Page 57

DRAWING ANIMALS

BY MICHAEL BUTKUS

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nimals are fascinating subjects, and you can spend many hours at the zoo with your sketchpad, studying their movements, their body structures, and their coat textures. (See pages 86-87 for more on drawing animals from life.) And because pencil is such a versatile tool, you can easily sketch a rough-coated goat or finely stroke a smooth haired deer. Of course, you don't have to go to the zoo to find models; try copying the drawings here, or find a wildlife book for reference, and draw the animals that appeal to you.

Studying the Head When drawing the head, pay special attention to the giraffe's most distinctive features. Emphasize the narrow, tapered muzzle and the heavy-lidded eyes, adding long, curved eyelashes. To make sure the knobbed horns don't look "pasted on," draw them as a continuous line from the forehead, curving back where they attach to the head.

Working Out the Structure To draw the full body, make sure the proportions are correct. Begin by placing circles for the midriff, shoulders, withers, and haunches. Then use the body width as a guide for the other parts: the neck (from shoulder to head) and the legs are all bout the same length as the body is wide, and the head is roughly a third as long.

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Smooth Coat Shade the undercoat with the side of a blunt 2B and pick out random coat hairs with a sharp HB pencil.

Long Hair Make wavy strokes in the direction the hair grows, lifting the pencil at the end of each stroke.

Rough Coat Using the side of your pencil, shade in several directions. With your pencil, use different strokes and various pressures.

Short Hair Use a blunt HB to make short, overlapping strokes, lifting the pencil at the end to taper the tips.

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Developing Markings Start drawing this trio by sketching and refining their general shapes and then outlining the markings with a sharp-pointed HB. Then shade in the spots with a round-tip HB, making your strokes darker in the shadow areas, both on the spots and between them.

The art of basic drawing  
The art of basic drawing  
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