Page 1

FBISD to vote on rezoning soon: Page 2

Ridge Point comes back against Travis in girls basketball action See the story on page 6. (Photo by Bill McCaughey)

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Chipotle is first to open in The Grid By Theresa D. McClellan THERESA@FORTBENDSTAR.COM

Months after breaking ground, the Chipotle Mexican Grill is the first business to open in the $500 million venture in Stafford called The Grid. In November, a banner flying in the wind against the new blonde-colored brick building housing the popular Mexican restaurant announced its opening. As construction and underground work continues on the massive 192 acres of the former Texas Instruments property, a site now called The Grid, workers at Chipotle happily served customers and expressed interest in what is to come to the sprawling development. “This is exciting,” Chipotle manager Miriam Santana said of the giant complex that will feature “a creative mixed-use reinvention” of the landmark site, according to the Dallas based Street Level Investments developers. “It’s going to bring a lot of people here,” said Santana. Touted as a destination retail and restaurant concept with 2,400 residential high-end units, 500,000 square feet of office space, a hotel, a central public green with pocket parks, jogging and bike trails and regularly scheduled entertainment events, evidence of work on the projects underway surrounds the light-filled restaurant. Workers in hard hats and heavy equipment could be

SEE GRID, PAGE 3

Fort Bend / Southwest • Volume 43 • No. 22

Visit www.FortBendStar.com

Brazos River brinkmanship

River reaches flood stage but stays in its banks By Joe Southern JSOUTHERN@FORTBENDSTAR.COM

The Brazos River played another game of brinkmanship last week but backed off without causing major flooding in Fort Bend County. The river rose to flood levels but didn’t inundate any homes or businesses last week, unlike the four floods from 2015 through Hurricane Harvey in 2017. Brazos Bend State Park was forced to close due to minor flooding. The Brazos River Turnaround on Highway 59 and parts of Missouri City’s Edible Arbor Trail were closed but that represented the bulk of the headache caused by the swollen muddy river. “The river has crested and it’s starting to drop,” said Alan Spears, deputy emergency management coordinator for Fort Bend County. Parts of low-lying areas in Needville flooded, including Cow Creek Road, Charlie Meyer Road at Turkey Creek, and River Oaks in Pecan Bend. The gauge in Richmond showed the Brazos cresting at 46.5 feet on Wednesday. The gauge downstream in Rosharon, the one used by Brazos Bend State Park, was forecast to reach 49.7 feet but crested a foot lower than that. “We had what is called a dry flood,” Park Superintendent Chris Bishop said. “What I mean by that is the river is rising but we’re not getting clobbered with rain.” It was rain a week earlier combined with rains in the northern river basin that led to the rising river according to the National Weather Service. “Most of these crests are driven solely from local rainfall,” Katie Landry-Guyton of the National Weather Service in Houston-Galveston said in a video update last

Christopher Bishop, superintendent of Brazos Bend State Park, shows the fishing pier at Hale Lake which flooded due to rising waters from the Brazos River. (Photo by Joe Southern)

week. In Brazos Bend, Bishop said he made the decision to close the park once the forecast topped 46.5 feet in Rosharon. “We don’t want to have a false sense of confidence for future floods, so 46.5 feet is my trigger point for closing in the future,” he said. At that point the road leading to the campgrounds goes under water and several of the trails become impassable. A handful of campsites flooded and the fishing pier at Hale Lake went under water again. Several popular hiking trails were closed as well. They are flooded not by the Brazos River, but by tributaries such as Big Creek that get backed up and experience a reverse flow. In Missouri City, authorities closed a portion of the Edible Arbor Trail due to minor flooding. “Staff has evaluated this section and closed both sides of the trail under FM

SaberCats try again

High water of the Brazos River flows under the train bridge in Richmond Thursday. The river reached flood levels but left Fort Bend County mostly unscathed. (Photo by Joe Southern)

1092 (Murphy Road) with barricades until the water recedes. Residents are advised to avoid these high water areas and use caution while walking on the trail and in

Mosley Park,” the city said in a press release. “According to the Fort Bend Office of Emergency Management, the river’s forecast crest level is about

10 feet lower than both Hurricane Harvey and Memorial Day in 2016, and five feet lower than Memorial Day and Tax Day flooding in 2015,” the city said.

Fort Bend Museum to be remodeled after fire By Joe Southern JSOUTHERN@FORTBENDSTAR.COM

The Houston SaberCats kicked off the second year of the Major League Rugby with a pre-season match against the Austin Elite at Constellation Field. See the story on page 6. (Photo by Joe Southern)

When a fire damaged part of the Fort Bend Museum in Richmond last year it left the burning question of how to rebuild the facility. The answer will formally be presented to the public with a major announcement at the end of January. Members of the Sugar Land Rotary Club, however, got a preview last Wednesday when Fort Bend History Association Board President Tim Kaminski made a presentation to the civic organization. He said the Fort Bend History Association will launch a nearly $2 million fundraising campaign to renovate the museum. “There’s been talk for years about renovating the museum, moving the museum, doing something else with it. But we decided it’s best to stay where we’re at, to stay on property. We are

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Showing an artist rendering of the remodeled Fort Bend Museum at Wednesday’s Sugar Land Rotary Club meeting are, from the left, Rotary Club President Margie Connolly, Fort Bend History Association Board President Tim Kaminski, and FBHA Executive Director Claire Rogers. (Photo by Joe Southern)

going into a major renovation campaign for the Fort Bend County Museum. With that, here’s what our future is going to look like,” he said, unveiling conceptual drawings of the revised facility. “Going forward, the drawing is in a carriage house style, something that

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typically would have been on the property had there been a carriage house there to begin with. This first part is an addition onto it so we can have additional office space and then the part that is currently the exhibit hall,

SEE MUSEUM, PAGE 3

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THE STAR

PAGE 2 • Wednesday, January 16, 2019

See us online www.FortBendStar.com

FBISD to vote on rezoning earlier than expected By Theresa D. McClellan THERESA@FORTBENDSTAR.COM

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The emotionally charged issued of rezoning is coming to a head this week. When Vanesia Johnson saw the proposed recommendations for the Elementary 51 she was pleased with the decision of the Fort Bend ISD Superintendent Charles Dupre. She sat on the focus group. She said she was the only Title One parent on the group and said she felt heard as a parent in an underutilized school that also catered to bilingual and special needs students. The west side mother grew concerned, however, when she saw the superintendent’s recommendations for the high schools on the east side of the district that did not include feeding more students into underutilized Thurgood Marshall High School. “There is a grave injustice perpetuated on the east side and no one is brave enough and bold enough. This was their moment. When I saw Option 1 I thought, have we arrived? It was a social justice moment. But they

(school leaders) didn’t take it and Marshall got pimped,” said Johnson. During community sessions last month the district explored four options and asked for public input via surveys. The district extended the surveys to Jan. 5 to accommodate the holiday season. Six days later, Dupre announced the decision that was previously expected to be made in February. On Monday night Dupre was expected to recommend a hybrid of options two and three for the board to consider. The Monday night meeting occurred after the Star deadline but the board was expected to discuss the recommendations and make a decision to vote on the recommendations at the Jan. 22 meeting. The decision on the high school was initially expected to occur in February, but at 9 p.m. Friday, Dupre sent out an apologetic email to parents and posted on the FBISD page that they had enough input to make a decision. The email was also posted on the district website. The district is trying to balance high school en-

rollment in the southeast portion of the district where Ridgepoint High School is overcrowded and Marshall and Willowridge high schools are underutilized. The changes would begin in the fall of 2019 where students entering ninth grade would begin a four-year phase-in of the new boundaries. Students entering 10th, 11th, and 12th grade in the 2019-20 school year would be eligible to remain at their current high school without district-provided transportation. Dupre said the feedback showed a community desire for minimal changes in the short term prior to the planned construction of a new high school in the southeast side of the district that was included in the 2018 bond. “We also recognize that the challenges associated with the boundary planning process have caused a great deal of anxiety, and because the community’s desires were so clear, we were able to formulate a recommendation faster than originally anticipated,” Dupre wrote. Summary of recommended changes: • The current Schiff Elementary School zone will feed through Baines Middle School into Hightower High School instead of Ridge Point High School. • The portion of Heritage Rose Elementary School that currently feeds to Baines Middle School (areas off or north of Highway 6) will feed through Baines into Hightower instead of Ridge Point. • Parks Elementary School will continue to feed through Lake Olympia Middle School and then into Willowridge High School instead of Hightower. • The area currently zoned to Palmer Elementary School north of Lake Olympia Parkway and east of Community Park will be zoned through McAuliffe Middle School to Willowridge instead of Hightower. This area is currently

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H MUSEUM, FROM PAGE 1 the whole building is going to be opened up. Not only are we going to be able to have exhibits there but we are going to be able to have indoor events for anywhere from 150 to 170 people,” he said. The museum would not only be used to teach people local history, but an expanded facility will also allow the Fort Bend History Association to lease the building for special events. “If we can run a secondary business, which is weddings and small corporate events and things like that, then we’re going to do that. And we think going in this direction is going to help us achieve that goal,” Kaminski said. The goal he mentioned is creating financial stability for the organization. “One of the plans for us was not just to raise money to rebuild this place but how do we make our organization sustainable over time? As anybody knows you don’t make it off your ticket sales and visitors, you make it from donations through charities and so forth,” he said. For the history association, the project is very bold. “We’re very excited, it’s a little scary, it’s more money than we’ve ever had to raise before,” Kaminski said. He said he hopes the campaign will help raise awareness of the organization in the public. Founded more than 50 years ago as the Fort Bend County Museum Association, the organization changed its name and rebranded itself about two

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years ago. Kaminski said that was necessary because so many other museums have opened in the county that are not affiliated with them. He also related the story of how his eyes were opened as to the scope of the association when he was asked to join the board several years ago. As a child, he visited the museum on a school field trip, but didn’t know much else about it. As an adult he was very active in the community but was surprisingly naïve about local history. “As I’ve discovered over the years, this organization has blossomed into having multiple locations with multiple items in its collection but nobody knew about it. As one of the most connected people in the county, if I didn’t know that, I knew the general public didn’t know that,” he said. Claire Rogers, executive director of the FBHA, said the organization operates the Fort Bend Museum, George Ranch Historical Park, DeWalt Heritage Center, and Decker Park, and oversees the Fort Bend Archeological Association. “Over 30,000 students come out to one of our sites each year. They come to learn history and we try to make it as hands-on and as interesting and interactive as we possibly can,” she said. Recognizing that Fort Bend County is one of the most culturally diverse in the nation, the organization is striving to be more inclusive. “In order for everybody to see themselves in this county museum the decision was made that we have

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got to diversify ourselves,” Kaminski said. “And now we have a very diversified board. Our programming is slated to represent and show how all the different cultures came into the county and at one point what were their contributions to the county? Those are stories that are going to be able to be told from today on forward.” He said adding diversification to the organization and the museum is something that has been needed for a long time. “Most of the collection that is shown there and most of the exhibits have been the same since 1972. Very little has changed when you walk in there,” Kaminski said. “Fortunately we did not lose any of the artifacts but the building was damaged to the point that one half of it had to be shut down, which is the office side. It has really limited our programming and what we’re able to do there.” He said he hopes that the renovation and expansion will allow more of the association’s collection to be displayed. “We have over 40,000 artifacts in the collection, many of which people have not seen before because we didn’t have the space. They’re housed at the Quonset hut out at George Ranch,” he said. He told the Sugar Land Rotary Club members that they can get involved in a number of ways. He encourages membership in the association, participation in events, and he is also recruiting new board members. For more information, visit www.fbhistory.org.

Hope For Three has lucheon ‘For the Kids We Love’ luncheon, presented by Mary and Tom Solcher and guest speaker, Grant Maniér, encourages support in raising awareness, acceptance and inclusion for local families and children living with autism spectrum disorder. “It’s not what I can’t do, but what I can do that makes a difference,” said Maniér, author, public-speaker and

From staff reports FOR THE FORT BEND STAR

Hope For Three Autism Advocates, a local nonprofit, is holding its annual luncheon slated for Valentine’s Day, Feb. 14, at Safari Texas Ranch, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. “For the Kids We Love”

Eco-Artist phenomenon. Maniér uses thousands of pieces of recycled paper products and shredded puzzle pieces, and more, by creating extraordinary masterpieces of art. Individual tickets ($50), and table ($500) sponsorships are available. For more information, visit hopeforthree. org or call 281-245-0640.

H GRID, FROM PAGE 1 seen throughout the area along Airport Road where the Chipotle restaurant is located. The 192 acres of property is bounded on the south by the Texas Instruments Ditch, on the west by Kirkwood Road and US Highway 59 on the north by West Airport Boulevard and on the east by FM 11092/Murphy Road. The Grid is expected to become a regional attraction for Stafford with shops, a central park, restaurants, high-end apartments, food halls with artisan chefs, and a hotel. About $500,000 of funds from the city’s hotel tax will be used to generate tourism and income to the city. “I believe things are progressing very nicely,” said Patti Worfe, executive director of Stafford’s Economic Development Corporation. “Obviously the Kirkwood side has a lot going on because of the underground infrastructure that is going on. Once that is complete, I hope to see things like Whiskey Cake,

Chipotle manager Miriam Santana, second from left with hat, and her staff happily greet a customer in Stafford. (Photo by Theresa D. McClellan)

In-N-Out Burger and Drive Shack begin construction,” she said. Developers have nabbed some popular tenants including Drive Shack, a golf entertainment venue, a craft cocktail bar called Whiskey Cake and the California fast foods franchise of In-N-Out Burger, which will be the first one in Texas. Worfe did not have a timeline for when the other businesses will open and the firm representing the developers did not return calls. Worfe said Stafford’s economic development

office, “has heard from several area businesses that they have enjoyed seeing all the workers in their businesses and have done whatever they could to help accommodate them.” Renee Robinson stopped into the restaurant to bring food to one daughter and visit another daughter working behind the counter with the crew at the restaurant. The proud mom watched her daughter working and gushed, “This place is gorgeous, but they need to have bigger signs so people will know it’s here.”

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THE STAR

PAGE 4 • Wednesday, January 16, 2019

See us online www.FortBendStar.com

News briefs Porter files for re-election in Sugar Land

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Steve Porter

Steve Porter, Sugar Land City Councilman District One, announced his campaign for re-election on May 4. He was first elected to city council in this same position in 2013 and, if elected, will be

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E E E E

Obituary

E E E E

THOMAS EMIL ALTENBERN JULY 9TH, 1935

Thomas Emil Altenbern passed away peacefully at the age of 83 on January 10th, 2019, in Sugar Land, Texas. Tom was born on July 9th, 1935 in Freeport, Illinois to William and Margaret Altenbern, and was the youngest of three sons. He is preceded in death by his parents, brothers Stanley and Bill, nephew Pe-ter, eldest son David, and granddaughter Christi Simpson. He is survived by Clara Jo Altenbern, his lov-ing wife of 63 wonderful years; his daughter, Deborah Nelson, and her husband Dave; his son Douglas and his wife Kelly Jo; his grandchildren Carolyn Blanton, Heather Stinger, Stephanie Altenbern, Jeffrey Altenbern, Tiffanie Altenbern; and eleven great-grandchildren. Tom was a well-known family man who was proud to love and support his children and grandchildren. Tom earned a degree in chemical engineering from The

E

serving his fourth-consecutive and last term on city council due to term limits, which he supports. "It has been my privilege to serve the citizens of District One as a council member and Mayor ProTem (in 2016-17) on Sugar Land City Council," said Porter. "For more than 39 years, my family and I have chosen to call District One our home. We love District One for the history, the great schools, the planned growth, and especially the friends and neighbors who also call District One their home." For more information, visit www.StevePorter4District1.com.

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University of Michigan, where he met and married Jo. Tom did not want to be just an engineer dealing with technology, but rather wanted to use his technical knowledge to help others. Most of his career was spent with the Dow Chemical Company, which required several relocations of his family around the country where they created life-long friend-ships, ultimately settling in the Houston area. When he retired in 1992, Tom looked for ways to use the gifts

that had served him well professionally to serve others. In addition to caring for his father, Tom tutored children and was actively involved in civic activities in and around Missouri City, serving on the Fort Bend County Grand Jury, and involvement in Quail Valley Proud and Quail Valley’s crime watch program. In his free time, Tom enjoyed golf, travel, and “cheap eats” nights with friends. Visitation will begin at 11 a.m., followed by a memorial service at 12 p.m., on Thursday, January 17th, 2019, at The Settegast-Kopf Co. @ Sugar Creek, 15015 Southwest Freeway, Sugar Land, Interment will follow at Forest Park Westheimer Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that contributions be made in Tom’s memory to the American Heart Association or to the Fort Bend Women’s Center. Tribute and or words of condolence can be left at www.settegastkopf.com.

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McCutcheon filing for re-election to Sugar Land City Council

Carol McCutcheon announced she will seek re-election as Sugar Land City Councilmember District 4 in the May 4 election. Since the annexation, her district has included Greatwood. “I am grateful I was elected to serve as the

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people’s voice on city council. I have worked hard for the people of Sugar Land and am proud of my service,” she said. For more information, visit www.carolforsugarland.com.

Alex Hunt to run for LCISD board seat 7 Alex Hunt, a KatyFulshear resident, Lamar Consolidated ISD parent, local attorney for children and families, and former public school teacher, has announced his candidacy for the District 7 seat on the Lamar Consolidated ISD Board of Trustees. Hunt has advocated for children his entire career. After graduating from The University of Texas, he taught sixth grade math in a Houston public school. Through

Fort Bend ISD to host textbook public review, Jan. 22-Feb. 1 The Fort Bend Independent School District will conduct a public review on the upcoming textbooks and instructional materials that are under consideration for adoption for the 2019-2020 school year. The public review takes place from Jan. 22 through Feb. 1 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day at the FBISD Education Complex, 1555 Independence Blvd., Missouri City.


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Wednesday, January 16, 2019 • PAGE

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My latest Facebook post and Twitter tweet is this: I quit Chances are good that some of you are reading this via Facebook or Twitter. The irony is that I have made a commitment (or resolution) to limit my social media access to no more than two hours a week. I would probably eliminate it altogether except I still need to be on it for work related purposes (such as posting stories to social media sites) as well as the occasional update for family and friends. This is a big experiment to see how it affects me on a couple levels. First, I estimate that I have been spending well over two hours a day just scrolling and trolling my Facebook and Twitter feeds. Over the last 10 years, that probably adds up to months of my life lost to staring at a computer screen that could have been spent being productive in the real world or spending time with my family. If I spent half the

FAITH, FAMILY & FUN JOE SOUTHERN EDITOR

time I wasted on social media with my children I’d be twice the dad I am today. I plan to use that reclaimed time to be more productive at work and to be more involved with my wife and children. I will use some of that time to work on my book project that I’ve been dragging my heels on for the last five years. No more excuses! Secondly, I want to see how it affects me physically and psychologically. The physical part should be simple. Any time I’m not planted in front of a computer I can be on my feet getting exercise and burning

calories. The psychological part will take a little more study. Without social media I won’t be exposing myself to the negative and divisive diatribe that is permeating our culture today. Removing all that negativity will open me to more positive things in life. More importantly, I won’t be allowing my mind to devolve into mental mush from hours of endless scrolling. I’ll be free to be more creative in my projects. I also hope to clear up the brain fog that I’ve been struggling with for the last several years. I figure using my brain rather than filling it with useless junk will help bring more clarity and purpose. To be sure there are a lot of things I enjoy about social media that I will miss. There is a lot of humor in my Facebook feed that will suddenly be gone from my life. I will miss the connections with friends and family scattered across the

country and other parts of the world. That will be a huge adjustment, but I think I’ll survive. After all, I managed to live the first 40 or so years of my life without social media. In order to achieve my goal, I deleted all social media apps from my phone. I’ve also removed all the social media tabs from the web browsers on my computers. That eliminates a lot of temptation. On the other hand, it is also creating some serious withdrawal symptoms. At the time of this writing I’m just one day into this grand experiment and I find that I’m feeling a little lost and unsettled without those quick peeks at Facebook or Twitter. Those times when I’d habitually click on my Facebook app are now filled with awkward moments of sitting there trying to figure out what I should be doing. The first thing I did was start cleaning and reorganizing my office at work. It

had become really cluttered and messy. I am now discovering things that I had shoved aside that actually need my attention. Hopefully that will lead to more stories getting done. It also led me to look back at old editions of the newspaper and realizing just how much I have accomplished in a short time. None of those things happened while I was scrolling through social media. It all happened while I was out in the community being involved and engaging in life. I need more of that. We all need more of that! One of the things I’m keeping in the back of my mind is how counterintuitive this move is for a journalist. Social media allows journalists to be connected to people and events in real time and in ways much broader than we had ever imagined in the pre-Internet dark ages. Not having that access on a regular basis is sure to have

some drawbacks. There will be a lot of things I miss. At the same time, I hope I’m so much more engaged in what’s really going on that I can do a better and more thorough job for our readers. More importantly, I hope it makes me a better person. That is the underlying objective of this goal. When the time comes and my obituary is written, I hope it is filled with numerous accomplishments and that my funeral is attended by an overflowing crowd. I don’t want the latter half of my life to be noted for likes, shares and re-tweets to a bunch of people that I used to know in the first half of my life. On a closing note, I find it refreshing that I will now be devoting more of my time and resources to my wife and children and not throwing it away on the Mark Zuckerbergs of this world. I find that to be very empowering indeed!

School finance reform – who needs it? Because the current method of funding public education is overly dependent on local property taxes, the 85th Texas Legislature established the Texas Commission on Public School Finance to find ways to fix it. The Commission, chaired by former Texas Supreme Court Justice Scott Brister, recently released its final report. A few of the recommendations included are: • $100 million a year to school districts that want to develop their own teacher evaluation metrics and tie pay to performance. • Up to $150 million to incentivize school districts to offer dual language programs, which instruct students in both English and Spanish, and to improve their dyslexia programs. • $800 million to incentivize school districts to improve students’ reading level in early grades and to succeed in college or a career after graduating high school. • $1.1 billion to improve education for low-income students, with school dis-

Jim Rice

tricts that have a higher share of needy students getting more money. • Create a new goal of having 60 percent of thirdgrade students reading on or above grade level and 60 percent of high school seniors graduating with a technical certificate, military inscription, or college enrollment without the need for remedial classes. • Cap local school district tax rates in order to offer property tax relief and a small amount of funding for schools —a proposal from Gov. Greg Abbott. • No extra funding for special education programs until the state has completed overhauling those programs in line with a fed-

eral mandate. The Texas Tribune reported, “In its final report, the commission said it wanted to: balance local and state funding for public schools; to rework “outdated or otherwise inefficient allotments, weights and programs;” to increase equity in schools “with significantly greater investment in low-income and other historically underperforming student groups;” to reduce the growth of property taxes and reliance on the so-called “Robin Hood” system that moves money from wealthier districts to poorer ones; to encourage adoption of “data-informed best practices” and to immediately spend more money to do it; and to increase per-pupil funding in the future based on the results of those practices.” What the report failed to suggest were ways to replace the revenue that is currently derived from local property taxes. The Tribune report went on to say that “Even if not one more dime is spent on public education in Texas, leveling the fundraising

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where else. As a homeowner myself, I would like my property tax bill to decrease, however there can be no lowering of local property taxes without revising the current school funding formulas, and there can be no revising of school funding formulas without finding an alternative revenue source to replace the current overreliance on local property taxes. It is a conundrum. The new Speaker of the

BAPTIST CHURCH

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load would force the state to raise more money.” Statewide the balance between state and local property taxes is roughly 35 percent state and 55 percent local property taxes with the difference being contributed by federal programs. It has been estimated it would cost more than $11 billion to bring that back into balance which is surely an amount that would require the state to find the money some-

GLORY BAPTIST CHURCH • 281-499-0440 211 Brand Lane Drive • Stafford, Texas 77477 Serving Stafford for 34 years Preaching the word - Singing the Hymns Worshipping the Lord Jesus Sunday 10:00 am Teaching - 11:00 am Preaching 6:00 pm Worshiping Wednesday 7:00 pm Praying www.gloryfbc.com METHODIST CHURCH

CHRIST CHURCH SUGAR LAND • 281-980-6888 A United Methodist Community 3300 Austin Parkway • Sugar Land, TX 77479 Sunday Worship in the Sanctuary Simple Service / Prayer & Communion: 8:15 am Contemporary: 9:30 am / Traditional: 10:55 am Sunday School for all ages available at 9:30 & 10:55 am. www.christchurchsl.org

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House, Dennis Bonnen, has made these two goals the top priorities of the Texas House. It will require hard work, commitment and understanding of this important issue on the part of the entire Texas Legislature as well as all our citizens to get this done. As parents, we all want the good things in life for our children. Most of us

SEE FINANCE, PAGE 9

CHURCH OF CHRIST

MISSOURI CITY CHURCH OF CHRIST • 281-261-8944 2019 Bright Meadows Dr. - Missouri City, TX 77489 www.mocitycoc.org Sunday morning services: 10:15 am

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STAFFORD CHURCH OF CHRIST • 281-499-2507 402 Stafford Run Rd. -Stafford, 77477 SUNDAY: Bible Study: 9:30 a.m. Worship: 10:30 a.m. Afternoon Worship 5:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY : Bible Study 7:00 p.m. www.staffordchurchofchrist.org

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

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FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH, LCMS 281-242-7729 800 Brooks St., Sugar Land Sunday: 8:00 am Traditional Worship 9:15 am Sunday School 10:30 am Contemporary Worship (Nursery Available) 4:00 pm Spirit of Life Worship

Scripture of the week

"For we do not preach ourselves, but Jesus Christ as Lord, and ourselves as your servants for Jesus' sake." - 2 Corinthians 4:5


THE STAR

PAGE 6 • Wednesday, January 16, 2019

See us online www.FortBendStar.com

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Ridge Point comes back to defeat Travis 54-47 in girls basketball By Bill McCaughey FOR THE FORT BEND STAR

Behind 41-30 at the end of the third quarter, the Ridge Point Panthers outscored Travis 24-6 in the fourth quarter to pull out a 54-47 win Jan. 8 at Travis. The first half was evenly played as Ridge Point led 15-12 at the end of the first quarter. Travis’ Delilah Van Campen sat out most of the first quarter with two fouls and when she returned with 6:07 to go in the half, the Tigers went on a 14-5 run to give Travis a 26-22 halftime lead. The Tigers increased their lead to 41-30 at the end of three quarters as Van Campen scored nine points in the quarter. The Panthers crept closer and with 5:00 to go in the game, Van Campen fouled out with the Tigers up 43-37. The Panthers then went on a 17-4 run as they applied more defensive pressure. At a timeout, Panther Coach Michael Vitek challenged his team to fight for every loose ball and to go for steals. The

Travis High School’ Avery Smith (24) scores two of her eight points in a loss to Ridge Point. (Photo by Bill McCaughey)

Panthers responded as they came up with three loose balls and two steals in the final three minutes. Behind 47-46 with 1:40 to go in the game, Taylor scored on a jumper, Aleighyah Fontenot and Raven Adams each hit two free throws and Taylor finished the scoring with two free throws for a 54-47 win. “That was not the way we wanted to start the game,” Vitek said. “But the kids were really battling on the defensive rebounds and we just kept playing together as a team, even when we were down. They just kept battling and battling. It’s all on them. They play hard together.” Fontenot led Ridge Point with 16 points, including four three-pointers. “About two summers ago, I began working on my threepoint shot. I try to shoot 300 to 500 three-point shots every day to get better,” Fontenot said. Ridge Point is now 6-0 and in first place in the district. Van Campen led Travis with 15 points. The Tigers are now 3-3 in district play.

Austin Elite beat the Houston SaberCats 14-10 Sam Windsor catches the ball during the second half of play Friday during the pre-season rugby match between the Houston SaberCats and the Austine Elite at Constellation Field. The Elite beat the SaberCats 14-10. The SaberCats will play again at Constellation Field on Saturday as they take on the Glendale (Colo.) Raptors. (Photo by Joe Southern)

By Bill McCaughey FOR THE FORT BEND STAR

Rugby returned to Sugar Land as the Houston SaberCats opened their preseason schedule with a 14-10 loss to the Austin Elite last Friday at Constellation Field. The SaberCats scored first as Zach Pangelinan scored a try at the 30:22 mark. The conversion kick was no good and Houston had a 5-0 lead. The rest of the first half saw both teams come close to scoring but both defenses were dominant. The SaberCats scored again in the 56th minute as Alex Elkins rammed his way over the try line. The conversion kick was again missed and the SaberCats had a 10-0 lead.

Austin immediately responded as Ben Mitchell powered his way over the try line in the 58th minute. Mitch Romero’s conversion kick was good, and the Houston lead was narrowed to 10-7. Ten minutes later, Aden McMullen scored a try for Austin and after Romero’s

successful conversion kick, Austin was up 14-10. The last twelve minutes were scoreless, and the final score was Austin Elite 14 and Houston 10. Last year, SaberCat Sam Windsor led the league in scoring. Windsor thought the SaberCats played well for the first match of the year, but need to improve in some areas. “We learned a lot of things tonight. We learned we need to be a little more disciplined. I think that was a trait of ours last season. It was a point of focus last season and I think tonight, it got the better of us,” he said. “We slipped into some bad habits, but credit Austin. They gave us a good fight. But tonight, was a trial game, no points on the standings, but it was

good to be back at Constellation Field. The fans were awesome as always. It didn’t rain for the most part, and we will be happy to give it a go next week.” The SaberCats are beginning their second season in Major League Rugby and will play their first five home games at Constellation Field as they await the opening of AVEVA Stadium on March 23 against the Utah Warriors. The SaberCats next game is Jan. 19 against the Glendale Raptors at Constellation Field. The remaining games to be played at Constellation Field include Feb. 22 against the Toronto Arrows, March 2 against Rugby United New York, and March 16 against the New Orleans Gold.

Yellow Rose Derby Girls kickoff sixth season From staff reports FOR THE FORT BEND STAR

For the uninitiated, roller derby’s popularity has grown leaps and bounds in the last 15 years since

its resurgence in Austin, and it has evolved into a competitive athletic sport. At the same time, roller derby has managed to hold on to the fun and quirky aspects like alter

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nization that participates in local community service. YRDG is growing in membership, community involvement, and are amassing a large fan base in the Fort Bend area. What its members all have in common is passion and drive for the sport of roller derby. The Yellow Rose All-Stars made their strongest showing in 2018. They posted an undefeated record (10-0) last season and climbed almost 100 spots in the international Women’s Flat Track Derby Association (WFTDA) Rankings. YRDG practices in Stafford at Southwest Indoor Soccer. They have played

their home games at the Fort Bend County Fairgrounds for the last five years. Yellow Rose will open their 2019 season with a doubleheader at 5 p.m. on Feb. 23 against local rival, Conroe Roller Derby. Tickets are $12 in advance and $15 at the door; BYOB, and free for children under the age of eight. The Yellow Rose Derby Girls are actively recruiting new derby skaters (18 and older). No prior experience is required. They are also recruiting skating and non-skating officials, volunteers, and welcoming new sponsors. For more information, visit yellowrosederbygirls.com.

The Yellow Rose Derby Girls team is ready for the 2019 season, which starts Feb. 23. Home games are held at the Fort Bend County Fairgrounds. (Submitted photo)

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Wednesday, January 16, 2019 • PAGE

7

F ORT B END H OME S HOWCASE Virginia Mack retires from AnitA Milne 281-413-9732 real estate after 28 years F ORT B END H OME S HOWCASE

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JSOUTHERN@FORTBENDSTAR.COM

After 28 years in the business, Virginia Mack has sold her last home. An associate with RE/ MAX Southwest, Mack retired on Jan. 15, ending what for her is a second career that started in 1990. “I enjoy helping people find those perfect homes they’re looking for,” she said. Mack graduated from college with degrees in microbiology and medical technician. After years of working in lab, she felt she had gone as far as she could in the field and started looking for something new. “I wanted something where the more you put into it the more you got out of it,” she said. That thing proved to be real estate. In October of 1990 she went into business for herself selling homes primarily in the Highlands, Commonwealth, and Sweetwater areas. Just her fourth year into the business she became one of the top sellers in the Sugar Land

Virginia Mack

area. She eventually joined Gary Greene Better Homes and Garden Real Estate. About 18 years

“Every listing I’ve ever had has been in the Star newspaper, from the first week until it sold," -Virginia Mack ago she moved over to RE/MAX Southwest. Mack credits a lot of her marketing success to the

Fort Bend Star. “Every listing I’ve ever had has been in the Star newspaper, from the first week until it sold,” she said. She said reaching more than 35,000 homes each week in the Star was cheaper and more effective than sending out 35,000 mailers. She said the exposure she got over time in the newspaper helped her get clients and grow her business much faster than she would have otherwise. “I always felt it was a great way to advertise,” she said. As Mack heads into retirement, her customers will still be taken care of as she has sold her business to Glory and West Crafts of RE/MAX Fine Properties. She said she searched for a year to find the right team she could trust with her clients, many of whom have become trusted friends over the years. As she plans to travel and visit family and friends in retirement, many of those clients are likely to continue spending time with her, just in a different capacity.

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tower while High School day. “I was surprised the H REZONING, FROM PAGE 2 12 is constructed and utilize portable buildings at district didn’t cancel the Ridge Point High School meeting,” said Brown. being developed. while High School 12 is The district is expected Citing community feed- constructed. Overall, the to announce an early colback, Dupre noted that responses indicated a de- lege program that would Quail Valley and Lake sire to select the plan that allow Marshall students Olympia expressed a01-09-18 resulted in ANITA the least disto earn an associate’s MILNE strong desire to stay at ruption.” degrees without paying Elkins. The Sienna comStakeholders indicat- tuition. Brown said Marmunity wanted to stay at ed High School 12 were shall parents were not part Ridge Point. Hightower promised in the bond and of the discussion, making High School wanted to there were many sugges- them wary. keep the Medical Science tions to expedite building Brown said she has seen Academy at Hightower. the campus. the district leaders pillage Schiff Elementary School For Marshall PTO presi- and ignore Marshall so wanted Elkins over Hight- dent Stephanie Brown, she much over the years that ower, and Parks wanted to said she felt her school was even an idea of an early remain at Hightower. college credit program ignored. According to the district, “Why did we not receive in the high school seems option one would have: any students in the rezon- suspect to her. She said • Balanced Utilization ing plan that Dr. Dupre there was no community and Enrollment among the sent out at 9 p.m.? We did involvement in the decifive schools over the next not expect to receive all sion-making process as 9 years without any school of Quail Valley schools, was displayed at the other exceeding 100 percent of just those areas which two campuses. utilization of design capac- are closer in proximity “We also don’t have a ity. that the district rezoned clear answer on who rep• Moved large groups of several years ago without resented Marshall on the students to avoid small, our knowledge. For ex- steering committee as isolated cohorts. ample, Quail Green South no one will take owner• Provided the highest and the Woods, down the ship for helping to make utilization of Marshall and street from Marshall,” said the decision to place an Willowridge throughout Brown. early college at Marshall,” all options. She attended the zon- Brown said. • Positioned the bound- ing meeting the first night During the rezoning aries so that most of the at Marshall when the talks, there was much future growth is pointed to rezoning options were in- angst from parents learnHightower. troduced. Some visiting ing their children could be Dupre wrote that by parents wondered why rezoned to Marshall. Parchoosing the hybrid op- more Marshall parents ents cited concerns calling tion he was following the were not in attendance. Marshall an underperlargest and loudest voices Brown said the high school forming school. from Quail Valley and Si- had just learned of a trag“I don’t call it underenna. edy with the death of a performing,” said Brown. “There was an overall popular high school ath- “I call it under-resourced. theme on the importance lete and many parents In 2009-2010 we were a of keeping communities were at home consoling recognized campus. Tell together,” he said. “Sien- their children. That same me why the district didn’t na responders suggested day, counselors had been build on that instead of moving people new to on campus trying to help taking away teachers and the community to High- students get through the programs.”

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CHARTER REVIEW COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING REGARDING REVIEW OF CITY OF SUGAR LAND CHARTER Charter Review Commission Meeting 4:00 p.m., January 23, 2019, City of Sugar Land City Hall, Cane Room 161, 2700 Town Center Boulevard North to receive and hear all Sugar Land residents interested in the review of the City of Sugar Land Charter. Details of the review of the City Charter can be obtained by contacting City of Sugar Land City Manager’s Office by email citymgr@ sugarlandtx.gov, phone (281) 275-2710, or visiting www.sugarlandtx.gov/crc. The agenda item for this meeting will be placed on the City’s website at www.sugarlandtx.gov under “Meeting Agendas, Minutes, and Videos” no later than Friday, January 18, 2019.

Notice to Bid

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the City of Meadows Place Board of Adjustment will conduct a public hearing at 6:30 p.m., January 29, 2019, at the Meadows Place City Hall, One Troyan Drive, Meadows Place, Texas, for the purpose of receiving written and oral comments from any interested person(s) concerning the request for variance to the City of Meadows Place Code of Ordinances Section 153.196(Q) allowing the applicant to install an electronic message sign on the property located at 11311 W Airport Blvd. At this time the public has the right to appear at the hearing and present evidence for or against this variance request. The City of Meadows Place public facilities are wheelchair accessible and accessible parking spaces are available. Requests for accommodations or interpretive services must be made 48 hours prior to this meeting. Please contact ADA Coordinator at (281) 983-2931 or FAX (281) 983-2940 for further information. Courtney Rutherford, City Secretary City of Meadows Place

Stafford MSD is seeking E-Rate services for E-Rate Funding Year 2019 (July 1, 2019 - June 30, 2020) All interested vendors please visit: https://portal. usac.org/suite/ Form 470 Application Number: 190004622 Please see RFP at https://erate.esc12.net/R12

NOTICE TO BIDDERS WILLIAMS TRACE BOULEVARD IRRIGATION The City of Sugar Land seeks bids for furnishing all labor, material, and equipment, and performing all work required for the following project in the City: CIP PROJECT NAME: Williams Trace Boulevard Irrigation CIP PROJECT NUMBER: ST1408 LOCATION OF WORK: Williams Trace Boulevard (Austin Parkway to State Highway 6), Sugar Land, TX 77478 Plans, specifications, and bidding documents may be obtained from www.CivCastUSA.com. Sealed bids one (1) original and two (2) copies, shall be delivered to the City of Sugar Land, Office of the City Secretary, 2700 Town Center Boulevard North, Suite 122, Sugar Land, Texas, 77479, on or before 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, January 31, 2019 at which time bids will be publicly opened and read. Bids received after the opening date and time will not be considered. A non-mandatory pre-bid meeting for all interested parties will be held at 11:00 a.m., Wednesday, January 23, 2019, Cane Room, City Hall, 2700 Town Center Boulevard North, Sugar Land, Texas 77479. Questions regarding this bid must be submitted on or before 11:00 a.m., Monday, January 28, 2019. Please contact Masuen Consulting, LLC at (866) 928-1533 x115. The City will award and give notice within sixty (60) calendar days after the opening date and time.

FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE ADVERTISING NEEDS CALL AT 281-690-4200 www.FortBendStar.com LEGALS PURSUANT TO Chapter 70, Texas Property Code, notice is hereby given to owner(s) and lien holder(s) of the vehicle(s) listed below. Vehicle(s) is/are located at Fort Bend County Texas. You have 31 days from the date of publication to redeem your vehicle. Call (210) 804-2094 for information. 1978 Mercury Cougar VIN: F9H93F674490F

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ZONING USE CLASSIFICATION AND PARKING SCHEDULE UPDATES IN THE DEVELOPMENT CODE CITY OF SUGAR LAND City Council Public Hearing: 6:00 p.m., February 5, 2019, City of Sugar Land City Hall, 2700 Town Center Boulevard North to hear all persons interested in the proposed update to the zoning uses classification and parking schedules, found in the Development Code. The purposes of the changes are to modernize and clarify the application of the zoning use classifications and parking requirements while better protecting the existing quality of life for our residents. These recommended changes do not change the character of our existing zoning districts or City, modify requirements for multi-family, or remove safeguards that are currently in place. Rather, they enhance the quality of life for our residents and businesses by permitting additional compatible uses, placing additional restrictions and regulations on certain uses, and continuing to protect single-family residential neighborhoods from undesirable encroachment. Learn more about the draft changes by visiting the project webpage at www.sugarlandtx.gov/DevCodeUpdate, or by contacting the City of Sugar Land Planning Department by email at longrangeplanning@sugarlandtx.gov or phone (281) 275-2218. The agenda item for this meeting will be available on the City website at www.sugarlandtx.gov under “Meeting Agendas” City Council no later than Friday, February 1, 2019.


THE STAR

See us online www.FortBendStar.com

H FINANCE, FROM PAGE 5 would agree this begins with receiving a quality education that allows them to graduate from high school ready to enter college, trade schools or the military and then get a job that pays a living wage that allows them to marry, buy a house,

raise a family and contribute to our common welfare. So who needs school finance reform – we all do! All our children deserve a quality education. The legislature has a constitutional duty to support and maintain a system of public schools in this state (Texas Constitution Article 7, Section 1). State stat-

ute imposes a further duty upon the legislature: “The mission of the public education system of this state is to ensure that all Texas children have access to a quality education that enables them to achieve their potential and fully participate now and in the future in the social, economic and educational opportunities

Wednesday, January 16, 2019 • PAGE

of our state and nation” (Texas Education Code §4.001). Just as we hold our school districts accountable for student achievement, we should also hold the Legislature accountable for supporting a public school system that provides a quality education for all students as the state consti-

tution requires. The Legislature needs to uphold its constitutional duty to support and maintain a system of public schools in Texas, and fund it adequately and equitably. Let us not squander this legislative session with arguments over how schools are funded; rather let us focus our efforts on im-

proving our public schools, which have and always will educate the majority of our students. If you agree, let your legislators know. (Jim Rice was elected to serve on the Fort Bend ISD Board of Trustees in May 2010. These comments are his alone and he is not speaking on behalf of the board.)

FOOT FACTS by Dr. Eric Tepper

BOARD CERTIFIED PODIATRIST, ACCPPS

LUMPS AND BUMPS

The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified 82 different types of benign and malignant foot lesions. These lumps and bumps are most prevalent on the toes and upper surfaces of the foot. While it can be alarming to find a lump developing on your foot, do not panic. Most foot lumps are benign tumors rather than cancerous ones. This is not to say that the growth should be ignored. Any unusual lumps on the foot ought to be evaluated by a podiatrist to determine whether or not further treatment or testing is required. Lumps that are painful or achy, interfere with normal range of motion, or cause footwear problems need prompt podiatric attention. HINT: Bone tumors sometimes replace healthy bone tissue, thus weakening the bone and making it more susceptible to fracture. Experience shows that about one person in four has a foot problem. It can be as obvious as a fungal nail or as perplexing as a newly developed bump, as simple as a callus or as painful as a puncture wound. There is no reason to suffer, however, when quality foot care is available close by at 3143 Hwy. 6 South. We treat feet of all ages, for all kinds of foot injuries, disorders, diseases, and hereditary conditions. Please call our office, 281980-3668, to make an appointment or if we can answer any foot care questions for you.

FORTBENDSTAR.COM DO YOU LIKE TO NETWORK WITH BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS? Do you want to earn $$ while you network?

IS LOOKING FOR DEDICATED SALES PROFESSIONALS • Assist Fort Bend Businesses in growing their sales through advertising • Network with professionals at business events and on sales calls • Earning potential unlimited! • Training provided If this is you, please email your resume to: Diane@FortBendStar.com

Or call 281-690-4200

JANUARY IS SCHOOL BOARD RECOGNITION MONTH

Thank you for all you do to ensure our District is the Best in Texas!

Jason Burdine President Position 1

Addie Heyliger Vice President Position 6

Dave Rosenthal Secretary Position 7

Grayle James Position 2

Jim Rice Position 3

9

Kristin K. Tassin Position 4


THE STAR

PAGE 10 • Wednesday, January 16, 2019

See us online www.FortBendStar.com

COMMUNITY CALENDAR FORT BEND COMMUNITY CALENDAR IS FOR NON-PROFIT EVENTS.

Deadline is noon every Friday. Please keep wording to a minimum. Answer the “5 W’s” Who, What, When, Where, and Why. Email to Editor@FortBendStar.com or mail to: Fort Bend Star, 3944 Bluebonnet Drive, Stafford, Texas 77477. MONTH OF JANUARY ESL CONVERSATION CIRCLES

Fort Bend County Libraries present a program for individuals who would like a place to practice their English language and conversation skills. The circles will take place at six locations in the Fort Bend County library system in January. The program is free and open to the public. For more information, call 281341-2652, or any of the branch libraries.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16 OPEN-MIC NIGHT

At the George Memorial Library, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., at 1001 Golfview in Richmond. Amateur performers to take the stage. Share original poetry, music, comedy, or one-act plays, or to showcase any other unique talents. Performances are limited to five minutes or less, no profanity or other insensitive topics. For adults aged 16 and up. Free & open to the public. Visit www. fortbend.lib.tx.us to sign up or call 281-341-2604.

THURSDAY, JAN. 17 GUARDIANSHIP AND ALTERNATIVES TO GUARDIANSHIP

University Branch Library, 14010 University Blvd., Sugar Land, will host the meeting, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Designed for families who need information on obtaining legal guardianship of an incapacitated loved one. An attorney will be present to answer any related legal questions. RSVP to: Kirk Monroe at 281-232-7701 or by e-mail: kmonroe@brazosbendguardianship. org or visit www.brazosbendguardianship.org.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18 STAYING INDEPENDENT AS YOU AGE

The University Branch Library will present the program, 10:30 a.m., 14010 University Blvd in Sugar Land. Tips on how senior citizens can remain independent, but prepare for the day when they need more help to manage their affairs. Are my kids or other family members the best choice as trustees or executors? What are the most important documents to have in place as I reach my later years? Free & open to the public. For more information, call -633-5100 or 281-633-4734.

SATURDAY, JAN. 19 RUMPELSTILTSKIN

The Sienna Branch Library invites families to attend a special marionette puppet show, 10:30 a.m., 8411 Sienna Springs Blvd in Missouri City. Master puppeteer Jean Kuecher, will entertain children with her beautifully handcrafted marionettes. Free & open to the public. For more information, call 281-238-2900 or 281-633-4734.

HOPE FOR THREE JIGSAW PUZZLE COMPETITION

Put your puzzle building skills against other teams in this twohour competition to benefit Hope for Three Autism Awareness. Join others at Constellation Field, 1 Stadium Dr., Sugar Land. Teams of four can pre-register for $100. Awards, prizes and bragging rights guaranteed. Sponsorship and Underwriting opportunities available. Call 281-245-0640 or visit www. hopeforthree.org/jigsaw for information and to register.

SUNDAY, JAN. 20 THE FORT BEND BRASS QUINTET

The Fort Bend Brass Quintet will be featured at the George Memorial Library, 1-2 p.m., 1001 Golfview in Richmond. The group will play a variety of musical pieces, from the 1930s to the 1980s. Free and open to the public. For more information, call 281-342-4455 or 281-633-4734.

TUESDAY, JAN. 22 BEAT THE PACK

Houston Methodist Sugar Land Hospital is offering a proven program to help people quit smoking. The complimentary program, was developed by Pfizer Inc. The next four-week series is Tuesday evenings from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Houston Methodist Sugar Land’s Main Pavilion Conference Rooms A and D. Learn the tools, tips and support to help smokers create and follow through with a personalized “quit plan.” Registration is required and space is limited. For more information or to register, visit houstonmethodist.org/events and search for Beat the Pack, or call 281-274-7500.

POWERFUL TOOLS FOR CAREGIVERS

This free, six-week, educational program is offered at Houston Methodist Sugar Land Hospital to help family and friends caring for adults with long-term health conditions. Each class will focus on different tools that help guide through the caregiving journey. Learn about setting goals, staying motivated and dealing with feelings of anger, guilt and depression, building confidence and ability to cope with the demands of caregiving. Classes are every Tuesday, 3–4:30 p.m. in the Brazos Pavilion Chapel, first floor, at Houston Methodist Sugar Land Hospital. Registration is required. Email snbowman@houstonmethodist. org or call 281-274-7164. Seating is limited.

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WEDNESDAY, JAN. 23 BULLET JOURNALING

Mamie George Branch Library will present the class for teens, 3-4 p.m., 320 Dulles Ave. in Stafford. Young adults in grades 9 through 12 will discover how a bullet journal can be used to keep ideas and tasks organized. Materials for this program are provided through the Friends of the Mamie George Branch Library. Free and open to the public. Seating is limited, reservations are required. Visit www.fortbend.lib.tx.us or call 281-238-2880.

KICK THE SUGAR HABIT

First Colony Branch Library will present the class, 6:30 p.m., 2121 Austin Parkway in Sugar Land. Learn the effects of sugar on your body and why it can be challenging to eliminate sugar in your diet. Get tips on how to transform sugar cravings and adopt a healthier diet. Free and open to the public. For more information, call 281-238-2800 or 281-633-4734.

THURSDAY, JAN. 24 HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL

Ridge Point High School Fine Arts Department presents Disney’s Original High School Musical. Jan. 24, 25, 26, 31 and Feb. 1, 2 Showtime: 7 p.m. Pre-sale online $12 Adults and $8 students at www.rphstheatrebooster.com . Tickets available at the door $15 Adults and $10 students.

THURSDAY, JAN. 24-26 GRAND HOTEL

The Clements High School Theatre Company invites you to Berlin in 1928. The world is between wars, the stock market is booming, and Berlin is the center of high life and optimism rules the day. But underneath it all, much is happening with Grand Hotel’s illustrious clients. All performances are in the Clements High School Auditorium. Tickets are $10 each at the door for all shows. 7 p.m. each evening.

SATURDAY, JAN. 26 WOMEN’S WELLNESS: ALL OF YOU

Christ United Methodist Church and United Methodist Women of Christ Church (UMW) are sponsoring a free health event for women of all ages, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 3300 Austin Parkway, Sugar Land. Learn to rejuvenate yourself: mind, body, and spirit. Presentations on weight gain, preventive health, nutrition, relaxation aromatherapy, balancing a busy life with a healthy lifestyle, battling stress, mental health, and more. Free continental breakfast and free child care with a reservation. A boxed lunch can be ordered for $8, or you can bring your own. To register, visit www.christchurchsl.org/wellness.

POOCH P.A.D.

The circus themed Pet Awareness Day. Noon – 3 p.m., at the Missouri City Animal Shelter, 1923 Scanlon Road. Learn the importance of proper pet care and ownership and even adopt a pet at the event. Various activities, vendor booths and food will be available. Volunteers are needed. Call 281-403-8500 or visit http://bit.ly/2BOmeNI for more info or to volunteer.

MONDAY, JAN. 28 FAMILY READING CHALLENGE

Begins and continue through March 2. Fort Bend County Libraries’ program is designed to encourage families to read, learn, and have fun together. Families participate in the program by reading books, logging the number of minutes they read, and earning virtual badges. All Fort Bend County families are eligible to participate. There is no charge to join. For more information, call 281-633-4734, or the library branch nearest you.

INTERNATIONAL COFFEE HOUR

Hosted at George Memorial Library, 9 a.m., 1001 Golfview in Richmond. Share a cup of coffee, and chat with friends at a social hour celebrating the multitude of diverse cultures found in Fort Bend County. Free and open to the public. For more information, call 281-342-4455 or 281-633-4734.

JAN. 28 - FEB. 1 CHILDREN’S BOOK WEEK

Fort Bend County Libraries will continue its tradition of welcoming newborns to the wonders of books. Fort Bend County babies born during this week may receive a special baby book bag, courtesy of the Friends of Fort Bend County Library. Each bag contains a book, a bib, a special certificate, a list of suggested reading for children, and information on parenting and on library services. The baby book bags will be distributed to babies born during that week at area Fort Bend County hospitals, but ALL Fort Bend County babies born that week are eligible to receive one, while supplies last. Families should call the Youth Services department, at 281-633-4762, to receive their book bag.

FREE RABIES VACCINE with the purchase of any shot package *Coupon must be presented at time of service. Expires: JANUARY, 31 2019

1 FREE

Blooming Onion with a purchase of an entrée.

281-980-4329 • 15253 S.W. Fwy Sugar Land, TX 77478 Must bring coupon to redeem. Expires 03/31/2019. Not to be combined with any other offering.

First Colony Friends of the Library will hold the sale, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 2121 Austin Parkway. Paperbacks, hardbacks, DVDs, children’s/youth books, nonfiction at bargain prices. Donations are accepted any time the library is open. Proceeds from the sale benefit the library and its programs.

THURSDAY, FEB. 7 WEIGHT LOSS SEMINAR

Join Dr. Nabil Tariq at 6 p.m. for a weight-loss seminar to learn about the different programs offered at the Houston Methodist Weight Management Center, get tips on grocery shopping and meal planning, and speak with a dietitian, exercise specialist and bariatric surgeon. Registration is required. Visit events.houstonmethodist.org/weightloss-sl or call 281-274-7500 for more information or to register.

ONGOING WHILE WE’RE WAITING SUPPORT GROUP

For Bereaved Parents - grieving the loss of a child at any age. Meets the thir Thursday of every month, 7 p.m., at the First Colony Church of Christ, 2140 First Colony Blvd., Sugar Land. For more information, call 281-413-2484

BINGO AT THE VFW

Help support our veterans! Play bingo at Post 3903 every Tuesday and Saturday night at 7:15 p.m. 1903 First St, Rosenberg. All prizes paid in cash. Pull Tabs, $200 Bonanza, $300 Coverall, $750 Coverall, kitchen & bar service.

RICHMOND-ROSENBERG ALZHEIMER’S CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP

Caregivers of patients with Alzheimer’s disease or other related dementias are invited to attend the first Thursday of each month, 7-8:30 p.m. at St. John’s United Methodist Church, 400 Jackson Street in Richmond, across from the historic Fort Bend County Courthouse. Free and open to the public. For more information, call 713-314-1313 or 1-800-2723900.

QUAIL VALLEY WINE SOCIETY

Meets the fourth Wednesday of every month for education of wines, food pairings and fellowship at the Quail Valley City Centre, 2880 LaQuinta, Missouri City. For more information, call 281-437-6798 or jackipauley@comcast.net

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

The Pregnancy Resource Medical Center has moved to 4411 Avenue N in Rosenberg across from Navarro Middle School. Volunteers are needed on a continual basis. For information on volunteering or supporting the PRMC in other ways, email info@prmcfortbend.org.

4-H, FOOD & NUTRITION

Fort Bend 4-H is looking for input from the community on how it can better serve the public. To learn more about 4-H projects, join 4-H at 7 p.m. at the University Library ( 14010 University Blvd Sugar Land), visit fortbend4h.eventbrite.com or call 281-342-3034.

STORY SPINNERS WRITING CLUB

Hosted by the George Memorial Library, 1001 Golfview in Richmond. 5:30 to 8 p.m. All levels welcome to write, share, learn and support. Free and open to the public. The program meets on the third Thursday of every month. For more information, call 281-342-4455 or 281-633-4734.

ADOPT A SHELTER CAT

Fort Bend Pets Alive is partnering with Half Price Books in Sugar Land to find homes for shelter cats and to promote literacy among young readers. School aged children are invited to come read to a cat, receive an “I read to a cat” bookmark and be eligible to adopt a cat for 50 perecent off that day. Held 1:30- 4:30 p.m. the first Saturday of every month at 3203 Hwy 6 S, Sugar Land.

FORT BEND RECOVERS HURRICANE HARVEY HELP

Those needing help with a recovery plan for home repairs, or any unmet needs, Fort Bend Recovers is here to help. Call one of these Helplines today: Case Management Helpline 281-2072555, Spiritual/Emotional Helpline: 281-207-2505, Lone Star Legal Aid 866-659-0666. A case manager will contact you and get you started on your road to recovery. Visit www.fortbendrecovers.org for more information and to donate.

CHILDREN’S PROGRAMS

The Sienna Branch Library, 8411 Sienna Springs Blvd in Missouri City presents a variety of programs every month. Free and open to the public. For more information, call 281238-2900 or 281-633-4734.

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Enjoy Your Event. Let Us Do The Cooking. • Spay/Neuter surgeries • Wellness Exams • Vaccinations • Heartworm tests, prevention and treatment • Flea and tick medication • Microchipping

SATURDAY, FEB. 2 BARGAIN BOOK SALE

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FOR ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES CALL 281-690-4200 FIND THE STAR ONLINE! WWW.FORTBENDSTAR.COM

Profile for Sugar Land Newcomer Guide

01/16/2019 Edition of the Fort Bend Star  

01/16/2019 Edition of the Fort Bend Star

01/16/2019 Edition of the Fort Bend Star  

01/16/2019 Edition of the Fort Bend Star

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