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summerville post Volume 19, No. 1

April 1995

SPRING GENERAL MEETING THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 1995 7:00 PM SANCTUARY, GOOD SHEPHERD CHURCH • John Sandeford, AIA, will speak on Lynn Drummond • Ross Snellings, Chairman of the Augusta Historic Preservation Commission, will answer questions on Summerville’s Historic Ordinance

Remember to Pay Your 1995 Dues Membership Form on Inside Back Cover


Presidents Report The 1994 Tour of Homes was a booming success, and many thanks go to Beverly Howard, Chairperson. The success of our annual Tour of Homes can only be measured by the involvement of so many volunteers from our neighborhood association and their obvious willingness to work. Unfortunately, it is not physically possible to list the names of all those who gave so much of their time and effort to this event. However, many thanks likewise go to all of those who worked so hard. The Board for the calendar year 1995 is off and running, and our thanks go to Robin Krauss, the past President, for her untold hours of hard work and commitment to our organization. Robin’s leadership has been exemplary, and the overall condition of the association is reflected by her efforts. On December 19, 1994, the Augusta City Council passed an ordinance declaring the Summerville Neighborhood as a historic district. A committee is now seeking information necessary for SNA to submit guidelines to the Historic Preservation Commission which would apply to our neighborhood. As a matter of general information, there are eight standing committees as follows: Finance; Neighborhood Enhancement; Education/Outreach; Neighborhood Safety; Land Use/Historic Preservation; Membership; Tour Advisory; and 1995 Tour of Homes. The names of Board members and committee members are listed in the Post., An invitation is hereby extended to any and all members of the Association to serve on the committee of your choice. The goal of the Board is for these committees to function and operate through membership involvement. The association will celebrate its 20th anniversary in the year 1996, and a committee is being formed for that purpose. We would like for this celebration to be as successful as any prior event sponsored by our association. Please contact Karen Klacsmann, Chairperson, to express willingness to serve in any capacity. The next general meeting is scheduled for 7:00 p.m., April 20, 1995, at the Church of the Good Shepherd, and all are invited to attend. There will be a slide presentation of architectural features found in our neighborhood and a brief explanation of the effect of the Historic Preservation Ordinance. The participation of all of our neighborhood members is invited. Richard Dunstan


Summerville Neighborhood Association 1995 BOARD OFFICERS J. RICHARD DUNSTAN, President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NANCY BOWERS,Vice President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOM SUTHERLAND, Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JIM NORD, Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737-8020,

860-9983 736-5878 738-3885 738-3386

1995 BOARD MEMBERS REMER BRINSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JIM GARVEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MARY HILL GARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LINDA JARVIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KATHY KING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737-4989, SUSAN KAUFMANN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BARBARA MERIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHARLES ROWELL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EILEEN STULB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ROBIN KRAUSS, Ex Officio Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

860-1110 738-6665 828-8372 738-1850 823-6950 733-0808 733-4846 650-8872 724-8512 736-8528

Standing Committee FINANCE Purpose: To oversee the financial responsibilities of the organization CHARLES ROWELL, CHAIR. . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-8872

JOE POLLOCK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-8234 BILLY THOMPSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-0533 DAVID BEES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-7363 PHIL WAHL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-1389 TOM SUTHERLAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-3885 EDUCATION/OUTREACH Purpose: To educate both the SNA membership and other groups and organizations about projects, goals, and objectives. JIM GARVEY, CO-CHAIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-6665 KATHY KING, CO-CHAIR . . . . . . 737-4989, 823-6950 BEV FORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 733-7674 MS. SUTHERLAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-3885 RICK DAVIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-6341 FREDDIE FLYNT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 733-1839 LAND USE/HISTORIC PRESERVATION Purpose: To support the majority of the neighbors in matters of zoning. To act as a liaison with the Planning and Zoning Commission. To continually update and revise the neighborhood plan.

MEMBERSHIP TRICIA ORUCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-1144 NEIGHBORHOOD ENHANCEMENT Purpose: To serve as a liaison, i.e. to report to Summerville Neighborhood Association Board concerns of Summerville citizens regarding neighborhood enhancement. To look for projects that would enhance the Summerville Neighborhood, to present such projects to the Board for review. To continue to follow up on community projects started by the Board in the past. To insure the maintenance of such projects is carried out. To serve as “daily eyes and ears “for the Board regarding the neighborhood i.e. for garbage, zoning, or any other violations, etc. BARBARA MERIN, CO-CHAIR . . . . . . . . . . . 733-4846 EILEEN STULB, CO-CHAIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . 724-8512 TAMMY BALK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-2320 JULIA BARRETT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-5577 JEAN GARDNER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-0351 MELANIE LARSON. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . work 868-2446 KATHY MILLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 667-8057 MARY HUNT MURRAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-1512 JAN HUDSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-2140 NEIGHBORHOOD SAFETY Purpose: To monitor pertinent safety issues. To maintain Neighborhood Watch program.

GRETCHEN SAUNDERS, CHAIR . . . . . . . . . 736-6692 REMER BRINSON. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 860-1110 LINDA JARVIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-1850 BILL HAMILTON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-2602 BILL & BARBARA STENSTROM . . . . . . . . . 738-6772 ROBIN KRAUSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-8528 JEWELL CHILDRESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 733-0973 MARY LOU GARREN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-3692

MARY HILL GARY, CHAIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-5377 KAREN BRUKER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-7955 JOHN HAYNIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737-8600 KAREN KLACSMANN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-0677 RICK PINNELL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-9896 TRICIE SCHOLER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 733-5311

1995 TOUR THERESA HOEHN, CHAIR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-5001

TOUR ADVISORY LINDA JARVIS, CO-CHAIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-1850 MARY HILL GARY, CO-CHAIR . . . . . . . . . . . 828-8372


Neighborly News Congratulations to Summerville for becoming the City’s third designated historic district, joining Bethlehem and Downtown. Neighbors CARL DRENNAN, PAUL GONZALEZ, and BRYAN HALTERMANN serve on the Augusta Historic Preservation Commission. I know we do a lot of complaining about our weird weather, but where else can we enjoy Japanese Magnolias in full bloom on Groundhog Day? Besides, our wacky weather fuels zillions of social conversations, thereby coming to the rescue of the tongue-tied. And who says we don’t get any snow? I pass softly drifted mounds of the pale stuff every day on the way to school. It covers the clay property along Milledge for weeks – just don’t inhale too deeply – it has a rather pungent aroma. We’re also fortunate that the mild winter allows a multitude of different blooms to be enjoyed together. Camellia blossoms and nandina berries are still in place when daffodils, snowdrops, tulips, and hyacinths pop up and plump pansy throw pillows are scattered all over the place. Then the cherries, quinces and redbuds add early color. We make “Yankee” friends and family quite jealous. Be prepared to be impressed – big time! The accomplishments of neighbors of all ages have been in the news lately. Let’s start with the youngsters this time. MAGGIE BADGER served as a page in the GA House and CARL TYSONs design will be the logo for the new Riverwalk Marina. JULIE HANCOCK (Westminster) and JEREMY CRANFORD (Aquinas) are AP Scholars and AMANDA WILLIAMS earned 2nd place in the Richmond County Math Contest. RACHEL VEAZEY received a Students Who Care Scholarship for community service and SUSAN SANDERS and SALLIE SHUFORD hold endowed scholarships at Wofford. JULIE MILLER has earned a spot on the UGA Presidential Scholar list. Various dean’s lists acknowledge our outstanding students, too, including KATHY KITCHENS (Washington & Lee), SHOSHANNA RABIN (UGA), SUSIE MCCORD (UGA), NORRIS BOARDMAN (UGA), AMY HANCOCK (Vandy), DAY DUNSTAN (Mercer), SCOTT NESBIT (Wake), APRIL MELTON (MCG), SALLIE SHUFORD (Wofford), DAVID OVERSTREET (Wofford), and JOHN CLARK BROWN (Wofford). We also have a crop of outstanding athletes. ADAM CRANFORD was a leader at the Kiawah Classic Golf Tournament and BLAIR SCURLOCK has earned a golf

scholarship to the University of Memphis. He was instrumental in ARC’s Class AAA state championship last year. CHARLES DUNSTAN had a great football season at Aquinas, JOHN SAVAGE starred in soccer for Westminster, rower, JENNIFER PULLING qualified for the U.S. Junior World Championship Team, and CLAIRE SERVY played terrific basketball for AC. Photogenic faces showed ISAAC RABIN enjoying the last game at the old Heaton Stadium, ANSLEY BELL at the Mardi Gras Ball, CAROLYN USRY’s grandsons JOSH MCRAE and HAVIRD USRY with an 8 point buck hunting trophy, and NANCY CAMPBELL as a finalist to become Honorary Cadet Colonel for ARC. TRAVERS PAINE was interviewed about ARC’s dress code (with WILL BADGER and ANDY ALLEN in photo, too). ELIZABETH GOLDBERG attended a yearbook workshop at Auburn and LAURA LOFTIS and CONNOR BLALOCK competed for Aquinas at the regional cheerleading competition. MICHAEL SMITH’s photo appeared in Augusta Magazine as a member of the 50th graduating kindergarten class at EDS. How can we top that, you ask? Well, the adults (I didn’t want to say oldsters, you’ll notice) are achievers as well. LISA KRISHER was nominated for judge of Superior Court, RICK ALLEN was nominated for 1994 Small Business Person of the Year (and is just about finished building the new baseball stadium), and MARGARET DUNSTAN became Development Director for Aquinas. JACK CONNELL served as chairman of our Legislative Delegation, JENNIFER GARVEY BERGER was named STAR teacher at DFA, and NANCY MILLS (a “Best of AGS” recipient) now directs St. Paul’s Center for Christian Spirituality (She was also mentioned as an eminent artist in Augusta Magazine.) CHARLES CALHOUN was elected to the Exchange Club board, JOEL SOBEL was asked to serve on the board of Historic Hotels of America and talked to the Chronicle about a turn-of-the-century key recently returned to the hotel), and BILL STENSTROM received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association of Medical Illustrators. Drs. JAMES BENNETT and JOE GREEN shared honors as corecipients of Pediatrician of the Year Award and Dr. BENNETT was also featured in an article about MCG’s mentor program. JULIA FOLEY MORGAN, who grew up on Henry Street, starred in The Nutcracker and AC’s JIM KELSON was named Coach of the Year. Summerville has worked with JIM BLOUNT through


the City Trees and Parks Department. He was named Outstanding Individual in Georgia for promoting urban forestry. He and BARRY SMITH (CON’s brother) deserve a lot of credit for the many new plantings and maintenance of neighborhood trees. VENDIE HOOKS and WHATLEY BUSH (ELISE and BILL WESTON’s son-in-law) are involved as “civilians”. RODDY KITCHENS participated in the Heart Ball which honored his partner, Dr. ZUMBRO. SHEILA STAHL was profiled as an “Unsung Hero” as Victims Assistance Program coordinator and LINDA CARPENTER was highlighted in the RC Chronicle. Dr. CAROL PRYOR was quoted in an article about AAUW’s 75th Anniversary and NANCY BOWERS has been involved with the assessment of Main Street Augusta. (We’re now a Main Street Georgia city.) PAUL GONZALEZ hosted the state convention of the American Architects Institute and his wife CAROLINE DI DONATO GONZALEZ worked on the Jr. League Attic Sale (Her smiling face was “shot” for the Chronicle.) FRANN BENNETT and BILL TOOLE were praised “In the Spotlight” of Sacred Heartsounds. WALT ALEXANDERSON received a similar honor in the Symphony newsletter, then smiled for the Spirit and appeared on TV12 with an Eagle Scout he sponsored. JAN STUNTZ described Christmas decorations for the Chronicle, MONTY OSTEEN unveiled AGS Tomorrow’s vision of downtown and became a sponsor for the Golf Hall of Fame, TODD SCHULTZ presented a “Benchmarking” speech and workshops, and GARY STROEBEL made a presentation in CT. ANDY JORDAN helped HELEN HENDEE distribute Christmas bikes through DFACS. MIKE GARRETT was profiled as an outstanding defense lawyer and FRAN TEDESCO described MCG’s progress. RABBI and MRS. MAYNARD HYMAN were interviewed about Rosh Hashana, Hanukkah, and bar Mitzvahs. MIKE SHLAER was informative about PHO’s. BRYAN HALTERMANN and ED RICE (“Best of AGS” recipient) talked about local art collections, CHRIS BOWLES discussed our housing market, and KEITH CLAUSSEN continued to be instrumental in guiding the Morris Museum (which received the 1994 -’95 Regional Designation Award in the Humanities part of the Cultural Olympiad). RANDY SMITH contributed his plastic surgery expertise to a young Salvadoran burn victim. Another good Samaritan, MARGARET LOFVING found a lost wallet while on her daily walk and tracked down the Ft. Gordon owner. PHILIP GOLDBERG is designing a drainage system for the Hyde Park Neighborhood and provides numerous

recycling opportunities. Artists SUSAN JOHNSTON and DONNA WHALEY produced an art exhibition with LALA MULHERN STREET at La Maison. The studios of RANDY LAMBETH and BRIAN RUST (whose sculptures are becoming well known) were open for the ‘95 GAAC Artist Studio Tour. The local real estate market really benefits from the expertise of award winners GWEN FULCHER YOUNG, TONY MULHERIN, DAVID MORETZ, CARRIE GARRETT, JANA CHILDS, LINDA JARVIS, JULIE BLALOCK, MARIE NEEL, LEE NEEL (who also appears frequently in photos and interviews regarding the RC Commission and is a “Best of Augusta” recipient) GAIL STEVES, and ANN MARIE MCMANUS (her dad, NOEL SCWEERS received recognition for 40 years of real estate service). Caught “saying cheese” for various news cameras were SUSAN SHAVER and her pig, PETUNIA, EVELYN LEONARD, CARRIE AMACHER, ELISE WESTON, NANCY THOMPSON, MARSHA DOHRMAN, DEL SMITH, KATHY KING, DONNA WHALEY, THERESA HOEHN, LUTHER MILLS, CAROLYN USRY, CAROLYN and RUSTY BAILIE (“then and now”), SENATOR CHARLES WALKER (soon to be a Monte Sano neighbor), DUDLEY BOWEN, Smoak’s STEVE and MARGARET PIERCE, AC’s HENRY THOMAS, DONN DUTEAU, BOB YOUNG (a best of AGS “recipient”), Dr. BENNETT (with his orchids this time), art collectors FREDDIE FLYNT and MIKE, MARSHA, and TESS SHLAER, ROBIN ZETTERBURG, FRAN TEDESCO, FRED FOY STRANG (Reid Memorial), GLORIA NORWOOD (Park Avenue Fabrics and Rep. Charlie’s wife), ROBERT FAIN and DAN BROWN (showing Good Shepherd’s partnership with Elim Baptist Church), PETE KNOX’s dad PETE, JOE NEAL’s son JOE (who was lost overnight in Colorado), ED CASHIN (BOB’s history expert brother and “Best of AGS” recipient), JANICE WILLIAMS (AC art professor who directed the mural on Fifth Street and is a “Best of Augusta” recipient), and Trinity’s CINDY WILKERSON (an “Unsung Hero” also featured in Sacred Heartsounds). The most visible public servants were AC’s president BILL BLOODWORTH (riding a hot air balloon on “A Day for Augusta College”, discussing restoration of the guardhouse with SNA, suggesting reading matter, planning to attend the 58th Joint Civilian Orientation Conference to tour bases from each branch of the military, and being “Focussed on the Future” of AC), MAYOR CHARLES DEVANEY (a “Best of Augusta” recipient, delegate to the first White House Conference on Travel and Tourism, and working toward the canal as a heritage


corridor), and TOM ROBERTSON (chairman of the Canal Authority, working to establish the Canal National Heritage Corridor, nominated to the board of the National Coalition for Heritage Areas, and program presenter at the winter meeting of the GA Historical Society. Many “Best of Augusta” designations were earned by Summerville people, places, and businesses. A few have already been mentioned in this column, but here are the rest of “the Best”: GABBY BOARDMAN, TRAV PAINE, BILL TEMPLETON, HUDSON TEMPLETON, PARTRIDGE INN, VILLAGE DELI, BASKIN-ROBBINS, DQ, PIZZA HUT, SMOAK’S, MAGNOLIA BOOKSHOP (reprinted the 1894 Artwork of Augusta) READY TO WEAR AGAIN, BAILIE’S, DANIEL VILLAGE BARBERSHOP, DURDEN’S BARBERSHOP, FAT MAN’s, VERA & CO., ALL THAT JAZZ (at P.I.), Walton Way, and Henry Street. Bravo! Kudos go to other well known businesses either in Summerville, or owned by Summervillians (not villains!) or their families and featured in AGS Magazine the Chronicle and Spirit: LAURIE MCRAE INTERIORS, DORIS DIAMONDS, SUMMERVILLE RAGS, DOT HOLLAND’S PERSNICKETY, MICHAEL O’BYRNE PHOTOGRAPHY, PARK AVENUE FABRICS, BOWLES CONSTRUCTION, BRETT’S TRANSFER, TIM CONWAY PHOTOGRAPHY, LE CAFÉ DU TEAU, THE SPOTTED COW, KINGS WAY GALLERY, THE FRAME SHOPPE, AGS ART GLASS AND KITCHEN TUNE-UP (DEREK SNEAD). PHILIPPE’s helps the Soup Kitchen by participating in the Taste of the Harvest, employees at JONES INTERCABLE help local charities, and SQUEAKY’s has an on-going spring fund-raiser to help fulfill the wishes of terminally ill children and teens. WEATHER’s FLORIST is celebrating its 35th anniversary, ROBIN KRAUSS’ GARDEN MAGIC moved to Surrey and DRAKE WHITE AND CHRIS HOWERDD started PHORUM, a marketing firm. PAUL’S PLACE (FAULKNER WARLICK’s restaurant and the PI (CHEF JEFF JACOBSEN) received ratings among the highest determined by the RC Health Department. GREEN THUMB CENTRAL, GARDEN MAGIC, FAT MAN’S, WEATHER’S and BILL TEMPLETON participated in the beautiful 1995 Sacred Heart Garden and Flower Show. Eight of our fabulous houses have been featured recently in Today’s Home. Included as “finished” (or as

finished as our homes ever get) were those of SARAH DIENST, KAREN, MARK, SLOAN, and ALLISON CLEARY (now they’re looking around to start over – what gluttons for punishment!), GWEN and BOB YOUNG, LARRY and MARY HUNT MURRAY (The kitchen was also in AGS Magazine as a “gathering place”), FRANCES and DONNA WHALEY (built by her grandfather in 1929), and STEVE and MARY XENAKIS who have been restationed here so newly promoted Brigadier General STEVE can direct the Tricare Program at Eisenhower. Homes highlighted as “seeing the light at the end of a tunnel “projects included those of ALAN and TINA WHITEHOUSE and CARLISLE, SHARA, BAKER, and JIM OVERSTREET (built by Joseph Cumming in 1922.) RODGER GILES’ solarium was spotlighted in jobs well done, folks. AGS Magazine’s “Places in the Sun” article (Just a “small world” Note – Rodge, Walt, and I were neighbors in Valley Park 26 years ago.) A new baby boom is in progress, especially on McDowell. STEPHANIE, WILL, and TREVOR HUGGINS welcomed HAILIE MARYANNA, RICK and CATHERINE RYAN are busy with twins KATHERINE VERDERY and HANNAH MIKELL (proud grandparents are PETE and CORNELIA VERDERY); MARCI and GLENN CANNON are enjoying daughter ANSLEE BROOK; and COREY PULLIAM has a new sister, ELYSE FRANCES, born to RUTH and ODON WILSON. There are two more babies due by mid summer! Elsewhere in the vicinity, ANN, JIM, and SIENNA NEELY have baby RAVEN to play with and ANN MARIE, GENE, MAUREEN, and MAC MCMANUS are delighted with baby CAROLINE. The stork has made Summerville a regular stop on his route. CARRIE LEE KINLAW and TODD SCHULTZ have had their own personal population explosion by adopting daughters, TERI, APRIL and HOPE. Congratulations to all! Besides babies and other children, newcomers are arriving continuously. Welcome to LISA ATKINS (Central), LIBBY CANADA (Milledge), BOB and KIM BOGART (Wrightsboro), THERESA SHIRLEY (Heard), CLAUDIA GAUGHF and JAY COCHRAN (McDowell), SUSAN and JANE HOUSTON (Meigs), the JONES family, POPE, GAIL, WILEY, JOHN POPE and ABBY (Kings Way) and MICKEY, NANCY and BILL CAMPBELL (Bellvue). Within the neighborhood, JOHN and ANN OVERSTREET will relocate from Magnolia Villa to Montrose Court and the BILLY LYNN family will move from Hickman to Gardner. We’re expecting


some new arrivals in the near future as construction and renovation projects move forward: the GREAR family, JESSE, DEBRA, MELISA, CHARLIE, STEPHANIE and JEFFREY, will head for Gardner, LINDA and STEVE BRETT are moving; the GIBBS family, BILL, MILLA, DAVID and JACK, will move into ALLEN and KEN ROPER’s former Anthony Road home; the LONG’s, JACK, BENITA, JACK and SALLIE, are working on the Pickens Road home recently sold by CHRIS ELMS; Senator and Mrs. CHARLES WALKER and Dr. and Mrs. HATNEY will reside in new homes on Monte Sano. We’ll bid fond farewells to the LOFTIS family, (Gardner), the WALKERS, CHRISTIE, BRITT, and HARRISON, (on Walton Way); MARY SVEDRES (Central); SCOTT ALLEN (Milledge), the RIVERS family, GARY; JOHN SCHAEFFER (Walton Way) and the POWELLS (Monte Sano).

A FEW NOTES OF GENERAL INTEREST • The GA Historical Society’s winter meeting included a tour of Summerville • There have been some robberies of front porch furniture • ARC’s JROTC program was named an Honor Unit with Distinction (which places it among the top 10% nationally). • Keep an eye on the property on Highland between Central and McDowell. Demolition permits have already been issued. • If you would like information about Collage: Creative Arts Camp, sponsored by the Friends of the Symphony, for elementary age children (July 10 21), call me (738-7527).

Sue

The Neighborhood Safety Committee The neighborhood Safety Committee’s goals for this year include increasing the coverage of the Neighborhood Watch, building a closer relationship with the police department and alerting the members about pertinent safety issues in the neighborhood. (We are looking for watch block captains. Call if you are interested.) We want to hear from you about any safety concerns in the neighborhood. Please let us know when something is happening (vandalism, burglary or nuisances) on your street. We want to help by supporting you.

1996 marks the 20th year of the Summerville Neighborhood Association We are in the planning stages of making 1996 a year-long celebration of our neighborhood. We need your input and ideas. If you are a long-time resident of Summerville, we’d like to hear about past traditions, see any old photos, record your reminiscing. If you’re new to our neighborhood, we’d like your ideas on events that can be enjoyed by all of us. Please call Karen Klacsmann, 736-0677 with your suggestions and ideas.


From Peaches to Professors William Bloodworth President Augusta College As I understand it, the history of the Augusta College campus begins with peaches. It was peaches that impressed Captain Matthew Payne, U.S. Army, in the fall of 1820 as he recuperated from the ravages of a fever that had killed all 30 enlisted men at the Augusta Arsenal on the Savannah River. Payne, commander of the arsenal, was nursed back to health at Bellevue, the family home of Freeman Walker, up in the Sand Hills some 300 feet above and several miles southwest of the river valley where the arsenal had begun its operations the year before. Payne was delighted by the taste of peaches grown on the Walker property – and also by its dry air and good water. In fact, Payne told his Army superiors that the Bellevue land was a far better place than the river for an arsenal, and he recommended that the government buy a 72-acre section from the Walker family to establish the arsenal there, adjacent to the Village of Summerville. In 1826 an Act of Congress authorized the purchase. Learning that the Federal government planned to build a new arsenal off the Walker land, 38 residents of Summerville signed a petition opposing the plan. An arsenal, they claimed, would disturb the “privacy, security and tranquility” of their village. Moreover, they claimed that they would be “more or less menaced by the neighborhood of soldiers, however strict their discipline.” The residents of Summerville did not prevail, however, and the new arsenal was established on the plank road eventually known as Walton Way. Buildings a the old arsenal site on the river were dismantled and moved to the Walker tract. The new site was cooler, dryer and less susceptible to disease. These were the same reasons people had chosen to buy land and build homes in Summerville. For the government, the Augusta Arsenal in Summerville was an especially good place, far superior to Charleston, for the storage of powder and munitions. The original fears of the residents were occasionally justified in the years that followed. In 1838, for instance, the commander of the arsenal noted the “prevalent and beastly state of intoxication” among enlisted men and found it

necessary to confine those found drunk and disorderly in a windowless dungeon beneath what is now Payne Hall at Augusta College. As the years passed, however, the arsenal and its civilian neighbors generally found themselves in a state of peaceful coexistence. The dungeon probably helped. According to Helen Callahan’s Summerville: A Pictorial History, many neighbors handed down pleasant memories of social events and military ceremonies at the arsenal. Memory often softens the past. Certainly the products of the arsenal were incongruous with Summerville. Ruby Mabry McCrary Pfadenhauer, official historian of the Augusta Arsenal (and still a Summerville resident), has noted that the early years of the arsenal produced such material as cannons, caissons, powder boxes, ammunition for small arms, horse shoes, fuses, and artillery projectiles. At one point, 12,000 pounds of powder were in storage where peaches once grew. Later, using a foundry, a large machine shop, a nickel plating plant, and quantities of explosives, the arsenal manufactured large projectiles and other arms of war. During World War II it repaired machine guns on tanks, coated small arms with grease for shipment to the front lines, and provided other ordinance work in various technical shops. A significant part of the industrial effort that led to victory in 1945 took place on Walton Way. In 1955 the arsenal was closed, having served its nation (two nations, actually, since it was surrendered to the Confederate States in 1861) from the Seminole War of 1835 to Korea. But its closing as a military post only opened the way for a long-cherished dream of a four-year college in Augusta. With the arsenal gone, Summerville became the field of that dream. In 1957 most of the arsenal property was transferred to the Richmond County Board of Education for use by the Junior College of Augusta, which has until that time been housed in Richmond Academy. More of the property followed. A month after the initial acquisition of arsenal land, State Senator Carl Sanders said, “We are going to have a four-year college in Augusta as a matter of time.” In 1958 the Junior College of Augusta, with an enrollment of 431 students, was accepted into the


University System of Georgia, at which point it became Augusta College. Five years later, with Carl Sanders now Governor, it was made a four-year college. In 1967 its first baccalaureate degrees were granted to 181 men and women. TODAY the property that once grew Freeman Walker’s peaches, stored Uncle Sam’s powder, and produced guns to fight Hitler serves as the main campus of a college with almost 6,000 students per term. For almost thirty-eight years now, the Freeman Walker tract at 2500 Walton Way has been devoted to the shaping of human talent. From lead and brass and explosives, it has turned to knowledge, art, and human values. It is a place of classes, workshops, exhibits, performances, and study. It is a place in partial fulfillment, it would seem, of Isaiah’s prophecy: “Nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.” There are soldiers again on the property because the college maintains an Army ROTC program. But it is primarily a place of students. Former president George A. Christenberry tells me that Augusta College students have on occasion behaved as college students are want to do – with the streaking craze of the 1970s most vividly in mind, I suppose. For the most part, however, our students today are serious, diverse, and interested primarily in their education. There are, of course, a lot of them. In a year’s time we serve over 8,000 individual students. And we have a least that many registrations for noncredit continuing education course. Our students come primarily from the Augusta metropolitan area, although 35 states and 23 countries now contribute to the student body. Sixty-three percent of our students are women. Over eighteen percent are African Americans. The average age of an Augusta c college undergraduate is 26, the median 22. They pursue over 50 programs of study at the associate, baccalaureate, master’s, and education specialist levels. But the geography they occupy on Walton Way is virtually the same size it was in 1829 when a few dozen soldiers of Company “C” of the Second Artillery first occupies the new arsenal. For this reason, the most notable trait of Augusta College students (especially from a neighborhood perspective) is that none of them live on campus. Yet they are still influenced by the neighborhood. One of the distinctive features of the college is its location: in historic buildings dating from the

beginning of the Augusta Arsenal, and in a residential neighborhood. The character of Summerville, including its respect for the material creations of the past and for neighbors, adds to the character of the college. I like to speak of Augusta College as Augusta’s college to emphasize its ties to the larger community. But I know that it is also Augusta’s college – in Summerville. IN THE RECENT PAST I know that the Residents of Summerville have been concerned about certain developments at the college. You have a right, as neighbors, to be concerned, as did those residents in 1826 who believed the arsenal would threaten their “privacy, security and tranquility.” In 1980 you raised a cry of alarm when the college sought to remove the 1890’s guardhouse at the corner of Walton Way and Katherine Street. In 1990 and 1991, I know, many of you expressed displeasure over a campus master plan that called for eventually housing two thousand students on the campus. In the past year I have heard personally from several of you ion the topics of parking and landscape. In the future I hope that I – or whoever serves the college as its president – will continue to hear, and heed, the concerns of neighbors. Today Augusta College is seeking to become the best possible college of its kind. “Of its kind” means metropolitan-based, community-oriented, and commuter-served. We are a non-residential college. Our master plan for facilities, updated last May, no long includes dormitories to house students on campus. We will continue, of course, to serve a wide variety of students who choose to move to Augusta, but we now have no plans to built or operate student residences on Walton Way. )And you should know that the “College Station” apartments on Wrightsboro Road are neither owned nor operated by the college or its foundation.) But we do plan to grow. This means planning for growth. Last May when we updated the master plan, we also considered where to put our new science building. A dozen possible locations were evaluated. We were assisted in this work by the presence and useful opinions of the president of the Summerville Neighborhood Association. The final selection of site for the building took into consideration a variety of factors, including parking, pedestrian movement on campus, and the appearance of the “back side” of the campus facing McDowell Street. As now planned, the science building – to be the largest building on campus – will be constructed in


the area between the swimming pool and the water tower. It will close off access to Monte Sano and allow us to develop the central part of campus as a pedestrian-only green space. As needed, we will develop additional ground parking around our old baseball field, which will remain as a grass for at least the next several years. And we will continue to explore all possible means for accommodating a large and growing institution of higher education on 78 acres of Summerville property. The science building is close to approval by the state legislature. Other plans are further from realization. We hope someday to replace our converted ware houses (our six academic buildings) with new multi-story structures designed for the classroom and office uses to which they will be put, at a considerable savings in ground space. Our student government leaders are now considering the possibility of a special fee to fund a student activity center. We would like to build a new continuing education center at an off-campus site, again at a savings in ground area on the Freeman Walker tract. In all of this and in other planning efforts, we would enjoy and benefit from the advice and assistance of our Summerville neighbors. We need, in particular, to plan carefully for parking, drainage, trees, and landscape. I am eager to develop plans

to improve and extend the park-like perimeters of the campus – even though I know that this kind of planning requires special expertise and considerable expense. Since the college has a large proportion of historic buildings, our operations must also include historic preservation. This fact is a constant challenge because “historic preservation” has little role in the distribution of state funds to the college. ON NOVEMBER 11 of next year, the Summerville Neighborhood Association will celebrate its twenty-fifth anniversary. At that time Augusta College will have been a Summerville institution for slightly more than thirty-nine years (following, of,course, the long history of the arsenal in Summerville). As president of the college, I hope that the Association’s birthday will be an occasion once again to celebrate our relationship as “neighbors together.” We do this well and brightly, of course, at our joint lighting of the holiday tree on campus every December. From my perspective, an even brighter relationship would include cooperative planning for an ever more attractive campus, continually good communications, and – possibly – even a Summerville museum somewhere on the old Freeman Walker tract. Too bad we can’t have peaches, too.

Calendar of Events NEXT BOARD MEETING – April 20, 1995 GENERAL MEETINGS April 20, 1995 July 20, 1995 October 19, 1995 SUMMERVILLE PICNIC – July 20, 1995 – 6:00 p.m. 1995 SUMMERVILLE TOUR OF HOMES October 13, 14, and 15, 1995 ALSO, REMEMBER! THE COTTON BALL – MAY 13, 1995 WALKING TOUR OF SUMMERVILLE (Register with Augusta College Continuing Education) MAY 14, 1995


Summerville Neighborhood Association 1995 MEMBERSHIP/DUES FORM Dues Paid: _____ Individual $5.00 Family $10.00 Senior Citizen $3.00 SNA dues payments are a tax deductible contribution. Membership Year runs January 1 - December 31 Last Name (or Organization): ____________________________________________ Member(s) First Names: ____________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ Please make checks payable to The Summerville Neighborhood Association I want to volunteer for  Tour ______________________________________________________________  Committee __________________________________________________________  Phone Tree ________________________________________________________  Other ______________________________________________________________ For New Members of to Update Information House # ______ Street Name ________________________ Apt./Box # ______ City, State, Zip ________________________________________________________ Home Phone ________________________ Work Phone _____________________ Please give form and payment to a SNA board member or mail to Summerville Neighborhood Association • P.O. Box 12212 • Augusta, GA 30904


Summerville Neighborhood Association P.O. Box 12212 Augusta, GA 30904

We Want You! to submit your great ideas for the Gala 20th Year Anniversary Celebration of the Summerville Neighborhood Association. Categories include, but are not limited to ideas for families, children, art, athletics, academics, history, schools, house and garden, and of course a theme. Prizes will be given. Winners will be announced in the Fall, 1995 issue of the Summerville Post. Ideas must be submitted in writing by May 15, 1995. Mail to:

The Summerville Neighborhood Association Box 12212, Augusta, Georgia 30904 or Fax to: 733-7461

Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Augusta, GA Bulk Permit #111

post-1995-april Summerville Post - April, 1995  

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