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SUMIT SAHDEV Academic

Portfolio


CONTENTS

POSITIVELY HOPEFUL Google Earth Lake Chad, Africa Neumeyer, Antarctica Calcutta, India

KANAZAWA MUSEUM FOR CONTEMPORARY ART Kanazawa, Japan


BASTIDE CONSTRUCT

EUROPEAN OBSERVATIONS

Installation

Mainland + Sicily, Italy Barcelona, Spain Paris + Poissy, France Vals, Switzerland London, England

BLOCK OF NOSTALGIA Berlin, Germany

A ROMAN PIAZZA

MOBEUS TRIP USA

Rome, Italy

GARMENT DISTRICT LIBRARY New York, New York

CITY IN A BOX Phoenix, Arizona

CONSTRUCTIVIST MUSEUM Moscow, Russia

PALAZZO DEL TRE Venice, Italy

ARTWORK


POSITIVELY HOPEFUL* site: Google Earth Lake Chad, Africa Neumeyer, Antarctica Calcutta, India

site: New York, New York

marks the locations around the world where the impacts of the

inevitably reaching a tipping point, where this new global public will

communications, such as the freedom of expression, equal access, and

climate change are most palpable; at the same time, the cross is also

actively engage solutions. This, in effect, will decrease the

a public domain of knowledge. Global warming is the most pressing

the form of a self-sustaining hotel deployed to each of those

devastation around the globe and inevitably reverse the problem -

issue that is impacting all citizens of the world, transcending national

locations, making these sites accessible to the public. Each of the

which will inevitably erase the very need for the thesis. In this

boundaries. Scientists predict irreversible changes to our shared

hotels harvest the resources available at each location - ranging from

feedback loop, the more hotels that are initially deployed, the faster

environment – destabilized local climates, rising sea levels, coastal

water, food, electricity, etc - while attempting to maintain a minimal

the project will undo itself.

flooding, desertification, spreading infectious diseases, loss of

impact on the environment. Each hotel is also functioning as a fully

agriculture. The climate change requires a global response from

operating weather station, continuing the existing international

citizens who are able to communicate and exchange ideas and

network of weather stations that are collecting data on the climate

information; it requires a response from all disciplines, all locations

change. As more locations are devastated by global warming, the

and all cultures. Global communications can strategically channel all

network of hotels will continue to grow, as will the capacity to

efforts into a single hub, forging a collaborative environment defined

monitor the globe. All the locations can be accessed virtually and

by collective intelligence. Mitigating the climate change necessarily

physically, increasing the ability to witness the devastation. The 12

depends on the awareness and involvement of a global public.

million copies of Google Earth or the option to visit any of the 55

Democracy is embodied in the freedoms provided by global

extreme climates firsthand become the vehicles for disseminating Technologies like Google Earth are examples of global

information on the climate change. Virtually, the network of hotels

communication devices that observe and disseminate information to

can track trends and patterns of the different global impacts while

the public. Monitoring the entire surface of the earth, Google Earth is

also providing a warning system if any one particular location is in

a tool for surveillance, wherein every individual has access to global

climactic danger. The interface thus reinforces the tethered

information. Instead of being exploited for negative purposes,

local-global scalar relationship of the project. The thesis also proposes

surveillance informs the public. It is constructive.

to retrofit Google Earth with a forum, providing a space for a global public to discuss ways to battle the growing global problem.

The thesis challenges the conventions of representation. Google Earth becomes the new site plan and its icon becomes architecture. The Google Earth icon of the red cross (the first aid sign)

As more and more people become virtual and/or extreme tourists, the degree of awareness about the global issue will increase,

*Princeton University School of Architecture Thesis


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+ TOURISM-

: Existing location of weather station being used to monitor global warming

: New weather stations that will mark and make accessible the locations where global warming is most palpable

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H O P E F U L -

N70 Degrees Latitude

N60 Degrees Latitude

N50 Degrees Latitude

N40 Degrees Latitude

N30 Degrees Latitude

N20 Degrees Latitude

N10 Degrees Latitude

0 Degrees Latitude

S10 Degrees Latitude Solar Panel Tilt Angle = Latitude of Location S20 Degrees Latitude

S30 Degrees Latitude

S40 Degrees Latitude

S50 Degrees Latitude

S60 Degrees Latitude

S70 Degrees Latitude

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N/S 10 Degrees Latitude

N/S 40 Degrees Latitude

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N/S 15 Degrees Latitude

N/S 50 Degrees Latitude

N/S 20 Degrees Latitude

N/S 60 Degrees Latitude

N/S 30 Degrees Latitude

N/S 70 Degrees Latitude

N/S 80 Degrees Latitude

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H O P E F U L -

Weather Station

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Roof Panels

Photovoltaic Panels*

Site Infill Panels*

Insulation Infill Panels*

Solar Hot Water Panels*

Window Panels*

Louvered Panels*

Water Collection Panels*

*Dimensions vary according to Google Earth resolution


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H O P E F U L -

Structure

Insulation

Sand

Snow

Water

Dirt

Gravel

10 Degree Angle (Minimum)

80 Degree Angle (Maximum)

Light access thru Door inside Window inside insulation layer* insulation layer* insulation layer* 010


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H O P E F U L -

Hotel + Life Support

Access Ramp

Compression determined by sectional variation in height

Compressed Spring

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Expanded Spring


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H O P E F U L -

Footings

Flooded Locations

Rising Pistons

Snow Covered Locations

Snow Shoe Model

Site

Sand Covered Locations

Water

Dirt

Sand

Snow

Gravel

Camel Paw Model

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Axonometric View (Google Earth View)

BE A VIRTUAL TOURIST: Tour the global impacts of the climate change virtually - Search out the locations where our world is suffering the most + learn what is being done about it

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Worms Eye View (Tourist View)

BE AN EXTREME TOURIST: Come + visit some of the most endangered locations around the globe - Witness the impact of the climate change first hand - as our world is changing, stay + learn what you can do to help turn things around 014


Lake Chad, Africa

Neumeyer, Antarctica

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Calcutta, India


Google Earth Resolution: 1 meter per pixel

Google Earth Resolution: 2 meters per pixel

Google Earth Resolution: 15 meters per pixel


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H O P E F U L -

(Search)

(Tilt)

(Upload)

(Click)

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Lake Chad, Africa with a Google Earth Resolution of 1 meter per pixel Roof Plan


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H O P E F U L -

(Search)

(Tilt)

(Upload)

(Click)

Neumeyer, Antarctica with a Google Earth Resolution of 2 meters per pixel Roof Plan

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H O P E F U L -

(Search)

(Tilt)

(Upload)

(Click)

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Calcutta, India with a Google Earth Resolution of 15 meters per pixel Roof Plan


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H O P E F U L -

(Tilt)

Lake Chad, Africa with a Google Earth Resolution of 1 meter per pixel Exterior Perspective

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(Tilt)

Neumeyer, Antarctica with a Google Earth Resolution of 2 meters per pixel Exterior Perspective 021


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(Tilt)

Calcutta, India with a Google Earth Resolution of 15 meters per pixel Exterior Perspective 022


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(Tilt)

Lake Chad, Africa with a Google Earth Resolution of 1 meter per pixel Elevation

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H O P E F U L -

(Tilt)

Neumeyer, Antarctica with a Google Earth Resolution of 2 meters per pixel Elevation

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(Tilt)

Calcutta, India with a Google Earth Resolution of 15 meters per pixel Elevation


+13.0 meters

+1.0 meters +0.0 meters

+13.26 degrees latitude +14.67 degrees longitude Lake Chad, Africa with a Google Earth Resolution of 1 meter per pixel Interior Perspective 026


+50.0 meters

+1.0 meters +0.0 meters -70.57 degrees latitude -8.25 degrees longitude Neumeyer, Antarctica with a Google Earth Resolution of 15 meters per pixel Interior Perspective

027


+30.0 meters

+6.0 meters

+1.0 meters +0.0 meters

+30.95 degrees latitude +88.56 degrees longitude Calcutta, India with a Google Earth Resolution of 2 meters per pixel Interior Perspective

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Lake Chad, Africa with a Google Earth Resolution of 1 meter per pixel Section 029

H O P E F U L -


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Neumeyer, Antarctica with a Google Earth Resolution of 2 meters per pixel Section 030


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Calcutta, India with a Google Earth Resolution of 15 meters per pixel Section 031

H O P E F U L -


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H O P E F U L -

Lake Chad, Africa with a Google Earth Resolution of 1 meter per pixel Site Plan + 1.0 meters 032


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Neumeyer, Antarctica with a Google Earth Resolution of 2 meters per pixel Site Plan + 1.0 meters 033

H O P E F U L -


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Calcutta, India with a Google Earth Resolution of 15 meters per pixel Site Plan + 1.0 meters 034


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Lake Chad, Africa with a Google Earth Resolution of 1 meter per pixel Reflected Ceiling Plan 035

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Neumeyer, Antarctica with a Google Earth Resolution of 2 meters per pixel Reflected Ceiling Plan 036


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Calcutta, India with a Google Earth Resolution of 15 meters per pixel Reflected Ceiling Plan 037

H O P E F U L -


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#53

LAKE CHAD, CHAD AFRICA DESERTIFICATION WEATHER STATION REPORT: + .100 degrees C/ + 32.1 degrees F increase from expected Ground Temperature: + 35 degrees C/ + 95.32 degrees F Precipitation: - .10 meters from previous annual averages

BOOK YOUR TRIP HERE:

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Global Average Global Trends Coastal Flood d Collapsing Ice Shelves Coral Reef Bleaching Deforestation Desertification Glacial Retreat Thawing Permafrost Warning System Forum Reservations

Google Earth Booking reservations at each hotel through the Google Earth interface

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ResearchSample.jpg

Img_065 Img_065

DCN_0002 Vacation.jpg DCN_0202

Global Warming.jpg Lake Chad.jpg

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Global Average Temperature Global Trends Coastal Flooding Collapsing Ice Shelves Coral Reef Bleaching Deforestation Desertification Glacial Retreat Thawing Permafrost Warning System Forum Reservations

Google Earth Using the existing features

H O P E F U L -


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Img_065: Underneath the Lake Chad Cross

ResearchSample.jpg

Img_065 Img_065

DCN_0002 Vacation.jpg DCN_0202

Global Warming.jpg Lake Chad.jpg

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Global Average Temperature Global Trends Coastal Flooding Collapsing Ice Shelves Coral Reef Bleaching Deforestation Desertification Glacial Retreat Thawing Permafrost Warning System Forum Reservations

Google Earth Using the existing features to share images of the site and the adjacent devastation

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Global Average Temperature Global Trends Coastal Flooding Collapsing Ice Shelves Coral Reef Bleaching Deforestation Desertification Glacial Retreat Thawing Permafrost Warning System Forum Reservations

Global Average Temperature Global Trends Coastal Flooding Collapsing Ice Shelves Coral Reef Bleaching Deforestation Desertification Glacial Retreat Thawing Permafrost Warning System Forum Reservations

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Global Average Temperature Global Trends Coastal Flooding Collapsing Ice Shelves Coral Reef Bleaching Deforestation Desertification Glacial Retreat Thawing Permafrost Warning System Forum Reservations

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Global Average Temperature Global Trends Coastal Flooding Collapsing Ice Shelves Coral Reef Bleaching Deforestation Desertification Glacial Retreat Thawing Permafrost Warning System Forum Reservations

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Global Average Temperature Global Trends Coastal Flooding Collapsing Ice Shelves Coral Reef Bleaching Deforestation Desertification Glacial Retreat Thawing Permafrost Warning System Forum Reservations

Global Average Temperature Global Trends Coastal Flooding Collapsing Ice Shelves Coral Reef Bleaching Deforestation Desertification Glacial Retreat Thawing Permafrost Warning System Forum Reservations

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Google Earth Map trends and patterns using the entire network: 1. Desertification 2. Collapsing Ice Shelves 3. Glacial Retreat 4. Glacial Retreat 5. Deforestation 6. Coral Reef Bleaching 7. Coastal Flooding 8. Thawing Permafrost

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Global Average Temperature Global Trends Coastal Flooding Collapsing Ice Shelves Coral Reef Bleaching Deforestation Desertification Glacial Retreat Thawing Permafrost Warning System Forum Reservations

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Global Average Temperature Global Trends Coastal Flooding Collapsing Ice Shelves Coral Reef Bleaching Deforestation Desertification Glacial Retreat Thawing Permafrost Warning System Forum Reservations

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ECO-TOURIST

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AL GORE

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CLIMATE CHANGE FORUM

What is likely to be the long-term outcome of this continuous decrease in the precipitation levels in the Lake Chad area? AL GORE

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We feel that this will lead to a huge setback in the amount of clean water present in the area. People will continue to suffer the impact of the climate change and this will more than likely lead to the area becoming unsuitable for future RESEARCHER habitation. This would force thousands of people to re-locate and chances are that if it continues at this rate that this will be happening within the next five to ten years -- very much within the current generation. Global Average Temperature Global Trends Coastal Flooding Collapsing Ice Shelves Coral Reef Bleaching Deforestation Desertification Glacial Retreat Thawing Permafrost Warning System Forum Reservations

Google Earth Warning System that would alarm the global public about sites that are endangered and extremely threatened by the climate change

I cannot believe that the climate change has such drastic impacts and so quickly. would take much longer to get here...

I thought it would be something that

SKEPTIC

Google Earth Forum that allows people to communicate across national borders in order to promote solutions and strategies in battling the climate change

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Global Average Temperature Global Trends Coastal Flooding Collapsing Ice Shelves Coral Reef Bleaching Deforestation Desertification Glacial Retreat Thawing Permafrost Warning System Forum Reservations

Google Earth The hotels continue the existing global network of weather stations, and can participate in imaging a Global Temperatures Model that would show the real time rising temperatures around the world

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Feedback Loop As more and more people become virtual and/or extreme tourists, the degree of awareness about the global issue will increase, inevitably reaching a tipping point, where this new global public will actively engage solutions. This, in effect, will decrease the devastation around the globe and inevitably reverse the problem - which will inevitably erase the very need for the thesis. In this feedback loop, the more hotels that are initially deployed, the faster the project will undo itself.

045 045


- P -OB SE I TA I V+E LT YO UH RO I PS ET F- U L -

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Feedback Loop Aerial view of the Lake Chad site after the problem has been reversed and the hotel removed

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KANAZAWA MUSEUM FOR site: Rome, Italy CONTEMPORARY ART*** site: Kanazawa, Japan

The project challenges the notion of museum exhibition spaces by implementing the concept of “context” in order to give more definition to the spaces for viewing art. A close look at the programmatic requirements allowed the exhibition spaces to be codified into three zones - artists community, gardens, and spaces for assembly. The exhibition spaces were designed as larger volumes that facilitated programmatic relationships by fitting the secondary programs within the spaces for art. While the museum’s collection may vary, the programmatic juxtapositions allow for the museum to serve as a site for production, display and assembly around the collection.

The institution’s capacity to accommodate the local public’s desire to access the collection fueled the understanding of the project as a community center. The project responded by loosely scattering the exhibition volumes to generate open space within the museum, increasing the “free zone” where people can enter without having to buy a ticket. Using the corners of the volumes to control circulation, a tight, exterior boundary contains an open network of circulation inside. During the day, the museum functions like a park; at night, the exterior boundary supports the public by maintaining access to the programs that are not directly related to the museum.

*Published in SANAA AT PRINCETON, a Princeton University student work publication (2009) **Project received a High Pass, recognizing the dedication, curiosity and risk invested in the work


- K A N A Z AW A

Aerial view looking east

001

M U S E U M -


- K A N A Z AW A

M U S E U M -

Shadow Site Plan

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- K A N A Z AW A

Aerial view looking at southwest corner

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M U S E U M -


- K A N A Z AW A

M U S E U M -

Plan +3 meters 004


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Aerial view of unroofed model

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M U S E U M -


- K A N A Z AW A

1. Artist studio space as context for exhibition 2. Artist workshop 3. Conversations between artists 4. Artist studio space as circulation through exhibition space 5. Exhibition from within artist studio space 6. Reception 7. Continuity across exhibition spaces 8. Opportunity to watch artists working 9. Conversations with artists 10. Lingering within the museum

M U S E U M -

11. Outdoor exhibitions 12. Outdoor spaces as private spaces to think about the exhibitions 13. Outdoor spaces as private spaces to think about the exhibitions 14. Conversations between members of the public 15. Lingering within the museum 16. Quiet outdoor spaces 17. Outdoor exhibition/Sculpture garden 18. Site specific exhibitions 19. Reception

19. Reception 20. Event space 21. Lecture hall 22. Citizen Run Gallery 23. Theater

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Aerial view overlooking center of the museum park

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M U S E U M -


12:00 am

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11:00 pm 10:00 pm

9:00 pm

8:00 pm

7:00 pm

6:00 pm

5:00 pm

4:00 pm

3:00 pm

2:00 pm

1:00 pm

12:00 pm

11:00 am

10:00 am

9:00 am

8:00 am

7:00 am 6:00 am 5:00 am 4:00 am 3:00 am 2:00 am 1:00 am

Circulation and accessibility after museum hours Circulation and accessibility during museum hours

M U S E U M - K A N A Z AW A

Reception

Reception

Reception


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Aerial view of roofed model

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Inventory of north-south sections through the exhibition spaces

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Aerial view looking at southeast corner

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Process sketches studying the programmatic and spatial consequences of rotating the exhibition volumes in different directions

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Aerial view of the sculpture garden

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Aerial view of the garden zone

M U S E U M -

Aerial view of the parkspace between exhibition volumes

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BASTIDE CONSTRUCT

The Bastide towns were founded during the Hundred Years War between England and France, mainly in South-Western France. They were new towns that were mainly set up on frontier and disputed lands to establish a border and a defensive presence. Bastides, totalling over 300 in all, could be understood as a kit of parts. The single condition that was responsible for the variety from this set of rules was the landscape. The site had a tremendous impact on the way in which the infrastructural grid would get distorted and resulted in the location of the different elements within the framework.

The project was to take the ideas of the Bastides and use them to build a construct. The ideas would have to mutate in order to sustain a new logic. The construct was designed to mimic the urban situation of these towns. The suspended post is both the literal structure that will support the construct as well as the infrastructural element that accommodates change. A secondary structural element can be placed within the post to stabilize the development of the construct. In order to allow for continuous variation within this framework, the puzzle pieces can be agglomerated to form an infinite number of clusters.


- B A ST I D E

Infrastructure that supports variation and a heap of puzzle pieces that can join in different ways

001

C O N ST R U CT -

Secondary member that has three settings

Agglomeration that grows from the top location


- B A ST I D E

Agglomeration that grows from the middle location

C O N ST R U CT -

Agglomeration that grows from the bottom location

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BLOCK of NOSTALGIA site: Berlin, Germany

Sited on a one kilometer stretch of the Death Zone of the Berlin Wall, this housing project transforms the urban wound into a fanatical internalized world that criticizes Berlin’s current urban redevelopment strategy.

Instead of allowing urban experimentation, the city insists on regulating the new construction by enforcing guidelines that recreate the space of the early nineteenth century city. These conditions sterilize the development of the urban fabric in a city that always accepted originality. Instead, the “Critical Reconstruction” enforces a certain kind of architecture.

Using Berlin’s traditional building typology - the perimeter block - the project creates a series of internalized worlds that mirror Berlin’s different urban physiognomies, playing on the spirit of the Critical Reconstruction. The Block of Nostalgia is one of the five perimeter blocks occupying the site and attempts to reinstate the space of the city from before the destruction of WWII, a time when Berlin was the cultural center of the world. Movies, literature, art and architecture were thriving in the city. Programs like film studios, libraries, churches, painting studios, movie theaters, amphitheaters, gardens, lap pools, are all contained in the block in order to recreate the delirium of the cultural Berlin. Each program is designed as an anthropomorphic structure, giving the courtyard a sense of hysteria and fiction.


- B L O C K

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N O ST A L G I A -

"Throughout the past century, it has been a commonplace to identify Berlin with continuous change, destruction, renewal, and experimentation."

"Critical Reconstruction reaches back beyond world wars, dictatorships, and modern urban experiments and finds a Berlin identity in the decades before 1914."

"The newly rebuilt blocks are supposed to be divided into individual buildings with identifiable entrances, rules intended to prevent long and forbidding facades that generate no activity on the street."

Berlin is condemned "forever to become and never to be."

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N O ST A L G I A -

Fifteen years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the area around the Nordbahnhof and Chausse Strasse, with its fallows, its provisional and temporary uses, its historic urban edges and its more recent abandonment represents an almost insurmountable barrier of one kilometer, an open "wound" within the body of the city of former East Berlin. The area is situated northwest of the historical center of Berlin at the edge of the central city. Due to its central location at the edge of the inner city, its easy accessibility and its high degree of exploitability, the area slowly becomes the focus of planning institutions as well as public and private investment and experiences great development pressure. Typical for this area are the traces of the 19 century suburban uses like the former Stettin Railway, the worker housing estates, the industrial plants, the drill grounds for the army and the cemeteries - all the institutions which were hard to fit into the 19th century city. The heterogeneity of the area, in term of use, building structure or block pattern constitutes a departure from continuous urban spatiality of the homogeneous city. The 3 meter elevated railway installation/plinth is the major spatial element in the area. Today, the area is well serviced by a number of subway -, S-bahn-, tramway-, and bus-lines. On the site the S-Bahn tracks surface and climb to about five meters above ground within the Northern third of the area. The problem asks for a feasibility study for the site, to see what programmatic ideas are possible to be put on the site. It is planned to accommodate housing for approximately five thousand persons in housing units which range in size from studios to three bedrooms. Furthermore, a number of complimentary facilities have to be accommodated, such as two small neighborhood parks for more passive enjoyment of green space, as well as more active areas like soccer fields, basketball courts, a kindergarten, a day care center, as well as shops along major roads for commercial development. Lastly, a 1:1 ratio of dwelling unit to car for parking has to be facilitated on the site.

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The block delineated by property lines.

Courtyards open up to allow light and ventilation into the depths of the block.

The block develops an exterior facade that is solely representation.


The block develops an interior facade that is raw, independent from the exterior condition.

The scale of the block is so large that it can accommodate a diversity of programs.

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Berlin's basic urban block typology is the perimeter block and has unique characteristics. The scale of the blocks paired with their programmatic density allows each one to become their own independent worlds. The contents of each block was then hidden and sterilized into a forbidding facade that generated no activity on the street, essentially gift wrapping each block and their worlds of activity.

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The Cemetery This is the only connection that the Block of Amnesia has to the rest of the city; from each of the experiments that are conducted in that block, there is always a residue (a monument) left behind. The cemetery keeps and displays the old monuments from the different investigations much like a file cabinet. The cemetery is also the culmination of the path that runs through all the different blocks.

The Block of Constant Construction This is the block which defines Berlin as a city that is condemned "forever to become and never to be." Cranes are constantly working on the site and construction workers always seem to be guiding the construction of something. All this activity and scaffolding that exists can be viewed through the chain link fence. The air is thick with anticipation and curiosity that is never cured by the machine sounds of the crane rotating its head all day long.

The Block of Amnesia The Block of Amnesia is intended to be the antithesis of the Block of Nostalgia. Where the Block of Nostalgia was from the onset declared architecturally sterile, the Block of Amnesia from its onset was declared to be architecturally potent. Here the built environment is constantly changing and developing; progress is studied and created at an accelerated pace. It is within this block that Berlin can continuously experiment within the realms of architecture. The occupants of this block share the obsession of invention. Each experiment has no theoretical ties to the preceding one and therefore, this block is in utmost freedom from the city's binding chronological layers. The perimeter block contains the rapid development that occurs within the block, completely unsuitable for the city. The block begins its architectural adventure by first constructing three buildings: Mies' Tower, Schinkel's Bauakademie, and El Lissitzky's Skyhook. Each of these buildings embodies the idea of progress; each one was way ahead of its time and conceivably was never able to be built. This block becomes a model for change.


The Block of Nostalgia

The Path This is an urban move that attempts to connect the site to the large park that lies to the north and west of the site. This path experiences all the different conditions of the site since it moves through all the different blocks.

The Garden Block The block is made of four terraces that slowly step up three meters higher than the level of the plinth. Each of those terraces is filled with schrebergarten, which means that each apartment in the block has a plot of land that they control and can build anything on it. The courtyard become a field of constructed fantasies, completely uncensored.

The Social Condenser The block is completely occupied, from plot line to plot line, with the leftover programs of the project. The Nordbahnhof S-bahn train station lies within this block, providing a density of people constantly passing in and out of the site. This block is also the beginning of the pathway that connects the site to the park that lies northeast of the site.


Plan +2 meters The Block of Nostalgia criticizes the mentality that Berlin has adopted in reconstructing the voids in the city, called "Critical Reconstruction."


Plan +4 meters The Block of Nostalgia includes all the programs that are reminiscent of the old Berlin in order to play on the spirit of the Critical Reconstruction.


Plan +10 meters


Perspective from inside the units.

View of the courtyards from the units.

Axonometric of the one bedroom housing unit showing the different framed views.

Sketched section through courtyard

Sketched axonometric studying the anthropomorphic figures

Sketched axonometric studying housing typology

Sketched section through the museum.

Sketched axonometric studying housing typology 014


The housing units were designed as perspective windows that frame the courtyard. The units alternate between forced perspectives and fake perspectives and their facades frame views of the courtyard in a paranoid and obsessive way. As if the views of the courtyard

View from laying on the bed

View from behind the ironing board

Section

Elevation

Elevation

View from couch

Section

Section

Elevation


will provide some relief and comfort to the residents, the facades register the different conditions of the apartment and provide plenty of framed views so as to make certain that for every movement, there will be a window looking out.

View from the desk

Elevation

View from big window

Section

Section

View through cabinet

Elevation

Section

Elevation


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Detailed plan of the lap pool

018


A ROMAN PIAZZA site: Rome, Italy site: Moscow, Russia

The studio project was sited on the intersection of the only straight road in all of Rome, the Via Giulia, and Via San Filippo Neri. The site lies along a direct access route from the Chiesa Nuova, which sits along the major east-west artery of Corso Vittorio Emanuele, all the way across the Tiber River to the Carcere Regina Coeli. The site has one facade facing the Via Giulia and at the other end, it faces and intersection of five different streets. The only existing conditions were on the Via Giulia side, where there was a small apartment complex and a fragment of a facade from an old palazzo that no longer remains. It was the fragment that interested me the most about this site; the opportunity was there to recontextualize that fragment and give it a new meaning and add to the cinematic quality of the city.

The first move was to encircle the open space with a wall; the existing edges would be contributing to the life of the piazza. This would also discourage vehicular access/storage at the site, while still promoting pedestrian flows along the existing circulation axis. The next step was to inject programs that would breathe life into the space throughout different times of the day. During the day, the piazza would be used as an extension of the showroom and cafe. At night, it would accept the overflow of people in the dance club and bar below, and on weekends, it could host a market. These conditions made the piazza a flexible space that the surrounding programs would be able to take advantage of at any time.


- R O M A N

P I A Z Z A -

Piazza Navona: Activity center

Piazza Pasquino: Parking lot

Site: Via San Filippo Neri & Via Giulia

Piazza Farnese: Setting

001


- R O M A N

Piazza Pasquino

Piazza Farnese

Piazza Navona

P I A Z Z A -

The project developed from two distinct efforts. In an independent study, I researched and analyzed serveral piazzas in Rome. The research was a comparative analysis aimed at understanding the change in the way the spaces were used. The analysis served as the pre-thesis research for the revitalization of an existing piazza space that currently functions as a parking lot. The design problem also drew ideas from the different urban studies of the city that were conducted throughout the semester. The piazzas of Rome are interesting in the way that they are all variations on a theme: they are open spaces within the dense urban fabric that accommodate a range of activities. By form and definition, it is a public domain, a place of passage, rest or assembly for citizens traveling alone or in groups. They have had a presence in Rome since antiquity, with the intention of servicing the city’s commerce, government and religion. Typically, the piazzas were the settings for important civic buildings, palaces, churches, and sometimes became semi-public appendages to a private residence. Over time and with the development of the city, the use of the spaces changed. Things like streets and cars and other infrastructure began to alter the way in which these spaces were used. In the comparative analysis, three categories of piazzas were chosen - Setting (Piazza Farnese), Parking lots (Piazza Pasquino), and Activity Centers (Piazza Navona) - and analyzed as models to illustrate the change of the activities over time, referring to such issues as their historical context, scale, the programmatic arrangement of the spaces around the piazzas, circulation, and density. In developing my own response to the Via Giulia Piazza, the comparative analysis played an important role. It provided perspective on the livelihood of the context as well as the opportunity to understand how these public spaces can take shape in so many different ways. Similarly, the Roman Pathway project also contributed to the design, providing insight over the cinematic qualities of the city.

Site

002


Sketch diagram of the wall and its transformations as it wraps the site.

003 Diagram of the Via Giulia facade

Distinct interior and exterior facades

Circulation diagram


Via Giulia Facade

Site Sequence

004


- A N

Plan +2 meters

005

U R B A N

W A L L -


A

A Long section A-A through the showroom

006


- A N

Plan +7 meters

007

U R B A N

W A L L -


B

B Long section B-B indicates the different programmaic relationships

008


- A N

Plan +10 meters

009

U R B A N

W A L L -


C

C

Cross section C-C looking back at the showroom facade

010


GARMENT DISTRICT LIBRARY site: New York, New York

The project is sited in the Garment District of New York City. The research of the area led to the idea of making this project an addition to the special research libraries of the New York Public Library . The intent was that this branch would be a place that people can come to in order to obtain information about fashion and textiles. This also introduced the idea of process. Fashion designers have a process for producing work and it would start with obtaining information. The next stage would involve using the information to produce something tangible. Once the product is complete, it would be exhibited and then placed on the market for consumption. The product can also be documented and archived back in the library, making it information for someone else to obtain. Each of the parts of the process were thought of as programs: a library for fashion, studio spaces, a shopping mall, and exhibition spaces. The programs needed to have their own independent lives but at the same time they also needed a space to be able to mix together.

Four parallel bars are laid down on the site with their long edges towards the avenue and the short edges towards the streets. There is no access allowed between the bars, and each one exists completely independently of the rest. The bars were lifted up off the ground to create a lobby space. A residue of each program is left on the ground, functioning as entrances into each bar. The lobby is a free and open space where the programs can mix and create new conditions, hybrids, and frictions.

site: Phoenix, Arizona


- G A R M E NT

GARMENT

DISTRICT

GARMENT DISTRICT: Located in the lower west side of New York City, it has been the undisputed center of American fashion since the mid 19th century when the development of mass production led to the growth of the apparel trades. This area is also an urban node where people can enter and leave the city, via Penn Station, the Lincoln Tunnel, and the Port Authority. The site is located amongst these two very important conditions.

BRANCH

OF

THE

NEW

YORK

D I ST R I CT

L I B R A RY -

PUBLIC

LIBRARY

BRANCH OF THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY: The New York Public Library system has a network of branch libraries that are scattered throughout the city. These libraries are a network of community libraries that offer a cultural range and are singularly attuned to New York City. This project would be included within the NYPL system and would be an additional research library.

NEW YORK: The proposed site is unique on two levels: the first is that it is a tabula rasa within the city and the second is that it is made of two New York City blocks.

LIBRARY: The library belongs to a process. It is used to conduct research; with that information, one can go and produce something that is tangible; once there is a product, it can be presented; later on the product can be documented, which turns it into information that is archived back in the library.

PUBLIC: The entire ground plane would be open to the public and would serve as a lobby space for all the different programs. It is where the different components of the project would be able to mix together.

001

Diagram showing the New York Public Library locations

Diagram showing the research libraries

Map indicating location of the site


- G A R M E NT

D I ST R I CT

L I B R A RY -

Port Authority

Jacob Javits Convention Center

Train yard storage; IFCCA competition site

Train yard storage

Entrance to the Lincoln Tunnel

Given site

Post Office

Madison Square Garden, Penn Station

The Projects

002


- G A R M E NT

D I ST R I CT

- G A R M E NT

D I ST R I CT

The given site was too small; in actuality, the site should respond to the scale of its surrounding context, which in this case is the scale of a mega block. The site should not be the little parking lot at the corner of the block: the site should be the whole block and the project should cover the void. The enlarged site has now become a tabula rasa, an entirely new element within the urban fabric.

L I B R A RY -

L I B R A RY -

Proposed Site

The city is made of different horizontal layers. The two mega blocks act as urban nodes by connecting the layers together. The voids, on the other hand, are holes that appear in the different layers.

003


- G A R M E NT

D I ST R I CT

L I B R A RY -

Diagramming the idea of a “process”

004


- G A R M E NT Exhibition Space

005

D I ST R I CT

L I B R A RY -

Shopping

Studio Spaces

Library


- G A R M E NT

D I ST R I CT

L I B R A RY -

3. The lobby is given more shape

2. The bars are then lifted to use the ground plane as a lobby

1. The programs are laid out in bars on the site

Diagraming the logic of the lobby (right). The simplicity of the project responding the simpler geometries of the adjacent mega blocks (below).

006


- G A R M E NT

3D Viz Rendering: Exploded axonometric 007

D I ST R I CT

L I B R A RY -


- G A R M E NT

D I ST R I CT

L I B R A RY -

Ground Plane slopes inward to make it easy to enter

Glass wall around the lobby

Vertical Circulation: firestairs and elevator shafts

Residue of the bars functioning as lobbies to the different programs above

008


- G A R M E NT

D I ST R I CT

L I B R A RY -

outdoor sitting area

storefronts Shopping Lobby

exhibition space

reception hall

streetfront gallery Plan +2 meters

009

exhibition space

Exhibition Space Lobby

Studio Lobby

reading spaces

cafe

Library Lobby

runway

information desk

theat re+st age


- G A R M E NT

Exhibition Space

Library

D I ST R I CT

L I B R A RY -

Exhibition Space

Plan +5 meters

Plan +8 meters

Plan +11 meters

Plan +14 meters

Exhibition Space

Shopping

Studios

Library

Exhibition Space

Shopping

Studios

Library

Studios

Library

010


- G A R M E NT

Aerial view of the model

Diagrammatic section through the bars

011

D I ST R I CT

L I B R A RY -


- G A R M E NT

Exhibition spaces

Lobby for the exhibition spaces

Train tracks below

D I ST R I CT

Shopping

Lobby for shopping

L I B R A RY -

Studio spaces

Parking spaces

Lobby for the library

Library

012


CIAB: CITY IN A BOX site: Phoenix, Arizona

This project was a collaboration among 12 students, led by

The FINAL REVIEW was the first time that the project -

Professor Archie Mackenzie. Beginning in the Fall of 2002, it grew into

including the infrastructures - was fully constructed. Based on the

a yearlong endeavor. The development of the cube is best explained

idea of collage and remanufacturing found objects, the studio

through its three phases: the Game, the Heap and the Final Review.

developed a manual of materials, stating which particular materials could be used to rebuild the city houses so as to create a distinct

The GAME began with a cube. Each student received 100

language through materiality. After seeing the cube for the first time,

pieces of property that were randomly scattered throughout the cube.

the studio further realized the potential of the project and decided to

The students then traded their pieces to create a cluster of space in

continue the collaboration for another semester.

which they would be able to design a city house. The designs of the city houses were based on collages, and each student was required to

*Published in CORNELL UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF

make three: one describing a client, a second describing an

ARCHITECTURE WORKS, a student work publication (2003)

architectural precedent and a third describing a memory of an experience in Ithaca. The students traded these collages among themselves, using the collages to generate ideas for the city house. The city houses themselves were constructed from found objects.

The HEAP was the collection of city houses inside a framework of a cube, at quarter scale and three feet on a side. After two rounds of building city houses, the construct became dense. The studio spent some time doing individual analyses of this urban collage to realize the possibilities of the project. The next move was to design infrastructures that would provide order to the heap, establishing committees to design structure, civic spaces and parking, the site, and ventilation.


- C ITY

Nate

Casey

I N

Ina Stephanie

A

B O X -

Ben

Me

The Game began with a cube, 144 feet on a side. Property inside the cube was distributed to the twelve students, each receiving one hundred pieces that were randomly scattered throughout the cube. The students then traded the pieces to create a cluster of space in which they would be able to design a city house. These clusters were mapped out threedimensionally on the game board, in order to keep track of the neighboring conditions. The design of the city houses were based on collages; each student was responsible for making three collages: one describing a client, a second describing a precedent, and a third describing a memory of an experience in Ithaca. These collages were traded among the students and were to generate the ideas of a city house. The city houses themselves were to be constructed from found objects and somehow structurally installed into the metal framework.

The game board

Amanda

001

Allison Sophia

Vinci

Chris

Hamda


- C ITY

I N

A

B O X -

The Heap was the collection of city houses inside a metal framework of a cube, at quarter scale - three feet on a side. After two rounds of building city houses, the construct became dense and unordered. Individual investigations were conducted to determine larger urban interventions, resulting in committees to design a structure, civic spaces and a parking structure, the site, and light, air and ventilation.

City houses from the heap

002


- C ITY

I N

A

B O X -

Images of my city house

My city house was driven by the client collage that I received. The apartment was located in the north-western corner of the cube and was designed for a dance teacher. The entry level was the dance studio. The entire studio could be opened up to the inside of the cube since the wall was constructed with operable wall panels. The lofted space upstairs was the private area of the apartment. It was a rather small bedroom that could be doubled in length by opening the wall out to include the space of the balcony. There was a living room that was below the studio that faces out towards the north. The corner location of the apartment allowed for commanding views of the city of Phoenix, Arizona.

003


- C ITY

I N

A

B O X -

Sketches during the design process of the public space infrastructure.

Image of the infrastructure appearing on the west facade of the cube.

004


- C ITY

Structure: Nate, Chris & Sophia The two poles are the primary structure for the entire cube. The initial structural ideas spawned from the way in which all the students were hanging their city houses from the top of the metal framework. In the final, the city houses and infrastructures were all suspended from the top of the cube.

005

I N

A

B O X -

Public Space: Stephanie & Me This infrastructure operated at two distinct scales. There was a large folding plane that weaved through the cube and experienced a variety of different conditions, i.e. interior facade, exterior facade, lobby space, etc. The other scale operated on the folding plane at a smaller scale like a virus, appearing throughout the infrastructure. It was responsible for creating access, private circulation, framed views, etc.


- C ITY

Light and Air: Casey, Vinci, & Allison This infrastructure generated the drawings for the alignment and construction details for when we built the cube. They also designed and built a system of louvres that were placed over the holes in the facades.

I N

A

B O X -

City Houses Around all the different infrastructures of the project were the city houses, all of which were reconstructed in a systematic way. The materials for the city houses were limited and catalogued in order to make the different systems more apparent and easier to comprehend.

006


- C ITY

Site: Hamda, Amanda & Ben The cube was sited on the side of a canal in Phoenix, Arizona. The ground plane was excavated in order to create a sunken garden. There was also an entrance that was created from the western edge of the site. And to the far east, on the other side of the canal, there was a farmers market that provided a view of the cube from afar.

007

I N

A

B O X -


- C ITY

I N

A

B O X -

The Final Review was the first time that the cube was constructed within the new rules. Deep in the core, the micro and macro scales of the public space infrastructure was put together and folding throughout the cube. The different structural systems were completely dependable and holding the cube in shape. The sun screens were strategically located along the facades of the project. The city houses also appeared to have a more structured appearance and that was because of the more systematic approach towards their construction. A manual of materials was developed which stated the particular materials that could be used to re-build the city houses. Construction began at 12:30 am the night before the final review. The cube came together two hours after the review was scheduled to commence. The Hartell Gallery in Sibley Hall was arranged to illustrate the different phases that the project had undergone, beginning with the collages, through the heap, the site model, and the cube itself.

8:00 am

Site model 008

008


- C ITY

9:30 am

11:00 am

I N

A

B O X -

12:00 pm

Scheduled review time

009


- C ITY

1:00 pm

I N

A

B O X -

2:00 pm

010


- C ITY

North Facade

011

South Facade

I N

A

B O X -

East Facade

West Facade


- C ITY

I N

A

B O X -

Image from the Southwest Corner

012


- C ITY

I N

A

B O X -

FormZ Renderings: View from the farmer's market

Stephanie's City House

013

View from the garden

Hamda's City House

Hamda's City House

Ina's City House


- C ITY

I N

A

B O X -

View from inside the cube

Ina's City House

Amanda's Gym

Hamda's City House

Casey's City House

014


- C ITY

I N

A

B O X -

View from inside the cube

Allison's City House

015

Ina's City House

View from the top of the northwest corner

Casey's City House

Ina's City House


- C ITY

I N

A

B O X -

View from above the cube looking back inside

Casey's City House

Stephanie's City House at Night

My City House at Night

View of the Cross Beams

016


- C ITY

Hartell Gallery at the final review

017

I N

A

B O X -


- C ITY

I N

A

B O X -

018


RUSSIAN CONSTRUCTIVIST site: Phoenix, Arizona MUSEUM* site: Moscow, Russia

The reading of Edwin Abbott's FLATLAND: A ROMANCE OF MANY DIMENSIONS led to an analysis of space in architecture. The painting was the genesis of the project. It begins with a two dimensional line and from that datum, more objects begin to emerge to create a three dimensional space. The program was then assigned to be a museum for Russian Constructivist artwork. The museum develops - schematically - the same way the painting grows. The idea is that the museum began as a field of space - a single ground plane. Then, objects floating in this field were paused for a moment to form the spaces of the museum. The museum also acknowledges El Lissitzky's work on Moscow, Russia. He had designed a series of buildings, skyhooks, that occupied the densest nodes along the city's outer ring. The project was never realized, however. This project attempts to construct one of the skyhooks as the museum and to do so in 2017, the one hundred year anniversary of the Russian Revolution.

*Published in CORNELL UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE WORKS, a student work publication (2003)


- C O N ST R U CT IV I ST

001

M U S E U M -


- C O N ST R U CT IV I ST

M U S E U M -

Spatial interpretation of Flatland Acrylic and ink on canvas 18x24

002


- C O N ST R U CT IV I ST

003

M U S E U M -


- C O N ST R U CT IV I ST

M U S E U M -

004


Section B-B

Section A-A 005

Section C-C

Section D-D


Collaged section E-E


- C O N ST R U CT IV I ST

M U S E U M -

A

1 A

2

4 E

E

5 Plan of main level Plan of suspended level 7 D

C B

6

3 B

007

C

D


- C O N ST R U CT IV I ST

1

M U S E U M -

2

3

4

5

6

7

Interior perspectives

008


PALAZZO del TRE site: Venice, Italy site: Kanazawa, Japan

The project is sited in the Campo Santa Maria Formosa in Venice, the largest open space that lies to the west of the nearby Piazza San Marco. On one edge of the footprint is a local canal, and on its other side is the piazza. The footprint for the site is about five stories tall but only four meters wide, forcing the development of the project to occur sectionally. The project accommodates three different clients with three distinct programs: a writer, a chef, and a painter. The writer needed a work space as well as a bookstore; the chef required a kitchen and a cafe; and the painter required a gallery and a studio space. A simple scheme was developed to provide clarity in the sectional organization: solid - void - solid. The private spaces bedrooms and workplaces - were vertically stacked in a tower that sits alongside the canal. The public programs open out towards the piazza side. The ground floor is an open cafe and the mezzanine is the public bookstore. The gallery is spread within the space, occupying much of the vertical surfaces. Above are the semi-public spaces shared by the three clients, the living room and a common workspace/library. The arrangement is similar, wherein there is one fully floor and a mezzanine above. The void in between is the circulation, both horizontal and vertical. The horizontal circulation bridges together the public and private zones of the project. It also alternates between the inside and the outside of the project, thereby creating a light well, which benefits the otherwise dark conditions of the ground floor in a site like this.


- P A L A Z Z O

D E L

T R E -

The project is sited in the Campo Santa Maria Formosa in Venice, the largest open space that lies to the west of the nearby Piazza San Marco. The Palazzo Querini Stampalia, re-designed by Carlo Scarpa in 1963, sits on the eastern edge of the piazza, and in the middle of the open space is the Chiesa Santa Maria Formosa. On one edge of the footprint is a local canal, and on its other side is the piazza. The "I think that Venice, more than any other Italian footprint for the site is about five stories tall but only four meters wide, forcing the development city, could accommodate the modern expression of the project to occur sectionally. The project accommodates three different clients with three of architecture. Because of certain of its Asymmetries distinct programs: a writer, a chef, and a painter. The writer needed a work space as well as a its very varied skyline, with high and low buildings, its bookstore; the chef required a kitchen and a cafe; and the painter required a gallery and a studio streets broad and narrow. And it has very beautiful space. A simple scheme was developed to provide clarity in the sectional organization: solid interior spaces, so if it would be possible to preserve void - solid. The private spaces - bedrooms and workplaces - were vertically stacked in a tower that sits alongside the canal. The public programs open out towards the piazza side. The ground things of this type in the historic fabric,there would be no fear of spoiling the city, so long as designs were floor is an open cafe and the mezzanine is the public bookstore. The gallery is spread within the carried out in a manner...worthy of it." space, occupying much of the vertical surfaces. Above are the semi-public spaces shared by the three clients, the living room and a common workspace/library. The arrangement is similar, Carlo Scarpa, 1978 wherein there is one fully floor and a mezzanine above. The void in between is the circulation, both horizontal and vertical. The horizontal circulation bridges together the public and private zones of the project. It also alternates between the inside and the outside of the project, thereby creating a light well, which benefits the otherwise dark conditions of the ground floor in a site like this.

001

Campo Santa Maria Formosa

Site

Palazzo Querini Stampalia, Carlo Scarpa


- P A L A Z Z O

Diagrammatic sketches of the plan

D E L

T R E -

Diagrammatic sketches of the section

002


- P A L A Z Z O

Painter's studio

Bedroom

Office space mezzanine

Bedroom

Living room

Chef's kitchen

003 003

T R E -

Bedroom

Writer's workspace

Section A-A

D E L

Bookstore + gallery mezzanine

Cafe + gallery


- P A L A Z Z O

D E L

T R E -

B

Chef's kitchen

Cafe + gallery

A

A

Ground floor plan B

004


- P A L A Z Z O

Writer's workspace

005

Bookstore + gallery mezzanine

D E L

T R E -

Bedroom

Living room


- P A L A Z Z O

Bedroom

Office space mezzanine

D E L

T R E -

Bedroom

Painter's studio

006


- P A L A Z Z O

Cafe + gallery

Bookstore + gallery mezzanine

D E L

T R E -

Office space mezzanine

Public

007

Painter's studio

Private


- P A L A Z Z O

Photomontage of site

D E L

T R E -

Section B-B

008 008


EUROPEAN OBSERVATIONS site: Italy France UK Spain Switzerland

The sketches were my notes on the different cities and countries that I had visited over the course of the semester abroad. They document both my own travels as well as the field trips with the school.

site: Moscow, Russia


- E U R O P E A N

001 001

O B S E RV AT I O N S -


- E U R O P E A N

O B S E RV AT I O N S -

Museo di Gibellina, Nuova Gibellina, Italy Francesco Venezia

Villa Savoy, Poissy, France Le Corbusier

La Defense, Paris, France Otto van Spreckelsen

Temple complex, Agrigento, Italy

002


- E U R O P E A N

Chapel at Brion Family Tomb, San Vito d'Altivole, Italy Carlo Scarpa

O B S E RV AT I O N S -

Temple facade, Selenunte, Sicily

Perspective of chapel ceiling, Florence, Italy Michelangelo

St. Benedict Chapel, Sumvitg, Switzerland Peter Zumthor

003

Villa Savoy, Poissy, France Le Corbusier


- E U R O P E A N

O B S E RV AT I O N S -

St. Benedict Chapel, Sumvitg, Switzerland Peter Zumthor

Church, Montepulciano, Italy

Well at a cloister, Monreal, Italy

Palazzo Querini Stampalia, Venice, Italy Carlo Scarpa

Woodcut ceiling in church, Palermo, Italy

004


- E U R O P E A N

Villa Savoy, Poissy, France Le Corbusier

O B S E RV AT I O N S -

Museo di Gibellina, New Gibellina, Italy Francesco Venezia

Palazzo Querini Stampalia, Venice, Italy Carlo Scarpa

Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, Florence, Italy Michelangelo

005

Cretto, Old Gibellina, Italy Alberto Brutti


- -E EUUR ROOP PE EAANN OOB BS SE ER RVVAAT TI IOONNS S- -

Villa Lante, Bagnaia, Italy

006 006


MOBEUS TRIP site: USA Site: Kanazawa, Japan

The trip was a road trip around the US, including twelve students of architecture, one TA, three mini-vans, two dogs, the professor, his wife and child. We did a figure eight across the country and visited architecture in over thirty-five states in eight weeks.


- -MMOOBBEEUUSS TTRRI IPP- -

Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconson Santiago Calatrava

001 001


- M O B E U S

T R I P -

Monument Valley, Utah/Arizona

Chemistry Building Suny Cortland Campus, Cortland, NY Werner Seligman

Kimbell Art Museum, Fortworth, Texas Louis Kahn

Athenaeum, New Harmony, Indiana Richard Meier

Neurosciences Institute, La Jolla, California Tod Williams Billie Tsien & Associates

002


- M O B E U S

T R I P -

Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico Legorreta + Legorreta

003

Unity Temple, Oak Park, Illinois Frank Lloyd Wright

Automatic drawing while driving, Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

Unity Temple, Oak Park, Illinois Frank Lloyd Wright

Church facade, Santa Fe, New Mexico


- M O B E U S T R I P - M O B E U S T R I P -

Kiva, Santa Fe, New Mexico

004

004


- M O B E U S

Robie House, Buffalo, NY Frank Lloyd Wright

T R I P -

Cleveland Arcade, Cleveland, Ohio

Unity Temple, Oak Park, Illinois Frank Lloyd Wright

Skate Park, Louisville, Kentucky

005

005

John Shaw Residence, Santa Fe, New Mexico John Shaw


- -MMOOB BE EU US S T TR RI PI P- -

Guggenheim Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada Frank Gehry and Rem Koolhaas

006 006


DRAWINGS + PAINTINGS

site: Phoenix, Arizona site: Moscow, Russia


Diptych of a Corner

001


Medium: Charcoal and graphite on paper Size: 29 in. x 20 in.

002


- D- AR RA TWWI N OG R SK -

003 003


-- AD RR TAWW OI NR GK S- -

Rib Cage of a Whale Medium: Graphite on paper Size: 42 cm x 59.4 cm

004 004


- D- AR RA TWWI N OG R SK -

005 005


-- AD RR TA WW OI NR GK S- -

Ribbon (Still Life) Medium: Conte Crayon on paper Size: 9.5 in. x 16 in.

006 006


- A RTW O R K -

005 007


-- AD RR TAWW OI NR GK S- -

Sixty Second Selfportrait Medium: Charcoal on newsprint paper Size: 9 in. x 12 in.

006 008


- P- AA IRNT TWI O N RG KS --

007 013


-- PA AR IT NWTOI N R KG -S -

Selfportrait Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 5 ft 6in. x 3ft

008 014


- D- AR RA TWWI N OG R SK -

009 009


-- AD RR TAWW OI NR GK S- -

Sketches of a Nude Medium: Charcoal on paper Size: 29.7 cm x 42 cm

010 010


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