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2017

Summer Frickey

JEA Portfolio


a journey through...

able of contents T Personal Essay

3

Photo Involvment

3

Wrestling Feature

4

Football Feature

5

In-Depth News

6

Explanatory News

7

Human Interest

8-9

Double Page Spread Design

10-11

Yearbook Design

12

Single Page Spread Design

13

Proof of Publication

14

Since starting journalism back in 2013, I’ve been known as quite a few things: staff writer, spotlight editor, managing editor, and even the occasional photographer… if we got that desperate for golf photos. Each of these positions came with their own benefits and drawbacks. As a staff writer my sophomore year, I learned to correctly write the date, and punctuate a quote. I learned the basics of teamwork, and memorized all of my editors names by heart. I learned that not everyone wants an interview, but that’s not always a bad thing, because when a tiny sophomore has to interview the senior quarterback, english becomes a very hard language to communicate. I learned that if layout doesn’t make you cry at least once an issue, you’re probably doing it wrong. And lastly, I learned that all of those editor names I had memorized would slowly turn into a second family, and saying goodbye at graduation was harder than any layout I’d ever attempt. As Spotlight Editor my junior year, I learned more about responsibility than I had ever asked for. I was no longer dreading interviews, but instead, I learned about a whole new demise: deadline day. This meant spending hours on InDesign perfecting my double page spread while everyone else had long gone. It was sophomore year that newspaper become more like an addiction than a class. I was keylining my instagram selfies and asking nearly everyone I came

journalism

across about their life story in hopes to find the next one-of-a-kind feature, and luckily, I did. It was in the middle of lunch when I heard a well-known wrestler scrambling for food; begging just about anyone for their fruit snacks, or apple slices. His name was Payten Andrews, and he hadn’t eaten in nearly two days, just so he could make weight for his upcoming wrestling match. Now I’m not exactly an athlete, but the idea of starving yourself for a title just didn’t settle right with me. I wrote a 442 word expose dedicated towards the teams diets. And in June, won Best In State under the category of sports feature because of it. It was at that point that I no longer thought of myself as just another high school newspaper geek, but a competitive young journalist. That would then lead me to where I am today. Senior and Managing Editor of The Pioneer Press. I work alongside some of the most talented individuals I’ve ever had the chance to meet to create a 16 page paper filled entirely with our corrected mistakes and unbreakable dedication. My days are spent correcting picas, and slightly tampering with font sizes to make headlines fit correctly. I’m no longer cramming to memorize names, or stressing over interviews, however, I have yet to master the whole deadline situation. After three life changing years newspaper has equally taught and tested my patience; it has gone from a class, to an addiction, to what I hope to be my career.


pinned against the scale

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not long after the interview had ended, I was Googling every wrestling term he spoke of so casually, as if I had become the author of Wrestling for Dummies. The day the article had been published, the state wrestling champion in his division congratulated me on getting the truth out there without damaging his or his coaches image, which was the one thing he had asked of me. All thanks to that dense, sweat sauna, I was given a state title in sports features, a new close friend, and more knowledge of wrestling than I’d ever asked for.

“I had the opportunity to watch my brothers and closest friends excel past every expectation this year, but that’s all I got to do, watch,” senior Kristian Bumanlag said. After dedicating the past seven years of his life to football, two broken fingers caused an abrupt halt in Bumanlag’s final high school season. On Sept. 2, the first game of the season, Bumanlag broke his right ring finger while attempting to tackle an opposing player on the Silverton team. “I honestly didn’t think much of it, I figured I dislocated it, I just tried popping it back in place and kept playing,” Bumanlag said. However, after a quick trip to the doctor after the game, he found out he had snapped the bone. “It wasn’t that big of a deal, and I could still do everything I needed to. The only problem being, the day I got the cast off, I broke another finger that night,” Bumanlag said. On Oct. 15, history repeated itself while in the midst of blocking one of Putnam’s starting defensive tackles. “The tears didn’t come until after I broke the second finger, because I knew the moment it happened I was done for the season. I had to sit out for four of the 10 games, but I never stopped training. You see your brothers getting better, getting stronger, givI ing it their all, and you can’t help to try and match their skills,” Bumanlag said. couldn’t But he is far from a stranger when it comes to sports injuries. explain why “Freshmen year I tore my ACL, sophomore year I had a couple exactly sports minor knee injuries, and now in senior year I’ve only got eight features are my fingers left. But injuries don’t really change anything, I still go-to. Maybe it’s the passion an athlete have so much love for the game and if I get the holds for their game, or opportunity to, I hope to pursue it throughout maybe it’s simply the fact college and the rest of my life,” Bumanthat they give better quotes. lag said.

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Before this story, I had never stepped foot inside the Sandy wrestling room, in fact, I didn’t know we had one. However, a year later and I’m still trying to figure out how to forget the one place where oxygen felt more sparse than sweat. It took me over three hours to find a wrestler who didn’t sugar coat their diet, but luckily for me, the one who had the most to lose, was the one to tell me the most. Though I didn’t understand hardly any of what he was saying, I think my casual head nods and momentary hum’s of agreement convinced him. Needless to say,

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he grumpy boys and grumbling tummies are back and hungrier than ever. As the wrestling season starts, some athletes are enduring extreme dietary measures to “make the weight.” Cutting weight can be a hard concept to wrap your head around, and even the wrestlers seemed to have gotten lost in the world of weighins. “You have to cut weight to classify for your weight class, and once you are assigned, you have only a couple hours to eat whatever you want to get bigger for the match, because that’s the goal: to be the biggest,” varsity wrestler Zac Wigzell said. Wigzell was the 5A 2015 state champion for his weight class and counts every calorie he takes in. “I think about my weight every second of every day. If I’m not doing workouts, then I’m planning them,” Wigzell said. Wigzell, like many other athletes, works out three times a day, once before school, once during wrestling practice, and once during club practice. His meal plan consists of a banana, two protein bars, half a sandwich and a small portion of meat each day, along with an abundance of water. Six months out of every year he is dieting. Some parents are concerned with the weight loss being unhealthy, but others are definitely more supportive. “My mom won’t even eat in front of me, but my dad is always making sure I’m following the meal plan to stay in shape,” varsity wrestler Payten Andrews said. In order to ensure the wrestlers aren’t losing too much weight, there is a dehydration test and a skin fold test at the beginning of the season along with weigh-ins done before every meet. If the wrestler fails to pass either test, they are not permitted to wrestle in the upcoming match. The coaches are aware of the crazy diets, but instead of ignoring the problem, they design meal plans when requested to ensure the team’s health. “Our coaches don’t encourage us to go out and drop 30 pounds. They know what it’s like, and they know how to keep us healthy,” varsity wrestler Jacob Noteboom said. By March when the season ends, these crazy diets will still be in place, because the team continues to keep themselves in shape. But the bottom-line is, these wrestlers are as dedicated to their sport as any athlete. “It’s as natural as a swimmer seeing how long they can hold their breath under water. Some call it dangerous, some call it wrestling,” Noteboom said.

Kristian however, was a special case. After dedicating his entire life to the game, I was skeptical about asking him the heartbreaking questions. I knew I was wildly unprepared for tears, and while I’m trained in journalism, I must have missed the day we were taught about how to comfort our subjects, but because of this interview, I quickly learned the ropes. Kristian had me laughing between spurts of heartache. He was in good spirits, and our interview became less of an interrogation and more of a conversation. I learned just as much about his character as I did his story, and thanks to that, I gained a broader perspective on how to go about fragile subjects. Maybe the friendships are the real reason behind my love for sports features.


overdue earthquake developing under pacific T

he New Yorker published an article erupting in a social media frenzy on July 20. “The Really Big One,” as they called it, informed readers about a long overdue earthquake developing under the Pacific. It is predicted to erupt anywhere from an 8.0-9.2 quake along the West Coast, and expected to last nearly four minutes. But if that alone wasn’t bone-chilling enough for you, then prepare yourself for the 700-mile long tsunami anticipated only a mere 10 minutes later. “Think of the land mass coming towards us as flexible ruler that’s being bent under North America. At some point, the ruler has to snap back in place, and when it does, the impact is what will cause the quake,” oceanic science teacher Andy Wex said. The question gnawing at us all, is it going to annihilate Sandy? Well according to a group of renowned scientists studying this beast; no. Though an expected 7 million people are to be effected, and nearly 13,000 are predicted to be injured in the phenomenon, the destruction course won’t put an end to our little town. But that doesn’t mean we won’t be affected; there’s a high probability the city could be without fresh water, or electrify for months on end, and cost millions of dollars to repair the damage. “People have to stop sugar coating this. It’s going to happen, and it’s going to be chaotic,” Wex said. Luckily for us, earthquakes often come in cycles, meaning scientists are able to pinpoint approximately when an earthquake is suppose to happen. But earthquakes have never been fond of arriving at a socially-acceptable time, meaning in 2015 we are 73 years past the expected due date of this monster. So how do we prepare for one of the biggest natural disasters in North American history? Drop, cover, and hold on. Because there is no way to prevent the earthquake or tsunami from occurring, the only thing we can do is ready ourselves. Some ways individuals could prepare themselves is by bolting their homes down to their foundations; this will protect the house from collapsing. Another good tip is to strap down your water heater. Seeing as it is a gas line, there is a good chance the pressure cause an explosion. Most importantly, have a safety kit including important documents, flashlights, batteries, basic first-aid supplies, canned food, bottled water, and warm clothing. If this earthquake does hit while school is in session, this would be the safest place to be. Sandy High was built to withstand some shaking. The stilts built around us, and shatterproof windows result in some of the best protection possible. Because of the stable structure, and over one million gallon fresh water tank Sandy High has, the city is more than likely going to be a refugee camp for any displaced people in the area.

Though it’s been over a year since I wrote this, and the natural disaster has yet to take place, the fear is still laced in my mind. I remember doing hours of research on earthquakes, more than I ever had for an actual science class for this story. The idea is, we could all be smothered to pieces at any given time, but just saying that would ensue chaos amongst the entire Northwest, or the couple hundred people who read my story at least. Which meant I had to learn how to tell the public about a tough situation, in a soft way. It taught me how to put myself in a reader’s shoe, a valuable lesson seeing as this story won excellent in the Northwest Media Olympics for 2015.

breaking down presidential policies

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ith the 2016 presidential election coming up in November, this year’s seniors will be the youngest voters in the country. As first year voters, it can be intimidating or confusing to try to wrap your head around what a presidential campaign might be and maybe that’s because not only are these candidates politicians, but highly trained actors. The people running know just what to say to win a couple of votes. But these men and women will be dictating the future of our country, so in whom do we instill our trust? On Feb. 1, republican Ted Cruz placed first in the Iowa Caucus with 27.6 percent of the vote. Cruz is the current junior senator of Texas and takes a conservative stance on most of his political views. In an attempt to put an end to undocumented immigrants, Cruz has proposed a multimillion-dollar plan to build a wall separating the United States from Mexico along with the deportation of over 150,000 resident aliens. In response to the recent social debates, Cruz has voiced his complete support for the second amendment right and refuses to engage in any gun control regulations. Regarding abortion, he is “pro-life,” and in relation to current U.S. threats, he has plans to quickly and decisively bomb ISIS. Close behind Cruz is probably the most well-known candidate, Donald Trump, who took 24.3 percent of the Iowa Caucus votes. Trump is the most inexperienced candidate, with no past involvement in government. It’s not hard to find where Trump stands on the spectrum of most issues, seeing as he is far more blunt about his opinions than his opponents seem to be, however he and Cruz share many similar ideologies. However, Trump rebounded from his defeat and won the New Hampshire primary on Feb. 9. In the Democratic Party, Hillary Clinton took first at the Iowa Caucus with 49.9 percent of the vote. Clinton has been in the political limelight since 1993 when she became the first lady to Bill Clinton. Since then she has served as the 67th Secretary of State and a senator from New York. Though raised as a die-hard Republican, her views were quickly swayed in her college years at Yale. Clinton holds quite contradicting views to those of her Republican opponents. “I will stand up against any effort to deport dreamers,” Clinton said on the issue of immigration. Clinton is a strong supporter of strict gun control, and marriage/racial/gender equality. She is an avid supporter Planned Parenthood, yet also takes the “pro-life” stance. The first issue she plans to take on is the wage gap. Clinton’s adversary Bernie Sanders took 49.6 percent of the Iowa Caucus vote, drawing a mere 0.2 percent behind. He also rebounded in New Hampshire, winning 60 percent to 38 percent over Clinton. Though Sanders is the oldest candidate running, most of his supporters are young adults, as much as 85 percent of his New Hampshire primary votes came from recent high school graduates. Sanders took his campaign mobile, spending nearly all of his time interacting with followers on social media; an unusually modern approach in order to gain attention from millenials. Though Sanders isn’t nearly as strict on gun control regulations as Clinton, he does support background checks in order keep criminals from gaining access to assault weapons. Sanders’ hasn’t spent too much time discussing ISIS or any other terrorist organizations but has promised to keep any war strategies in line with our constitution. Sanders first order of business would be a major tax shift directed towards the wealthy. According to Sanders, “You can’t have it all while kids in this country go hungry.” All in all, there’s no doubt that the opinions of young adults will greatly influence who moves into D.C. next year, especially when 18-25 year olds make up over 21 percent of the nations voters.

This was the first story I ever received immense backlash for. While I thought I was merely writing a story decoding presidential policy for myself and many other new voters, it struck a nerve I never meant to touch. Maybe it was because I’m young, and haven’t has as much time to study politics, but no matter what side of the political spectrum I was on, it was still wrong in someone’s eyes. I was getting messages on Twitter and Instagram telling me I was pushing liberals views onto a conservative town, and shouldn’t publish my opinions in a school newspaper. But that’s what we have a newspaper for: to voice our otherwise unheard opinions. In fact my own advisor testified in court to give us that right. Nevertheless, this story pushed me to keep writing political controversies. I’d never once earned so much feed back on a story. Anytime my name was published near the word presidency, the school erupted in both positive and negative ways. Thanks to this “liberal” news article, I learned how to tiptoe around fragile subjects, and just as well, how to throw a sledgehammer at it.


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16th annual mckenzie river cat show

he McKenzie River Cat show has come to Portland. On March 14 and 15 the fierce competitors packed up their Gucci collars and headed for the Double Tree Hotel. These cats aren’t your typical claw-ful messes, some came from purebred bloodlines that have been specially trained since birth to compete in su-purr-ior shows. “Purrington has a personal trainer to help him stay in shape,” Sandra Louise of New York said about her pet. Louise isn’t the only one to fly out for this event, there were pets from all over the country clawing their way to the finals. TruTails MacGyver is currently the No. 1 cat in the nation and lives in Fort Collins, Colorado. Seventh in the nation, better known as Belinda Paws, is from Houston Texas. “TruTails has been in over 20 pageants since the beginning of the year, and he has won every single one. He was born to compete,” Trudie Dennis, the owner of TruTails MacGyver said. Striker, a British short hair, who is currently fourth in the nation, has his own groomer in order to keep his luscious fur tamed. However, it’s widely known that looks aren’t enough to get these cats a purr-fect score. Like On March 14th, 2015 I spent hours on end interdog shows. The judges of a cat show compare cats to their breed standards. These standards viewing cat ladies and stage moms for the McKspecify how an ideal cat for their breed would look and act; therefore they need to act the part enzie River cat show; where I learned just about everything there is to know on how to groom as well as look it. a tail and pamper a paw. It was at that point I “One dreadful meow at the wrong time and your cat goes from the top of the scratching realized I was where I belonged. By the end of the pole, to a has been and never will be again,” an owner said. event, my camera looked like the blueprints to a These frisky felines were judged by highly trained veterinarians, all of which seemed to have cat calendar, and that’s just how I like it. I started gotten their PhD in C.A.T. On the first day, Pam Moser, Kenny Currie, Darrel Newkirk, and writing hundreds of different hooks for my story, but none of them seemed to do the show justice. Brian Moser took to the judging tables to determine which competitors had the right cat-titude That is, until I wrote the first cringe-worthy cat for the finals and in the end, as expected, TruTails MacGyver, a reigning champ for three years pun. Though I’m still unsure why I thought puns now, defended his title as the most tail-ented cat in Oregon. were a groundbreaking new angle, it ended up

17th annual mckenzie river cat show I

n the heart of Portland on March 13, hiss-tory was made. People from far and wide came together in celebration of the 17th annual McKenzie River Cat show. winning me honorable mentions in Human InterThough I must warn all feline-enthusiast that such an event isn’t for the weak at est for the 2015 Media Olympics. This then fueled heart. Fur-endships were lost, and tail-ent was put to the test. me to attend and report on the 2016 McKenzie Upon my first step inside the Double Tree Hotel, I could practically smell the anRiver cat show, and thus continue the tradition. ticipation gleaming off the competitors, though anticipation has a strangely similar And not to let the cat out of the bag, but the third, scent to Fancy Feast, so there was quite possibly an over lap in my theories. and final, part to the trilogy is currently underway. Nancy Dodds, Donna Fuller, Ellyn Honey and Darrell Newkirk took to the judging tables this year, qualifying cats based on their breed standards, such as teeth alignment and fur condition. After a cat places in their breed, the top five move up to an “overall” category, where the competitor are no longer judged on their looks, but on the content of their cat-titude. Only minutes into the show was I reintroduced with many furr-miliar faces. Last year, I met Purrington James, a purebred Bengal from New York. Purrington, like many other show cats, has his own person trainer to keep his body in the best possible condition. He placed 1st in his breed, and 11th overall, moving up two places from his previous title. Three-time reigning champ TruTrails MacGyver took center stage on Sunday; the pale completion in his eyes has seized to die out since our last encounter. MacGyver is well known in the community for being one of the fiercest competitors in the nation. Unlike most title winners, he is a mixed breed. Thus meaning he can qualify in both Main Coon and Brown McTabby, whereas most can only compete in one. As expected, MacGyver took 1st in both qualifying breeds, and then 1st overall. A new purr-sonal record from this Colorado native. In second place came Princess Melborn, a newcomer to the McKenzie River Cat show who is quite paw-sibly going to be MacGyver’s greatest threat next season.


Spotlight

Pioneer Press

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e c a s l P e h t ’ll Go! ! h ou Y

January 13, 2016

Thailand What’s better then relaxing on a white beach with the waves crashing on the shore? Thomas Busk-Jepsen went on a family vacation to Thailand. “Thailand is very warm, it was around 90 degrease every day,’ Busk-Jepsen said. Besides relaxing on the beaches Busk-Jepsen did many other things while he was in Thailand he visited Thailand temples, went snorkeling, rode an elephant and even saw a monkey. When I asked Busk-Jepsen to describe Thailand he said it was warm with lots beaches that you can snorkel at and swim in. When Busk-Jepsen was snorkeling he saw lots of different kinds of fishes.

Cloud Forest

Cairo

Cultural experiences are different all over the world. Louise Gustafsson has been to places such as Barcelona, Copenhagen and New York but her most favorite place she has been by far is Cairo. “Cairo was just so different from anywhere I have been,” Gustafsson said. The culture in Cairo was different from Norway but it was exiting to see. The majority of Cairo is poor people and the conditions that they lived in were humbling. Other then the humbling experience that Cairo offers there is also lots of beautiful sculptures and sight seeing opportunities. “It’s a good place to see if you want to see something new and different,” Gustafsson said.

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balloon fonts and an existential life crisis In April of last year I decided to dabble in match-making for Prom season. It was as if I was an underpaid host of the Bachelor. I showcased Sandy’s singles by asking them the make or break first date questions, such as, what is your go to dance move? The real deal breaker. This layout is one of my favorites, mainly due to the modularity of it. Our prom was Mardi Gras themed, which meant I was given a few key colors to run with. However, I didn’t want bubbly hearts and streamers floating down the base of my page. I remember finding out how to make my font look like balloons and spiraling into an extensional life crisis, thinking to myself, “this is the peak of my career.”

Croatia

Sophomore Molly Murphy-Brown has been to six places out of the country. “I got to see the cloud forest and stay in an ecolodge and I could hear the forest sounds because the walls were like screens and we saw monkeys right by our room.” Murphy-Brown said.

Rome, Italy The Colosseum, Vatican City, and Pantheon are all breathtaking destinations millions of people dream of visiting one day. From 20122014, math teacher Aaron Stewart had the privilege of living in Rome, Italy, and experienced these treasures quite often “The buildings were just beautiful. On the weekends, or after school, we could walk downtown and just hang out, maybe have a Gelato. We adjusted to the culture with an open mind. Pasta is big in Rome – they eat about two bowls of it a day, and we did too,” Stewart said. “I recommend this trip to everyone, as long as they have an open mind. Anyone who wants to lay back by the sea and relax, or visit historical monuments – Rome is perfect for you,” Stewart said.

Deep within a heavily forested national park lays 16 crystalline lakes that connect through a series of cascading waterfalls. The luscious greenery and mineral-rich water attracts various wildlife species, from bears and boars to rare birds and clouds of butterflies. The magnificent inner-connected waterfalls are astounding, and are surrounded by a shroud of mist, with millions of tiny rainbows reflected in them. A wonderland of dew soaked greenery, powerful waterfalls, green-blue lakes, and majestic wildlif.

Costa Rica

Juneau, Alaska This 12 mile long ice cave is over 3,000 years old, and soon its breathtaking beauty will be gone. This crystal blue cave is melting, and it’s only a matter of time before this one in a lifetime glacier is gone from this planet forever. Its surreal wonder is said to be “otherworldly”, and though there is a chance of falling ice, the light blues and deep turquoises are worth the risk. Since the ice is slowly meting, the pooled water around it as formed Mendenhall Lake, which is just as beautiful, with its wall of towering glaciers surrounding it and an array of colors in its sunsets. Go see this awe-inspiring hunk of ice, because in reality, it’s so much more.

Dominican Republic Junior Kyler Kim spent his last spring break in the Dominican Republic. “In The Dominican Republic I did this thing called 27 waterfalls, which was a four mile hike where you hike uphill and there are natural waterslides and cliffs we jumped off of,” Kim said.

Senior Davyn Owens has been to Canada, Costa Rica and Japan. I went to Costa Rica for the Eco Tour Mr. Magee does and we got to work with sea turtles and meet some tribes and lots of cool stuff.” Owens said. “Just for the heck of it I went to Japan. While I was there I got to see the Tokyo Sky Tree which is the highest building in the world at 2080 feet.”

Paris Bolivia

London Sophomore Izzy Totten has been to 12 countries. “Amsterdam was my favorite. There were a ton of cute shops and little canals like in. We went to the Anne Frank house which was really cool.” Totten said. “London was also cool because we went to Buckingham Palace.” It was great Totten said. “We also went to the London Eye and it was really cool because you can see all of London from it. It was kind of scary because it doesn’t stop, you just have to get on it while it’s moving and when you’re at the top you’re basically on top of the Ferris wheel.”

Often referred to as the “Worlds Largest Mirror” or the “Mirror of the Sky,” this prehistoric lake dried up and left the largest salt flat in the world in its place. However, the true magic happens when it rains, because when it does, the salty crust turns into a giant mirror. The sky, the clouds, the colors of the sunrise and sunset, all are reflected in one of Mother Nature’s most unique creations. Though wildlife is rare amid the bright, white salt mounds and cacti-studded islands, pink flamingos can be seen in flocks, searching the desert-like plain for food. In the end, no matter what you decide to do, this unearthly experience is one you have to take; besides, it might be your only chance to walk on the clouds.

Social studies teacher Anouxa Vixathep had the once in a lifetime opportunity to visit Paris, France to compete in the World’s Master Games for track and field. Aside from competing, Vixathep spent six weeks with his family to take in the culture of France. “The meals were the best part, French families sit down for an hour and a half just to eat – and they ate in courses. Another thing that was cool was that the majority of people take public transportation or walk,” Vixathep said. Vixathep’s most memorable moment was the fireworks show at the Eiffel Tower. Half a million people showed up to see the stunning fireworks display. Events like these take place often, which is a big hit for tourists. “I had nothing but great experiences, the people were great. They’re very social people, with amazing food and culture. Traveling to places like Paris allows you to learn more than you’d ever learn through a book or on the Internet,” Vixathep said.

seuss leads to accidental success Stories by Jessica Gaspard, Sacheen Lampert, Danie Rhodes, Karli Shields

This layout was problematic from day one. I had this great idea to design a map, with push pins where every student had gone. But I was quickly swayed when I realized every location based page had been done that way already. This then lead me to Plan B, Dr. Seuss. From the dawn of my youth he has steered my in the right direction, so he had to be the man for the job. I used my favorite slightly sketchy website, also known as dafont.com, to come up with the perfect look-alike font and the rest just kind of fell into place. I changed the contrast and color-base to make the hot airballons, that were originally just from one piece of clipart. The sign I stumbled upon on accident, but fit too perfectly not to use. This layout is oneofmyfavoritesbecauseithappenedbyaccident,butnevertheless,won me an excellent in the Northwest scholastic press for double page spreads.

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Spotlight

Pioneer Press

Sandy High

Bachelorettes

Girls Prom Prep Makenna Wells Staff Writer

Danyielle Wagner

What moves will you bust on the dance floor? “Classic dad dancing” Where is your ideal pre-prom dinner? “McDonald’s Dollar Menu, of course. Go big or go home, am I right?” Why should someone go to prom with you? “I’ve got Susan the Saturn, I’m the next teenage heartthrob, and I’m basically hilarious.”

Cassidy Cartwright What moves will you bust on the dance floor? “The moonwalk or the shopping cart, maybe “the floss,” an original move by yours truly.” Where is your ideal pre-prom dinner? “Pioneer Coffee.” Describe your ideal prom date? “Tall, can dance, preferably starred in “Neighbors,” very muscular, looks like Zac Efron (is Zac Efron).”

Ashlee Geertz

What moves will you bust on the dance floor? “Have you seen the Rihanna “Work” video? Yeah, a little something like that.” Where is your ideal pre-prom dinner? “Portland City Grill.” Describe your ideal prom date? “Tall, athletic, compliments me. No Nikes.”

In a year: “Any free time I had I spent looking for the style of dress I wanted on my phone,” junior Ashlee Gertz said. Work out program to look good. Think of date candidates. In a month: Schedule hair and make up appointments. Find the perfect dress that makes you look “on point”. Pick hairstyle that compliments you. Find where to get a tan that doesn’t look orange. “I prefer tanning beds because they look way more natural,” senior Noelle Centeno said. Make dinner reservations at some high-end restaurant. Plan where to get your nails done and what color would look best with the dress. Buy high heels that you can barely walk in. Practice walking in the heels to avoid looking like a penguin. “I practice walking in my heels all the time prior to the dance so I look like a model when I strut,” senior Tori Eri said. Have your friends start dropping hints to the special someone. “I just got back from the beach and Gavin was standing inside my house, holding a sign and flower with a beautiful watch,” sophomore Hope Eisert said. Post how you got asked on social media. Say you’re going to eat healthy but do not.

The Perfect Ask Samantha Bergeron Staff Writer

Boys: Light up the drive way with candles, at the end be holding a sign that says Prom and have roses. Get your truck really dirty and spell out Prom in the dirt. Buy her Nikes and “run” to Prom together. Put her on a scavenger hunt that goes down memory lane (first kiss, first date, place you met), then be waiting for her at the end. Get all your best friends to have individual signs that spell out Prom and an arrow pointing to you. Buy her a puppy with “Prom would be ruff without you,” or you can make the dog tag say Prom. Spell out Prom with rose petals on her bed. In a jar, give her a number of reasons to go to Prom with you. If she is shorter than you, make a chart that is bigger than her and say “you have to be at least this tall to say no to Prom.” Girls: Connect it in some way with the sport the guy plays, for example “let’s tackle prom together,” written on a football. Ask with a pun connected to any food, such as “I doughnut want to go to Prom without you.” Use his favorite movie and a common line. If you are dating, do something that has a special meaning to the two of you, like something involving the song you two connect with. Act as a dead person with caution tape around and say “I’m dying to go to Prom with you.” Get a teddy bear and say, “ It would be un-bearable to go to Prom without you.” Take the theme of the dance and incorporate it in the ask. Get a bucket of Dum Dums and say “it would be dum if you didn’t go to Prom with me.’

In a week: Get your eyebrows waxed. Get spray tan. Look for accessories. Lay out everything. Try on your dress at least 10 times. In a day: Shower and shave bright and early in the morning. Brush teeth. Call the girls. Drink lots of water. Pick up boutonniere. Cry because you are too stressed out to think. Call date multiple times to make sure they are getting ready. Go get hair and makeup done with you’re main girl. Put the dress on that you have been dying to show off. Get together with your group of friends. Go to the fancy restaurant that you have being excited to try out. Take cute picture you’ll cherish forever. Go to Prom.

SHS singles brought to you by Hayley Pullen

April 22, 2016

Boys Prom Prep

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Sandy High Bachelors

Magi Allen Staff Writer

In a year: “A year in advance from Prom my girlfriend will come over and scroll through Prom dresses, but I don’t feel I need to prepare anytime soon,” junior Tucker Eri said. In a month: Purchase Prom tickets. Look up cheesy ways to ask a girl in the school newspaper. Contemplate if you are going to Prom or not. Ask a girl while many procrastinate till the last day. “In a month I’m going to make sure I’ve asked a girl to accompany me to Prom. Then I would start doing push-ups and workouts so I look good in my tux,” junior Mason Gorski said. Think about where you are going to get your tux and where is the cheapest place. In a week: Have mom order a corsage for your date. Get dance lessons from mom. Make an appointment for the tux. Go get fitted for a tux. Coordinate tux with the date’s dress. Try to plan for after Prom, and then realize date has already made plans. Get a fresh haircut. Make sure you have a crew of friends going with you. Consider what transportation you will ride in. Listen to date complain about how she looks bad in the dress and wants a different one. In a day: Sleep in. Lie around and chill until the last minute before leaving. Have mom pick up the corsage. Beg for money from parents because you spent all of yours on useless stuff. Shower. Shave the beard. Mom reminds you to brush teeth. Throw some gel in hair and comb it. Throw on tux. Put too much cologne on. “I start my morning off with a Snapchat to my Prom date to make sure she knows I’m awake. I then get up to go get some coffee with a nice breakfast and pick up the corsage. I’ll probably go fill my car up with gas and check on the reservations. I’d then get ready for an amazing night,” senior Drew Kenny said. Eat a huge breakfast. Spill food on your tux. Pick date up. Drive to the place you’re taking pictures. Fake smile for all the pictures the parents are going to take. Go to an overpriced restaurant to eat. Head to Prom.

Kyler Kim

Where is your ideal pre-Prom dinner? “Gotta be fancy, Portland City Grill.” Describe your ideal Prom date? “Same height, maybe shorter. Brunette, honestly I’m thinking of the pictures.” Why should someone go to Prom with you? “I’m just a single guy looking for a good night out. I’d be a fun date, and I’d know how to treat a woman.”

Jakob Eslinger What moves will you bust on the dance floor? “Dabbing in between the classic robot routine.” Where is your ideal pre-prom dinner? “Burgerville, the classier version of McDonald’s.” Describe your ideal prom date? “The female version of Chayse Jackson (flowing hair, mysterious eyes and a great sense of humor).”

Mitchel Medley What moves will you bust on the dance floor? “Probably the Sprinkler, it shows off my elbows.” Describe your ideal Prom date? “She has got to be able to break down, be a good dancer, can’t be shy, and have a really nice smile.” Why should someone go to Prom with you? “Well, I mean, I can pull off moccasins, my best friend is my grandma and I have really nice shoulder blades.”


Back to where it all began, a single black and white page layout. While they seem to be simplistic, they make up the majority of our 16-page paper. Single pages are easily one of my favorites because there are so many possibilities to make them different from the rest. Not to mention headlines are always a blast to write out hours before deadline. This page was one of my favorites, mainly because of the dollar bill which I thought to be brilliant at the time, and the way our stories fit complementary to each other. Olivia Dwyer

Money saving skills are very important in life. When you’re an adult, most of us won’t have our parents to fall back on when we need quick cash. And if you end up over-spending, you can drop into debt and that’s a hard thing to get out of. Life is expensive, but there are techniques for saving money. For example, wait until you know there’s going to be a sale to shop, buy clothes that you can mix and match with so you don’t need as many clothes. To avoid over spending on food or coffee, instead of getting coffee four times a week cut it back to two. When you go to the store, make a list of the necessities and stick to it. If you have a gym membership but never go, or if you have magazine subscriptions but find yourself throwing them away, cancel them. When you find yourself in your mid 20’s and owe $30,000 in student loans, trying to afford your apartment, and fix the car, you’re going wish you hadn’t spent that $80 a month on coffee.

In years past, Sandy High School students have competed in various events to earn the coveted Spirit Points. These Spirit Points were intended to create friendly competition and increase class pride and unity by rewarding classes for their participation in school spirit. Class unity can have a positive impact on an individual’s high school experience. It can provide a sense of belonging to new students and freshman coming from smaller communities to a school three times the population. It helped bond individuals to a common goal. It was no longer a “me against them” but an “us against them”. Individuals became a part of a whole versus staying in their isolated world. Another benefit of earning the most spirit points was the great prizes. These prizes varied from ice cream or donut parties to pizza parties. Students were motivated to help their class win to garner not only the prize but also the bragging rights of being the “winning class.” Spirit points were awarded for a number of different events such as dressing up for spirit days or winning competitions such as bringing in the most cans during the canned food drive. What started off as a great idea to try to increase school spirit has slowly died down to a slow simmer. Participation in these events has slowly dwindled to a handful of students. The flame that had once ignited a school has fizzled to smoldering ashes. Spirit points have become a thing of the past and this year it has been decided that the competition won’t be happening. There are a number of factors that

junior freshmen

have culminated in this loss of spirit. “Class unity is hard because we don’t have designated halls for the different grades so you can go a whole day without seeing a lot of people from your class,” senior Alyson McGaughey said. Students have more options of how they learn and spread out in different directions from home-school, on-line classes, off-campus opportunities as well as in class programs, making unification more challenging. This year Leadership has decided to change their tactics and focus their attention on unifying the school across the classes. They want to improve the high school experience for students with different activities. Instead of grade level competitions they have feel it may be more effective to focus on first period class competitions. Another idea generated was capitalizing on instant gratification such as handing out candy to those who dressed up versus waiting on the ultimate prize. Leadership is working hard at trying to keep pace with the changes of attitude and what drives students. They are looking for new opportunities to increase student involvement. They are starting the year with a fresh slate - out with the old ideas and in with new exciting changes! Not having spirit points will be very beneficial to students, giving Leadership time to focus on other activities.

SENIOR

Staff Writer

An increasing number of students are transferring to homeschooling in the past couple of years. According to many recent studies, what once was considered odd is becoming more accepted. From online school to having a guardian teach the student, homeschooling has a lot of benefits. The most obvious is that students wouldn’t have to leave their house. The learning is based right in the comfort of the student’s own home. The learning itself is also individualized to the needs of the student. One of popular reasons for homeschooling is the absence of distractions in the learning environment. The student and the teacher both don’t have the distractions of the other students and classroom. There is more time spent on the success of the student. Many students may like homeschooling or online school because of the flexibility it gives your schedule. Students can schedule their learning around other activities like sports, jobs, volunteering, family activities, and household responsibilities. These students also get to extend their learning outside the classroom and into the real world. The students take trips to museums, intern at offices or hospitals, and explore nature at a wilderness camp. There is a lot of controversy on wheth-

Staff Writer

Teagan Pendleton

er or not homeschooling is actually good for the student or not. The main claim is that homeschooled students are not being exposed to the same social situations that are in a public school. Therefore, they are socially behind their peers. This has proved to be wrong on many occasions. The students studying at home can certainly still be amazing athletes on sports teams, great performers in theatre, and fit in socially with their peers, without going to public school. Another concern people have is the access to a qualified teacher. Most parents are not exactly qualified to be teaching. There are many homeschooling programs that tell the parents exactly what to teach and how to do it. As the student gets older, they begin to become more independent and essentially teach themselves. People also are concerned with the access homeschooled students have to resources such as chemistry labs or auto shop. These students are limited to their options, but many museums and universities have special programs specifically for homeschool students. The successfulness academically depends on each student and the learning environment they work best in. Some students learn best when they are put into a classroom and surrounded by peers, while others need to be one on one with an instructor to obtain the information. It is important to look into these things before making any decisions.

Source: onlinecollege.com

Taya Vance

sophomore

Rest in peace Pio Points Public vs. home school

When you finally get your paycheck after putting in all your hours, it’s hard not to splurge and buy everything on your wish list. However, everything is so expensive nowadays and you have to be conscious about what you spend your money on. “My want is a dog,” said freshman Bailey Taylor. “I want a scholarship to college just because of how expensive it is, it would make it easier,” said senior Kyler Kim. “ I mean, money is obviously a need for everyone and for me too,” he added. But you have to keep in mind that all of us are teenagers, and things we do like getting coffee four times a week or eating out all the time are more expensive than you think. If you went to Dutch Bros. or Starbucks four times a week, you’re spending somewhere around $80 a month on drinks. That money adds up quickly if you

Staff Writer

save it.

Opinion November 10, 2016 5 Death of a part-time paycheck: Gone but not forgotten

back to the basics

Pioneer Press

manufacturing my idea on indesign Senior year I decided to expand my layout knowledge and join yearbook. It was a whole new ballgame. After three years of InDesign, I thought I knew just about everything there was to know about page design. Naive is a good way to explain how I felt. I was given the manufacturing page, seems easy enough, although my first move was to google the word manufacturing because here I thought it was a class on cars. A learning experience we’ll call it. My next obstacle was trying to figure out how to design a page that hadn’t been done before. I started with blue circles, a good base for any page in my opinion. However, as my page developed, it hit me that my manufacturing page looked more like a tribute to bubble baths. The color scheme soon turned to brown, and morphed to tan, until it felt less like a scrub in the tub.


Sports

15 Freshman compete at the varsity level NFL needs to address problems January 13, 2016

Makenna Wells

proof of publication

Staff Writer

Varsity sports in the high school are extremely competitive. As you get older, the more serious sports become. Freshmen who make the varsity team are not only are the youngest and less experienced, they are also the ones who are expected to shine the most. Every minute of every game they are constantly trying to prove themselves to everybody around them. Colton Gorski is a freshman on the boys varsity basketball team this year. “It’s stressful having to live up to everybody who says I shouldn’t be on varsity and to feel like I have to prove myself,” Gorski said. Most players have invidual goals for

themselves, especially the younger ones due to the years ahead of them. “Some goals I have for this season is really just to fit in where the team needs me and really gain from this experience,” Gorski said. For some coaches it is stressful putting a young player on the varsity team. Physical size is often a factor as freshman are usually still growing. Coaches look for future potential when looking at the younger players. “We hope all our younger ones on varsity improve because of the more advanced experience. Then hopefully they’ll be a heck of a ball player their junior and senior year,” varsity basketball coach Jason Maki said. Coaches take their best 12, even if that means a returning varsity player is cut, due to the potential of a young athlete.

Pioneer Press

Getting used to the flow of things can take a while. When a freshman makes varsity it is a completely new atmosphere. They must adapt to the new coach, teammates, and plays. “After two or three games, I got use to everything new,” freshman varsity girls soccer athlete Jordan McCloud said. Freshman Baylee Groom was awarded second team all league this year for the varsity girls soccer team. Anything is possible, even if you are one of the youngest on a highly-skilled team. Being a freshman on varsity is a great experience. Junior Jake Malek has been a varsity athlete since his freshman year. “No matter how you look at it you can always win. If you just push yourself you can achieve great things,” Malek said.

Wrestlers cutting weight to start season Summer Frickey

Spotlight Editor

The grumpy boys and grumbling tummies are back and hungrier than ever. As the wrestling season starts, some athletes are enduring extreme dietary measures to “make the weight.” Cutting weight can be a hard concept to wrap your head around, and even the wrestlers seemed to have gotten lost in the world of weigh-ins. “You have to cut weight to classify for your weight class, and once you are assigned, you have only a couple hours to eat whatever you want to get bigger for the match, because that’s the goal: to be the biggest,” varsity wrestler Zac Wigzell said. Wigzell was the 5A 2015 state champion for his weight class and counts every calorie he takes in. “I think about my weight every second of every day. If I’m not doing

workouts, then I’m planning them,” Wigzell said. Wigzell, like many other athletes, works out three times a day, once before school, once during wrestling practice, and once during club practice. His meal plan consists of a banana, two protein bars, half a sandwich and a small portion of meat each day, along with an abundance of water. Six months of every year he is dieting. Some parents are concerned with the weight loss being unhealthy, but others are definitely more supportive. “My mom won’t even eat in front of me, but my dad is always making sure I’m following the meal plan to stay in shape,” varsity wrestler Payten Andrews said. In order to ensure the wrestlers aren’t losing too much weight, there is a dehydration test and a skin fold test at the beginning of the season along with weigh-ins

done before every meet. If the wrestler fails to pass either test, they are not permitted to wrestle in the upcoming match. The coaches are aware of the crazy diets, but instead of ignoring the problem, they design meal plans when requested to ensure the team’s health. “Our coaches don’t encourage us to drop 30 pounds. They know what it’s like, and they know how to keep us healthy,” varsity wrestler Jacob Noteboom said. By March when the season ends, these crazy diets will still be in place, because the team continues to keep themselves in shape. But the bottom-line is, these wrestlers are as dedicated to their sport as any athlete. “It’s as natural as a swimmer seeing how long they can hold their breath under water. Some call it dangerous, some call it wrestling,” Noteboom said.

Summit works hard in all sports to succeed

Marley Salveter Staff Writer

The athletic success of Summit High School in Bend is a long running routine for the students participating in the state-competitive sports. So far this year, Summit has won the state title for girls soccer, girls and boys cross country, girls volleyball, girls water polo, and football. That’s more state titles won in one season than Sandy has won in the past 10 years. Not only did the girls varsity soccer team take the state title this year, but have done so for the past three years, while the cross country team won their eighth straight state title. It seems that this school has no competition, so why do they continue to dominate the same teams when they could simply move up to a better league? This question is commonly asked upon many frustrated opponents, confused to why a large 5A school that athletically dominates any competition is still playing at a level that is not challenging enough for them. The school population at Sandy on average over the past four years is about 1,200 students; we are labeled as one of the bigger 5A schools. Summit, on average over the past four

Photo courtesy of Summit High School

The Summit High School football team celebrates their state championship win over Ashland this fall. This was one of six state championships Summit won during the fall season.

years has 1,350; that’s potentially 150 additional students. In the Bend area, there are five 5A schools, three of which have the population numbers to be qualified for 6A, but the other two, Redmond High School and Ridgeview High School, have numbers around 800 to 900 students. Because of the two smaller schools, Summit stays in 5A so they can compete against other teams near them. “They’re keeping Summit geographically convenient, even though 60 percent of the schools have 6A numbers,” Athletic Director Wade Locket said. If Summit did decide to

Issue 1,Volume 36

The Sandy High School

move up, the league with the most available space would be either the Three Rivers League or Greater Valley Conference, although, they are not conveniently located. The opponents in both leagues are a pretty far distance from Summit. Another reason this school may have success with athletics is their training environment. The elevation in Bend is 3,600 feet, about 2,600 feet higher than Sandy’s elevation. The higher altitude forces the students at Summit to adapt to less oxygen; this gives them an advantage with endurance. This benefit may be one of the reasons their cross country team

has won numerous times. Also, some of the coaches were once professional athletes. The offensive coordinator for the football team is Drew Bledsoe, a former football player in the NFL, and his sons are both first team all-state players. One plays quarterback and the other plays defensive back. “It sounds like they will most likely move us up to 6A sometime in the near future,” quarterback John Bledsoe said. There are many reasons why Summit wins so much, moving up to 6A would benefit their competition circumstances and would be a reasonable decision for their school.

Pioneer Press 37400 Bell Street

March 18, 2016 A&E 11 Pioneer Press Dog park offers convenience, companionship, enjoyment Hayley Pullen Staff Writer

Dallas Smith Over the years I have always looked forward to the weekends to snuggle up on the couch with a bag of chips on my right, and a can of Dr. Pepper on my left watching some NFL action. But over the past years I really stopped enjoying watching any NFL games, even my own team. The first reason why I can’t stand the NFL is all the penalty flags. It seems that after every play there is a whistle and some stupid penalty that no one cares about; it becomes super boring when all we see is referees talking on the screen. The second reason is I’m tired of seeing every single player celebrate with the “dab” after every play. It’s cool when Cam Newton does it but it is becoming very cliché. The NFL is becoming the “No Fun League.” Last year the NFL banned the goalpost dunk, along with spinning the ball, military salute, and pointing the ball. I like touchdown celebrations and I’m sure other fans do too. I wouldn’t be surprised if they banned the “dab” or Odell Beckham’s “whip.” I’m tired of the short leash that all NFL coaches are on. For example, last year Denver fired head coach John Fox after making the playoffs four straight years, along with a Super Bowl appearance. I hate the scrutiny that big media quarterbacks get. For example Johnny Manziel, Tim Tebow, and Sam Bradford. All Manziel does is tear up the field. It doesn’t always lead to wins but give him the experience and he could be great for the Browns. Tebow is definitely a better starting option than half of the quarterbacks in this league that are starting today, teams are just scared. It bothers me watching football with quarterbacks that are “game managers.” It’s not exciting to see Alex Smith do little dump off passes to Jamal Charles all the way down the field. Matt Hasselbeck had a lot of success this year with the Colts just being a game manager. It’s way more exciting seeing players like Matthew Stafford and Aaron Rodgers who are air raid quarterbacks and aren’t scared to throw it up into coverage. Or seeing Russell Wilson and Marcus Mariota run all over the field. This is just a couple reasons why I and other people are losing interest in the NFL.

Anya Walker The Pioneer Press

Local dogs covered in mud play at the Sandy Bluff Dog Park on a soggy day. The dog park offers owners and pets alike the opportunity to enjoy the outdoors together in a fun safe area, rain or shine.

Who doesn’t love taking their dog to the park? The Sandy Bluff Dog Park has been available for dogs and their owners to run around since June 2014. Many people in the Sandy and neighboring areas take advantage of the large field for their dogs to run around and play with other doggy friends. The enclosed 8.4-acre park, located at 36801 Goldenrain St., has provided an area central for most, making it a convenient stop. It has included gates equipped with a push rod, allowing them to be opened with one hand, all while holding the leash with the other. There is also a separate, smaller dog area to ensure the safety of the tiny dogs in the Sandy area. “There’s tons of space for dogs to run amok. There’s a handy twogate system you can bring your dog into, unhook them and them let them into the main area. This provides a controlled area for them,”

Kyla Moore

Feature Editor

If you’ve been looking for a new sub-shop with toasty sandwiches and a fun atmosphere, then Firehouse Subs is for you! Firehouse Subs is a sandwich shop that recently opened in Gresham Village on Burnside. It’s open 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. everyday. When you first walk in, you feel like you are really in a fire station, complete with helmets and coats hanging on hooks and signs pointing you to the “bunk rooms.” The atmosphere is fun and inviting. The entire place was clean, including the bathrooms. Firehouse subs offers 10 different toasted sandwiches that you can customize with toppings such as lettuce, onions, pickles, tomatoes, mayonnaise, and more. The different sandwiches offer meats such as ham, turkey,

Review

beef, and bacon. You can also get two cold subs: Momma’s Chicken Salad, and Tuna. They also offer options under 500 calories which include salads and sandwiches on a wheat roll. You can complete your meal with chili or order a combo, with which you can get chips or a cookie and a drink from their Coca-Cola freestyle fountain. And for the kids, they offer a meatball sub, turkey and ham, and grilled cheese, plus they come with a cute little plastic firefighter hat. I went with my friends and I was able to try four sandwiches: the Italian, the turkey bacon ranch, the smokehouse beef & cheddar brisket, and the hook and ladder sub. The turkey bacon ranch includes smoked turkey breast, bacon, cheddar cheese, peppercorn ranch, mayo, lettuce, tomato, and onion. The flavor was evenly distributed between the turkey, the bacon, the ranch, and the cheese it had enough cheddar to where you could taste the cheese, but it wasn’t overpowering. The hook and ladder sub was a good classic. It had ham, turkey,

Monterey jack, and mayonnaise. The ham was sweet and the toasted bread and warm meat made for an enjoyable original. The Italian had genoa salami, peperoni, honey ham, provolone cheese, Italian dressing, and seasonings. It was a little too peppery, but still a good sandwich. They were all in all very good sandwhiches. My favorite, however, was the smokehouse beef & cheddar brisket. It was delicious barbeque-y goodness that melted in your mouth! It consisted of smoked beef brisket, cheddar, mayonnaise, and Sweet Baby Ray’s BBQ sauce. It was the best sandwich by far and my favorite, I will definitely be ordering it again. The sandwiches were, however, overpriced. A medium combo (which includes drinks and chips) for a typical sandwich was $9.25 and $8.99 without the combo. The workers were very friendly, although a little slow. But the wait was certainly worth it for the delicious sub sandwiches and appealing environment to enjoy a excellent meal with friends.

Cat show celebrates new year full of great competitors Summer Frickey Spotlight Editor

In the heart of Portland on March 13, hiss-tory was made. People from far and wide came together in celebration of the 17th annual McKenzie River Cat Show. I must warn all feline-enthusiasts that such an event isn’t for the weak at heart. Fur-endships were lost, and tail-ent was put to the test. Upon my first step inside the Double Tree Hotel, I could practically smell the anticipation gleaming off the competitors. However, anticipation has a strangely similar scent to Fancy Feast, so there was quite possibly an over lap in my theories. Nancy Dodds, Donna Fuller, Ellyn Honey and Darrell Newkirk took to the judging tables this year, qualifying cats based on their breed standards, such as teeth alignment and fur condition. After a cat places in their breed, the top five move up to an “overall” category, where the competitors are no longer judged on their looks, but on the content of their cat-titude. Only minutes into the show was I reintroduced with many furr-miliar faces. Last year, I met Purrington James, a

purebred Bengal from New York. Purrington, like many other show cats, has his own personal trainer to keep his body in the best possible condition. He placed first in his breed, and 11th overall, moving up two spaces from his previous placing. Three-time reigning champ TruTrails MacGyver took center stage on Sunday; the pale complexion in his eyes has ceased to die out since our last encounter. MacGyver is well-known in the community for being one of the fiercest competitors in the nation. Unlike most title winners, he is a mixed breed. This means he can qualify in both Main Coon and Brown Tabby, whereas most can only compete in one. As expected, MacGyver took first in both qualifying breeds, and then first overall. This set a new purr-sonal record for this Colorado native. In second place came Princess Melborn, a newcomer to the McKenzie River Cat Show, who is quite paw-sibly going to be MacGyver’s greatest threat next season. As the night drew to an end, a few things were for sure; TruTails remains the undefeated champion, and Portland remains a national melting pot for animal Summer Frickey The Pioneer Press culture. Malfoy is being handeled by his owner waiting the judges and their final decsions. Show cats are judged on their pedigree and where they sit on the standard breeding scale. Cat-s all folks.

Find late night activities pg 8 and 9

Sandy, Oregon 97055

February 19, 2016 Pioneer Press 2 News Stay connected with Leadership’s social media takeover Renee Dennis

Spotlight Editor

Posters and flyers have been popping up all around campus advertising Leadership’s new Snapchat account. The school’s Leadership team runs multiple social media profiles, including an Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and even a YouTube page. They decided to start this new account so that students can now “attend” the away games, assemblies, dances and so on. “We really like how connected it keeps us with the students. We know that students are using Snapchat a lot more so we thought that would be the best way to reach the most amount of people,” senior Kylie Hoang said. As Director of Communications, Hoang is in charge of creating and maintaining Pio Pack’s social media accounts. The team is currently trying to gain an interest before they begin posting at all the events.

So far, they have uploaded photos and videos of the behind the scenes of preparation for Winter Formal. Still to come: ticket reminders, playlist ideas and student-directed questions. Twitter will most likely advertise last minute things like what time the pregame will be that night. Instagram will post about overlapping events such as when Doernbecher’s fundraising and pageant will be and what students should do to prepare. “Snapchat is all about the hype. Our Twitter and Instagram pages are more for formal information,” senior Dylan Kenny said. The Snapchat account will be more about the moment rather than when doors open and how much tickets cost. Over 100 students have already added The Pio Pack on their multiple forums, and they are hoping for more. For all things information and Anya Walker The Pioneer Press fun at SHS, follow @sandyleadership on Snap- The Leadership team launched a new interactive way to keep up to date on chat, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram today. school activities.

Powerball causes spending frenzy Staff Writer

Anya Walker The Pioneer Press

A representative from the Clackamas Fire District informs people on basic earthquake safety and how they can prepare. The meeting was held on Monday, Sept. 21 in the lecture hall.

Sandy prepares for earthquake expected on the West Coast Spotlight Editor

The New Yorker published an article erupting in a social media frenzy on July 20. “The Really Big One,” as they called it, informed readers about a long overdue earthquake developing under the Pacific. It is predicted to erupt anywhere from an 8.0-9.2 quake along the West Coast, and expected to last nearly four minutes. But if that alone wasn’t bone-chilling enough for you, then prepare yourself for the 700-mile long tsunami anticipated only a mere 10 minutes later. “Think of the land mass coming towards us as flexible ruler that’s being bent under North America. At some point, the ruler has to snap back in place, and when it does, the impact is what will cause the quake,” oceanic science teacher Andy Wex said. The question gnawing at us all, is it going to annihilate Sandy? Well according to a group of renowned scientists studying this beast; no. Though an expected 7 million people are to be effected, and nearly 13,000 are

protect the house from collapsing. Another good tip is to strap down your water heater. Seeing as it is a gas line, there is a good chance the pressure cause an explosion. Most importantly, have a safety kit including important documents, flashlights, batteries, basic first-aid supplies, canned food, bottled water, and warm clothing. If this earthquake does hit while school is in session, this would be the safest place to be. Sandy High was built to withstand some shaking. The stilts built around us, and shatterproof windows result in some of the best protection possible. Because of the stable structure, and over one million gallon fresh water tank Sandy High has, the city is more than likely going to be a refugee camp for any displaced people in the area. On Monday, Sept. 21 the Clackamas Fire District hosted an informative seminar to help build the city’s disaster resilience at Sandy High. It covered basic earthquake safety, along with how individuals can prepare themselves for this event.

Schedule changes made to SHS for standardized tests Emma Ritter A&E Editor

Students returned two weeks early to find the day schedule extended by five minutes, and early release schedules extended to every Wednesday of the year. District-wide, early release was added every Wednesday after the first week of school. The hour is taken off the day so teachers can have meetings about curriculum and how best to educate students. “The idea is that while students are

home doing homework the teachers are doing the same thing,” Principal Kim Ball said. “Any time teachers can get together and collaborate translates to better outcomes for kids.” Early releases also offer an opportunity for teachers from across the district to get together and talk. There is a certain amount of time students need to be in the classroom learning, and the extra early-release days were taking more time away than previous years, so five minutes were added to every day to meet requirements.

“There are regulations on how many minutes students have to be in their seats,” Ball said. “[Because of early release] students had less contact time actually in their seats in their classes.” Sandy High went back in session Aug. 24. Returning two weeks before Labor Day is another change Sandy students returned to. The school year starts earlier in the summer to increase time available for studying for standardized tests. “Rationally, you could say if I had nine more days to study there will be more

Staff Writer

Most people know the heart-warming story of Cinderella. A compassionate and respectful girl is left with her terrible stepmother and stepsisters, who turn her into a glorified maid. However, one night at the prince’s ball changes her fortunes forever. The popularity of this fairy tale has led to many movie adaptations, including a new Disney flick, “Cinderella,” starring Lily James as the namesake, and directed by Kenneth Branaugh. The movie stays true to its fairy tale roots with a plot very similar to the original Disney cartoon. Even though you know what will happen next, the movie still charms you, and keeps you interested, with its incredibly stunning visual effects, and its down to earth, classic love story feel. It starts with Cinderella as a child. She lives happily with her parents in their country house. One day her caring mother, who encourages Cinderella in her belief in magic, falls ill. On her deathbed, her one wish for her daughter is that she continues to be “kind and courageous,” in everything she does. The rest of the movie is based on these two traits that Cinderella

demonstrates throughout the film, including when she deals with her unjust step-family. Lily James portrays Cinderella with the unparalleled grace and gentleness one would expect from the Disney Princess. James is very likable throughout the movie, even if she tends to be a bit naïve at times. Visually, the movie looks unreal at times. Every scene is popping with colors, sometimes ones you couldn’t even imagine. The dress Cinderella’s fairy godmother grants to her is full of beautiful shades of blue, and the castle the prince resides in dances with hues and tones that cause genuine enjoyment for the eyes. Part of what makes the movie so enjoyable is the triumph that comes with Cinderella’s marriage to the prince, who is played by Richard Madden. When she finally overcomes her imperious stepmom it creates a gratifying feeling in one’s heart. Cate Blanchett, who plays the evil stepmom, does an extraordinary job of causing you to hate her. Her snide remarks are constant; you can sense the hatred she has for Cinderella in every word she utters. Sometimes, the movie can be predictable, and tries too hard to make you feel, but the overwhelming charm that exudes from it can cause any viewer to enjoy this picture.

New enjoyable sub sandwich shop opens in Gresham

Natasha Hunt

predicted to be injured in the phenomenon, the destruction course won’t put an end to our little town. But that doesn’t mean we won’t be affected; there’s a high probability the city could be without fresh water, or electrify for months on end, and cost millions of dollars to repair the damage. “People have to stop sugar coating this. It’s going to happen, and it’s going to be chaotic,” Wex said. Luckily for us, earthquakes often come in cycles, meaning scientists are able to pinpoint approximately when an earthquake is suppose to happen. But earthquakes have never been fond of arriving at a socially-acceptable time, meaning in 2015 we are 73 years past the expected due date of this monster. So how do we prepare for one of the biggest natural disasters in North American history? Drop, cover, and hold on. Because there is no way to prevent the earthquake or tsunami from occurring, the only thing we can do is ready ourselves. Some ways individuals could prepare themselves is by bolting their homes down to their foundations; this will

Timothy Grozav

Art students score at scholastic awards Drama wins awards Anya Walker Staff Writer

One of the biggest events that occurs every year for art and photography students is the Scholastic Art Awards. Students can enter as many pieces of their artwork as they like for a small fee. When students enter their work it is then judged and possibly given an award. They can receive a Gold or Silver Key, or Honorable Mention. This year eight students from Sandy High received Gold Keys for their work. The students who received a Gold Key were juniors Noah Burton, Dylan Kenny, Davyn Owen, and Katie Schlaht. Seniors Karlie Kitchens, Carter Knox, Mikayla Lindsey, and sophomore Jessica Freeman also received a Gold Key. Silver Key winners were seniors Margarette Engstrom, Sarah Grassl, and Mikayla Lindsey, and juniors Noah Burton, Veronica Graciano, Dylan Kenny, and Hayley Pullen. Sophomores Grace Crofts and Dana

Welty received a Silver Key as well. Students’ artwork was displayed at the Pacific North College of Art from Feb.5-20. “I mainly entered to see the other artwork,” Burton said. This year the awards ceremony took place on Feb. 18 at the Portland Art Museum. “It felt pretty good to get a Gold Key for my first time,” Freeman said. Each Gold Key winner’s work qualified for State and he or she will found out if they got an award March 16. Only one student from Sandy High qualified for a National Medal. Carter Knox received a National Gold Medal for his Drawing and Illustration. “Having an art competition gives students a goal to shoot for,” art teacher Dan Shanklin said. “It gives students a chance to be recognized for their talent.” The Scholastic Art Awards is a one of the largest art competition for youths. It gives them a chance to show off their talent, whether it’s art, photography, or fashion.

Anya Walker Staff Writer

Forty Sandy High drama students competed at the Oregon Thespian Northeast Regional Acting Competition on Saturday, Feb. 7. They competed against 18 schools. Six students from Sandy qualified for the State competition in April, and five Sandy students were regional finalists. Regional Finalist Awards: Duo Dramatic Experienced Acting: junior Dalton Turner and senior Trinnen Munkers; seniors Theresa Lehr and Victoria Parnell. Solo Novice Acting: senior Charlie Moyer. Sandy’s entry qualified for State in Small Group Musical Theatre. The group consisted of seniors JJ Dominguez and Shawn Young, sophomore Riley McCord, and junior Dillon Erwin. Senior Noah Poulin and Dominguez qualified for the State Competition in Duo Dramatic Experienced Acting. Lehr also qualified for State in Solo Experienced Acting.

TruTails MacGyver defends title as most ‘tail-ented’ cat

Summer Frickey Staff Writer

The McKenzie River Cat show has come to Portland. On March 14-15 the fierce competitors packed up their Gucci collars and headed for the Double Tree Hotel. These cats aren’t your typical claw-ful messes, some came from purebred bloodlines that have been specially trained since birth to compete in su-purr-ior shows. “Purrington has a personal trainer to help him stay in shape,” Sandra Louise of New York said about her pet. Louise isn’t the only one to fly out for this event, there were pets from all over the country clawing their way to the finals. TruTails MacGyver is currently the No. 1 cat in the nation and lives in Fort Collins, Colo. Seventh in the nation, Belinda Paws, is from Houston Texas. “TruTails has been in over 20 pageants since the beginning of the year, and he has won every single one. He was born to compete,” Trudie Dennis, the owner of TruTails MacGyver said.

Striker, a British short hair, who is currently fourth in the nation, has his own groomer in order to keep his luscious fur tamed. However, it’s widely known that looks aren’t enough to get these cats a purr-fect score. Like dog shows. The judges of a cat show compare cats to their breed standards. These standards specify how an ideal cat for their breed would look and act; therefore they need to act the part as well as look it. “One dreadful meow at the wrong time and your cat goes from the top of the scratching pole, to a has been and never will be again,” an owner said. These frisky felines were judged by highly trained veterinarians, all of which seemed to have gotten their PhD in C.A.T. On the first day, Pam Moser, Kenny Currie, Darrel Newkirk, and Brian Moser took to the judging tables to determine which competitors had the right cat-titude for the finals and in the end, as expected, TruTails MacGyver, a reigning champ for three years now, defended his title as the most tail-ented cat in Oregon.

Summer Frickey The Pioneer Press

Striker, a british short hair, is known for striking paws-itively daring poses. He and his sister have been in over 25 cat shows this season alone.

September 25, 2015

Are you ready for the Big One?

Summer Frickey

senior Davyn Owen said. “This is a fantastic place to bring your dog to gain social skills.” With spring being just around the corner, this park provides an excellent area for individuals, families, and friends to hang out and enjoy the sunshine with their furry, lovable best friend. “My friend and I took his dog to this park a while ago. She seemed to really enjoy the massive field to run about,” senior Taylor Fegel said. At the Sandy Bluff Park, there are paths, a play structure, pond, and picnic tables for everyone to utilize. The park is open from 6 a.m. until 10 p.m. everyday. If you aren’t in the Sandy area, there are many different places to take your furry companion, including Thousand Acres, located off the Crown Point Hwy. in Troutdale. While this provides a massive amount of space, it quickly becomes muddy due to the frequent rainy weather. However, nothing quite compares to the much smaller, more convenient park that is Sandy Bluff Dog Park.

Pioneer Press 5 A&E ‘Cinderella’ stays true to fairytale roots, charms viewers March 19, 2015

time to absorb content,” Assistant Principal Matt Newell said. “The problem with standardized testing is that the window of opportunity seemed to come earlier in the year,” Newell said. “The idea was to shift the school year a little bit so that when the national tests come out, then you guys have at least two weeks more schooling.” We are not alone in early starts. “There are quite a few other schools doing it,” Newell said. Portland School District, for example, started Aug. 27.

Most people have probably heard about the insanely large Powerball jackpot at stake earlier this year. Powerball is a lottery game played in 44 states, Washington D.C., the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. Numbers are drawn every Wednesday and Saturday at 7:59 p.m. Pacific Standard Time. Five white balls are drawn from a set of 69 numbered balls, and one red ball from a set of 26. Powerball starts at $40 million and rises until someone wins. The lottery jackpot reached a total of $1.6 billion before three winners claimed and split the prize on Jan. 13. The winners were from California, Florida, and Tennessee. Each won about $328 million after taxes. This particular Powerball broke records. It was the biggest jackpot in Powerball history. Before this, Powerball had never reached $1 billion. The jackpot grew so high because the last winning tickets were claimed in early November, allowing the prize to keep growing. If no winning tickets were claimed that night, it would’ve likely reached $2 billion. The mere thought of winning $1.6 billion left many Americans daydreaming about what they could Anya Walker The Pioneer Press The Powerball lottery recently went to $1.6 billion. Three winning do if they happened to win. People would buy one, tickets were sold, netting each winner about $328 million. two, or occasionally dozens of tickets from a lottery

machine, hoping their ticket would be the lucky winner. “If I were to have won the Powerball, I would probably have bought a farm somewhere here in Oregon, where I would raise micro pigs,” science teacher Dan Wright said. “I would then use the left over money to genetically engineer a micro hippopotamus that I could raise and sell, too!” Some people, it seems, have silly ideas for using the lottery money, probably meaning they don’t ever expect to win. Others have more realistic ideas, sometimes involving charities or organizations. “If I won, I would go on a long trip, put aside enough for my son’s college and a comfortable retirement, then give the rest to some charity to help Syrian refugees,” Spanish teacher Karen Van Wye said. Even the slim-to-none chance of winning the Powerball couldn’t turn away the many Americans from participating in the drawing. The chances of winning the jackpot were 1 in 292 million. You are about 1.5 million times more likely to die in a car wreck while driving to a gas station to buy a lottery ticket. Still, that didn’t stop people from hoping that their ticket would be the one to send them into financial paradise. The next Powerball drawing will be this Saturday at the scheduled drawing time. The jackpot has already reached over $180 million. Other forms of lottery in Oregon include Megabucks, Keno, and Mega Millions.

Future Voters: Elections are right around the corner Summer Frickey Spotlight Editor

With the 2016 presidential election coming up in November, this year’s seniors will be the youngest voters in the country. As first year voters, it can be intimidating or confusing to try to wrap your head around what a presidential campaign might be and maybe that’s because not only are these candidates politicians, but highly trained actors. The people running know just what to say to win a couple of votes. But these men and women will be dictating the future of our country, so in whom do we instill our trust? On Feb. 1, republican Ted Cruz placed first in the Iowa Caucus with 27.6 percent of the vote. Cruz is the current junior senator of Texas and takes a conservative stance on most of his political views. In an attempt to put an end to undocumented immigrants, Cruz has proposed a multimillion-dollar plan to build a wall separating the United States from Mexico along with the deportation of over 150,000 resident aliens. In response to the recent social debates, Cruz has voiced his complete support for the second amendment right and refuses to engage in any gun control regulations. Regarding abortion, he is “pro-life,” and in relation to current U.S. threats, he has plans to quickly and decisively bomb ISIS.

Close behind Cruz is probably the most well-known candidate, Donald Trump, who took 24.3 percent of the Iowa Caucus votes. Trump is the most inexperienced candidate, with no past involvement in government. It’s not hard to find where Trump stands on the spectrum of most issues, seeing as he is far more blunt about his opinions than his opponents seem to be, however he and Cruz share many similar ideologies. However, Trump rebounded from his defeat and won the New Hampshire primary on Feb. 9. In the Democratic Party, Hillary Clinton took first at the Iowa Caucus with 49.9 percent of the vote.Clinton has been in the political limelight since 1993 when she became the first lady to Bill Clinton. Since then she has served as the 67th Secretary of State and a senator from New York. Though raised as a die-hard Republican, her views were quickly swayed in her college years at Yale. Clinton holds quite contradicting views to those of her Republican opponents. “I will stand up against any effort to deport dreamers,” Clinton said on the issue of immigration. Clinton is a strong supporter of strict gun control, and marriage/racial/gender equality. She is an avid supporter Planned Parenthood, yet also takes the “pro-life” stance. The first issue she plans to take on is the wage gap. Clinton’s adversary Bernie Sanders took 49.6 percent of the Iowa Caucus vote, drawing a mere 0.2 percent

behind. He also rebounded in New Hampshire, winning 60 percent to 38 percent over Clinton. Though Sanders is the oldest candidate running, most of his supporters are young adults, as much as 85 percent of his New Hampshire primary votes came from recent high school graduates. Sanders took his campaign mobile, spending nearly all of his time interacting with followers on social media; an unusually modern approach in order to gain attention from millenials. “As president, I will fight for comprehensive immigration reforms that allow citizenship for the 11 million aspiring Americans living in this country,” Sanders said about immigration. Though Sanders isn’t nearly as strict on gun control regulations as Clinton, he does support background checks in order keep criminals from gaining access to assault weapons. Sanders’ hasn’t spent too much time discussing ISIS or any other terrorist organizations but has promised to keep any war strategies in line with our constitution. Sanders first order of business would be a major tax shift directed towards the wealthy. According to Sanders, “You can’t have it all while kids in this country go hungry.” All in all, there’s no doubt that the opinions of young adults will greatly influence who moves into D.C. next year, especially when 18-25 year olds make up over 21 percent of the nations voters.

Pioneer Press Sports Boys start season ranked first in State, also undefeated 10

December 15, 2016

Nathan Benson Staff Writer

Photo courtsey The Mee Ma

Senior Jadon Floyd makes his way defending down court, during last season. The boys are undefeated so far this year.

As the winter sports season starts up, the boys basketball team has high hopes for this upcoming season and they want to start the year off strong with their first opponents. Their next game will be Saturday at home against Barlow High School at 5:30 p.m. The team will play their first league game at home on Jan. 6 against La Salle. They will be playing six preseason games before that point as well. The boys are off to a great start to this season with an undefeated record of 3-0, and are currently No. 1 in the OSAA 5A rankings. Last year, the team had an overall record of 9-15 and struggled during the season. The team wants to perform better this year, especially down the stretch of the season. This year, seven seniors who are eager to prove their talents, will be leading the team. They were able to

win their first game of the season against Hood River by a large margin of 22 points. “The team is off to a very hot start. We are No. 1 in the state, and we hope to keep it that way. We need to keep up the pace and get intense on defense. Our goal is to get to State and we aren’t going to stop until we get there,” senior Ammon Brown said. They were able to win their last game in Astoria by a score of 67-54. They have won every game by double digits and have a lot of momentum going into the team’s regular season. “I think this season is going really well, as long as we keep playing as a team and for each other, it should be a great season,” junior Brandon Remsburg said. They are hoping to continue their strong start to the season and stay on top of teams early. By doing so they want to keep a high ranking in State and be a big contender in the post season.

Girls basketball fight for better season Swim teams Hope Eisert

Staff Writer

Last year’s girl’s basketball team had some challenges as they were having a rebuilding season. They battled their way through the season, ending 8-15. Jeff Stanek, the head coach of the program is determined to turn this season around from last year and come out strong. They are kicking off their winter season 3-0 taking wins against Hood River, The Dalles, and David Douglas. “I really like this team. The chemistry is good, the fundamentals have increased over the last year and the

girls seem to understand what we are trying to do. It’s fun,” Stanek said. “Things are going okay on the defensive end of the court but our offense is a bit behind. That’s to be expected early in the season.” The girls are trying to make this season the best they can while working hard to reach goals, pushing themselves to the limit. “This season is going to be one to remember. Our key to success will be to stay focused on defense and execute our offensive plays,” senior Mattie Burns said. The girls know they are going to have some struggles, but they are sure of their potential on the court.

“We are gonna come out timid. With four seniors, one junior, and six sophomores we are definitely a young team,” sophomore Tana Dwyre said. “It’s going to take some time for us younger ones to get used to the varsity feeling.” One of the best parts about being on a team is the bond that is created throughout all of these girls, and the team work they all have to put in. The Pioneers will be taking on some tough competition this season with Milwaukee on senior night, and one of the biggest rivalries, La Salle. This team is determined not to fall short of success this season.

popping it back in place and kept playing,” Bumanlag said. However, after a quick trip to the doctor after the game, he found out he had snapped the bone. “It wasn’t that big of a deal, and I could still do everything I needed to. The only problem being, the day I got the cast off, I broke another finger that night,” Bumanlag said. On Oct. 15, history repeated itself while in the midst of blocking one of Putnam’s starting defensive tackles. “The tears didn’t come until after I broke the second finger, because I knew the moment it happened I was done for the season. I had to

sit out for four of the 10 games, but I never stopped training. You see your brothers getting better, getting stronger, giving it their all, and you can’t help to try and match their skills,” Bumanlag said. But he is far from a stranger when it comes to sports injuries. “Freshmen year I tore my ACL, sophomore year I had a couple minor knee injuries, and now in senior year I’ve only got eight fingers left. But injuries don’t really change anything, I still have so much love for the game and if I get the opportunity to, I hope to pursue it throughout college and the rest of my life,” Bumanlag said.

Bumanlag fights against injury Summer Frickey Managing Editor

“I had the opportunity to watch my brothers and closest friends excel past every expectation this year, but that’s all I got to do, watch,” senior Kristian Bumanlag said. After dedicating the past seven years of his life to football, two broken fingers caused an abrupt halt in Bumanlag’s final high school season. In the first game of the season, Bumanlag broke his right ring finger while attempting to tackle an opposing player on the Silverton team. “I honestly didn’t think much of it, I figured I dislocated it, I just tried

hope to make improvements Stacia Howes Photo Editor

The swimming team is in the beginning of what is shaping up to be a good season. They are rebuilding this year, and are looking forward to the season ready to take home as many wins as possible. Their first meet was scheduled for Thursday Dec. 8, but was rescheduled due to weather cancellations.Their first meet of the season will be today at the aquatic center in Sandy. One of the challenges that the team faces is low numbers. In order to accumulate points, teams need as many people to swim in as many races as possible. That means that large teams already have advantages over smaller teams because they have more swimmers to gain more points. So, in order to win meets, swimmers have to win as many events as they can to get more points. The boys team has grown from last season, which will help them compete. Last year the team’s record was 2-4-0. They are hoping for an even better season this year. “This season so far looks to be another rebuilding year, in terms of numbers,” Jamie Paul swimming head coach said. Over the past few years the team has had more and more swimmers, but they are still hoping for success this season, in spite of numbers. “I’m excited to see how my athletes will perform on an individual level because I think that they are going to be extremely successful this season,” Paul said. Even if the SHS teams don’t have enough swimmers to win many meets, they can still qualify many individual swimmers for the state meet. Practices leading up to meets are always the most important, and the teams feel prepared for this season.

Wrestlers work hard to keep championship title at home

Hope Eisert Staff Writer

Competition is gratifying in sports, especially when you’re slamming your opponents down on the mat. Last season the wrestling team felt much victory after ending their 2015-2016 wrestling season 6-1 and taking the title of conference champs for the seventh year in a row. The boys just took their first match at the Ranger Classic tournament starting their season off 1-0. “We as a team have the potential to win our eighth consecutive league title. The key is just trusting in ourselves, and staying healthy.” coach Bryce Reisnaur said. This season should not be a disappointment by looking at the hard work these boys have been putting in early in the morning before school, and late nights at the gym trying to burn off those few extra pounds to make weight for their upcoming matches. SHS has returning district champs junior Brody Diaz De Leon, and possibly sophomore Jack Rademacher. Rademacher took a tough hit during his football season

and may not be returning this season to wrestle. “I think we have a lot of great wrestlers in the room. We lost a lot of talented seniors last year but we have guys who have been working hard in the off season to fill their spots,” junior Levi Rotzien said. “We’ve set our goal to be conference champs for the eighth year straight, and we are going to be working hard to achieve that because we have the key to success, being great teammates and pushing each other every day.” There’s no better feeling than throwing down your opponent to the ground and hearing the sound of victory while the whistle is blown and everyone is on the sidelines cheering. “You know that one scene in Rocky 4 where he knocks Ivan Drago out in Drago’s home country of Russia? Yeah that’s what it feels like to win,” Diaz De Leon said. This upcoming season won’t be one to miss as the Sandy Pioneers aim at the title. Hillsboro will be their toughest competition this season, but nothing will stop the boys from thier title.

Katie Hokanson The Mee Ma

Junior Hunter Rickman takes down his opponent at the Ranger Classic. The team took first in the tournament.


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