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SUMIT SAHDEV


EDUCATION 2009

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

2005

CORNELL UNIVERSITY

School of Architecture Post Professional Master of Architecture (M.Arch 2) College of Architecture, Art, and Planning Professional Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch) Concentration in Visual Studies Dean’s List

EXPERIENCE JULY 2009PRESENT

OCTOBER 2013PRESENT; SUMMER 2012

STUDIO HILLIER

DESIGNER, Princeton/NJ •Manage projects in schematic design and design development, including multi-family residential development projects, attached dwelling residential development projects, an office space renovation, and a daycare facility •Coordinate and produce construction documents, including a duplex, a single family addition, and multi-family residential development projects •Prepare presentation materials for client meetings, local zoning submissions and design team presentations •Present and review projects to clients and municipal officials •Prepare marketing materials and research •Conduct zoning and building code analysis •Conduct site surveys and documentation •Manage and mentor junior employees to produce presentation-quality models and materials

STAN ALLEN ARCHITECT

CONSULTANT, Princeton/NJ •Investigate and produce design ideas for competitions •Prepare presentation materials and models for competitions, including the invited competition LEIPZIG MONUMENT TO FREEDOM AND UNITY (finalist) •Prepare marketing materials

JANUARY 2011PRESENT

FREELANCE DESIGNER

MARCH 2007JULY 2007

METROPOLITAN UNITED STUDIO

NOVEMBER 2005JUNE 2006

CR STUDIO ARCHITECTS

•Designed and executed a landscape plan for a private residence •Produced construction documents for a master bath renovation •Prepared a zoning and code analysis for a private residence •Conducted site surveys and documentation for the renovation of a single family detached residence DESIGNER, Hoboken/NJ •Produced construction documents for mid-rise residential project •Assisted in schematic design for urban mixed-use project INTERN, New York/NY •Participated in design development for custom residence •Produced construction documents for Audi NY showroom •Constructed study and final models for office projects •Conducted site surveys and documentation


EXPERIENCE CONT’D OCTOBER 2005

BRIGGSKNOWLES ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN

SUMMER 2004

DESIGN LABORATORY

SUMMER 2003

SKIDMORE OWINGS + MERRILL

CONSULTANT, New York/NY •Participated in design development for an apartment renovation •Investigated details through drawings and prototypes INTERN, New York/NY •Generated drawings and edited red-lines •Researched sustainable design for a speculative portable classroom project INTERN, New York/NY •Constructed study and final models for schematic design for a military campus master plan •Investigated design ideas with team members

JURIES 2013

NEW YORK SCHOOL OF INTERIOR DESIGN, Design Studio 486, Midterm + Final Reviews

2008

NYIT, Architecture Studio 402, Final Review

PUBLICATIONS & EXHIBITIONS 2009

Published in THE SANAA STUDIOS 2006-2008: LEARNING FROM JAPAN: SINGLE STORY URBANISM, Edited by Florian Idenburg

2008

Studio work exhibited at PRINCETON UNIVERSITY SoA OPEN HOUSE

2004

Curated and exhibited work in CORNELL-IN-ROME ARCHITECTURE EXHIBITION

2003

Published in CORNELL UNIVERSITY: WORKS

2002

Sketches exhibited at CORNELL UNIVERSITY MOBEUS TRIP EXHIBITION

SKILLS Design, Drafting, Sketching, Model-making, Collaging, Rendering AutoCAD, Rhinoceros 3D, Laser Cutting Adobe: Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign MS Office: Word, Excel, Power Point, Outlook Previously Used: 3D Studio Max, 3D VIZ, Form Z, Vector Works Experienced in welding, casting, and use of machinery and manual tools

TRAVELS PU Traveling Studio, JAPAN (2008), INDIA (2008), PU Traveling Studio, UAE (2007), SPAIN (2004), FRANCE (2004), UK (2004), SWITZERLAND (2004), Cornell-in-Rome Program, ITALY (2004), Cornell Abroad Mobeus Road Trip, USA (2002)


ALL LOOPED UP site: Chicago, USA Lake Shore Drive The competition called for ideas to occupy the unfulfilled site of Santiago Calatrava’s Chicago Spire. While the competition called for ideas to respond to the Spire’s hollow foundation, it was impossible to ignore the relationship of the site to its context. As the Chicago River enters into the city, it creates a break in the otherwise continuous and popular Lake Shore Park. The proposed loop reconnects the park edges. In doing so, it develops the underutilized waterfront properties and attempts to tether them with the its context. The loop is a complex system. It is composed of several simple systems that are entangled and together, they produce a collective behavior that allows the loop to have a rich identity. Each of the systems involved contribute to the complex loop in different ways, i.e. atmospheres, access, bridging the edges and the context, etc. Flowing back and forth and all around, this complex system has a simple mission: to loop together Chicago’s waterfront park system with a whirlwind of intensity.

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Lincoln Park

Pfc Milton Olive Park Jane Addams Memorial Park Gateway Park DuSable Park Millennium Park Grant Park

Northerly Island

Burnham Park

Site Plan


1. Chicago River 2. Lake Michigan 3. Ogden Slip 4. Lake Shore Park 5. Lake Shore Drive 6. Navy Pier 7. Lake Shore Tower 8. Harbor 9. Future Harbor 10. Competition Site/ Site for Calatrava’s Tower a) Garden Loop

b) Broken Loops

c) Hardscape Loop

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7.

4.

10. 3.

1.

6.

9.

5.

8. 4.

Aerial view of the site

2.

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View 2 d) Points

e) Tower Loops

a-e) Complex System View 1

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1: Low perspective of hanging gardens


2: View below hanging gardens

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Positively Hopeful site: 50 international locations

Global warming is the most pressing issue that is impacting all citizens of the world, transcending national boundaries. The climate change requires a global response from citizens who are able to communicate and exchange ideas and information. Global communications can strategically channel all efforts into a single hub, forging a collaborative environment defined by collective intelligence. Technologies like Google Earth are examples of global communication devices that observe and disseminate information to the public. Monitoring the entire surface of the earth, Google Earth is a tool for surveillance, wherein every individual has access to global information. Google Earth becomes the site plan and its icons becomes architecture. The Google Earth icon of the red cross marks the locations around the world where the impacts of the climate change are most palpable. The cross is also the form of a self-sustaining hotel deployed to each of those locations, making these sites accessible to the public. Each of the hotels harvest the resources available at each location - ranging from water, food, electricity, etc - while attempting to maintain a minimal impact on the environment. Each hotel also functions as a weather station, continuing the existing international network of weather stations that are collecting data on the climate change. All the locations can be accessed virtually and physically, increasing the ability to respond to the devastation.

Google Earth mapping the locations of weather stations and the global network of hotels


N/S 10 Degrees Latitude

N/S 15 Degrees Latitude

Lake Chad, Africa with a Google Earth Resolution of 1 meter per pixel Exterior perspective

N/S 20 Degrees Latitude

N/S 30 Degrees Latitude

Calcutta, Indian with a Google Earth Resolution of 15 meters per pixel Exterior perspective 09


N/S 40 Degrees Latitude

N/S 50 Degrees Latitude

Neumeyer, Antarctica with a Google Earth Resolution of 2 meters per pixel Roof plan

N/S 60 Degrees Latitude

N/S 70 Degrees Latitude

N/S 80 Degrees Latitude

Neumeyer, Antarctica with a Google Earth Resolution of 2 meters per pixel Exterior perspective


Roof Panels (dimensions vary according to Google Earth resolution)

Structure

Insulation Layer

Access Ramp

Neumeyer, Antarctica with a Google Earth Resolution of 2 meters per pixel Interior perspective Footings

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KANAZAWA MUSEUM site: Kanazawa, Japan

The project challenges the notion of museum exhibition spaces by implementing the concept of “context” in order to give more definition to the spaces for viewing art. A close look at the programmatic requirements allowed the exhibition spaces to be codified into three zones - artists community, gardens, and spaces for assembly. The exhibition spaces were designed as larger volumes that facilitated programmatic relationships by fitting the secondary programs within the spaces for art. While the museum’s collection may vary, the programmatic juxtapositions allow for the museum to serve as a site for production, display and assembly around the collection. The institution’s capacity to accommodate the local public desire to access the collection fueled the understanding of the project as a community center. The project responded by loosely scattering the exhibition volumes to generate open space within the museum, increasing the “free zone” where people can enter without having to buy a ticket. Using the corners of the volumes to control circulation, a tight, exterior boundary contains an open network of circulation inside. During the day, the museum functions like a park; at night, the exterior boundary supports the public by maintaining access to the programs that are not directly related to the museum.

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Site Plan


Sections through the different exhibition spaces

View 1: Aerial image of model 13


View 2: Aerial image of unroofed model 14

View 3: Close aerial image of the exhibition + garden spaces


View 3 View 2

View 1

Plan +3 meters

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THE YELLOW BRICK ROAD site: Berlin, Germany

The fundamental identity of Berlin is its mutability: since its inception, the urban field has been a collage of successive idealizations. The city’s receptive nature is now being sterilized by its current redevelopment strategy in an attempt to stabilize the urban field: urbanism as equilibrium. A Counter-Measure. Instead of laying a uniform blanket over the city, incessantly collage fictions; instead of prescribing urbanism, applaud uncertainty; instead of nostalgia, incur amnesia; instead of the Critical Reconstruction, deploy its antithesis. The thesis acknowledges the presence of an urban anomaly within the city’s fabric: the S-Bahn - a line of continuous tracks that run elevated through the entire historic center. In its continuity, the S-Bahn collects architectural landmarks that are unique to the city: points. Potential: by densifying this line with more points - intersections between the S-Bahn and the city’s other infrastructures - the thesis creates a new urban layer within the fabric. The result is a yellow brick road of architectural encounters that enhances the experience of S-Bahn’s urban promenade.

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Conceptual Site Plan of Berlin


Lehrter Bahnhof

Hackescher Markt Bahnhof Alexanderplatz Bahnhof

Bellevue Bahnhof Friedrichstrasse Bahnhof Tiergarten Bahnhof

S-Bahn

Jannowitzbr. Bahnhof Ostbahnhof

Zoologischer Garten Bahnhof

Aerial view of model

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1. Diagrammatic plan of the S-Bahn and it’s points 2. Cross-sectional conditions along the S-Bahn in the area around the Hackescher Markt Bahnhof station 3. Planometric diagram of the episodic points - including existing and proposed points - in the area around the Hackescher Markt Bahnhof station

S-Bahn + Block + Station S-Bahn + Block S-Bahn + Road S-Bahn + Block S-Bahn + River S-Bahn + Landmarks S-Bahn

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Southwest aerial of the model


Southeast aerial of the model

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STAN ALLEN ARCHITECT site: Leipzig, Germany

“The working analogy of the project is the stone yard - a working space in which the monument is continually being constructed. The evidence of the construction, and the outline of the finished monument, is always available. Construction also implies destruction. As the events leading up to October 1989 suggest, sometimes change demands that existing structures be dismantled. The main body of the monument is based on a five sided figure with an active, figured profile. The singularity of the block is cut and opened up by a series of axes that relate to local landmarks: The Rathaus, Deutsche Bank, and the City Hochhaus Leipzig. In this way, the monument, and in particular its negative space, is knit into the local context. The original figure is doubled and in turn further dismantled creating a field where many different activities can take place. To be successful, a monument today must also engage everyday life as well as the occasions of commemoration. “

-Stan Allen

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Site Plan


While the cube is a simple, stable figure, the extruded pentagon establishes a more complex field, with multiple views and angles while maintaining the simplicity of this basic geometry.

South Perspective

1. Begin with an extruded form

2. Apply deformations

3. Subtract site lines

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“A series of pathways aligned to key views in the city of Leipzig open up the blocks, allowing citizens to traverse the space of the monument. A village-like cluster of related geometric elements is created. “

4. Apply Transformations: deformation, subtraction, rotation, translation

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5. End with a Field Condition

-Stan Allen

North Perspective


Perspective within the field

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STUDIO HILLIER site: Princeton, New Jersey

“We are a client-centric, research based architecture and urbanism practice in downtown Princeton. The studio is led by founding partners Barbara A Hillier and J. Robert Hillier. Most of our ideas and beliefs about architectural practice remain unchanged. We believe in the inclusivity of architecture and the profound need for public / private dialogue. We view architects as artists and thinkers, technologists and writers, makers and doers, who deserve a humane workplace where they can thrive. Fundamentally, we believe that architecture exists within the interdisciplinary corpus of cultural production, that it performs as both index and road map for advancing society and human history.�

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Wall Sections, Olden House, Princeton University


Elevations of Duplex

Section, Olden House, Princeton University

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Construction details, Olden House, Princeton University

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Second + Third Floor Plans, Olden House, Princeton University


Floor Plan, Private Residence

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7189 River Road

21 Castle Howard Court

214 North Harrison Street

50 Random Road

153 Witherspoon Street

Olden House

Daycare Facility

Site: Solebury, PA Use: Residential Size: 2,800 SF Status: Complete

Site: Princeton, NJ Use: Residential Size: 4,400 SF Status: Construction Documents

Site: Princeton, NJ Use: Mixed Use Size: 4,800 SF Status: Discontinued

Site: Princeton, NJ Use: Residential Size: 5,200 SF Status: Complete

Site: Princeton, NJ Use: Residential Size: 7,500 SF Status: Construction Documents

Site: Princeton, NJ Use: Residential Size: 15,000 SF Status: Under Construction

Site: Plainsboro, NJ Use: Commercial Size: 16,400 SF Status: Discontinued

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150 Spruce Lane

Heathcote Farm

New Jersey City University Dormitory

Site: Princeton, NJ Use: Residential Size: 16,600 SF Status: Discontinued

Site: South Brunswick, NJ Use: Residential Size: 65,300 SF Status: Schematic Design

Site: Jersey City, NJ Use: Educational Size: 156,600 SF Status: Schematic Design

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Sumit Sahdev - Short Portfolio