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Why the Indus Script WAS true writing and why a largercorpus of texts existed in the


Indus Valley civilization:Si mple proof addressed to mainstream researchers &archaeologis


ts Published in the International Journal of Philosophy and Social Sciences(IJPSS), Vol II, No 2, 2012 Sujay Rao Mandavilli


This paper is meant to read together with the paper ‘ The reconfirmation and reinforcement of the Indus script thesis: a logical assessment and inquiry as to the elusive and enigmatic nature of thisscript , which was published ‘


in the ICFAI Journal of History and Culture in January 2011. In theaforementioned paper, we had clearly shown that the Indus script used in the Indus Valley civilizationwhich flourished from 2600 BC to 1900 BC, was a logo-syllabic script. In this paper, we show that


thecase for the lost manuscript hypothesis has never been stronger than it has been in the past onedecade. This hypothesis has had many adherents even in the West even earlier when very little of theIndus had been excavated, but few will now deny that no other


scenario is likely. This hypothesis wasearlier based on hunches, now its adherents can base it on science and valid epistemology. TheIndus Valley Civilization has always amazed legions of archeologists since the 1920’s and has been taught to students all


over the world: it can now take its pride of place among old world civilizations.This paper also introduces Logosyllabic thesis B as opposed to the older logo-syllabic thesis A andlays bare the differences between the two. We insist that only approaches such as


those detailed inthis paper can be applied for the study of the Indus script given the low quantum of archaeologicaldata in relation to the total known size of the IVC. (This ratio is the lowest for all known civilizations). This paper is meant to


be read after ‘Syncretism and Acculturation in Ancient India; a new nine phase acculturation model explaining the process of transfer of power from the Harappans to the Indo- Aryans which was published in two parts in the peer ’


-reviewed ICFAI journal of History and culture inJanuary 2009 and January 2010. This paper detailed methods to reconstruct the languages spoken inthe IVC.

@ Copyright Sujay Rao Mandavilli


In the earlier paper, The reconfirmation and reinforcement of the Indus script thesis : a logicalassessment as to the elusive and enigmatic nature of this script , which was published in the ICFAIJournal of History and Culture in ‘

’


January 2011 1

, we had shown very logically, and in a manner thatwould have appealed to the skeptic and the layman alike, that the Indus script was a fully evolvedlogosyllabic script. In this paper, we take our earlier conclusions a


step further and show irrefutablythat a larger corpus of texts existed in the Indus. The Lost Manuscript hypothesis has had manyadherents even in the West even decades earlier when very little of the Indus had been excavated,but few will now deny that no other scenario is


likely. This hypothesis was earlier based on hunches,now its adherents can base it on science and valid epistemology. The Indus Valley Civilization hasalways amazed legions of archeologists since the 1920’s and has been taught to students all


over the world: it can now take its pride of place among old world civilizations. Archeologists should alwayskeep this in mind: a longer corpus of texts may well turn up someday if inscribed on nonperishablematerials.The reasons why a large


corpus of texts definitely existed, either on non-perishable or perishable materials, and can be very reliably inferred are given below: Reason # 1 The Dholavira Signboard Fig 1. This signboard displays a high rate of sign repetition, more than Linear-


Elamite inscriptions even. The fact that the order of signs could have played a role in determining the meaning cannot be overlooked , and possible evidence for this can come from the fact that the spoked wheel occurs in the second and third position in the signboard (also the seventh and the tenth). This glyph may have encoded speech as this signboard may have


represented the name of this place. Note how this feature may have been put to use in land-locked and far-from Mesopotamia Dholavira for ornamental purposes, pointing out to a greater use of this feature, because this relatively difficult to use option would have been imported only if it had served a greater purpose. This automatically implies the existence of longer texts.


This also proves one thing: speech-encoding could be interpreted by a relatively large number of elites.

One of the most significant discoveries in the Indus was made in the Indus city of Dholavira,now in Gujarat in India. It was a large signboard with ten characters


discovered in 1999. Each signmeasured about 37 centimeters high and the board on which letters were inscribed was about 3meters long, making it very large by Indus standards. Some further facts about the Dholavirasignboard are presented below so as to


reinforce our case. 1

The Reconfirmation and reinforcement of the Indus script thesis: A logical assessment as to the elusive andenigmatic nature of this script Mandavilli, Sujay Rao ICFAI Journal of History and Culture January 2011

@ Copyright Sujay Rao Mandavilli 


It is one of the most famous of Harappan inscriptions and has become instantly famous ever since it was discovered in 1999. It also shows convincingly that the Indus script was put to a widevariety of uses. It was very large in size, 


and even giant if compared to the much smaller seals and measured 3meters or so in length. It was located in Farfrom-Mesopotamia Dholavira, and in one of the furthest sites fromMesopotamia. It was not even the largest 


city in the IVC. It hung over the citadel there, and may have been a prominent landmark of the citadel. The factthat it was hung over the citadel meant it was meant to be read by large sections of society and atleast by elites. It must have represented 




the name of the place and must have been closely tied to speech: notethe sign repetition. The rate of sign repetition is much higher than most LinearElamiteinscriptions. The spoked wheel sign repeats four times. 


Even Rongorongo glyphs, though unquestionably longer, do not display this kind of signrepetition. There is no overwhelming evidence that Rongorongo branched off from a script whichhad reached the linguistic stage, either. Though more evidence


must be sought, these are twoconvincing arguments that the Indus script is a stronger case for true writing than Rongorongo. The sign which was used as a determinative was a very common Indus sign. I.e. the spokedwheel sign. 




The sign used as a determinative appears to have been also similar to determinatives in other writing systems such as Linear Elamite but not exactly identical to them. This feature is notavailable in ProtoElamite. On the other hand, Linear Elamite does not appear until


around 2100BC i.e. well after the Indus script came into widespread use or closer to the end of the IVC. Whilethe relationship between Proto and Linear Elamite is yet to be established (there are severalschools of thought, and most consider the link to be


tenuous) 2

, it would strongly imply that theIndus script was logo-syllabic. The glyph suggests that the determinative could be used either before or after another commonIndus sigh probably varying its meaning. 




The other signs with which the determinative was used were also common Indus signs. The Indus script was also related to ProtoElamite but was developed after the scripts of West Asia had become logo-syllabic which means it probably 


had a linguistic component. It was put to the most frivolous use. Few scholars will now dispute the fact that the Indus script was a logosyllabic script on the basisof this evidence. Few scholars will deny the fact that speech 




encoding was one of the major functions of the Indus script and had this feature had reached a very precocious maturity. On thebasis of this evidence, we can even conclude that this appears to be a fully developed logo-syllabic script. Human learned to code sound through the


rebus principle and acrophony and thetransition from logographic to logosyllabic scripts was often long drawn and messy. This glyphhowever, appears to represent a logosyllabic script in a mature form, perfectly adopted for use inthe


Indus. One would only hope more such inscriptions were found, but to state that the discoveryof this inscription was probably a timely godsend would be a gross understatement and wouldonly make our case very strong, in a manner no other glyph


perhaps can. The reasons would nothave been very far to seek: the Indus script would have had the benefit of being introduced later than the scripts of Egypt or Mesopotamia and all the developmental effort was probably carriedout there. The Harappans


were spared the trouble of experimentation and imported the scriptafter it had reached maturity. This inscription was apparently more closely tied to speech than most Linear-Elamite inscriptions.Speech encoding would have been a prized 


possession: no one would have used it just for adecorative signboard at far-fromMesopotamia Dholavira. Why would a man who had inscribedthis, done so o

If nobody else could read it? 2


The archaeology of Elam: Formation and Transformation of the Ancient Iranian state D.T.PottsCambridge University press, 1999


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aryan indus indus valley indus script sujay rao mandavilli true writing (more tags) aryan Tags: indus indus valley indus script sujay rao mandavilli true writing sujay rao lost manuscript lost corpus lost manuscript hypothesis indus logosyllabic indus script logosyllabic indus logosyllabic script (fewer) Free download or readfalse online for free. Flag for inappropriate content http://www.scribd.com/doc/111707419/Sujay-Indus-Reintroducing-Lost-Manuscript-Hypothesis 05/08/2013 pdf text original


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