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Front Cover: Main photo by Kelley L. Cox Sidebar photos by RomaPics


Main Photo by Kelley L. Cox / Sidebar photos by RomaPics


Fan photo by Kelley L. Cox / Inside Superdome photo by Jonathan Bachman / Outside Fan Jam photo courtesy of Allstate


Photo by Kelley L. Cox


City photos courtesy of New Orleans & Company


Plantation photo courtesy of Oak Alley Plantation / Inset photos courtesy of New Orleans & Company


Photos by Wally Porter


2019-20 ALLSTATE SUGAR BOWL OFFICERS

Monique G. Morial President

Ralph Capitelli President-Elect

Lloyd N. Frischhertz Vice President

Richard C. Briede Treasurer

Walter F. Becker, Jr. Secretary

Stanley J. Cohn Chairman, Past President

2019-20 ALLSTATE SUGAR BOWL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Cecil “C.J.” Blache

Riley Busenlener

Brian Capitelli

Joseph M. Dardis

W. Scott Duggins

Hudson A. Higgins

Brian A. Jackson

William J. Kearney, IV

G. Charles “Chuck” Lapeyre Past President

Jason W. Loerzel

Conrad Meyer, V

Michael O. Read

Renny Simno

Jenny L. Tripkovich

SUGAR BOWL EXECUTIVE STAFF

Dennis J. Waldron Past President

James P. Waldron

Roderick K. West Past President

T. Carey Wicker Past President

Paul Hoolahan Chief Executive Officer

Jeff Hundley Chief Operating Officer

Photos by Wally Porter and Kelley L. Cox


ALLSTATE SUGAR BOWL COMMITTEE MEMBERS Lance Africk Terry Q. Alarcon Sidney J. Barthelemy John A. “Jay” Batt, Jr. Vicky Bayley Walter F. Becker, Jr. Thomas Beron Thomas E. Binion Kathleen Orr “Kaki” Birtel Cecil “C.J.” Blache Henry J. Bodenheimer Peter Bodenheimer Stephen H. Boh Dickie Brennan Ralph O. Brennan Richard C. Briede A. Vernon Brinson Steven D. Brinson Ronald V. Burns, Sr. John R. Busenlener Riley Busenlener Brian Capitelli Ralph Capitelli Ben B. Carollo Sidney H. Cates, III Michael M. Christovich Edith Joy Brown Clement Miles P. Clements Stanley J. Cohn Jay Corenswet Sam Corenswet, Jr. Charles V. Cusimano Charles V. Cusimano, II Charles V. Cusimano, III P. Keith Daigle John J. “Jack” Dardis Joseph M. Dardis Brian P. David J. Thomas David

John E. David Daniel E. Davillier Oliver S. Delery, Jr. Lawrence Ditoro, Jr. Russell Doussan, Jr. W. Scott Duggins James W. Fabacher James E. Fitzmorris, Jr. Thomas A. Flower Kyle M. France Timothy B. Francis Lloyd N. Frischhertz Fabian K. “Fritz” Fromherz Kurt Fromherz Michelle Gaiennie Bruce J. Gaubert Mary Jane David Gillette Gary J. Glueck Holly Carter Gordon Marlin N. Gusman Oscar M. Gwin, III Oscar M. “Mac” Gwin, IV Hudson A. Higgins Peter H. Hopkins Brian A. Jackson Raymond J. Jeandron, Jr. Raymond J. Jeandron, III Cappy Meyer Johnson Theodore L. Jones William J. “Bill” Kearney, III William J. “Bill” Kearney, IV Clifford H. Kern, III Jay H. Kern Ronnie Kole Jack Laborde James C. Landis G. Charles “Chuck” Lapeyre W. Elliott Laudeman Jason Loerzel

Archie Manning David B. Melius Conrad Meyer, IV Conrad Meyer, V L.C. “Monty” Montgomery, Jr. Warren Montgomery Monique G. Morial Dr. J. Lee Moss Dr. Wayne D. Pierce Michael O. Read Dorothy “Dottie” Reese Noel Rivers, III Jerry E. “Jay” Romig, Jr. Mark C. Romig, APR Richard D. Roussel M.P. “Pete” Schneider, III George R. Simno, III Renny Simno Kennedy “Sandy” Smith Richard R. Smith E. Allan Smuck, Jr. Edwin A. Stoutz, Jr. Stephen R. Treuting Jenny L. Tripkovich Dennis J. Waldron James P. Waldron Roderick K. West Camille Whitworth Thomas C. Wicker, Jr. T. Carey Wicker, III David G. Wolford Charles C. Zatarain, III Michael P. “Mick” Zatarain Ashley Melius Zio Lee Zurik Sam Zurik, Jr. Sam Zurik, III

ALLSTATE SUGAR BOWL ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE MEMBERS Nathan S. Africk Allison Briede Badon Gregory M. Bowser Christopher Capitelli Erik W. Fabacher Photos by Wally Porter and Kelley L. Cox

Jonathan Friedmann Ryan M. Gaubert Jennifer Jeandron Guenard Betsy Becker Laborde Eric Laborde

Anne Teague Landis John Lee Moss, Jr. Nicholas E. Pontiff Michael O. “Beau” Read, Jr. Caroline C. Zatarain


Allstate Sugar Bowl file photos / Anthem flag photo by Colin Arnold


Photo by Jonathan Bachman


Allstate Sugar Bowl ďŹ le photos


Photo by Kelley L. Cox


Photo by Jonathan Bachman

Photo by Kelley L. Cox


CFP Trophy photo by Joe Faraoni, ESPN Images Superdome skyline photo courtesy of the Mercedes-Benz Superdome


Main photo by Colin Arnold / Photo credits (clockwise from top left): Kelley L. Cox, Jonathan Bachman, Kelley L. Cox


Photo by Kelley L. Cox


Photo by Kelley L. Cox


Photo by Kelley L. Cox

T

he idea of a New Year’s Day football classic in New Orleans was first presented in 1927 by Colonel James M. Thompson, publisher of the New Orleans Item, and sports editor Fred Digby. Digby continued to push the concept on a yearly basis, convinced that football had a future and New Orleans should be a prominent part of it. Finally, on January 1, 1935, the inaugural Sugar Bowl Classic kicked off with a proud Digby in attendance. While there was considerable doubt in the potential for the event, the teams in that first game, Tulane and Temple, were both paid nearly double their guarantees.

Since that first Classic, the Sugar Bowl has hosted 84 more games. Over its storied history, 50 College Football Hall of Fame coaches have stalked the sidelines of the Sugar Bowl, while 93 College Football Hall of Fame players and 18 Heisman Trophy winners have shown their skills in the New Orleans event. Throughout history, Sugar Bowl fans have had the opportunity to experience the brilliance of 28 national championship teams as well as seven match-ups between the top two teams in the nation – true national championship games. The Sugar Bowl has always treasured its rich history, taking great pride in the quality of play the game has


Photo courtesy of Notre Dame athleticS

presented over the years. In the spring of 2017, a group of Sugar Bowl Committee members formulated a plan to establish an official Sugar Bowl Hall of Fame. The inaugural Hall of Fame class was composed of 16 legends of the annual New Orleans football classic. In December of 2018, the Allstate Sugar Bowl introduced 10 more legends as its second Hall of Fame class. The latest class of Hall of Famers spans seven decades of Sugar Bowl action and includes seven all-star players, two national championship coaches and one individual who both starred in the Sugar Bowl as a player and directed a team to the national championship as a coach.

Photo courtesy of Penn State athletics


Photo courtesy of Pitt athletics

Photo courtesy of Georgia athletics

Photo courtesy of New Orleans Times-Picayune

Photo courtesy of Florida State athletics


Photo courtesy of Texas athletics

Photo courtesy of Florida athletics

Photo courtesy of LSU athletics

Photo courtesy of Georgia athletics


Photos by RomaPics


Photos by RomaPics


Photo by Ron Brocato

Allstate Sugar Bowl ďŹ le photos


Photo courtesy of LSU Athletics

Allstate Sugar Bowl ďŹ le photos


haquille O’Neal has a nine-foot, 1,200-pound bronze statue outside the Staples Center in Los Angeles. He also has a 900-pound likeness in Baton Rouge outside LSU’s basketball practice facility. He’s a member of the Pro Basketball and College Basketball Halls of Fame, a four-time NBA champion, a 15-time NBA All-Star and a Gold Medalist for the USA Olympic Team. Before those memorable honors, “Shaq” was recognized twice by the Allstate Sugar Bowl as the Corbett Award winner for the top amateur athlete in the state of Louisiana.

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In Jackie MacMullan’s article for ESPN.com on O’Neal’s retirement in 2011, she wrote, “O’Neal will be remembered as one of the most dominant, recognizable and controversial figures in the game, whose body of work included rap records, movies, a lengthy business portfolio and an even lengthier history of philanthropic deeds.” The story closed with a quote from O’Neal, “I tried to make people happy. And I tried to have fun. I think I did both.” O’Neal won four NBA Championships and scored 28,596 career points (fifth in NBA history) with 13,099 career rebounds (12th in league history) and 2,732 blocked shots (seventh all-time). He was the NBA Most Valuable Player in 1999-2000, as well as a three-time NBA Finals MVP, a three-time All-Star Game MVP and the NBA Rookie of the Year. He made 15 All-Star Game appearances and finished in the top-10 of MVP voting 13 times. A Texas product, Shaq played three seasons at LSU and scored 1,941 career points, fifth on the school’s all-time list. He is second on the school’s career rebound list with 1,217. He was a McDonald’s High School All-American in 1989 and then a two-time AP First-Team All-America selection in college, while earning National Player of the Year honors in 1991. In international play, he won Gold Medals the 1996 Olympics and in the 1994 FIBA World Championships, earning tournament MVP honors. He won the Corbett Award in both 1991 and 1992 and is one of seven winners of Olympic Gold Medals to earn the honor. He is also one of three Pro Basketball Hall-of-Famers to be recognized as the top amateur athlete in Louisiana (joining Pete Maravich, 1968 and 1969, and Robert Parish, 1975). “The Sugar Bowl has had the opportunity to be associated with some of the greatest athletes in the country,” Allstate Sugar Bowl CEO Paul Hoolahan said. “But someone like Shaquille O’Neal, he’s one of the greatest athletes in the world. We are very proud that he’s a Louisiana legend and a part of the illustrious list of Corbett Award winners that we have honored.” From its earliest years, the Sugar Bowl Committee has been honored to provide opportunities for young athletes from around the country, athletes like Shaquille O’Neal. That’s because, at the Allstate Sugar Bowl, We Believe in Champions.

Photo courtesy of USA Basketball


Photo Credits (clockwise from top left): RomaPics, RomaPics, Ron Brocato, Nicholls State Athletics, New Orleans Advocate, LSU Athletics, RomaPics


Photo Credits (clockwise from top left): Nola.com, Delgado Athletics, LSU Athletics, Ron Brocato, ESPN, CrescentCitySports.com, LSWA, LSU Athletics, Ron Brocato, Xavier Athletics, New Orleans Advocate, New Orleans Advocate, UNO Athletics


Photo Credits (clockwise from top): Wally Porter, RomaPics, Wally Porter, RomaPics, St. Katherine Drexel Prep


Photo Credits (clockwise from bottom left): New Orleans Saints, Glen Lewis, Sugar Bowl Archives, Ole Miss Athletics, Miami Dolphins


Photo Credits (clockwise from bottom left): Milwaukee Bucks, New Orleans Saints, Tuero Family, NBA Photos, Isidore Newman


I

n 2013, McMain High School junior Aleia Hobbs had a solid day on the track at Tad Gormley Stadium, placing second in both the 100- and the 200-meter dashes at the Allstate Sugar Bowl Track & Field Classic. As a senior, she won the 100-meter dash in the same meet and that same July (2014), she was recognized by the Allstate Sugar Bowl as its Greater New Orleans Amateur Athlete of the Month for winning a pair of titles (100 meters, 4x100 relay) at the USATF Junior Olympic Championships. As she developed into a star sprinter at LSU, Hobbs would go on to earn three more Greater New Orleans Amateur Athlete of the Month honors from the Sugar Bowl as well as being twice recognized as the Bowl’s Greater New Orleans Amateur Athlete of the Year. However, her crowning achievement locally was when she was presented with the Sugar Bowl’s James J. Corbett Award as the top female amateur athlete in the state of Louisiana in August of 2018. “The Sugar Bowl has been involved with thousands of outstanding athletes throughout our years,” Allstate Sugar Bowl CEO Paul Hoolahan said. “But I think we’d be hard-pressed to find any individual who has been connected to our organization like Aleia – a champion at our long-time track classic, four athlete of the month honors, two athlete of the year awards and then she capped it all with the Corbett Award. She is a true champion and we look forward to watching her continue to excel.” Hobbs closed her collegiate career with three NCAA Championships – the indoor 60-meter dash and the outdoor 100-meter dash and 4x100 relay – and she followed those victories up by winning the USATF outdoor national title in the 100meter dash to become the first woman since 1991 to win the NCAA title and U.S. national title in that event. “It’s an amazing feeling,” Hobbs said on the podium after the race. “This season was the best season I’ve had in my life. To finish it out with this title is just a blessing.” A nine-time All-American, Hobbs was one of 10 semifinalists for the Bowerman Award, which is presented to the top collegiate athlete in track and field each December. She won a combined 20 races between indoors and outdoors in 2018 and posted four of the top eight wind-legal 100-meter dash times in NCAA history. “She’s been such a great representative for LSU and we will miss her,” said LSU track and field coach Dennis Shaver. “When you take a step back and look at what she has achieved this season, the times and all-time ranks are astounding. She will go down as one of the most accomplished sprinters in NCAA history.” From its earliest years, the Sugar Bowl Committee has been honored to provide opportunities for young athletes from around the country, athletes like Aleia Hobbs. That’s because, at the Allstate Sugar Bowl, We Believe in Champions.

Photo courtesy of LSU athletics


Photo by Parker Waters


Photo by Wally Porter


Photo by Mike Trummel


Photo by Wally Porter


Photo by Wally Porter


Photo by Parker Waters


Photos by Ron Brocato and Ricky Gilmore


Photos by RomaPics


Photos by RomaPics


Photo by Sophia Germer, New Orleans Advocate


Photo by RomaPics

Course photo courtesy of English Turn


Photos courtesy of Crescent City Classic


Photo courtesy of Nola.com


Photos by Kelley L. Cox and Wally Porter


Photo by Wally Porter


Bill Clark photos courtesy of UAB Athletics / Posed photos by Melissa Macatee


Photo courtesy of University of New Orleans


Photos by Wally Porter


Photos by Wally Porter


Photo by Yamlak Tsega


Photo by Parker Waters


Photos courtesy of New Orleans Recreation Department


Photos by Lawrence Burl


Photos by Wally Porter


ean Tuohy is a very successful businessman in the Memphis area – his company, RGT Management, Inc., which he founded in 1987, owns and operates over 100 restaurants, including Taco Bell, Kentucky Fried Chicken and Long John Silver’s. Despite that success, he is possibly most widely-known as the father portrayed by Tim McGraw in the movie The Blind Side.

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Tuohy is another fine example of a young man with Sugar Bowl experiences that went on to outstanding success – whether it be in the playing arena or in the real-world. A New Orleans native, Tuohy is the son of the late Skeets Tuohy, a legendary basketball coach at Isidore Newman School and a member of the Allstate Sugar Bowl’s Greater New Orleans Sports Hall of Fame. As a star prep player, the younger Tuohy played one year for his father at Newman before Billy Fitzgerald, another Greater New Orleans Sports Hall of Famer, took over the program. Sean developed into a two-time all-state selection, averaging 24.8 points per game as a senior and earning MVP honors at the prestigious New Orleans CYO Tournament, now sponsored by the Sugar Bowl. The standout point guard went on to star at Ole Miss where he led the SEC in assists for four straight years – he is one of just two players to lead the conference in any statistical category for four years and he remains the league’s all-time assist leader with 830. In addition to captaining the Rebels to their first SEC basketball tournament championship in 1981, he also helped the team win the 1979 Sugar Bowl Basketball Tournament, earning all-tournament honors after wins over Michigan and Tulane. “I’ve been lucky to win many trophies and many plaques throughout my athletic career both at Newman and at Ole Miss but I only hang three on my office wall: my high school state championship, my SEC Championship all-tournament team plaque, and the third one is the Sugar Bowl alltournament team plaque. Playing a game in front of my family and friends is still one of the biggest thrills of mine and I owe it all to the Sugar Bowl basketball tournament.” Tuohy, who is also a broadcaster for the Memphis Grizzlies, and his wife, Leigh Anne, established their charity, The Making it Happen Foundation which promotes awareness, provides hope and improves standards of living for all the children fighting to survive in the invisible cracks in society. “The Sugar Bowl is always proud to see alumni of our amateur athletic events go on to further success,” Allstate Sugar Bowl CEO Paul Hoolahan said. “Whether it be further success in sports, success as a philanthropist or success in business, it is always rewarding to us. And Sean Tuohy has seen success in all of those endeavors.” From its earliest years, the Sugar Bowl Committee has been honored to provide opportunities for young athletes from around the country, athletes like Sean Tuohy. That’s because, at the Allstate Sugar Bowl, We Believe in Champions. Photo courtesy of Ole Miss athletics


Photos by Tim Alexander


Photos courtesy of Oklahoma Athletics


All photos courtesy of athletics from each university represented


A

bove the door to the old football offices at TCU’s Amon Carter Stadium is etched the Latin phrase, “Crede Quod Habeus et Habes” – “Believe that you can, and you will.”

At Tulane Stadium on January 1, 1939, with his team trailing Carnegie Tech, 7-6 in the Sugar Bowl, Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Davey O’Brien, channeled that motto – imploring his Horned Frog teammates to do just that, telling them to keep their poise, play like they knew how to play and that they would win the game. Five plays into the second half, he connected with Durwood Homer for a 44-yard touchdown pass that put TCU back in the lead, although he would again miss the extra point. O’Brien would go on to make a 20-yard field goal and come up with an interception late in the game to seal a 15-7 victory. For the day, O’Brien threw 224 yards, a Sugar Bowl record that stood until 1963 and also punted for a 40-yard average. It was a performance that earned O’Brien a spot in the inaugural Sugar Bowl Hall of Fame. To fabled sports writer and TCU graduate Dan Jenkins, who, as a child growing up in Fort Worth saw all of O’Brien’s home games, “Davey could do it all. Not just passing but running – he bounced off tackles like a rubber ball. Never got injured and often played 60 minutes. “His heart was bigger than the whole team and his leadership skills may have been his greatest quality. An amazing player.” After a short two-year stint in the NFL, O’Brien became a wellrespected FBI agent for 10 years. In 1950, O’Brien made another career switch – putting the geology degree he’d earned at TCU to good use as an oil man, working for H.L. Hunt among others before eventually starting his own firm. He was also active in the community with the YMCA and Golden Gloves while remaining a diehard support of TCU until his death in 1977. “I’m sure that being Davey O’Brien opened doors for him,” his son David Jr. said. “But he was a working oil man. My father was extremely modest. My favorite stories about him are from people who talk about how nice he was.” “The Sugar Bowl has had a longtime goal of preserving our past,” said Paul Hoolahan, the organization’s chief operating officer. “Most college football fans know about Davey O’Brien the football player, but we want people to know that many former stars have gone on to tremendous success off the field as well.” From its earliest years, the Sugar Bowl Committee has been honored to provide opportunities for young athletes from around the country, athletes like Davey O’Brien. That’s because, at the Allstate Sugar Bowl, We Believe in Champions.

Photo courtesy of Davey O’Brien Foundation


Photo by Tucker Reynolds


Photo by Delgado Athletics


Photos by Wally Porter


Photos by Wally Porter


Photo courtesy of Kentucky athletics


The sweet taste of victory and beignets.

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The Allstate Sugar Bowl: More Than Football  

The Allstate Sugar Bowl has established itself as one of the premier college football bowl games, having hosted 28 national champions, 93 Ha...

The Allstate Sugar Bowl: More Than Football  

The Allstate Sugar Bowl has established itself as one of the premier college football bowl games, having hosted 28 national champions, 93 Ha...

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