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Miss India 2016 (2nd Runner-up)

Pankhuri Gidwani at the Sulabh Campus on April 23, 2016

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PROFILE OF

PANKHURI GIDWANI Pankhuri Gidwani is the 2nd runner-up of the FBB Femina Miss India 2016 Beauty Contest. She was crowned by the previous 2nd runner-up Ms. Vartika Singh. Pankhuri will represent India in the Grand International Beauty Contest, 2016. Basically, Pankhuri Gidwani hails from Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh. Her family is settled in Lucknow. Pankhuri has done all her education from Lucknow. She had deep interest in modelling since her school days, and eventually with hard work and strong dedication she has made a mark in the world of modelling. There is no denying that Pankhuri is quite beautiful and replete with amazing physical features and people may soon find an alternative of Sushmita Sen and Tabbu in Pankhuri, if she makes an entry into Bollywood.

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Address by

Hon’ble Ms Pankhuri Gidwani Miss India 2016 (2nd Runner-up)

My greetings and my salutations to everyone here. Let me thank Hon’ble Bindeshwar Pathak ji for giving an opportunity to visit and address you all here. For one thing, in this prayer assembly I have learnt many good things, i.e. we should all work together and shed all discrimination based on caste and creed. In these 10 minutes that I have been here I learnt that, given an opportunity to work with this organization in future, I can learn a lot. As we are told, the scavenger women, who are present here, once used to clean human excreta and now after getting training in different trades were brought into the mainstream of society. The opportunity which they never received in their homes, is now being given by Sulabh International. This is indeed a great thing. I would like to thank the teachers of schoolchildren, for their good work. I have studied only up to 12th Standard. In our school, we used to go on excursions. When you visit a place, you see and learn so many things new, just as we can see here how toilets are built. I was a student of environmental science. We were then taught what is bio-degradable and what is eco-friendly etc., because we need to take good care of our environment. So you will also get to learn many new things. One should not take this as a simple picnic tour here. You need to thank your teachers for providing you an opportunity. As regards my life’s journey, let me tell you that I started my journey towards Miss India from the University Campus. The campus is the place where the hunt for talents starts. If you have beauty, talent and skills, you will be given a chance to make a direct entry into the Miss India contest. Miss India is not merely a beauty contest. Just now a girl recited a poem which talked about the importance of beauty within and outside. If someone needs your help, you should be ready to help that person. If one is in trouble, you should immediately come to his or her rescue. One needs to be a good human being first to become Miss India because Miss India pageantry is a platform for you to reach the masses. And until and unless you have sympathy or concern for others or a kind heart you don’t deserve to become a representative of India at the international contest. You must be sensitive to the feelings of your people, and your country, to complete a journey towards your goal. We have a sub-contest called ‘Beauty with a Purpose’. Everyone has a goal in life. One of such goals can be to serve and work for others. Dr. Bindeshwar Pathak gave me huge support to accomplish my goal as I desired to visit villages, constructing toilets. But how was it possible? Once I went for an environmental project and I faced certain problems due to lack of a toilet. Then I strongly felt that I must work on this issue, but I did not know how to proceed. The answer was to approach an NGO or other organization, who could help me to fulfil my goal. And the organization I found out was Sulabh International. Lastly, I would like to give you a piece of advice: Never give up your effort because unless you try your best you will not succeed. Keep on moving and do your best and you will surely achieve your goal, no matter you are young or old. If your faith is righteous and your dreams are larger, you can do anything, and achieve everything. Take care of yourself and have focus on your goal. Definitely, you will achieve your goal. 2

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Welcoming at Sulabh Campus

Dr. Bindeshwar Pathak, Founder, Sulabh Sanitation and Social Reform Movement, welcoming Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, Miss India 2016 (2nd Runner-up), at the Sulabh Campus on April 23, 2016.

Ms. Usha Chaumar, President of Sulabh International Social Service Organisation, a liberated woman scavenger, welcoming Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, Miss India 2016 (2nd Runnerup) at the Sulabh Campus.

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Mrs. Indrani Mazumdar, Chiarperson of Sulabh International Centre for Action Sociology, welcoming Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, Miss India 2016 (2nd Runner-up), at the Sulabh Campus.

Shri Pankaj Jain, IAS (Retd.), welcoming Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, Miss India 2016 (2nd Runner-up), at the Sulabh Campus.

Shri S. Chatterjee, IAS (Retd.), welcoming Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, Miss India 2016 (2nd Runner-up), at the Sulabh Campus.

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Dr. Pathak’s path-breaking initiatives– Freedom for untouchables and restoration of their human rights After liberating the untouchable manual scavengers, Dr. Pathak developed a holistic plan to restore their human rights and dignity and bring them into the mainstream of society. Firstly, he got them relieved from the work of cleaning human excreta by getting bucket toilets cleaned by scavengers and converted into Sulabh flush toilets. Thus, the owners of the bucket toilets got the flush toilets and raised no objections. Secondly, he set up a centre called ‘Nai Disha’ at Alwar, Rajasthan, to provide them education and vocational training to earn their own livelihood. Dr. Pathak first taught them how to read and write, and how to put their signatures to draw money from the banks. For three months, Sulabh provided them stipend in cash because they were not literate. But after they learnt to read and write Sulabh gave them their stipend by cheques. Sulabh gave them vocational education in making eatables like papads, noodles, pickles and also in market-oriented trades such as tailoring, embroidery, fashion designing, beauty-care, etc. Vocational training enabled them to earn their livelihood, thus freeing them from economic problems. Dr. Pathak helped them to perform rituals and ceremonies of the Brahmins and upper castes. Initially, there was some opposition, but now the Brahmins offer them a cup of tea when they visit them. Now, they even invite the exuntouchables on festive occasions and marriage ceremonies and exchange gifts. Dr. Pathak also took the ex-untouchables to Varanasi to take a dip in the sacred Ganga. They also offered prayers to Lord Shiva at the Vishwanath temple and received the Lord’s blessings. After that 200 Brahmin families had a meal with them. This had never happened before. Later, Dr. Pathak also took them to the holy shrine of Ajmer Sharif and the sacred Cathedral Church, New Delhi, where they participated in the prayers. They also visited and prayed at the Gurudwara. Thus, the people of different faiths and castes accepted the former untouchables. Through these measures Dr. Pathak succeeded in emancipating the scavengers as well as making two towns of Rajasthan—Alwar and Tonk— scavenging-free. The scavengers now freely mingle with the upper-caste families, including those that had earlier employed them to clean and carry night soil. Now they sit together for tea and breakfast. The scavengers do the facials and beauty-care work for the upper-caste ladies. They are no longer discriminated against in the market place while shopping or buying fruits and vegetables. The upper-caste families now exchange greetings and attend the festivals of the untouchables and vice-versa. This shows a remarkable social change in the people’s attitude. Alwar and Tonk are now free of untouchability. Thus, Dr. Pathak has brought the untouchables into the social mainstream. Mrs. Laxmi Nanda, a former untouchable woman scavenger from Alwar, Rajasthan, welcoming Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, Miss India 2016 (2nd Runner-up), by applying the traditional vermilion ‘Tilak’ on her forehead.

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Liberated manual women scavengers from Alwar & Tonk (Rajasthan) and Nekpur, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh, presenting bouquet to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, at the Sulabh campus.

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A group photograph with the former untouchable women scavengers from Alwar and Tonk (Rajasthan) and Nekpur, Ghaziabad, (Uttar Pradesh).

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Dr. Pathak’s Prophetic Gesture to Widows of Vrindavan On a writ petition filed by the National Legal Services Authority (NALSA) for ameliorating the lives of the Vrindavan widows, the Hon’ble Supreme Court had expressed concern at their plight, requesting the concerned authorities to inquire whether Sulabh would provide food to the widows, who were living in pitiable and penurious conditions. This prompted Dr. Bindeshwar Pathak to immediately pay a visit to Vrindavan. On visiting the Ashrams, he found their condition heartrending and pathetic. Shocked

and moved to tears on hearing their stories and miseries, he immediately provided a stipend of Rs. 1000 per month to each of the 552 widows. Since then Dr. Pathak has taken various steps to mitigate the sufferings of the widows and improve their living conditions. Later, it became apparent to him that the amount of Rs. 1000 per month per widow was inadequate. Some of them still used to go to various temples to sing bhajans for five rupees a day for meeting their expenses on food and other essentials. He wanted to ensure that the widows living in these government-run shelters do not go to bed hungry or eke out their living by begging, which was hitherto a common sight. Keeping these things in mind, he increased the stipend amount to Rs. 2000 with effect from February 2013. This has enabled the widows to have two meals in their Ashrams, obviating the need to go out for singing and begging. This has instilled in them a sense of belonging and has lifted their broken spirits.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani shaking hands with the Widows of Vrindavan and Varanasi.

Dr. Pathak introducing Widows of Vrindavan and Varanasi to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani.

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Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani shaking hands with the Widows of Vrindavan and Varanasi.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani spending some happiest moments with the Widows of Vrindavan and Varanasi.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani accepting the bouquet from Widows of Vrindavan and Varanasi.

Widows of Vrindavan and Varanasi greeting to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani.

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A group photograph with the widows of Vrindavan and Varanasi.

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Hirmathla: The saga of an open defecation-free village Hirmathla is a village in Mewat district of Haryana where Sulabh has undertaken promotion of sanitation awareness and construction of toilets for all inhabitants. Sulabh got financial assistance from the Rail Tel Corporation India Limited under its Corporate Social Responsibility Programme for construction of 100 individual household toilets. Out of the total cost, the beneficiary’s contribution was Rs. 3,000 and the rest of the cost was borne by Rail Tel for 100 units and for 36 units by Sulabh. Every household in the village has a toilet now. Thus, the village has become free of open defecation. Having been declared a Nirmal Gram, Hirmathla has been awarded for the same. Sulabh has provided Total Sanitation Coverage in the village: construction of toilets for all individual households; creation of awareness for sanitation; promotion of health and hygiene programmes in schools; encouragement of women empowerment; and strengthening of Self-Help Groups (SHG) for monitoring and implementation of the sanitation and social plans.

Dr. Pathak explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani the plight of the women in Hirmathla village. Today this village has been declared as open defecation-free village, and serves as a model village in the area where the concerted efforts of the motivators have led to a behavioural change.

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A group photograph of the women from Hirmathla village.


Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani accepting the bouquet from the women of Hirmathla village.

Women of Hirmathla village greeting to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani.

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Making a qualitative change in the Arsenic-affected people of Madhusudankati, West Bengal Sulabh has set up in Madhusudankati, a remote hamlet in West Bengal near the India-Bangladesh border, a pilot project, Sulabh Purified Water Plant, which treats water collected in a deep, manmade pond at the village. It has been developed jointly by Sulabh and French NGO 1001 Fontaines. The plant started operating several months ago with the capacity to produce everyday 8,000 litres of potable water called Sulabh Jal. The water costs 50 paise (less than one cent) per litre, which makes it the cheapest purified bottled water. For residents of Madusudankati, the plant has proved to be a great help after years of suffering from skin and other diseases caused by arsenic in groundwater pumped from wells. After commencement of the Sulabh Water Treatment Plant, the residents are getting clean Sulabh Jal. There has been considerable improvement in the health of the people affected by the arsenic poison. Apart from supplying safe drinking water, Sulabh is also treating people suffering from arsenic poisoning at a health centre adjacent to the water plant.

Dr. Pathak explaining the Sulabh Purified Water Project to the Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani. Sulabh has installed water treatment plants at six sites in West Bengal. The raw water is drawn from the river Ganga, local pond and well. After its treatment at the Sulabh Water Treatment Plant, the raw water becomes purified and absolutely safe for drinking. The purified water costs 50 paisa per litre.

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A group photograph with the people of Madhusudankati village, Kolkata.

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Sulabh Purified Water ATM: An innovative initiative for community service The Sulabh Purified Drinking Water is the latest technological initiative from Sulabh. Impure water from rivers, ponds, wells, water bodies and taps is purified by this Sulabh technology; the treated water becomes safe for human consumption. Sulabh has installed water treatment plants at six sites of West Bengal in Madhusudankati in North 24 Parganas, Murshidabad in Murshidabad district, Mayapur in Nadia, Suvasgram in South 24 Parganas, ISKON Haridaspur in North 24 Parganas and Chaksultan in West Midnapur. Raw water is drawn from the river Ganga in Mayapur and Murshidabad, while in Madhusudankati it is taken from a local pond. In Haridaspur, Chaksultan and Mirzapur, (West Midnapur) it is taken from well. After its treatment at the Sulabh Water Treatment Plant, the water from the river/pond/well becomes purified and absolutely safe for drinking. Sulabh is bottling this water which is known as Sulabh Safe Drinking Water. It is available for 50 paise per litre in West Bengal. At the entrance of Sulabh Campus in New Delhi, such purified water is available for Re 1/- per litre at the Sulabh Water ATM.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani using the Sulabh Water ATM facility installed at the entrance of the Sulabh Campus.

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A Sulabh representative explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani about the technology used to make the Sulabh Purified Water.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani operating the installed vending machine for making sanitary napkins at the Sulabh Public Toilet Complex.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani watching how the incinerator machine works, installed in the Sulabh Public Toilet Complex at the entrance of Sulabh Campus.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani burning the sanitary napkins in the incinerator machine.

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Sulabh Health Centre: An initiative to outreach The Sulabh Ideal Health Centre is a part of the Sulabh Toilet Complex. A Total Healthcare Concept is practised here to achieve the goal of ‘Health for All’, as visualized by WHO. The Health Centre has the following facilities: Free consultations with doctors by general public throughout the day. Dispensing of essential medicines at a token amount of Rs. 5 to those who are willing to pay; otherwise they are given free of cost. Sanitary Napkin Vending Machine which provides low-cost sanitary napkins. Distribution of Condoms, Oral Contraceptive Pills (OCPs), Oral Rehydration Salt (ORS), Iron, Folic Acid and Calcium Tablets free of cost. Works as the Pulse Polio Centre of the Delhi Government.

Dr. Namita Mathur explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, Miss India 2016 (2nd Runner-up), about the activities of the Sulabh Health Centre.

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Sulabh Biogas Plant: A low-cost energy initiative The human excreta in the Sulabh Public Toilet does not go waste, it is linked to the Sulabh Biogas Plant where it is treated and converted into gas. This Sulabh biogas is used for cooking, lighting lamp, electricity generation, warming oneself and also for street-lighting. 32

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Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, lighting the mantle lamp, which is fuelled by biogas from the Sulabh Toilet Complex, as the source of energy.

A Sulabh representative explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, the production of electricity from biogas produced from the Sulabh Biogas Plant linked to the Sulabh Public Toilet. This can also be used for street lighting as was being done in Patna by Sulabh.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, frying papad at the Sulabh kitchen, where the biogas from the Sulabh public toilet complex is used for cooking. It is more economical than the conventional gas.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, offering papad to the Sulabh representatives frying her own hands in the Sulabh kitchen.

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Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, watching a demonstration of the Sulabh biogas being used for warming oneself during the winter season.

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Sulabh Effluent Treatment Plant: Eco-friendly Innovation Another technology developed by Sulabh is the Sulabh Effluent Treatment Plant where the effluents from Sulabh public toilets are treated and made odourless, colourless and pathogenfree. This concept of recycling is based on the fact that the water in the system is purified through Ultra Violet (UV) rays and such water becomes free from pathogens and bacteria. The Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) is less than 10 per milligram per litre in the treated water, making it safe to be used as fertilizer or discharged into river bodies as there is no chance of pollution. Dr. Pathak thus developed the human waste treatment system in its entirety to dispose it of locally, without the need of costly sewage treatment plants, etc. Recognizing this, the BBC Horizons has declared the Sulabh technologies as one of the five unique inventions of the world.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, being explained by the Sulabh representative, the working of the Sulabh Effluent Treatment Plant, where the water is made pathogen-free, and is safely used for floriculture and horticulture.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, keenly watching the treated water taken out from the Sulabh Effluent Treatment Plant.

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Dr. Pathak’s technological invention Sulabh Two-Pit Ecological Compost Flush Toilet: A Tool of Social change Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948) was the first national leader in modern India, who paid attention to the problems of open defecation and manual scavenging. He wanted to end these practices at the earliest, as he was keen to restore the human rights and dignity of the untouchables. He had a special concern for the scavenging untouchables—he wanted that their status should be on a par with others, and even that of the highest in the land—but felt that till the time they cleaned human faeces, nobody would have food or social relation with them. In 1968, Dr. Bindeshwar Pathak joined the Bihar Gandhi Centenary Celebration Committee, which was formed to make preparations for the centenary celebrations of Gandhiji in 1969. There, he was assigned the task of finding an alternative to manual scavenging as well as developing the ways and means to restore human rights and dignity of the untouchables, which was the dream of Mahatma Gandhi. After extensive research, Dr. Pathak invented the two-pit ecological compost flush toilet known as Sulabh Shauchalaya for the safe and hygienic disposal of human waste. This toilet technology, which is appropriate, affordable and culturally acceptable, requires only one litre of water to flush out the excreta in comparison to the requirement of 10 litres per flush in a conventional toilet. In the Sulabh technology, the human excreta gets converted into fertilizer because out of the two pits, one is used at a time and the other remains as a standby. Manual cleaning of human excreta is not required in this system. In addition to this, bio-fertilizer is produced, which can be used to raise the farm productivity, or for horticultural and floricultural purposes. This technology proved to be the effective solution to end the practice of manual cleaning of night soil by the untouchable scavengers and defecation in the open.

A Sulabh volunteer showing to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, the low-cost Sulabh toilet made out of local material like gunny bags. Gandhiji had always advocated the use of locally available materials. Sulabh two-pit ecological toilets can be built by whatever materials are easily available in a particular area.

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Dr. Pathak explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, the model of the Sulabh two-pit ecological toilets and how it diverts incoming excreta from one pit to the second pit.

A Sulabh volunteer explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, the functioning of the two pits attached to the Sulabh low-cost toilet where the human excreta in the pit does not require manual cleaning and, after a period of two years turns into bio fertilizer which contains 1.8% nitrogen, 1.6% phosphate and 1% potassium and can be used to raise the productivity of the fields.

A Sulabh volunteer explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, the child-friendly toilet developed by Sulabh, which can be used effectively in playschools and nurseries.

A Sulabh volunteer explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, superstructure of the Sulabh Shauchalaya for the higher income groups.

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A Sulabh volunteer explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, the Sulabh two-pit pour-flush ecological technology.

A Sulabh volunteer showing to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, the low cost Sulabh toilet made out of local material like gunny bags which are both easily available and economical.

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Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, being shown the model of a Sulabh roofless toilet. This type of toilet has been specially designed for the people who are habituated to defecate in the open.

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A Sulabh volunteer explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, the model of the Sulabh two-pit ecological toilets and how it diverts incoming excreta from one pit to the second pit.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, getting a detailed overview of the two-pit model which requires only one litre of water to flush.

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Dr. Pathak’s initiatives: Wealth from Waste In the Sulabh two-pit ecological compost toilet, the human excreta after remaining in the pit for two years gets converted into bio-fertilizer. This biofertilizer is free from pathogens, as it contains nitrogen (1.8%), phosphate (1.6%) and potassium (1%). This can be used to enhance the productivity of the soil—for agriculture and horticulture purposes. This manure is a rich fertilizer, and also a very good soil conditioner that improves the farm productivity.

A Sulabh representative explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, the Sulabh technology of purifying domestic waste water through duckweed (a free floating aquatic plant), which cleans water to a level that it can be safely discharged into any water body.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, smelling a pod of odour-free dried human excreta taken out from the Sulabh two-pit compost toilet.

A Sulabh volunteer explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, the untreated and treated water taken out from Sulabh public toiletlinked biogas plant. The BOD of this water is less than 10 mg/litre which is good for use in the field or to be discharged into any water body.

Dr. Pathak showing the dried water hyacinth to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, and explaining that the biogas generation shows better results when fed with the dried water hyacinth which increases gas production.

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Dr. Pathak explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, the low-cost door made from compressed human excreta.

Designer Door: Made out of Human Excreta Mr. Santiago Sierra and Ms. Mariana David, two sculptors from Mexico, visited Sulabh in January 2006 with a project to make some art works out of manure converted from human excreta of the pits of Sulabh Shauchalayas. After much experimentation and research, they created 22 sculptures in the shape and size of doors. In their artistic venture, they got assistance from Mr. Michael Coombs, an artist from London. Their art works were displayed in the Lisson Art Gallery in London in November 2007, and later also exhibited in the Munich Gallery in Germany. One of their art works is prominently displayed in the Sulabh International Museum of Toilets.

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Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani was amused to see a small ball of dried human excreta bouncing back when hit on the ground. One can freely touch it and also play with it.

A Sulabh volunteer explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, a small ball of dried human excreta. One can freely touch it.

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The Sulabh Research and Development Laboratory Sulabh has a well-equipped and fully functional laboratory with testing facilities for undertaking research and innovation in waste water treatment methods, lowcost sanitation technologies, development and improvement of biogas digester system, etc. Among other things, this laboratory has the distinction of testing a large number of samples, at the behest of the Delhi Pollution Control Board, from effluent treatment plants of various industries in Delhi and providing certificates about the quality of the effluent discharged.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, looking at the samples through the microscope at the Sulabh Research and Development Laboratory.

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Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, evincing keen interest in the functioning of the Research Laboratory on the Sulabh Campus.

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Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, with the children of Sulabh Public School during the Morning Assembly.

Dr. Pathak’s thrust on education for the children of former untouchable scavengers: Sulabh Public School

The Sulabh Public School is situated within the Sulabh Campus in New Delhi. Here, 60 per cent of the students are from the Dalit community and 40 per cent from other communities. This English medium school is one of the first schools of its kind, where Dalit students get not only free quality education, but also get all facilities, including books, uniforms, etc., free of cost. In this model school, the toilets are cleaned by the teachers and students themselves, and not by others. Mahatma Gandhi wanted that all people should clean their own toilets. This school fulfils this dream of Gandhiji. 55


Sulabh Vocational Training Centre The Sulabh Campus in New Delhi also houses a Vocational Training Centre. This centre imparts to young students, mainly belonging to the weaker section of society, two-year training in vocations like tailoring, beauty care, computers, fashion designing, embroidery, stenography, electronics, etc. It is heartening to note that not a single youngster trained here in the market-friendly trades has come back to say that he or she has not got a job. They all get employment because the training given here is extensive and effective. The Sulabh Vocational Training Centre empowers youth from struggling background, by skilling them in a trade in order to earn their living and lead a meaningful life.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, interacting with the students of the Cutting & Tailoring class, a wing of the Sulabh Vocational Training Centre.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, interacting with the slum students of the tailoring class, a wing of the Sulabh Vocational Training Centre.

A group photograph with the students of Cutting & Tailoring class.

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Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, interacting with the students of the Beauty care class, a wing of the Sulabh Vocational Training Centre.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, interacting with the students of the Typing & Shorthand class, a wing of the Sulabh Vocational Training Centre.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, interacting with the students of Sulabh Public School in Computer class.

A group photograph with the students of the Typing & Shorthand class.

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Sulabh School Sanitation Club Sulabh has set up a School Sanitation Club. In this Club, apart from other activities, the schoolgirls are taught to make sanitary napkins using simple materials. The Club has also installed a vending machine, where sanitary napkins are available. Incinerators have also been installed for safe disposal of sanitary napkins.

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The girls of the Sulabh School Sanitation Club explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, the procedure for making sanitary napkins.

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Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, appreciating the students for their unique work.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, keenly watching the newly made sanitary napkin.

The girls of the Sulabh School Sanitation Club explaining to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, the procedure for making sanitary napkins.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, is very happy to get the newly sanitary napkins from the vending machine.

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Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, operating the vending machine for making sanitary napkins.

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Sulabh International Museum of Toilets: A Panorama Unfolding the Epic of the Culture of Sanitation A unique Museum of Toilets is located at the Sulabh Campus. One of its kinds in the world, the Sulabh International Museum of Toilets has a rare collection of artefacts, pictures and objects detailing the historic evolution of toilets since 2500 BC. A large number of visitors, both from India and abroad, have shown keen interest in this museum, finding it informative, educative and fascinating. So far about 30 lakhs persons have visited it through our website, and over 10,000 people have visited this museum. Different items collected in the museum give a chronology of developments relating to sanitation technology, divulge toilet-related social customs and etiquettes, and shed light on the sanitary conditions and legislative efforts of many countries over the centuries. The museum has an impressive display of privies, chamber pots, toilet furniture, bidets and water closets in use from 1145 AD to the contemporary time. The museum aims to educate students and interested people about the historical trends in the development of toilets, provide information to researchers about the design, materials and technologies adopted in the past, and those in use in the contemporary world, and help policy-makers and sanitation experts better grasp the efforts made earlier in this field, throughout the world so that they can learn from the past and solve the present-day problems in the sanitation sector. Sulabh International Museum of Toilets has been ranked by the Time magazine as the third in the world’s 10 weirdest museums.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani watching the various artefacts at the Museum.

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Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, spending the happiest moment in Sulabh International Museum of Toilets.

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Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani watching the various artefacts at the Museum.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani evincing keen interest in the display boards which show the four-and-a-half-decades journey of Dr. Pathak and Sulabh

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani jotting down her impressions in the visitors book at the Museum.

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, is very happy to see the air-conditioned Sulabh public toilet in Lucknow to display in the panel boards.

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Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani seeing and buying the products from the former untouchable women scavengers from Alwar, set up stalls showcasing various items manufactured by them.

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Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani seeing and buying the products from the widows from Vrindavan, set up stalls showcasing various items manufactured by them.

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Sulabh Assembly Hall

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani, being felicitated by Dr. Pathak.

Dr. Pathak presenting the two-pit model memento to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani.

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Dr. Pathak presenting a Madhubani tapestry made by the artists of Madhubani from Bihar to Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani.

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SULABH INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL SERVICE ORGANISATION In General Consultative Status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council Sulabh Bhawan, Palam Dabri Road, New Delhi - 110 045 Tel. Nos. : 91-11-25031518, 25031519; Fax Nos : 91-11-25034014, 91-11-25055952 E-mail: info@sulabhinternational.org, sulabhinfo@gmail.com Website: www.sulabhinternational.org, www.sulabhtoiletmuseum.org

www.xtremeonline.in #9311156526

Hon’ble Ms. Pankhuri Gidwani with the children of Sulabh Public School during her visit at Sulabh Campus

Miss India 2016 (2nd Runner-up) Pankhuri Gidwani at the Sulabh Campus on April 23, 2016  
Miss India 2016 (2nd Runner-up) Pankhuri Gidwani at the Sulabh Campus on April 23, 2016  
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