodland oasis on the prairie, a natural canyon where a group of Pueblo settled. For history buffs, the trail can be combined with a visit to the El Cuartelejo Pueblo ruins, just off the mountain bike loop.

I N T E R M E D I AT E Bike a portion or the entire 52 miles of the Prairie Spirit Trail. Managed by the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism, this path is built over the tracks of an old railway, which means it connects through several towns along streams and rivers of eastern Kansas. Additional upkeep is provided by Friends of the Prairie Spirit Trail, who also maintain an online site with updates on trail conditions and events at bikeprairiespirit.com.

PHOTOGRAPHS (CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) Brian Goodman, Justin Lister, Jason Ebberts (3)

CHALLENGING The Epic Switchgrass Bike Trail at Wilson State Park is the queen of Kansas mountain bike trails. Over 20 miles in length, the path takes riders through fast singletrack runs, across rocky terrain and alongside the lake. It’s a destination path, and that roadtrip experience is made easier since the path passes near campsites where riders can rest up at the campfire or explore the park’s waterfowl refuge at the end of the day. The path is seasonal and closes during the winter.

BIG EVENTS Dirty Kanza This 200-mile gravel race attracts over 2,000 riders from across the world for an extremely challenging course over gravel roads, across creeks and through rolling hills. Held the first weekend of June, it starts before the sun rises and finishes as the sun sets over the host town of Emporia. Much of the city shows up to cheer on the racers and greet them at the end of the course with a street party, Kansas craft beer and live musical concerts into the night. Bike Across Kansas Each year since 1975, groups of riders have gathered in the summer to bike across the length of Kansas. The allage event, now with several hundred participants, follows a different route from year to year, but always a paved route that takes cyclists on a journey that allows them to stop off and experience the small towns and attractions along the way. Organizers welcome riders of all skill levels, but suggest any participant be able to bike 30 miles in three hours and be capable of logging 50–80 miles a day.

D I D YO U K N OW ? Kansas is serious about integrating mixed-use and biking trails into its network of state parks. The trails range from the short 0.6 mile Waterfall Trail at Milford State Park (which features—you guessed it—an engineered waterfall on the trail loop) to the 26-mile stretch of trail at Kanopolis State Park (Kansas’ first state park). Mountain bikers will want to test out their prowess at some of the skills loops, such as the trail at Clinton State Park. Bike trails can be found across the state, from urban creek rides in metro Kansas City areas, to the Cimarron National Grasslands Trails, in the southwest corner of the state that includes the 19-mile Santa Fe Companion Trail and the 10.5-mile Turkey Trail. Good trail etiquette and common sense are required when cyclists, hikers and equestrians share a trail. Experienced bikers are used to yielding the trail, but passing by a horse and rider requires particular care. Call out to the riders with your voice—not a bell because that could startle a horse—and give the horse and rider as much room as possible.

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water sp YES, KANSAS! Landlocked? Not at all. With two National Water Trails, more than 150 lakes and 10,000 stream miles, Kansas has some great options for water recreation. Many of the state’s parks are located at federal and state reservoirs—creating opportunities for everything from sailboat journeys to beach holidays. The state’s navigable rivers and waterways enable float trips for paddlers of all skill levels.

RESOURCES

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For a complete overview of regulations, sites, classes and more on boating in Kansas, go online at ksoutdoors.com/Boating.


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ports GIVE THIS A TRY!

CASUAL

For a scenic, unhurried outing, put a canoe in the water at Eudora and paddle the Kansas (or “Kaw”) River to De Soto on a winding trip that often rewards with sights of waterfowl and other wildlife. Another good option is to try an evening float trip through Tuttle Creek State Park as part of the Little Apple Glow Paddle event. If you don’t have your own canoe or kayak, you can rent from one of several providers or enroll in a float trip with the nonprofit Friends of the Kaw. Go online at kansasriver.org to see their upcoming trips.

I N T E R M E D I AT E Kanopolis Lake (or Reservoir) in Central Kansas is a delight for family boating excursions. Developed with a marina and stocked with fish, the 3,500-acre lake is surrounded by camping sites and trails developed through Kanopolis State Park. Kids will love the Slide Cave on the Buffalo Tracks Canyon Nature Trail (reached through a one-mile hike), and a boating excursion can easily overlap with a few hours at the beach or a shore-side visit to enjoy the extensive equestrian trails.

PHOTOGRAPHS Jason Dailey (2), KDWPT (2), Jason Dailey

CHALLENGING If your idea of water sports comes with a “roar,” then try skiing on Wilson Lake, one of the clearest lakes in the state, located about 50 miles west of Salina. Or, take out a Jet Ski to roar past the scenic limestone formations at Cedar Bluff Reservoir west of Hays.

BIG EVENTS The Kansas Canoe and Kayak Association hosts several outings throughout the year. See their website at kansascanoe.org for a schedule of upcoming expeditions.

D I D YO U K N OW ? The Kansas River and the Arkansas River that flow through Kansas are designated as a National Water Trail, a status recognized by the National Parks Service for “exemplary water trails that are cooperatively supported and sustained.” You can read more about the Kansas portions by going online at ksoutdoors.com and looking for the “rivers” section of the “Activities” tab. There is a strong need to keep Kansas’ waters safe by preventing the spread of non-native animals and plants, like zebra mussels, that threaten lake and river ecology and harm native species. They can’t be seen with the naked eye, so they often “hitchhike” when boaters forget to clean, drain and dry their boats and equipment, including minnow buckets, livewells and bilges. Remember to do this every time, on every lake and river. If you take alcohol with you on the waters, remember that many factors can change the effect of alcohol while boating. Direct sun, wind, glare off the water, dehydration and the motion of the waves can cause a person to become intoxicated three times faster than on shore.

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fishing YES, KANSAS!

Fishing is good in Kansas, a state with 24 major reservoirs, 40 regularly stocked state fishing lakes, and more than 100 community and county lakes, rivers and streams. Here, anglers can enjoy casting a line for everything from bluegill, channel catfish and northern pike to black bass, striped bass, walleye and rainbow trout.

RESOURCES For a full list of sites, regulations, license information, overview of species and more, go online at ksoutdoors.com/fishing. In addition, anyone fishing in Kansas is recommended to read over (or print out and carry) the yearly fishing regulations summary. This can also be found online by clicking on the “Regulations” tab of ksoutdoors.com/fishing.

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GIVE THIS A TRY!

CASUAL You don’t have to choose between the town and country life when it comes to fishing. Kansas is committed to making urban fishing fun and enjoyable by stocking 85 metropolitan area lakes with channel catfish, hybrid sunfish, and wipers as often as every two weeks from April through September. Lake Afton in Sedgwick County, for example, was stocked with over 1,900 pounds of fish in the previous year. This is often the most accessible type of fishing with little investment necessary for an enjoyable outing.

I N T E R M E D I AT E Glen Elder Reservoir, also known as Waconda Lake has rewarded anglers with some giant white crappie, channel and flathead catfish, striped bass and more. Located near Beloit, the site was once the Waconda Spring, where a resort was built in 1904 and later converted to a health spa. Construction of the Glen Elder Dam and Waconda Lake began in 1964. With more than 12,000 acres, the lake is open to sport fishing year-round.

PHOTOGRAPHS (CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) Bill Stephens, Larry Harwood (2), Bill Stephens (2)

CHALLENGING Looking for an unforgettable expedition? Kansas offers special licenses for hand fishing (the sport that is also referred to as “noodling”). This license allows holders to hand fish for catfish in designated waterways from sunrise to sunset from mid-June to the end of August in designated waterways. This sport prohibits using man-made objects to capture the fish. Bring yourself, plenty of patience and lightningquick reflexes for this ultimate fishing challenge. For more information on the designated areas, licenses and regulations, go online to ksoutdoors.com and search for “hand fishing.”

D I D YO U K N OW ? If you weren’t born with a fishing rod in your hand but want to learn how to enjoy the sport, then you can enroll in a state-sponsored fishing clinic at various locations across Kansas. The clinics are geared toward novices of any age and are held throughout the spring and summer and occasionally in the fall. Depending on the instructor, the classes cover fish identification, management, casting demonstrations, equipment, water safety and even fish cooking. Plenty of time is devoted to baiting the hooks and catching fish, too. Adults are welcome to attend with young students. If you want to learn more about these clinics, call the Pratt Operators Office at (620) 672-911 or go online at ksoutdoors.com and enter “fishing clinic” in the search bar.

BIG EVENTS Free Fishing Kansas celebrates National Fishing and Boating Week by offering a free weekend of fishing (meaning that you do not have to have a license during those days), usually during the first week in June. Go online at ksoutdoors.com to see the exact dates and to see maps and listings of all public (and a few private) waters that are part of the celebration. Trout Season If trout fishing is your sport, then November 1 to April 15 is the best time of the year in Kansas. Sure, it can be a chilly time of year, but Kansas provides an incentive by stocking trout in 35 locations. Since 1997 Kansas has stocked nearly 200,000 rainbow trout and 4,000 brown trout. This program is funded with a state trout permit and federal aid dollars.

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wildflowers YES, KANSAS!

GIVE THIS A TRY! CASUAL

I N T E R M E D I AT E

CHALLENGING

Several nature centers feature wildflowers. The Dyck Arboretum of the Plains in Hesston, for example, lets you experience the wildflowers of the Great Plains in cultivation, with hundreds of varieties of native and adaptable wildflowers, grasses, shrubs and trees. Go online at dyckarboretum.org for more information.

The Baker Wetlands Discovery Center in Lawrence highlights the diverse natural life in the HaskellBaker Wetlands Preserve, designated a National Natural Landmark by the National Park Service. Find out the latest status and plan your visit by going online to bakeru.edu/wetlands. You can also combine this visit with a stop at the nearby Haskell Indian Nations University Cultural Center to learn more about this institution’s rich Native history and its ties to the natural environment surrounding the campus. Go online at haskell.edu to plan your visit.

Ready for an adventurous road trip? A great place to glimpse nature’s color palette is along the state’s twelve byways, particularly the Wetlands & Wildlife National Scenic Byway through Barton, Reno and Stafford counties. Another view of Kansas’ natural floral beauty is the Western Vistas Historic Byway, a 102-mile route that begins at Scott City and ends at Sharon Springs. Share the wildflowers and the spectacular scenery with turkey, prairie dog, deer, buffalo, pronghorn and more. Go online at ksbyways.com to start planning your trip.

BIG EVENTS

PHOTOGRAPH Mike Yoder

Throughout the year, the nonprofit land preservation organization Kansas Land Trust hosts wildflower walks led by local experts. Go online to the “Events and News” section of the website klt.org to find upcoming walks.

D I D YO U K N OW ? We’re not called the “Sunflower State” without reason. Sunflowers bloom across the state, and several fields have become huge tourist attractions in late August and early September when the sunflowers are in full bloom. One of these is the Lyndon Leaders 4-H sunflower field eight miles north of Lyndon at the intersection of 189th and Highway 75. Look for “Lyndon Leaders” on Facebook for updates on the blooms.

From butterfly milkweed in orange, red or yellow to white dog’s-tooth violets, Kansas wildflowers dot the prairies, fields, parks and roads of the state. The unspoiled landscapes of Kansas show plenty of floral color, with camas in April to Indian mustard and Spanish needles in October. In addition, the same plains that host these flowers are also home to the nation’s largest remaining stand of tallgrass prairie, thousands of migrating birds, wildlife and even the iconic bison and the rare prairie chicken. RESOURCES If you are looking to distinguish Queen Anne’s lace from black-eyed Susans, there are resources to assist. The Kansas Wildflowers & Grasses website, kswildflower.org, lists wildflowers by color or time of flowering, along with nearly 900 species of grasses, trees, sedges, rushes, ferns and more.

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BIG EVENTS Special hunts are provided by the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism on department lands, including state parks, wildlife areas and refuges. The hunts also occur on walk-in hunting areas, National Wildlife Refuges, city and county properties, and other locations. The number of participants is limited. You can find out more by sending an email to specialhunts@ksoutdoors.com. Glen Elder State Park in Mitchell County hosts a December pheasant hunt for youth (ages 11–16) and women of all ages.

GIVE THIS A TRY!

CASUAL If you are new to shooting sports, the best way to start is through a rifle and hunter education course (see Resources on this page). Safety should absolutely come first. You might also consider beginning with clay shooting. Kansas has several lodges and clubs that offer instruction in this increasingly popular sport that captivates novices and experienced shooters alike. For a full list of lodges and public gun clubs, go online at huntkansas.org.

I N T E R M E D I AT E

RESOURCES Be smart about hunting. All hunters must be certified by an approved hunter education course before they can hunt in Kansas, except those 15 years old or under who are accompanied by an adult as well as those born before July 1, 1957. Kansas Hunter Education teaches new hunters to be ethical, safe and knowledgeable. The 10-hour course covers a variety of essential safety and ethics topics. Courses are offered throughout the year with most held August through October. For more experienced hunters, Advanced Hunter Education classes focus on specific types of hunting such as beginning waterfowl, goose, upland bird, deer and varmint hunting. These classes do not substitute for the required Hunter Education Course. For more information, go online at ksoutdoors.com and type “hunter education” in the search bar. For a full listing of Kansas hunting resources, go online at ksoutdoors.com/Hunting.

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One favorite spot to begin your Kansas hunting is Webster Reservoir. Set in the picturesque Chalk Hills 8 miles west of Stockton, the lake is a stopping place for many species of waterfowl and shorebirds. Another great place is Cedar Bluff State Park along Smoky Valley Scenic Byway near Ellis. Here, more than 14,000 acres of water and wildlife area provide an excellent destination for hunters and anglers.

CHALLENGING Kansas is an excellent land for bowhunting, with a depth of retailers and resources to support this sport and way of life. The state does not require a bowhunter license for big game hunting, but does facilitate courses across Kansas. For more information go online at ksoutdoors.com and look for the “Bowhunting” section under the “Hunting” tab.

D I D YO U K N OW ? Each year, Kansas grants a limited amount of licenses to falconers for capturing passage peregrine falcons (peregrine falcons taken during their migration flight). Hunting with falcons and other raptors such as golden eagles is permitted in the state. Go online at ksoutdoors.com and look for the “falconry” section of the “Hunting” tab for advice and the complete list of regulations.

PHOTOGRAPHS (CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) KDWPT, Bill Stephens (2), Larry Harwood (2)

“Pass it On” is a series of designated hunts (some before the official season) where seasoned hunters mentor youth hunters in order to pass on the traditions of safety, respect for the land and love of hunting. Go online at ksoutdoors.com and search for “hunter retention and recruitment” on the “Hunting” tab.


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hunting PHOTOGRAPHS (CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) Larry Harwood, Bill Stephens, Larry Harwood (2), Bill Stephens

YES, KANSAS!

Simply put, Kansas offers some of the best hunting in the nation. It is a sport—and way of life—passed on through generations of hunters committed to stewardship of the land and conservation of animal populations. Kansas has 300,000 acres of public lands and more than 1 million acres of private land seasonally open to hunters. Additionally, it has approximately one-half million acres of professionally managed hunting facilities providing private fee-tohunt access. All this land for hunting means game is rich and plenty. Whitetail deer, turkey, quail, pheasant, geese and more can be found on the land.

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hiking YES, KANSAS!

A Kansas hike provides fascinating scenery, strolls past historic sites and relaxing family time. All state parks and many wildlife areas and fishing lakes have hiking trails available with a wide variety of terrain, distances and physical challenges. Pick from among thousands of miles of trails and find something suitable for a morning walk, a challenging trek or an overnight adventure. GIVE THIS A TRY!

CASUAL

I N T E R M E D I AT E

CHALLENGING

The two-mile paved path of Lawrence’s Burroughs Creek Trail runs through the city’s historic eastside neighborhoods, past playgrounds and to Haskell Indian Nations University. A private and public partnership, which includes the local history museum and library, is developing a mobile-device app tour to highlight historic interest points along the trail. It is perfect for young children and those with limited mobility.

Elk City State Park and the Tablemound Trail has great options for hikers and yearround explorers. It takes hikers along vertical rock walls then drops through a ravine before crossing through woods and small creeks. The total distance is just under three miles with only a small section along a roadway.

There is no rule that you have to hike the entire 117 miles of the Flint Hills Nature Trail … but, then again, there isn’t any reason not to. Developed in partnership between KDWPT and the Kanza Rail to Trails Conservancy, this trail runs from Osawatomie in the east to Herington in the west and passes through communities including Rantoul, Ottawa, Pomona, Vassar, Osage City, Miller, Admire, Allen, Bushong, and Council Grove, each providing a chance for refreshments and small side excursions. But most importantly, the trail passes through the Flint Hills and its treasure of natural tallgrass prairie. This native grassland provides direct encounters with wildlife and flowers of the ecosystem as well as an understanding of how the plains appeared, smelled and sounded in the years before settlement.

Your tail-wagging friend can join you on several hiking routes, but a particularly good one is the Elk River Hiking Trail, a 11.4 mile pointto-point trail along a lake, near Elk City. It’s accessible year-round for people and their dogs, who must be kept on leash.

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RESOURCES For a listing of trail options throughout the state, go online to the Kanza Rail-Trails Conservancy, at kanzatrails.org or to GetOutdoorsKansas.org/trails. Kansas has a wide range of trails that are ADA accessible and perfect for anyone with mobility concerns. An extensive list with public feedback is available online by the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy at traillink.com/stateactivity/ks-wheelchair-accessible-trails.aspx. Kansas has a strong network of museums and nature centers across the state. Several of them offer handson exhibits for kids and a network of short hiking trails. Go online at ksoutdoors.com/education and look for the “Museums and Nature Centers” tab under “Wildlife Education Service.”

BIG EVENTS Become an Outdoor Woman! Hike—and a whole lot more—at the all-female Outdoors Women course run by the state of Kansas. These workshops help women hone outdoor skills such as orienteering, camping, birdwatching, botany, fishing, hunting, canoeing, wild game cooking and archery. Programs are held each spring and fall at Rock Springs 4-H Center near Junction City. For more information, go online at ksoutdoors.com/education.

PHOTOGRAPH Brian Goodman

D I D YO U K N OW ?


g Hunting • Sporting Clays • Lodging • Parties Business Retreats • Fund Raisers • Weddings


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parks&t YES, KANSAS! You can sense the adventure from the names: Sand Hills, Mushroom Rock and Prairie Dog. The extensive Kansas state park system offers ideal outdoor exploration in an accessible and well-maintained environment. Picture a day of camping, boating, fishing, hiking, biking, horse riding or just plain relaxing—and end it with spectacular sunsets and fellowship around the campfire.

RESOURCES

For a full listing and detailed information of Kansas state parks, go online at ksoutdoors.com/State-Parks.

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trails GIVE THIS A TRY!

CASUAL

Camping does not have to be synonymous with “roughing it.” If you are looking to combine nature with comfort, then reserve your cabin today at ksoutdoors. com/stateparks. These structures provide full access to the park facilities and spectacular views of nature combined with the comfort of air conditioning and a kitchen. It is ideal for families with younger or senior campers, or simply for anyone looking to enjoy their own little house on the Kansas prairie. Another fun lodging experience is the yurt at Eisenhower State Park.

BIG EVENTS

PHOTOGRAPHS (CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) KDWPT, Carlton Heller (2), KDWPT (2)

I N T E R M E D I AT E Try some bouldering Kansas-style at Rock City Park near Minneapolis. You can also visit Mushroom Rock State Park, named for one of the eight wonders of Kansas geography, unique rock formations that resemble mushrooms. These rocks served as landmarks for Native Americans and early pioneers such as Kit Carson. About six miles to the west, in Kanopolis, are four remaining buildings of Fort Harker, a U.S. Army outpost from 1866 to 1872. When you drive to the park, you can approach it along the Prairie Trail Scenic Byway, a 56-mile route that intersects the route of Spanish conquistadors and Swedish immigrants who passed through the land.

The Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism traditionally waives access fees to all state parks on three days each year. If you haven’t been to a state park in a long time, this is the perfect cost-free opportunity to pack up the family and bring them to enjoy everything that state parks offer. Look for date confirmations and announcements at ksoutdoors.com.

CHALLENGING

D I D YO U K N OW ?

For 15 years, Fall River State Park in southeast Kansas has hosted a historical reenactment that recreates the life of an 1800–1840s rendezvous and trading town between Native Americans and mountain men. Visitors can see authentic crafts as well as blackpowder shoots and tomahawk-throwing competitions. The event is open to the public and held in September. Search for the “Fall River Calendar” page at ksoutdoors.com or call 620-6372213 for more information.

Kansas motor vehicle owners can buy an annual park vehicle permit as part of their annual vehicle registration process. The Kansas State Parks Passport costs $15.50, a discount from the regular price of $25. Also, residents 65 or older or persons with disabilities can buy a park vehicle permit directly from KDWPT. This annual vehicle park permit is $13.75, and $3.25 for regular daily permits.

For a full listing of events at all Kansas state parks, see the detailed calendar online at ksoutdoors.com/State-Parks/ Event-Calendar.

Do you know if you can call a badger? Well, Tuttle Creek State Park staff and affiliated local experts can answer that question during their workshops on trapping and predator calling taught at the park office. The course covers methods for hunting or calling legal game in Kansas, including badger, beaver, bobcat, coyotes, gray fox, mink, muskrat, opossum, otter, raccoon, red fox, striped skunk, swift fox, and weasel. For more information, call the park office at 785-539-7941 during weekday work hours.

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kansas outdoors

disc golf YES, KANSAS!

Disc golf is a game that is growing across the nation, especially in Kansas. For example, the Glass Blown Open, an annual event held in Emporia for the last 15 years, has set a record as the largest disc golf tournament ever held. Players are drawn to the friendliness of the competition and the affordability of the game—and Kansas is here to welcome them. D I D YO U K N OW ?

OTHER COURSES

J O N E S PA R K / E M P O R I A Full 18-hole course with water areas and woods; separate east and west sections

O A K PA R K / W I C H I TA A full course in urban surroundings that offers something for all skill levels

S TO N E C R E E K PA R K / D E R B Y The challenge of a river and lots of trees make this a solid course

E L M W O O D PA R K / N O R TO N A sprawling course across the local fairgrounds with walks and plenty of obstacles

Disc golf courses are featured in 7 Kansas state parks. Two of these—Clinton and Tuttle Creek—boast full 18hole courses. For a full list, go online at ksoutdoors.com and look for “disc golf” under the “Activities” tab.

In addition to downloading the Kansas state parks Pocket Ranger app, be sure to download the Official Kansas Tourism app to see why there’s no place like Kansas. Find attractions, restaurants, hotels, and events across the state.

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YES, KANSAS! Kansas was an early adopter of geocaching—the familyfriendly sport where you use a GPS or smart phone to locate hidden boxes on mostly public lands. For years, the Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism hosted an annual geocaching competition. Now we have upped our game, including geocaching opportunities through the state’s official “Pocket Ranger” app. To download the app onto your phone, search for “Kansas state parks” in either the App Store or Google Play, or receive a direct link by going online at pocketranger.com/apps/Kansas.

PHOTOGRAPHS (CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) Casey Wilson, Jason Dailey

RESOURCES


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Manhattan, KS

For information call 785-477-9543 or visit wildwoodzip.com


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There’s no one way to enjoy the outdoors. But whatever your favorite outdoor activity is, Kansas has a place to enjoy it and people who share your interest. Join us in these pages for a Flint Hills horse ride, a Lake Cheney regatta and other adventures. We hope the beauty and excitement of these scenes inspire you to make your own journey.

featured in kansas


PHOTOGRAPH Brian Goodman

Here’s our take on the

BEST KANSAS OUTDOOR EXPERIENCES for the coming year

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he outdoors calls to everyone in a different way. We realize that some of us are hunters, and some of us aren’t. Some enjoy a two-day hike with a campfire and a pitched tent for the overnight excursion. Others prefer shorter jaunts that allow the family to return home for bedtime. Whatever your particular take on the outdoors, we hope you will agree that there is something vitally important about immersing ourselves in nature and cultivating that love and respect for the natural world with the next generation. In celebration of our love for the Kansas landscape and wildlife, here’s our list of the top 10 Kansas outdoor events for 2018. Whether you find a new family favorite from our list or discover a treasure we haven’t included, we hope you’ll join us in choosing to get outside. Going outdoors is not just a pleasure—though it is that. Going outdoors is essential to us, to our health and to our future.

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7.

9.

Explore Historic Lake Scott State Park

Draw the Bow

10. Take a First Day Hike

What better time is there to begin an outdoor adventure than on the first day of the year? Joining a First Day Hike starts your new year on just the right foot. Initiated by America’s State Parks, an association of directors of the nation’s fifty state parks (plus directors from U.S. territories), this program seeks to provide guided hikes across the United States on January 1. Several Kansas state parks participate in the program that offers families and individuals the chance to establish a rewarding New Year’s Day tradition. For a list of participating venues in Kansas, go online at ksoutdoors. com/State-Parks/ Special-Events/FirstDay-Hikes.

Enjoyed by both young and old, groups and individuals, archery offers competition and camaraderie for all ability levels. You can challenge yourself or others—or hone your hunting skills—at ranges within several Kansas state parks. An ideal range for beginners is located at the Shawnee State Fishing Lake Hunter Education Range. Several times a year, the range is open to the public with instruction provided by experienced archers at a nominal fee to cover the costs of hunter education courses. For more information on public archery ranges, go online at ksoutdoors.com/ Outdoor-Activities/ recreational-archery. The Shawnee State Fishing Lake Hunter Education Range public courses are detailed online at schea.org/openrange.

8. Zip It!

Looking for a fastmoving date night or an adventurous family outing? Zip lining offers a range of experiences to satisfy your inner thrillseeker. In Kansas, you can try this sport at Zip KC.You can choose from various excursions, including a hike and zip routine or a quick-paced run over nine different lines. The Bonner Springs course covers a wooded area near the Kansas River, allowing the zip lines to cross over bluffs and trees. This is also the area that hosts the KC Timber Challenge and Fall Family Timber Challenge, a challenging obstacle course race. For more information go online at zipkc.com or kctimberchallenge. com. Also check out Wildwood Outdoor Adventure Park in Manhattan. Go online at wildwoodadventure park.com

Historic Lake Scott State Park is beautifully situated in a canyon dotted with natural springs, craggy bluffs and woods. With 1,020 acres, the park surrounds the 100acre, spring-fed Scott State Fishing Lake. A 160-acre wildlife area lies west of the park. This is also early American history to explore, with more than 26 archeological sites. A National Historic Landmark is within the park: El Cuartelejo is the remains of the northernmost NativeAmerican pueblo. The Steele home, the dwelling of settlers from 100 years ago, has been preserved much as it was. About a mile south of the park is Battle Canyon, the site of the last Native-American battle in Kansas. The park is along the Western Vistas Historic Byway, about 11 miles north of Scott City.


5.

3.

Experience a Kansas Ranch

6.

PHOTOGRAPHS (FROM LEFT) Brian Goodman, Bill Stephens, Sunflower Publishing, KDWPT (7)

Visit an OutdoorsThemed State Museum or Nature Center The Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism’s six museums/nature centers offer a common theme of stewardship and appreciation of the land told through encounters with the region’s particular eco-system. For example, Prairie Center just outside of Olathe in eastern Kansas allows visitors to explore some 300 acres of prairie. The Pratt Education Center provides numerous interactive exhibits as well as wildlife dioramas and a series of 400–600 gallon aquariums highlighting the state’s aquatic diversity. You can read descriptions of each of these centers by going online at ksoutdoors.com and entering “museums and nature centers” in the search bar.

Colorado has the mountains and California the beaches … we’ll give them that. But Kansas makes a claim to cowboy culture. This is the home of the Wild West, where Dodge City received and ran off rowdy riders, where the cattle industry was born at the end of long cattle runs from Texas, where rodeos still flourish and ranches continue to thrive. Kansas ranches welcome visitors for a variety of experiences, including guided horse rides, chuck wagon campfire meals and more. Visitors can explore federal lands such as the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve in Chase County. Go online at nps.gov/ tapr or to travelks. com (and type “ranch experience” in the search bar) to learn more.

1.

See Bison

Ride the Winds

4.

Discover Your Own Scenic Wonder Throughout the year the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism shares some of our favorite images online with #myksstatepark and #optoutside. Enjoy some of our favorite views from the staff and the public. But don’t wait for us. Some of the best outdoor treasures are the small, isolated pockets of nature. For example, photographer Mickey Shannon is documenting the beauty of Kansas waterfalls at his site mickeyshannon.com/ kansas/waterfalls. These mostly unheralded attractions are potent reminders that nature often creates beauty where we might not expect to find it.

You might know that the name “Kansas” comes from the Kanza people, whose nation’s name means “people of the south wind.” The land of strong winds and wide, open skies has shaped Kansas throughout its history and might partially explain our rich aviation heritage as home to legends such as Amelia Earhart and Clyde Cessna. What better way to connect with this natural history than by enjoying a hot-air balloon excursion? Several Kansas balloon clubs and private operations offer excursions. This year Anthony, Kansas celebrates its 20th Sunflower Balloon Fest from May 12-14. In Topeka, you can catch the annual Huff ’n’ Puff Hot Air Balloon Rally held each September. Go online at sunflowerballoonfest. com and huff-n-puff. org to learn more about the times and events.

2. Visit the Flint Hills

Covering a large swath of centraleastern Kansas, the Flint Hills is a breathtaking landscape of tallgrass prairie and rocky terrain. You can explore it by taking a four-wheel drive across the back roads, by visiting Konza Prairie station preserved by Kansas State University or simply driving along the Flint Hills National Scenic Byway. Perhaps the best introduction for groups of different attention spans and physical capabilities is to start at the Flint Hills Discovery Center in Manhattan. This museum provides interactive exhibits, videos and educational exhibits to explain the unique landscape. Suitable for young children and curious adults, it also hosts walking tours and serves as a springboard for helping you choose your own route through the Flint Hills.

The bison, or “buffalo” as they are commonly called, once dominated the landscape of Kansas and much of the Midwest. Extensive efforts have been made to stabilize their populations, both in preserves and by private ranchers. You can witness bison in their natural habitats at several ranches and locations, but perhaps one of the best introductions to them is by taking a tour at the Maxwell Wildlife Refuge. Here, guides take groups on a covered tram ride across the wild habitat to observe bison (as well as elk and other animals) in their native landscape. A yearround ticket is only $8 per adult, making this an affordable and unique opportunity for a close-up appreciation of this powerful creature that has played an essential role in the history of Kansas. For more information, go online at maxwellwildliferefuge. com.


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K

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A

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Classes at Cheney Reservoir launch thousands of sailors STORY BY Amber Fraley PHOTOGRAPHY BY Aaron Patton

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When it comes to learning to sail, most people might not immediately think of Kansas. But the fact is Kansas has more than 150 lakes, many of which are public and have boating access, and they’re scattered all over the state—and where there are lakes, there are sailors. “People often do a double-take when they think about learning to sail in Kansas,” says Kent Carter, boating instructor with the Ninnescah Sailing Association near Wichita. “But of course people find out quickly if they sail on Cheney Reservoir, or Clinton Reservoir, for instance, that there’s a lot of boating and other water activities.” You could say that Wichita native Kent Carter is proof Boater education courses are required of Kansans living the nautical life. For 35 years, he was an environmental chemist for the city of Wichita, making sure the city’s for anyone 20 years or under who water was safe to drink. Even prior to that, though, he had another wishes to pilot a sailboat in Kansas connection with the water: sailing, kayaking and canoeing. without direct adult supervision. There Carter began teaching canoeing classes for the Red Cross is no minimum age for an individual to in 1980. The director, wanting to add sailing classes, sent Carter hold a certification from an education off to a national aquatic school for two weeks to learn sailing and course for sailboats. A student should be begin teaching it. “I had always wanted to sail. I was about thirty no younger than 12 to hold a certificate at the time and thought it was probably a rich man’s sport. Little did I know the opportunity would fall into my lap.” for operating a motor-powered or PWV Carter has been teaching ever since and continues boat without direct supervision. sailing instruction on Cheney Reservoir through the not-forprofit and open-to-the-public Ninnescah Sailing Association (NSA). In all, he has taught more than 3,000 people to sail, and over 200 sailers to become instructors. Carter believes that sailing is a skill people of all backgrounds can master, and he

35


says most people who take the basic sailing class have never sailed before. The classes are affordable, and participants have use of one of five Sunfish sailboats that Carter says are ideal for training beginners. “You only have to keep one hand on tiller, which guides the rudder, and one hand on the single line on the boat, called the mainsheet, that operates the sail. It’s a great way to learn how to sail.” Participants in the basic sailing course learn basic boat-handling skills, sailing terminology, knot tying, sailing theory, water safety and small-craft safety. The course takes place over three days, with one evening of classroom instruction during the week and two days of hands-on training on the lake over the following weekend. “We spend all day, from eight in the morning until five at night, to do all the basic skills that they need to learn how to sail,” Carter says. “I am fortunate to have a NINNESCAH SAILING team of eleven dedicated volunteer sailing instructors who teach our sailing ASSOCIATION program with me. They are all certified by the U.S. Sailing Association.” 2018 Learn to Sail classes In the weeks following the class, Carter says most of his students decide At Cheney Reservoir they love sailing and want to continue. “They often go on and either buy a small boat such as a Sunfish or a catamaran, or even larger sloops,” says Carter. The skills students learn through the NSA sailing class naturally transfer to CLASS 1 larger crafts and even ocean sailing, says Carter. “As they get better and better, Tuesday, June 19 and many of them will eventually buy a large 25- or 30-foot keel boat. Once you

Saturday & Sunday, June 23–14 CLASS 2 Tuesday, July 17 and Saturday& Sunday, July 21–22 CLASS 3 Basic Keelboat (advanced sailing class) Saturday, August 12

“Sailing brings families together.”

–Kent Carter

get into a larger sailboat, they’re exactly the same skills as sailing a small boat; it’s just that moving up to a larger boat, there’s more equipment for you to learn how to use.” Preregistration is required. Carter recommends sailing as a family pastime. “Sailing brings families Call 316.729.5757 or go together in the aquatic environment,” he says. “Any activity the family shares online at ninnescah.org based on a day of sailing at the lake just builds and strengthens family bonds for more information. and creates a lifetime of wonderful family memories.” But Carter’s reasons for sailing are more personal. “For me, sailing is complete release and therapy. It’s a great way to get away from everyday life and enjoy the relaxation of hearing the wind in your sails and the water slapping against the boat. It’s just ethereal and therapeutic. It’s a great sport.”

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KANSAS-BASED

Sailing Clubs

Johnson County Sailing Club Shawnee Mission / jcprd.org

Kansas Sailing Association Lawrence / kansassailing.com

Municipal parks and recreation classroom and on-lake instruction for adults

Club focused on sailboat races; facility also hosts KU (University of Kansas) Sailing Club

Kansas City Sailing Lawrence / 785.841.7245 kansascitysailing.com

Lake Quivera Yacht Club Lake Quivera / lqyc.com

Sailing supply center that also offers instruction for adults and youth

Private club that hosts regattas and sailing classes

Perry Yacht Club Meriden / 785.484.2261 perryyachtclub.com This private club hosts events and classes, including “Sailing Sisters” to promote women’s sailing

Ninnescah Sailing Association Wichita / 316.729.5757 ninnescah.org Not-for-profit that provides instructional courses and sailing opportunities

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All vessels powered by motor (gasoline, diesel, or electric) or sail must be registered and numbered. New owners can register their boat in person at a state park, a regional office, one of our boat registration agents or by filling out the Application for Certificate of Number Kansas Boating Act Form and mailing it with the $32.50 registration fee to: KDWPT Pratt Operations Office / ATTN: Boat Registration / 512 SE 25th Ave. / Pratt, KS 67124


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Nickerson, Kansas

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888-489-8039 Shawnee Yacht Club Topeka / shawneeyachtclub.org With 77 years of sailing, club hosts instructional classes, competitions and gatherings

Southwind Yacht Club Salina / southwindyachtclub.com Activity and competition boating club based on Milford Lake

Walnut Valley Sailing Club El Dorado / wvsailing.com

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Concordia, Kansas

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kansas outdoors

’18

KANSAS in

From backyard sightings to rare encounters, Kansas offers opportunities to spot and appreciate a range of bird species STORY BY Outdoors magazine staff with Kathleen Dinsdale and Susan Kraus PHOTOGRAPHY BY Casey Wilson

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kansas outdoors

Kansas offers a rewarding environment for birders, everything from backyard habitats to refuge lands for migratory species. We take care of winged visitors through preservation projects such as the Marvin Schwilling Memorial Blue Bird Program. The past year, the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism began hosting a “Kansas Big Year” competition for Kansas birders to record and share their sightings within the borders of Kansas. The state also hosts some prime birding spots and opportunities for serious hobbyists. See the “birding” section online at ksoutdoors. com/wildlife-habitats/wildlife-watching for more information. Migration Landings Visualize a flock of massive white pelicans, outlined against a blue sky or setting sun, their wingspans larger than eagles’, riding the thermals, descending to the earth with a slow, deliberate grace. They turn as one, becoming for a moment invisible against the white of the clouds, then drop into the open water of the wetlands. Only when they land do you realize you’ve been holding your breath. This is the experience at Cheyenne Bottoms, a state wildlife management area as well as the largest inland marsh in the U.S. and a prime resting stop for birds migrating from Central and South America to as far north as northern Alaska. Thousands of diverse species use these precious wetlands to rest and feed. Many fall under the generic term “shorebirds,” but one can find owls, woodpeckers, warblers and wrens, grosbeaks and orioles, finches and terns, 28 varieties of ducks, eagles, hawks, falcons, cranes and plovers, sandpipers and stilts, gulls, geese and grebes, herons, loons, ibises and more. It is estimated that some 45 percent of North America’s shorebird population stops off in Kansas when migrating north in the spring. For more information on visiting Cheyenne Bottoms, search for “Cheyenne Bottoms Wildlife Area” at ksoutdoors. com and go online to the Kansas Wetlands Education Center at wetlandscenter.fhsu.edu. Prairie Chicken Mating Dances Yes, un-huh. Yes, un-huh. We heard them say it over and over, with growing, then

42

fading intensity, growing and fading again. It was the boom of the birds, the signature love song of male prairie chickens looking to get lek-y. A lek, of course, is a place in the prairie where the male Tympanuchus pallidicinctus gather year after year to strut their stuff and win a mate. Every once in a while, the Yes, un-huh would be answered with an impatient, What? What? This encounter came at a field in southeast Kansas, during prairie chicken mating season in March. We arrived at the lek at 5:30 a.m., and as the sun began to rise, we could see the male birds before us. Chicken-shaped, but grouse by classification, their heads have feathered black spikes that resemble rabbit ears when fully erect. On their tails is what looks like a similar white set of bunny ears. Their throats have a sun-orange air sack that they inflate to the size of a large orange while they shimmy and stamp their legs during the courtship dance. The choreography of this early-morning display is extraordinary. Males charge one another like bulls, black spikes lowered like horns as they run 30 or more feet toward each other. They stop, just a foot apart, and make a couple of vertical jumps. Then they flap and fly at each other repeatedly, but never making enough contact to inflict any trauma. They scream at each other: What? What? They continue the Yes, un-huh, yes, un-huh. And then, at precisely the same moment, the two turn away from one another and wander off into the crowd. The dance is repeated again and again, with different matchups of males. As the morning brightens, the females began to appear, slowly gliding in and looking bored. I fully expected them to be filing their nails and chewing gum. These girls are smaller and more drab than their Romeos, but they appear utterly unimpressed with the screaming, the What, what? and even the Yes, un-huh. Suddenly, some in our group spot a male and female mating. The moment is over before my eyes can search out the two. Our guides say that the female won’t be back for the rest of the season. She’ll build her nest in nearby grassland and then raise her clutch. The dominant males will stay at the lek, however, trolling for girl chickens day after day, from late March to early June. One of the best opportunities to witness this first hand is at the Konza Prairie Biological Station, the 8,600-acre tallgrass prairie jointly owned by K-State and the Nature Conservancy and managed by the Kansas State Division of Biology. The Konza’s environmental education program offers a blind for viewing the birds, which is available during the spring mating season by reservation. Call (785) 587-0381 to reserve a seat in the blind and to process payment of $25 per person with proceeds supporting the Konza Environmental Education Program.


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Riding the trails or hills of Kansas is one of the best ways to experience the state’s history and beauty STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY Jason Dailey

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K

ansas offers numerous opportunities to enjoy horseback rides across the land of prairie and rolling hills. In addition to private riding paths, there are several trails maintained by the state on public land, including the 25-mile trail along the shores of Lake Clinton. You can read more about the state trails by going online to ksoutdoors.com and looking for the “Horseback Riding” tab. A full list and map of public equestrian trails are hosted by the Kansas Horse Council and posted online at kansashorsecouncil.com/equestrian-trails-inkansas. Whether you hire a horse and guide through a ranch or set off with your own mount, this is simply one of the best ways to see the state whose history is crossed by legendary routes such as the Chisholm Trail, the Oregon Trail, the Santa Fe Trail and linked with the legend of the cowboy. Photographer Jason Dailey has worked for years in the landscape of Kansas, but rarely from the back of a horse. For this photo essay, he joined a group of novice riders guided by expert Flint Hill horsemen and horsewomen on a ride over the rolling landscape. Here is his account—and visual chronology—of the adventure. As I hummed down the highway toward Cottonwood Falls, a sentry of dark clouds was racing me to my destination. These storm clouds and I were heading to the Flint Hills to connect with a group of equestrians, Western-style riders. I planned to spend a weekend mounted on a horse, exploring the landscape at a gentle trot. When I checked in at the Grand Central Hotel, the dark sky was a vast canopy of gray wisp broken by lightning. The next morning dawned bright and the air felt crystal clear, filtered by the power of an overnight Kansas thunderstorm. The smell of campfire and coffee met me as I arrived at the gathering point, past the puddled back roads of Chase County and into a land of rolling hills, patched

with herds of cattle and weighty with the sense of sheer volume of space. The campground was surrounded by long horse trailers, beyond which were tents with the fire pit at the center. The smells of breakfast lingered, but everyone with an authentic cowboy hat was tacking up horses for the first ride. Soon, we set out as a group of about thirty horses and riders toward higher ground that allowed us to witness the breathtaking expanse of the Flint Hills. As our horses kept us moving together, conversations rolled as easily as the hills around us. I felt like I could close my eyes, and To set up your horsealmost feel as if I was in riding adventure, go a hammock talking to online at ksoutdoors. friends next to me who were also gently rocking com and look for the back and forth in the “Horseback Riding” tab. breeze. The slower pace not only allowed us to visit but also gave the horses a safe passage over the field specked with flint rocks. At mid-day, we crested a hill just as the sun fully emerged, herding us back down into a valley and along a ridge that allowed us to dip into a copse of trees near a stream. Our horses cooled off with a drink and a bit of shade before seeming to confer and decide that it was time to bring this group of riders back into camp. We set out as novice riders—and, admittedly, we returned as novice riders. But our appreciation for the prairie, for the Flint Hills, this beautiful stretch of outdoors, had grown immensely.

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g u i d e

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r e s o u r c e STATEWIDE RESOURCES

Equestrian Trails

Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism

Belleville Travel Information Center 702 12th St. Belleville (785) 527-2883

Office of the Secretary 1020 S. Kansas, Room 200, Topeka (785) 296-2281

Cherokee Strip Land Rush Museum 31639 US Hwy 77, Arkansas City (620) 442-6750

Boulder Bluff Horse Trail El Dorado State Park (316) 321-7180

Pratt Operations Office 512 SE 25th Ave., Pratt (620) 672-5911

Colby Visitors Center 350 S. Range #10, Colby (785) 460-7643

Cottonwood Trail Sand Hills State Park (316) 542-3664

Emporia Research and Survey Office 1830 Merchant, P.O. Box 1525, Emporia (620) 342-0658

Concordia Travel Information Center 130 E Sixth St., Concordia (785) 243-4303

Crystal Trail Milford State Park (785) 238-3014

Kansas City District Office 8304 Hedge Lane Terrace, Shawnee (913) 422-1314 Regional Offices Region 1 1426 U.S. 183 Bypass P.O. Box 338, Hays (785) 628-8614 The northwest quarter of Kansas that includes 26 counties. Region 2 300 SW Wanamaker Road, Topeka (785) 273-6740 The northeast quarter of Kansas that includes 20 counties. Region 3 1001 McArtor Drive, Dodge City (620) 227-8609 The southwest quarter of Kansas that includes 28 counties. Region 4 6232 E. 29th St. North, Wichita (316) 683-8069 The south central region of Kansas that includes 13 counties. Region 5 1500 W. Seventh St., Chanute (620) 431-0380 The southeastern quarter of Kansas that includes 18 counties. State-Owned Travel Information Centers Belle Plaine Travel Information Center 770 N. I-35, Belle Plaine (620) 326-5123Â Located on I-35 Kansas Turnpike at Milepost 26. Accessible from both northbound and southbound lanes. Goodland Travel Information Center I-70 East Milepost 7, Goodland (785) 899-6695 Located on I-70 at Milepost 7, accessible from eastbound lanes only. Community Travel Information Centers Abilene Convention & Visitors Bureau 201 N.W. Second, Abilene (785) 263-2231 Atchison Area Chamber of Commerce 200 S. 10th, P.O. Box 126, Atchison (913) 367-2427

50

Dodge City Convention & Visitors Bureau 400 W. Wyatt Earp Blvd., Dodge City (620) 225-8186 Franklin County Visitors Center 2011 E. Logan, Ottawa (785) 242-1411 Garden City Travel Plaza 1265 Solar Ave., Garden City (620) 276-3264

Bluestem Trail Sand Hills State Park (316) 542-3664

Dune Trail Sand Hills State Park (316) 542-3664 Eagle Ridge Trail Milford State Park (785) 238-3014 Equestrian Trails Perry State Park (785) 246-3449 Horse Trail Eisenhower State Park (785) 528-4102

Great Bend Convention & Visitors Bureau 3111 10th St., Great Bend (620) 792-2750

Kanopolis Multi-use Trails Kanopolis State Park (785) 546-2565

Kansas Originals Market 233 Hwy 232, Wilson (785) 658-2602

Pipeline Trail Milford State Park (785) 238-3014

Hays Convention & Visitors Bureau 2700 Vine St., Hays (785) 628-8202

Pond Trail Sand Hills State Park (316) 542-3664

Lawrence Visitor Information Center 402 N. Second, Lawrence (785) 856-3040 Liberal Travel Information Center 1 Yellow Brick Road, Liberal (620) 626-0170 Lindsborg Travel Information Center 114 N Main (Covered Kiosk), Lindsborg (785) 227-8687 Olathe Mahaffie Stage Coach stop & Farm Historic Site 1200 Kansas City Road, Olathe (913) 971-5111 Wyldewood Cellars Winery 32633 Grapevine Road, Paxico (785) 636-8466

VISITOR SERVICES Hiking Trails Kansas Trails Council www.kansastrailscouncil.org Kanza Rail-Trails Conservancy www.kanzatrails.org

Complete list of state hiking trails getoutdoorskansas.org/trails

Prairie Trail Sand Hills State Park (316) 542-3664

Crawford State Park 1 Lake Road, Farlington (620) 362-3671 Includes cabins and campsites

Prairie Dog State Park 13037 State Hwy 261, Norton (785) 877-2953 Includes cabins and campsites

Cross Timbers State Park 144 Hwy 105, Toronto (620) 637-2213 Includes cabins and campsites

Prairie Spirit Trail State Park 419 South Oak, Garnett (785) 448-6767 No camping

Eisenhower State Park 29810 S. Fairlawn Road, Osage City (785) 528-4102 Includes cabins and campsites

Sand Hills State Park 4207 East 56th, Hutchinson (316) 542-3664 Includes campsites

El Dorado State Park 618 NE Bluestem Road, El Dorado (316) 321-7180 Includes cabins and campsites

Scott State Park 101 West Scott Lake Drive, Scott City (620) 872-2061 Includes cabins and campsites

Elk City State Park 4825 Squaw Creek Road, Independence (620) 331-6295 Includes cabins and campsites

Tuttle Creek State Park 5800 A River Pond Road, Manhattan (785) 539-7941 Includes cabins and campsites

Fall River State Park 144 Hwy 105, Toronto (620) 637-2213 Includes campsites

Webster State Park 1140 10 Rd., Stockton (785) 425-6775 Includes cabins and campsites

Glen Elder State Park 2131 180 Road, Glen Elder (785) 545-3345 Includes campsites

Wilson State Park No. 3 State Park Road, Sylvan Grove (785) 658-2465 Includes cabins and campsites

Hillsdale State Park 26001 W. 255th St., Paola (913) 783-4507 Includes RV camping and campsites Kanopolis State Park 200 Horsethief Road, Marquette (785) 546-2565 Includes cabins and campsites

Randolph Equestrian Trail Tuttle Creek State Park (785) 539-7941

Kaw River State Park 300 Southwest Wanamaker Road, Topeka (785) 273-6740 No camping

Rock Creek Horse Trail Clinton Wildlife Area | Rockhaven Park (785) 887-6882

Lovewell State Park 2446 250 Road, Webber (785) 753-4971 Includes cabins and campsites

Saddle Ridge Trails Hillsdale State Park Vehicle permits are required for entry. (913) 783-4507

Meade State Park 13051 V Road, Meade (620) 873-2572 Includes camping

Tallgrass Sand Hills State Park (316) 542-3664

Milford State Park 3612 State Park Road, Milford (785) 238-3014 Includes cabins and campsites

Woodland Trail Sand Hills State Park (316) 542-3664

STATE PARKS/FISHING LAKES Cedar Bluff State Park 32001 147 Hwy, Ellis (785) 726-3212 Includes cabins and campsites Cheney State Park 16000 NE 50th, Cheney (316) 542-3664 Includes cabins and campsites Clinton State Park 798 N. 1415 Road, Lawrence (785) 842-8562 Includes cabins and campsites

Mined Land Wildlife Area 7545 NW Belleview Rd., Columbus (620) 827-6301 Includes cabins and campsites

State Fishing Lakes Atchison State Fishing Lake 11692 Pawnee Rd., Atchison (913) 367-7811 Barber State Fishing Lake Medicine Lodge (620) 895-6446 Black Kettle State Fishing Lake Moundridge (620) 628-4592 Bourbon State Fishing Lake 10 miles south of Moran on Hwy 59 to Elsmore, then east 4 miles (620)-449-2539 Brown State Fishing Lake Robinson (913) 367-7811 Butler State Fishing Lake Latham (620) 876-5730 Chase State Fishing Lake 1130 Lake Road, Cottonwood Falls (620) 767-5900 Clark State Fishing Lake Kingsdown (620) 227-8609

Mushroom Rock State Park 200 Horsethief Road, Marquette (785) 546-2565 No camping

Concannon State Fishing Lake Garden City (620) 276-8886

Perry State Park 5441 Westlake Road, Ozawkie (785) 246-3449 Includes cabins and campsites

Cowley State Fishing Lake 20467 U.S. Hwy 166, Dexter (620) 876-5730

Pomona State Park 22900 S. Hwy 368, Vassar (785) 828-4933 Includes cabins and campsites

Crawford State Fishing Lake 9 miles north, 1 mile east of Girard (620) 362-3671 Douglas State Fishing Lake Baldwin City (913) 845-2665


r e s o u r c e

g u i d e

Ford State Fishing Lake Dodge City (620) 895-6446 Geary State Fishing Lake Junction City (785) 461-5402 Goodman State Fishing Lake Ness City (620) 276-8886 Hain State Fishing Lake Spearville (620) 895-6446 Hamilton State Fishing Lake Syracuse (620) 227-8609 Hodgeman State Fishing Lake Jetmore (620) 276-8886 Jewell State Fishing Lake 2131 180 Road, Glen Elder (785) 545-3345 Kingman State Fishing Lake 8685 W. Hwy 54, Cunningham (620) 532-3242 Kiowa State Fishing Lake Greensburg (620) 895-6446 Leavenworth State Fishing Lake 24421 Parallel Road, Tonganoxie (913) 845-2665 Logan State Fishing Lake 1.5 mile north and 3 miles west of Russell Springs (785) 726-3212 Louisburg Middle Creek State Fishing Lake Louisburg (913) 783-4507

Pottawatomie Lake No. 1 and No. 2 State Fishing Lakes Manhattan (785) 539-9999 Rocky Ford State Fishing Lake Manhattan (785) 539-9999 Rooks State Fishing Lake 1140 10 Road, Stockton (785) 425-6775 Saline State Fishing Lake North from I-70 exit 249 to Watkins Road, then east 1 mile to Gerard Road, then north ½ mile to entrance. (785) 628-8614

Keith Sebelius Reservoir Located at 4 miles west and 1 mile south from Norton La Cygne Reservoir Southeast of La Cygne (913) 795-2218 Lovewell Reservoir Webber (785) 753-4971 Marion Reservoir Just north of U.S. 56, between Marion and Hillsboro Hillsboro (620) 382-2101

Scott State Fishing Lake 520 W. Scott Lake Drive, Scott City (620) 872-2061

Melvern Reservoir 35 miles south of Topeka on US-75 (785) 549-3318

Shawnee State Fishing Lake Silver Lake (913) 845-2665

Milford Reservoir 5 miles northwest of Junction City on US-77

Sheridan State Fishing Lake Located 12 miles east and ¾ mile north of Hoxie. (913) 877-2953

Perry Reservoir Perry

Sherman Wildlife Area Located 7 miles south, 2 miles west of Goodland. (785) 726-3212 Washington State Fishing Lake Washington (785) 461-5402 Wilson State Fishing Lake Buffalo (620) 637-2748 Woodson State Fishing Lake Toronto (620) 637-2748

Toronto Reservoir 15 miles southwest of Yates Center, Fall River (620) 583-6783 Tuttle Creek Reservoir 5 miles north of Manhattan Manhattan Webster Reservoir 1210 9 Road, Stockton Wilson Reservoir Sylvan Grove (785) 658-2551

HUNTING

State Fishing Reservoirs

Hunting Associations

Cedar Bluff Reservoir 13 miles south of I-70 Ogallah Interchange (exit 135) on K-147 32001 147 Hwy, Ellis (785) 726-3212

Kansas Bowhunters Association thekbasite.com

Cheney Reservoir Wichita

Kansas Outfitters Association kansasoutfittersassociation.com

Clinton Reservoir 5 miles west of Lawrence

KS Sport Hunting Association www.huntkansas.org

Council Grove Reservoir 1 mile north of Council Grove (620) 767-5195

Mid America Hunting Association‎ www.magba.com

El Dorado Reservoir El Dorado

Prairie Wind Hunting Club www.prairiewindhunting.com

Montgomery State Fishing Lake Independence (620) 331-6820

Elk City Reservoir Independence (620) 331-6820

Hunting Outfitters

Nebo State Fishing Lake Holton (913) 793-3066

Fall River Reservoir Fall River

Lyon State Fishing Lake 2272 Road 250, Reading (620) 699-3372 McPherson State Fishing Lake 2450 Pueblo Road, Canton (620) 628-4592 Meade State Fishing Lake Meade (620) 873-2572 Miami State Fishing Lake 387th St., Fontana (913) 783-4507

Neosho State Fishing Lake Saint Paul (620) 449-2539 Osage State Fishing Lake Carbondale (620) 699-3372 Ottawa State Fishing Lake Located about 25 miles north of Salina on US-81, and 8 miles east on KS-106. 1079 N. 190th Rd., Minneapolis (785) 658-2465 Ext. 3

Glen Elder Reservoir 2131 180 Road, Glen Elder Hillsdale Reservoir Paola John Redmond Reservoir ½ mile south and 1 mile west of New Strawn (620) 364-8613 Kanopolis Reservoir 33 miles SW of Salina on K-149 and K141 US, Kanopolis (785) 546-2294

Kansas Sport Clay Association kssca.org

Bass Pro Shop 12051 Bass Pro Drive, Olathe (913) 254-5200 www.basspro.com Bell Wildlife Specialties 155 West Oak, Harveyville (785) 589-2321 www.huntingkansaswhitetails.com The Beyer Ranch 652 8th Road SW, Gridley (620) 836-5080 Buster’s Outfitters PO Box 143, Sun City (620) 546-5777

Byron Walker Wildlife Area 8685 W. Hwy 54, Cunningham (620) 532-3242 www.ksoutdoors.com

Kansas Hunting Adventures 112 E. Hazelwood, Waterville (785) 363-2327 www.kansashuntingadventures.com

Cabela’s 10300 Cabela Drive, Kansas City (913) 328-0322 www.cabelas.com

Kansas Trophy Hunts 134 E. Main, Sedan (620) 725-4011

Carters Big Island Hunt Club 108 Sr. Joseph St. St. Paul (620) 232-4829

Kansas Trophy Whitetails 1539 Indian Rd., Morrowville (785) 265-3360 www.kansas-trophy-whitetails.com

CatDaddy’s Catfishin Adventures 1308 NW Logan, Topeka (785) 357-0934 www.catdaddyguideservices.com

LaSada 3721183rd St., Russell (785) 483-3758 www.lasada.com

Cecil’s Trails End Hunting Lodge 12803 108 Road, Minneola (620) 430-0663 hunttrailsend.com

Lazy J Hunting Service 400 Orth St., Sublette (620) 675-2338 www.lazyjhunting.com

Cimarron Crossing Motel 410 Ave. A, Cimarron (620) 855-2225 www.cimarronmotel.com

Lone Pine Game Birds 444 90th Road, Toronto (620) 637-2967 www.huntlonepine.com

Clay’s Guide Service 27303 B St., Haviland (620) 546-4149 www.claysguideservice.com

Long Branch Creek Outfitters 107 N Marks, Oberlin (785) 475-3439

Crooked Creek Hunting Ranch 25048 15 Road, Meade (620) 873-7189 Flint Hills Hunts PO Box 838, Winfield (620) 221-3767 www.kansashunts.com Flying W Outfitters 6199 4 Road, Plains (620) 629-0946 Golden Prairie Hunting Service 607 W. Gwinn Court, Sublette (620) 675-8490 Kansas Governor’s One Shot Turkey Hunt 200 S. Main St., Ste. 2, El Dorado (316) 321-3835 www.ksoneshot.com Guide Lines Guide Service 3608 Hackberry Drive, Topeka (785) 267-0065 Hanke’s Hunts 1510 3rd Road, Waterville (785) 562-7157 hankeshunts.com Hays City Sportsmen’s Club 5810 230th Ave., Hays (785) 623-9477 Hickory Creek Lodge 1230 W 570th Ave., McCune (620) 423-5491 www.hickorycreekoutfitter.com Jeff’s Guide Service 100 Lakeview Lane Ellis (785) 650-8263 www.jeffsguide.com JL Bar Ranch 1720 Seneca, Winona (785) 751-4426 K & K Outfitters 317 N 250th, Mulberry (620) 249-3003 www.duckandbuck.com

kansas outdoors

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Finney State Fishing Lake Garden City (620) 276-8886

McNeil Game Farm and Outfitting 1816 18th Road, Clay Center (785) 632-5040 (785) 447-0629 McPherson Valley Wetlands 967 Mohawk Road, McPherson (620) 241-7669 www.kdwp.state.ks.us Mill Creek Outfitters 35040 Old K-10 Road, Alma (785) 499-2980 Mined Land Wildlife Area 507 E 560th, Pittsburg (620) 231-3173 Monster Bucks of Kansas 664 3 Road, Bremen (785) 337-2396 www.kansashunter.com Muddy Creek Game Birds Muddy Creek Whitetails 8721 NE Brown Road, Meriden 785-484-2325 www.muddycreekwhitetails.com Murphy’s Landing 22030 Hwy 39, Stark (620) 754-3300 www.murphysatstark.com Oasis Hunting R1, Box 110, Deerfield (620) 426-6291 www.oasishunting.com Odyssey Hunts 109 Albert St., Lakin (620) 355-6301 Prairie Outfitters & Excursions 5001 E. Ninth Ave., Winfield (620) 222-8870 PrairieOutfittersandExcursions.com Prairie Stars Enterprises 408 S First St Sterling (620) 278-3255 Rebel Ridge Outfitters P.O Box 752, Syracuse (620) 384-7700 www.rebelridgeoutfitters.com

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kansas outdoors

r e s o u r c e River Bluff Hunting Company 425 70 Rd., Scandia (316) 258-7969 www.riverbluffhunting.com Riverview Ringnecks R2, PO Box, Webber (402) 984-3028 Rock and Rose Ranch 16400 Axelton Hill Road, Randolph (785) 410-7747 Rocking K Ranch Hunting 313 NE 150th Ave., Stafford (620) 546-4668 www.ks-hunting-land.com Saline River Hunting Lodge & Guide Service 20015 260 Ave., WaKeeney (785) 743-5878 www.salinelodge.com Sand Wells Outdoors 902 Road S, Hugoton (866) 365-6112 www.sandwellsoutdoors.com Shawnee Creek Preserve 2733 NE Center Star Road, Columbus (620) 674-8563 Show Me Birds Hunting Resort 6186 SE 20th St., Baxter Springs (620) 674-8863 www.showmebirds.com Solomon Valley Outfitters LLC 1319 Kansas St., Downs (785) 545-5327 Steve Lloyd Wetlands Area Rt 837, Wakefield (785) 632-6701 www.cckansas.org Timber Hills Lake Hunting & Fishing Adventures 1369 Valley Road, Mapleton (620) 743-4114 www.timberhillslake.com USI RV Park 2920 E 33rd St., Wichita (316) 838-8699 www.usirvpark.com Upland Inn 407 S Walnut, Greensburg (316) 250-3038 www.uplandinnhunts.com Wild Horse Canyon Bed and Breakfast & The Shady Porch 255 N Longhorn Road, Dighton (620) 397-5914

Ash Creek Upland Game Hunting 269 Pawnee Road, Windom (620) 489-9411 www.ashcreekhunting.com The Barn Bed and Breakfast Inn 14910 Blue Mound Road, Valley Falls (785) 945-3225 www.thebarnbb.com Barrel Springs Hunt Club 416 Railroad Ave., Tribune (620) 376-2701 www.barrelspringshuntclub.com Big Hill Lodge 415 S Liberty, Cherryvale (877) 244-4455 www.bighilllodge.com Blue River Whitetails, LLC 416 N Denver Ave., Hanover (785) 337-2530 www.blueriverwhitetails.com

Mom’s House Country Hunting Lodge 610 Road 25, Bird City (785) 734-2549

Special T Hunting 639 210 Rd., Beloit (785) 529-4081 www.specialthunting.com

Morris Gun Dogs & Guided Hunts 2104 Browning Ave., Manhattan (785) 477-2521 www.morrisgundogs.com

Spillman Creek Lodge 1125 E Pike Drive, Sylvan Grove (785) 277-3424 www.spillmanceek.com

Murphy’s at Stark 22030 Hwy 39, Stark (620) 754-3300 www.murphysatstark.com

Sportsmens Lodge 2523 Ave. E., Wilson (785) 658-2424

Doyle Creek Ranch Bunkhouse 2702 110th, Florence (620) 382-4228 http://doylecreekangus.com Eckman Hunting Preserve 988 E. 1800 Road, Baldwin City www.eckmanhuntingpreserve.com (785) 830-0034 Evergreen Lodge 805 E. Broadway, Jewell (785) 428-3569 Farmyard Lodge 1281 Vale Road, Concordia (785) 243-7336

Flint Oak 2639 Quail Road, Fall River (620) 658-4401 www.flintoak.com

Buckshot Inn 117 W. Hwy 36, Smith Center (785) 282-6644 www.buckshotinn.com

Flying W Ranch LLC R1, Box 11, Clements (620) 340-2802 www.flying-w-ranch.net Refer to directions on site.

C&W Ranch 4000 S Halstead Road, Smolan (785) 668-2352 www.cwranch.com

Gasper Farms Hunting 1326 W. 160th Drive, Osborne (785) 346-2697

Camelot Inn 933 N. First, Osborne (785) 346-5413 www.camelotinnosborne.com

Iron Gate Lodge 12740 NW Belleview Rd., Oswego (620) 870-9766 www.irongatelodge.net

Cecil’s Trails End Hunting 12803 108 Road, Minneola (620) 430-0663 http://hunttrailsend.com

Kansas Creek Gamebirds 435 80 Rd., Jamestown (785) 335-2381 www.kansascreekgamebirds.com

Claythorne Lodge 1329 NW 100th St., Columbus (620) 597-2568 www.claythorne.com

Kansas Creek Inn 1330 Union Road., Concordia (785) 243-9988 www.kansascreekinn.com

The Country Cabins 2534 Kestrel Road, Hiawatha (785) 742-4320

Kansas Trophy Whitetails 1539 Indian Rd., Morrowville (785) 265-3360 www.kansastrophywhitetails.com

Country Lodgings 4062 O Road, Smith Center (785) 389-6281

Cowboy Way Ranch & Vacations 10075 Shanuk Lane, Westmoreland (785) 456-8626

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Double E Pheasant Ranch 2038 15th Ave., McPherson (620) 242-5430

Bruiser Whitetail, LLC 620 Warpole Rd., Olsburg (785) 468-3640 www.bruiserwhitetail.com

Wyrick Farms 22429 49th Ave., Haviland (620) 338-6701 www.huntwyrickfarms.com

Arrow B Hunting Lodge 1115 Hwy 24, Stockton (785) 425-5030

Spearpoint Ranch 1890 N 215th Road, Barnard (785) 524-5330 www.spearpointranch.com

Flint Hills Adventures, Inc. 1439 Road 29, Elk City (620) 673-4066 www.flinthillsadventures.com

Covert Creek Lodge LLC 1982 Co 671 Ave., Waldo (888) 942-3245 www.covertcreeklodge.com

Acorns Resort 3710 Farnum Creek Road, Milford (785) 463-4000 www.acornsresortkansas.com

Mikey’s Outfitting 1178 U.S. Hwy 24, Stockton (785) 425-7082 www.mikeysoutfitting.com

Bluestem Hunting Preserve, Inc. 2301 N. Hwy 11, Kingman (620) 532-6361 www.bluestemhunting.com

Wolf River Outfitters, LLC 1315 290th, Hiawatha (785) 741-5218 www.wolfriveroutfitters.com

HUNTING/FISHING LODGING

Double Arrow C Ranch 1209 P Road, Eureka (620) 583-7271 www.doublearrowc.com

Cressler Creek Log Cabin 1302 North Road 80 East, Hoxie (785) 675-1295 www.cresslercreeklogcabin.com Dairy Barn Lodge RR 1 Box 20, Atwood (785) 626-3743 Don’s Guide Service, LLC 308 N Hobart, Glen Elder (785) 545-5651 donshuntingandfishingkansas.com

Kuhrt Ranch Resort 2735 Road 75, Edson (785) 899-5306 www.kuhrtranch.com Lazy D Outfitters, Inc. 3330 DD Road, Madison (620) 437-2027 www.lazydoutfitters.com Lil’ Toledo Lodge 10600 170th Road, Chanute (620) 244-5668 www.liltoledo.com The Lodge 250 S. Main St., Hoisington (620) 653-4771 www.purpleprairie.net Midwest Outfitters, Inc. 1275 Heritage Road, Washington (785) 325-2577 www.midwestoutfittersinc.com

Pheasant Hunters Paradise 15068 Road 17, Kismet (620) 629-1342 swkansaspheasanthunting.com Pheasant Runn Hunting and Guide Service 25047 160 Ave., Collyer (785) 635-2030 www.pheasantrunn.com Pilgrim Ranch Retreat 1895 AA 180th Rd., Cottonwood Falls (620) 344-5991 www.pilgrimranch.com

Sunflower Inn 102 Clifton St., Clifton (785) 455-3770 T&C Wildlife Hunt Club 2461 Arrowhead Road, Arcadia (620) 638-4300 www.time2hunt.com The Farm House 22035 160 Ave, WaKeeney (785) 769-5351 The Fin and Feather Lodge 200 E. Kansas, Glen Elder (308) 390-9370 www.thefinandfeatherlodge.com

Posusta Lodging 20436 Beatty Road, Lucas (785) 526-7767

Timber Creek Lodge 1960 W 7th Road, Mankato (785) 428-3601

Prairie Wings Gamebirds RR1 Box 43, Webber (785) 753-4871

West Lake Inn 259 West Hwy 24, Downs (785) 454-3345 www.downsks.net

Rancho Milagro Ranch 2366 Ave. K, Brookville (785) 472-4850 www.ranchomilagroks.com Ravenwood Lodge 10147 SW 61st St. Topeka (785) 256-6444 www.ravenwoodlodge.com Ringneck County 2030 Rd. A, Goodland (785) 332-0408 www.ringneckcountry.com Ringneck Ranch 655 Solomon Lane, Tipton (785) 373-4835 www.ringneckranch.net Saline River Hunting Lodge & Guide Service 20015 260 Ave., WaKeeney (785) 743-5878 www.salinelodge.com Sappa Creek Lodge R2, Oberlin (785) 475-3720 www.sappacreeklodge.com Shaps Beaver Creek Ranch 6404 Rd 23, Goodland (785) 899-5942 www.shapsranch.com Slate Creek Lodge 403 South West Rd., Wellington (620) 717-1655 Smoky River Rendezvous 115 Belleview., Winona (785) 846-7785 http://smokyriverrend.com Solomon Valley Outfitters 1319 Kansas St., Downs (785) 545-5327

Wheatland Hunting Lodge 2589 Hwy K-148, Agenda (785) 732-6498 Wolf Creek Outfitters 20050 Mellard Road, Lucas (785) 525-6200 www.wolfcreekhunting.net


2018 / 2019

HUNTING

SEASONS

For more regulations and to view unit maps, go to ksoutdoors.com DEER (Permit required) (proposed season dates) • Youth and disabled hunters: Sept. 8-16, 2018 • Muzzleloader: Sept. 17-30, 2018 • Archery: Sept. 17-Dec. 31, 2018 • Regular Firearm: Nov. 28-Dec.9, 2018 SPRING TURKEY (Permit required) • Youth/Disabled Season: April 1 - 17, 2018 • Archery-Only Season: April 9 - 17, 2018 • Regular Season (firearm/archery): April 18 - May 31, 2018 FALL TURKEY (Permit required) • Season: Oct. 1 – Nov. 27 and Dec. 10, 2018 Jan. 31, 2019 PHEASANT • Regular Season: Nov. 10, 2018–Jan. 31, 2019 • Youth Season: Nov. 3-4, 2018 • Daily Bag Limit: 4 cocks in regular season, 2 cocks in youth season • Possession Limit: 16 during regular season; 4 in youth season QUAIL • Regular Season: Nov. 10, 2018-Jan. 31, 2019 • Youth Season: Nov. 3-4, 2018 • Daily Bag Limit: 8 in regular season, 4 in youth season • Possession Limit: 32 in regular season; 8 in youth season GREATER PRAIRIE CHICKEN (Permit required) • Early Season (Greater Prairie Chicken Unit): Sept. 15 - Oct. 15, 2018 • Regular Season (Greater Prairie Chicken Unit): Nov. 17, 2018 - Jan. 31, 2019 • Daily Bag Limit: 2 • Possession Limit: 8 SQUIRREL • Season: June 1, 2018 - Feb. 28, 2019 • Daily bag limit: 5 • Possession limit: 20

RABBITS (Cottontail & Jackrabbit) • Season: All year • Daily bag limit: 10 • Possession limit: 30

EXOTIC DOVE (Eurasian collared and ringed turtle doves only) • Year-round • No limit

CROW • Season: Nov.10, 2018- March 10, 2019 • No Limit FURBEARERS (Hunting and trapping) • Season: Nov. 14, 2018 - Feb. 15, 2019 • No limit • Species: badger, bobcat, mink, muskrat, opossum, raccoon, swift fox, red fox, gray fox, striped skunk, weasel. BEAVER AND OTTER TRAPPING • Season (statewide): Nov. 14, 2018 - March 31, 2019 • NO OPEN TRAPPING OR HUNTING SEASON ON ANY OTHER FURBEARERS COYOTES HUNTING & TRAPPING • Season (statewide): All year DOVE (Mourning , white-winged, Eurasian collared, and ringed turtle doves) • Season: Sept.1 – Nov. 29, 2018 • Daily bag limit: 15 (The daily bag limit applies to mourning and white-winged doves, single species or in combination. There is no limit on Eurasian collared and ringed turtle dove, but any taken in addition to a limit of mourning and white-winged doves must have a fully-feathered wing attached during transport.) • Possession limit: 45

RAIL (Sora and Virginia) • Season: Sept. 1 - Nov 9, 2018 • Daily bag limit: 25 • Possession limit: 75 COMMON SNIPE • Season: Sept. 1 - Dec. 16, 2018 • Daily bag limit: 8 • Possession limit: 24 WOODCOCK • Season: Oct. 13 - Nov. 26, 2018 • Daily bag limit: • Possession limit: 9 SANDHILL CRANE (Permit required) • Season: Nov. 7, 2018 - Jan. 3, 2019 • Daily bag limit: 3 • Possession limit: 9 Duck and goose seasons are set using frameworks provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and those seasons will be approved at the Kansas Wildlife, Parks and Tourism Commission meeting in April 2018. Season dates will be updated at www.ksoutdoors.com as soon as they are approved.

Hunters, anglers and state park visitors will soon have the ability to automatically renew select licenses and permits when purchasing online through www.kshuntfishcamp.com. And beginning January 1, 2018, many Kansas licenses and permits will be valid for 365 days from the date of purchase, giving you more season for the same amount of money. For a complete list of licenses and permits that will be valid for 365 days, visit ksoutdoors.com/365-licenses. For information on auto-renew, visit ksoutdoors.com/auto-renew.

53


51

40

27

Elkhart

MORTON

STANTON

160

270

27

Johnson

HAMILTON

Syracuse

50

GREELEY

96

51

270

56

70

25

270

STEVENS

Hugoton

270

GRANT

190

KEARNY

Ulysses

25

25

51

83

83

144

FINNEY

156

4

Liberal 83

54

83

40

TREGO

24

GRAHAM

9

383

23

23

96

FORD

MEADE

283

283

160

54

34

34

154

183

Ashland

154

56

Jetmore

283

Ness City

147

Wakeeney

Hill City

283

CLARK

Dodge City

HODGEMAN

156

NESS

Meade

Meade

23

98

Dighton

60

183

Philipsburg

383

KIOWA

50

156

1

19

4

19

PRATT

18 232

156

281

281

42

Medicine Lodge

64

61

50

ST. John

8

54

BARTON

Great Bend

281 Pratt

281

181

24

RUSSELL

281

STAFFORD

Larned

96

281

Russel

281

COMANCHE BARBER

Coldwater

160

Greensburg

183

281

Osborne

9

Smith Center

OSBORNE

SMITH

8

Wilson

EDWARDS

Kinsley

PAWNEE

183

La Crosse

RUSH

36

PHILLIPS

2

141

140

4

SALINE

96

61

HARPER

14

61

17

2

96

42

81

49 177

81

166

160

55

15 53

35W

35

235

Wichita

Wellington

49

296

81

15

15

Abilene

SEDGWICK

50

56

4

Clay Center

24

82

149

77

177

57

BUTLER

15 15

38

COWLEY

16

9

96

Eureka

OSAGE

470

75

31 Lyndon

68

57

54

LYON

Yates Center

COFFEY WOODSON

57

Burlington

99

75

96 39

Fredonia

99

Sedan

MONTGOMERY Coffeyville

39

Iola

47

Parsons

7

Paola

52

7

65

146

169

Erie

Oswego 59

59

57

7

7

26

69

66

103

57

239

52

68

166

66

96

57

160

Pittsburg 126

54 Fort Scott

7 69

31

52

135

Columbus 69 CHEROKEE

126

Girard CRAWFORD

3

39

54

BOURBON

3

Mound City 31

LINN

169

MIAMI

Prairie Spirit Trail 59

68

150

435

Kansas City

WYANDOTTE

69 JOHNSON

Olathe

635

Hillsdale

35 33

LABETTE

101

10

5

Leavenworth

Crawford NEOSHO

166

7

Clinton

Lawrence

ANDERSON

169

31

ALLEN Chanute

169

96

160

37

169

75

96

47

Independence

Elk City

160

Howard

39

WILSON

59

Garnet

57

92

32

DOUGLAS

FRANKLIN

50

73 192

LEAVENOskaloosa WORTH 16 24 40

59

Ottawa 268

56

Topeka

92

4

Atchison

36

DONIPHAN

Troy 20

4

9

120

7

73

JEFFERSON

Perry

75 SHAWNEE

170 Emporia

159

Cross Timbers

ELK CHAUTAUQUA

166

20

159

Holton 116 ATCHISON

75

Hiawatha

73

Pomona

31

4

159

BROWN

Eisenhower

56

GREENWOOD

35

Cottonwood Falls

50

99

WABAUNSEE

Alma

75

JACKSON

Kaw 70

Fall River

El Dorado

160 Winfield

77

54

Arkansas City

77

254

196

177

18

Manhattan

Westmoreland 63

62

Seneca

Tuttle Creek 13

187

NEMAHA

63

POTTAWATOMIE

87

99

MARSHALL

Council Grove 177

4

CHASE

150

MORRIS

77

113

24

16

9

36

40 Junction 57 City GEARY

177

77

Marysville

77

El Dorado

MARION

15

RILEY

56

Marion

43

18

82

15

CLAY DICKINSON

9

148

WASHINGTON

Washington

15

Milford

Newton

HARVEY

SUMNER

44

Hutchinson

Anthony

179

14

Kingman

81

104

McPHERSON 35W Mc Pherson

Cheney

14

Lyons

Salina

OTTAWA

Mushroom Rock

70

CLOUD

Belleville

Concordia

81

106

Minneapolis

Sand Hills

KINGMAN

RENO

RICE

56

28

Kanopolis

14 ELLSWORTH

Ellsworth

14

156

Lincoln

LINCOLN

181

36

81

Lovewell

REPUBLIC

Glen Elder

9

JEWELL

Beloit

MITCHELL

128

14

Mankato

28

’18

kansas outdoors

visit

Webster 183

Hays ELLIS

70

18

24

Stockton

ROOKS

Prairie Dog

Norton

NORTON 283

Cedar Bluff

Cimarron

GRAY

Hoxie

23

SHERIDAN

123

36

DECATUR

Gove

83

Oberlin

LANE

GOVE

117

Sublette 190 HASKELL SEWARD 83 160

160

383

Scott City

83

Garden City

50

SCOTT

Scott

LOGAN

25

THOMAS

25

Colby

Oakley

25

Atwood

RAWLINS

Lakin

WICHITA

Leoti

Goodland

Sharon Springs

27

Tribune

27

SHERMAN

24

WALLACE

54

36

ST. Francis

161

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CHEYENNE

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• Cedar Bluff State Park, Reservoir & Wildlife Area • Smoky Valley Scenic Byway • Halfway between Kansas City & Denver on 70 WaKeeney Travel & Tourism

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Kansas Outdoors | 2018  

Guide to Kansas outdoors activities, an official publication of the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism.

Kansas Outdoors | 2018  

Guide to Kansas outdoors activities, an official publication of the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism.