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Articles: Buy Local A One Tank Trip Discover Sea Turtles


Contents

Buy Local

5

South Carolina First

9

I Was Born And Raised On A Carolina Sea Island

10

10 Reasons To Plant Trees...Now!

12

The Government of South Carolina

13

Carolina Girls (and Guys) Avoid Sun Damage

14

Discover Sea Turtles

17

I’m Living In God’s Gift To Earth

19

One Tank Trip

21

South Carolina Has All The Tools To Compete In The New Global Village

23

University of South Carolina Football

25

Commerical Real Estate

27

Growing Up Southern Is A Privilege

29

College Football

31

When Life Gives You Lemons...Squeeze Them Into Some Sweet Tea

33

Southerners Have A Genius For Phychological Alchemy

35

Time To Refinance or Buy!?

37

Spotting Migrating Birds In South Carolina

41

How To Make Grits

44

In South Carolina

46

The History of Shagging

48

I’m A Carolina Girl

49

Neighborhoods

51

Anything To Do With South Carolina

53

Visiting Murrells Inlet

54

www.Discover.sc Online Magazine | 2009 3


From The Editor Buy Local Promoting local business is as simple as having other company’s business cards or brochures posted on a board in your store. In an effort to promote your area, we are distributing decals that say “Check us out at www.Discover.sc,” in hopes that local shoppers will visit the site to find local restaurants, clothing, specials, coupons and more. We are doing our part, so please join us, and promote your local merchants, and everyone will benefit!

Buy

Top Ten reasons to Think Local Local - Be Local – Help Local Businesses

1. Buy Local -- Support yourself and South Carolina. Many studies have revealed when you buy from an independent, locally owned business in the your own area, rather than a nationally owned businesses, considerably more of your money is used to make purchases from other local businesses. Local businesses continue to strengthen the economic base of the local community. These include case studies showing that local local owned businesses generate a premium in enhanced economic impact to the community and our tax base.

2.Support Local Area Community Groups:

Non-profit organizations receive an average 250% more support from smaller South Carolina area business owners than they do from large companies.

3. Keep Your Area Unique: Where we shop, where we eat and have fun -- all of it makes our community home. Our one-of-a-kind local businesses are an integral part of the distinctive character. Local tourism businesses also benefit. “When people go on vacation they generally seek out destinations that offer them the sense of being someplace, not just anyplace.” ~ Richard Moe, President, National Historic Preservation Trust.

4. Reduce Environmental Impact: Locally owned businesses in your area can make more local purchases requiring less transportation. This generally means contributing less to sprawl, congestion, habitat loss and pollution.

5. Create Additional Jobs: Small local businesses are the largest employer nationally and in the community, provide the most jobs to local residents. 6. Receive Better Service: Local businesses often hire people with a better understanding of the products and services they offer, and take more time to get to know customers. Cont. next page www.Discover.sc Online Magazine | 2009 4


7.Invest

in Your Community: Local businesses are owned by people who live in this community, and they are less likely to leave, and are more invested in the community’s future.

8. Put

your

Taxes

to

Good Use:

Local businesses require a relatively little infrastructure investment and make more efficient use of public services as compared to nationally owned stores entering your area.

9. Buy What you Want, Not What Big Advertising Budgets Want you to Buy: A South Carolina marketplace comprised of tens of thousands of small businesses is the best way to ensure innovation and low prices over the long-term. A multitude of small businesses, each selecting products and services based not on a national sales plan but on their own interests and the needs of their local customers, promises a much broader range of product choices.

10. Promote Local Prosperity: An escalating body of economic research shows that in an increasingly homogenized world, entrepreneurs and skilled workers are more likely to invest and settle in communities that preserve their one-of-a-kind businesses and distinctive character. Larry Local Editor in Chief

www.Discover.sc Online Magazine | 2009 5


CEO Dennis Stewart Editor In Chief Larry Local Creative Director Daniel Holliday Art Director Amy Coats Web Developers Matthew Coats Administration & Marketing Vivi Morillo Angie Woods

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carolina media SERVICES

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Copyright Š 2009 Carolina Media Services. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. 3290 Ashley Phosphate Road Charleston, SC 29418 Phone: (843)720-9604 Fax: (843)725-4734 Info@Discover.sc www.Discover.sc


South Carolina Firsts Like any other State, South Carolina is full of “Firsts”. The following is a list of some of the more popular Firsts, that may be good to brag about, or for use in a trivia game: • First European settlement in South Carolina in 1526 near Georgetown settled by Spanish explorer Lucas Vasquez de Ayllon named San Miguel de Gualdape (Rumor has it that he was the first “Half-back”- that he wanted to be half way back from Florida to New York) • First permanent English settlement in South Carolina established at Albemarle Point in Charleston in 1670

• First steam locomotive built in the United States to be used for regular railroad service “Best Friend of Charleston,” 1830. • First municipal college - College of Charleston, opened April 1, 1838 • First Roman Catholic cathedral in South Carolina Cathedral of Saint John and Saint Finbar Charleston, April 1845 • First state to secede from the Union, December 20, 1860. • First shot fired in Civil War on Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, April 12, 1861.

• First opera performed in America - Charleston, February 18, 1735

• The first submarine ever to sink an enemy ship was the H.L. Hunley used by the Confederates on February 17, 1864 in Charleston Harbor against the U.S.S. Housatonic.

• First building to be used solely as a theatre Dock Street Theatre in Charleston, constructed in 1736

• The first state intercollegiate football game took place on December 14, 1889 with Wofford defeating Furman

• First Jewish synagogue in South Carolina (Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim) - Charleston, 1750

• First commercial tea farm - Summerville, 1890

• First free library established - Charleston, 1698

• First Black Baptist Church established, Silver Bluff, 1773 • The Charleston Chamber of Commerce was the first city Chamber of Commerce in this country - 1773 • First public museum - Charleston Museum, organized January 12, 1773 • First business publication - South Carolina Price Current in Charleston, 1774 • The first time a British flag was taken down and replaced by an American flag was in Charleston in 1775 • Golf was first played in the city limits of Charleston. The South Carolina Golf Club was formed in 1786 - this was the first golf club. • First Roman Catholic Church St. Mary’s August 24, 1789, Charleston • First cotton mill built - James Island, 1789 • First fireproof building built - Charleston, 1822

• First black woman to practice medicine in the state was Dr. Matilda Arabelle Evans in 1897 • First textile school established in a college Clemson, 1899 • The first car was manufactured in Rock Hill by John Gary Anderson in January 1916 • First woman lawyer in South Carolina - Miss James M. Perry of Greenville was admitted to practice on May 4, 1918 • First national historic preservation ordinance passed by Charleston city council on October 13, 1931 • First television station WCSC broadcast from Charleston June 13, 1953 • First U.S. Senator elected by a write-in vote Strom Thurmond, November 2, 1954 • First Spoleto Festival held in Charleston May 1977 • First Internet company to bring you the Internet, Streaming Radio, and Online Magazineswww.ONLY.sc ( click here for more information)


www.Discover.sc Online Magazine | 2009 12


Carolina Girls ( and Guys)… Avoid Sun Damage One of the great reasons for living in South Carolina is the temperate weather. Three fourths of the year, there’s no need to put on much more than a light cotton shirt and an airy pair of pants, shorts or a skirt. The beaches are never empty at any time of year, but once the thermometer climbs back over the 75 degree mark each spring, the coast begins crawling with sun bunnies from all over the state and beyond. Whether you’re hitting the beaches or spending the day outdoors catching up with your lawn care, keep in mind that too much sun exposure can be dangerous and sometimes fatal. Each year, more than 1 million new cases of skin cancer are diagnosed nationwide. In Charleston County, an average of 112 people are diagnosed yearly with the most dangerous type of skin cancer, melanoma. Among people ages 30 to 35, in fact, the incidence of melanoma is second only to breast cancer. Following area a few tips to help you avoid sun damage and keep your skin healthy and cancer free:

Wearing sunscreen does not completely eliminate the risk of sun damage:

Even if you’re slathering on a thick layer of SPF 50 each time you walk out the door, sunscreen is not a fool-proof, all day guarantee for sun protection. Any change in skin color caused by the sun, including a light tan, is evidence of sun damage. Sunburns are primarily caused by UVB rays, but UVA rays – which cause premature aging and sun damage – are not filtered by all sunscreens and often penetrate deep into the skin. SPF 30 is not two times better than SPF 15 The generous and repetitive application of sunscreen is far more important than the SPF number, as long as it’s at least SPF 15. SPF 15 provides 92% protection from the sun, while SPF 30 provides 97% and SPF 40 provides 97.5%. Sunscreen should also be applied in thick layers: if applied to thinly, an SPF 30 sunscreen might only be as effective as an SPF 15. To ensure proper protection, think of applying two spoonfuls. Sunscreen should also be applied liberally 30 minutes before going outside, and reapplied every two hours when spending time outdoors.


Skin cancer affects all ages:

It’s been estimated that as much as 25 percent of skin damage occurs before a person is 18 years old. While children and teenagers are not at as great a risk of getting skin cancer as adults, skin cancer is also occurring in young people, especially those who get consistent amounts of sun exposure. In addition, high amounts of sun exposure among children and teenagers results in high rates of skin cancer later in life.

Skin color is not a guarantee against sun damage:

Although people with fairer complexions are at highest risk, skin cancer can be most serious for people with darker skin tones. Melanoma in Harmful UVA rays can penetrate glass, meaning many are unknowingly exposed when driving to work or sitting by an office window. Many people, in fact, end up with more sun damage on the left side of their bodies for that very reason: they don’t realize driving a car exposes them to harmful rays. While vehicles with tinted glass are ideal, it’s important to remember proper sun protection including sunglasses, long sleeves and sunscreen applied liberally to hands when driving.

Apply more than lip gloss to protect your lips:

Shiny lip glosses that do not contain sunscreen do not protect the skin. Lip protection is an important part of skin care that’s often overlooked. Glosses and lip balm should contain a minimum of SPF 15 to

prevent sun damage. Unfortunately, skin cancers on the lips are often more aggressive and can become dangerous if left untreated.

Check your sunscreen ingredients:

Until the Food and Drug Administration comes out with official guidelines for sunscreen in 2009, people should watch for ingredients such as titanium oxide, zinc oxide, mexoryl and parsol which protect against both types of UV rays.

Skin cancer can occur on any part of your body – not just the sun exposed areas:

The most common sun-induced skin cancers are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. While incidents are highest among sun-exposed areas, all three types can occur in non-exposed areas such as under fingernails and between toes, where many people aren’t watching for it.

Good news – skin cancer is not always deadly:

Left untreated, skin cancers can be very dangerous. But unlike other types of cancer, melanoma and other types of skin cancer typically develop on the outermost layer of the skin, making them easier to detect. Skin cancers can be deadly when left undetected, but are easily treatable when caught early… which is why it’s important for people to schedule annual head-to-toe skin checks with a dermatologist to check all freckles, moles and marks on the skin.


Discover sea turtles May through October is sea turtle nesting season in South Carolina and each year, these gentle giants of the sea return to their native shores and lay eggs; usually under the cover of night.

Better know a turtle

There are four species of sea turtles which visit the shores of South Carolina: the loggerhead, the Green, Kemp’s Ridley and the Leatherback. The endangered loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta), has a reddish-brown shell and a relatively large head with strong jaw muscles which are used to crush the shells of the conchs and crabs on which it feeds. They tend to nest at night and lay about 120 eggs per nest. A female will lay an average of four nests per year with about two weeks between nestings. Hatchlings tend to emerge about two months later and usually at night.

The Green, Kemp’s Ridley, and Leatherback sea turtles are even more rare in South Carolina. The Kemp’s Ridley has a grayish-black to dark olive shell which lightens with age and only nests in Mexico. The Green is actually named for the color of its fat, not its shell, which is usually gray in mature turtles. The Leatherback is the world’s largest reptile. Adults commonly exceed 1000 pounds. Unlike other sea turtles, it has rubber-like ridges comprising the shell. Commonly seen feeding on cannonball jellyfish, Leatherbacks have become more frequent visitors to South Carolina waters over the past 20 years.


Lights out for sea turtles

All of the sea turtles above are either listed as endangered or threatened. Since 1980, the number of nesting loggerheads has declined by three percent every year. Unfortunately, one of the main causes for this decline is human interference in the form of boat propellers, trash bags that look like jellyfish and distracting lights which lead hatchlings away from the moonlit ocean. However, many beach communities are enacting a “lights out” policy during nesting season to help sea turtles. Property owners on or near the beachfront are often required to keep external lights off that are facing the beachfront. Hatchlings use the darkness of the sand dunes versus the light reflecting off the ocean as identifiers to tell them where to go. Lights from beach houses can confuse hatchlings and cause them to go in the wrong direction, never making it to the ocean. Since an average of only one percent of hatchlings survive to adulthood, it is important that we do not decrease their survival chances. Furthermore, if lights are bright enough, they can discourage adult females from nesting, which can also negatively impact the population.

Lend a helping flipper

With the help of local “Turtle Teams” and responsible beachgoers who are conscious of turtle season, you may be fortunate enough to witness a turtle coming ashore to nest or hatchlings emerging from the dunes during turtle season. If so, be careful not to interfere. If you do find hatchling lost in the dunes, possibly because of light pollution, you can try to place the turtle on the beach closer to the water. You may also find tracks from a sea turtle in the morning going towards the dunes. If so, make note of the location and contact your local Public Safety Department. They will be able to contact the proper Sea Turtle group to ensure the nest is cared for and recorded for research purposes. While seeing something as small as the evidence of a sea turtle is inspiring, being able to help works to ensure these wonders of nature do not disappear.


A One Tank Trip Got the vacation blues? South Carolina abounds with destinations you can visit on one tank of gas… trips that showcase the Palmetto State’s beauty without busting your budget. What a rich, exotic place South Carolina is. One of the original American Colonies, the state has an abundance of historical sites that bring our nation’s past to vivid life. The outdoors lover can enjoy a variety of activities such as kayaking, hiking, saltwater fishing, even scuba diving in the company of alligators. The state’s culture has been shaped by its European, African and Caribbean settlers, as evidenced especially by the food, which is some of the most delicious we’ll ever have the pleasure of eating.

Hilton Head Island

One of the most famous Islands in the world is at our back door. Hilton Head Island is an optimum place to begin a One Tank Trip through South Carolina. Hilton Head, whose 70-square mile area gives it the distinction of being the second-largest barrier island on the East Coast. This incredible golf resort community features a multitude of activities to keep families well-entertained, such as kayaking, dolphin watching cruises and fishing charters. For more land-based vacation fun you can rent a bicycle and take a cruise along the beachfront trails,

or play any of the twenty-four golf courses located on the Island. Or maybe you just want to sit and watch the azure-blue waters. Whatever you’re looking for, Hilton Head is your one stop for relaxing entertainment. Outdoor activities and water sports are plentiful, and the relaxed, carefree atmosphere takes us away from the stresses of city life the moment you arrive.

Beaufort

Known as the “Queen of the Carolina Sea Islands” and just down the road from Hilton Head Island, is the splendid Southern town of Beaufort. Just take the US-278 northwest to state highway SC-170, which brings you to Beaufort. The town’s historic homes and peaceful way of life will make your visit to Beaufort seem like a step back in time to the quieter, simpler, days of the historic Old South. This isn’t meant to imply that Beaufort is stuck in the past – far from it. The town is host to many contemporary art galleries and golf courses, and the adjacent Parris Island Marine Training Camp is one of the most sophisticated military training centers in the United States. Truly, South Carolina offers visitors a chance to enjoy the modern age while giving a glimpse into our nation’s past; it’s the perfect place to enjoy the best of all possible worlds


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Commercial Real Estate Renting in Today’s Market First make sure that the area you have chosen is right for your intended business. If you plan on expanding, take that into consideration. Do you need to be close to an expressway, or the local airport? Before you decide, think ahead, because you may be getting into a long term commitment.

Weigh the benefits of guaranteed foot traffic at a mall location against premium rent. Some malls require that all tenants stay open during mall hours, and pay for common area usage as well as the store’s own space and upkeep. Stores may also be asked to pay a percentage of sales to the mall.

Make sure that any space you’re considering is big enough for both your current needs, and your foreseeable growth. Be realistic and never overcommit.

Identify your closest competitors. Also check out neighboring businesses with an eye for complementary products or services. If you are locating in a mall, check the lease agreement for any guaranteed protection against competition.

Do your homework beforehand. Investigate traffic patterns; tour the area and building. Find out who the previous tenant was, and why the business left. Learn what kinds of marketing the location does in support of its tenants (if any) and whether co-operative marketing funds are available to you.

Evaluate whether the physical location and space is a good fit with your product line. Do you need a large, bright space or is an office warehouse sufficient?


Investigate any restrictions on signage. Signs are vitally important to retail businesses, yet many landlords decide on what a store can and cannot do. The rules may be even stricter in a mall, which closely monitors its physical appearance. Negotiate the terms of your lease aggressively. Think about consulting a realtor that is familiar with the area. Never accept wording that’s confusing or that leaves you wondering who is liable for what. Ask for the right of first refusal on adjacent space in case you need to expand. Negotiate for free improvements, free rent, and other incentives before signing your lease. Hire a real estate attorney who not only specializes in lease negotiations, but knows your area and, preferably, has dealt with your kind of business before. A lease negotiation can cover tens, if not hundreds, of terms, and you want someone in your corner who has seen it all before. Know who is responsible for maintaining the heating, air-conditioning and other systems, as well as keeping up the parking lot and building exterior. This can be critical in older buildings. Who pays for the utilities and trash pick-up? The time has probably never been better to start a new venture if you have a business that is not being adversely affected by this economy. Just make sure you get the right location.


College Football Clemson Tigers Date

09/26/09

Opponent vs. Middle Tennessee at Georgia Tech vs. Boston College vs. TCU

10/03/09

at Maryland

10/17/09

vs. Wake Forest

Clemson, SC

TBA

at Miami

Miami Gardens, FL

TBA

10/17/09

Clemson, SC

TBA

10/24/09 10/31/09

Clemson, SC

TBA

11/07/09

Raleigh, NC

TBA

Clemson, SC

TBA

11/14/09 11/28/09

Columbia, SC

TBA

09/05/09 09/10/09 09/19/09

10/24/09 10/31/09 11/07/09 11/14/09 11/21/09 11/28/09

vs. Coastal Carolina vs. Florida State at North Carolina State vs. Virginia at South Carolina

Location Clemson, SC Atlanta, GA Clemson, SC Clemson, SC College Park, MD

Time 6:00 p.m. ET 7:30 p.m. ET 12:00 p.m. ET TBA

USC Gamecocks

TBA

SC State Bulldogs Date 9/6/09 9/12/09 9/26/09 10/3/09 10/10/09 10/17/09 10/24/09 10/31/09 11/7/09 11/14/09 11/21/09

Opponent at

Location

Time

at Hampton University vs. Delaware State at Howard University vs. Morgan State University vs. NC A&T State University

TBA

Columbia, SC Tuscaloosa, at Alabama AL vs. Vanderbilt Columbia, SC at Tennessee Knoxville, TN Fayetteville, at Arkansas AR vs. Florida Columbia, SC vs. Clemson Columbia, SC

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Wofford Terriers Date

Opponent

Location

Time

6:00 PM ET

9/19/09

Wisconsin

Madison, WI

12:00 PM ET

Columbia, SC

TBA

9/26/09

Chattanooga

Chattanooga, TN

6:00 PM ET

Norfolk, VA

1:00 PM ET

10/3/09

Georgia South- Spartanburg, ern SC

1:30 PM ET

Orangeburg, SC

2:00 PM ET

10/17/09

Appalachian State

Spartanburg, SC

3:00 PM ET

Hampton, VA

2:00 PM ET

10/24/09

Western Carolina

Cullowhee, NC

4:00 PM ET

Orangeburg, SC

1:30 PM ET

10/31/09

Elon

Spartanburg, SC

1:30 PM ET

Washington, DC

1:00 PM ET

11/7/09

The Citadel

Charleston, SC

3:00 PM ET

Orangeburg, SC

1:30 PM ET

11/14/09

Samford

Spartanburg, SC

1:30 PM ET

Orangeburg, SC

TBA

11/21/09

Furman

Greenville, S

3:00 PM ET

Orangeburg, SC

University

Columbia, SC

7:00 PM ET

ET

vs. Florida A&M

Columbia, SC

Spartanburg, SC

FL

University

Columbia, SC

Charleston Southern

man University

at Norfolk State

vs. Florida Atlantic vs. 09/24/09 Mississippi vs. South 10/03/09 Carolina State 10/10/09 vs. Kentucky 09/19/09

9/12/09

4:00 PM

of South Carolina

Athens, GA

at Georgia

Tampa, FL

Daytona Beach,

at University

09/12/09

Raleigh, NC

Time 7:00 p.m. ET 7:00 p.m. ET 7:00 p.m. ET 7:30 p.m. ET

South Florida

at Bethune-Cook-

Winston-Salem

Location

9/5/09

2:00 PM ET

vs.

Opponent at North 09/03/09 Carolina State

7:00 PM ET

Orlando, FL

Grambling State

Date


Citadel Bulldogs Date

Opponent at North Carolina

Location Chapel Hill, NC

09/19/09

at Princeton

Princeton, NJ

09/26/09

vs. Presbyterian

10/03/09

Furman Paladins

Time 6:00 PM ET 3:00 PM ET

09/05/09

Charleston, SC

vs. Appalachian State

Charleston, SC

10/10/09

at Elon

Elon, NC

10/17/09

at Western Carolina

Cullowhee, NC

10/24/09

vs. Furman

Charleston, SC

10/31/09

vs. Samford

Charleston, SC

11/7/09

vs. Wofford

Charleston, SC

09/05/09

11/14/09 11/28/09

at Chattanooga Georgia Southern

Chattanooga, TN Statesboro, GA

Location

Time

vs. Presbyterian

Greenville, SC

5:00 PM ET

09/12/09

at Chattanooga

Chattanooga, TN

6:00 PM ET

7:00 PM ET

09/19/09

at Missouri

Columbia, Mo.

2:00 PM ET

1:00 PM ET

09/26/09

at Western Carolina

Cullowhee, N.C

6:00 PM ET

1:30 PM ET 4:00 PM ET 2:00 PM ET 1:00 PM ET 3:00 PM ET 2:00 PM ET 2:00 PM ET

10/03/09

vs. Elon

Greenville, SC

3:00 PM ET

10/17/09

vs. Samford

Greenville, SC

2:00 PM ET

10/24/09

at The Citadel

Charleston, SC

2:00 PM ET

10/31/09

vs. Appalachian State

Greenville, SC

12:00 PM ET

11/07/09

at Auburn

Auburn, AL

11/14/09

at Georgia Southern

Statesboro, GA

2:00 PM ET

11/21/09

vs. Wofford

Greenville, SC

3:00 PM ET

CSU Buccaneers Date

Opponent

Location

Time

Date

Opponent

TBA

PC Blue Hose Date

Opponent

Location

Time

9/5/09

at Florida

Gainesville, FL

7 PM ET

09/05/09

at Furman

Greenville, SC

5:00 PM ET

9/12/09

at Wofford

Spartanburg, SC

7 PM ET

09/12/09

vs. Elon

Clinton, SC

1:30 PM ET

9/19/09

at South Florida

Tampa, Fla

7 PM ET

Charleston, SC

1:30 PM ET

vs. UTChattanooga

Clinton, SC

9/26/09

vs. North Greenville

09/19/09

1:30 PM ET

Charleston, SC

Charleston, SC

1:30 PM ET

at The Citadel

10/3/09

vs. Savannah State

09/26/09

7:00 PM ET

Boiling Springs, NC

11:30 AM ET

at Stony Brook

10/17/09

at GardnerWebb

10/03/09

Stony Brook, NY

3:00 PM ET

vs. Liberty

Charleston, SC

at Old Dominion

Norfolk, VA

10/24/09

1:30 PM ET

10/10/09

6:00 PM ET

vs. VMI

Clinton, SC

10/31/09

at VMI

Lexington, VA

1:30 PM ET

10/24/09

2:00 PM ET

Lynchburg, VA

Clinton, SC

1:30 PM ET

at Liberty

11/7/09

at Presbyterian

10/31/09

3:30 PM ET

vs. Stony Brook

Charleston, SC

vs. Charleston Southern

Clinton, SC

11/14/09

1:30 PM ET

11/07/09

1:30 PM ET

Charleston, SC

1:30 PM ET

at Coastal Carolina

Conway, SC

11/21/09

Coastal Carolina

11/14/09

12:30 PM ET

11/21/09

vs. GardnerWebb

Clinton, SC

1:00 PM ET


When life hands you lemons... squeeze them into some sweet tea!


Southerners have a genius for psychological alchemy...If something intolerable simply cannot be changed, driven away or shot they will not only tolerate it but take pride in it as well.


rate with the tax advantages of a mortgage, and you have an incredibly cheap way to build wealth, but you better act now.

Time to Refinance Buy !?

or

Right now, mortgage rates are at their lowest level since 1971. Think about that. Twenty-five years ago, homeowners were paying as much as 18% on a 30-year fixed. Today it’s just a little over 5%.Combine that

Real estate guru Barbara Corcoran has already seen a tremendous surge in refinance applications – more than triple the average – and the number of people getting approved is astronomically higher as well, she says. But that doesn’t mean the low rates are a panacea for the ills of the housing market. It is only once home prices start to go up that we will finally see a light at the end of tunnel, Corcoran says. Until that happens, we are still going to have to crawl out of this mess. “[Low interest rates are] a not a lifesaver,” Corcoran says. “This is just a helping hand.”

David Kittle, chairman of the Mortgage Bankers Association, has this advice to homeowners looking to refinance: Do it. Don’t get greedy searching for another quarter-point. Lock in rates now. He is seeing applications soar over 125% just since Thanksgiving due to the low rates. Of course, you should only refinance if it saves you at least 3/8 on the rate and if you plan on staying in your home for at least four years, Kittle says. Along with good credit, proof of income and money by means of a down payment or equity in the home, there are certain things every homeowner needs regardless of interest rate levels.

www.Discover.sc Online Magazine | 2009 37


Visit www.Jobs.sc To Find Your Dream Job!

Click & Point To See Jobs Now! A proud member of www.Only.sc which includes:

www.Radio.sc www.LocalTraffic.sc www.Classifieds.sc www.Barter.sc www.News.sc www.Weather.sc Contact your www.Only.sc Representative today to be a part of www.Jobs.sc.

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Fax:(843)725-4734

Info@Jobs.sc

www.Discover.sc Online Magazine | 2009 38


South Carolina where roots, place, family, and tradition are the essence of identity.


Spotting Migrating Birds In South Carolina How and why to birds migrate?

In South Carolina in the mid to late fall, if you go outside after sundown and listen carefully for sounds above, you may hear the chips, clucks and squeaks of migratory birds passing overhead in the darkness. Their calls are often mistaken for those of insects. A possible reason for the evolution of nocturnal migration is that it enables birds to avoid predators such as hawks. Nocturnal migrants are able to navigate by using a variety of clues, primarily celestial patterns, but also through the orientation of magnetic fields, and even sounds, such as ocean waves. This time of year, tens of millions of birds leave their summer nesting grounds, flying vast distances over land and water to reach wintering grounds in the tropics. The most number of birds move southward with the passage of cold fronts, and. if you examine the daily weather map, you will be able to determine when they are coming.

Where birds migrate

Most of the migrating birds which move through the coastal area are inexperienced navigators, birds that hatched the previous summer. Migrating along the ocean is a dangerous enterprise, as they can be blown offshore when winds change direction in-flight. Most adult birds migrate far inland to avoid the coast. Migrant flocks are composed mainly of species that feed on insects and other invertebrates, abundant food that is a critical source of energy for nesting, but food that is scarce in winter. Insects as well as fruits are abundant in the Caribbean Basin, where most of the migrating birds spend the winter. The most common migrant species are insect-eating members of the warbler, vireo and thrush families. After a cold front passes through South Carolina, the best way to see these birds is to go for a walk in the most unpopulated area nearby: hiking trails, national parks and old plantations are some of the best places to spot migrating birds. Most migrants can be spotted as they feed along the edges of wooded areas, especially where there are pools of water. However, if you have a lot of vegetation in your yard, you may be just as likely to see them at your house.

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Get Your Carolina Girl Gear!


How to make grits By now, you should know that grits are not only the starch of choice in South Carolina, it’s also the acronym for “Girls Raised in the South”; so if you don’t have your recipe down by now, it’s time to get boiling. Proper grits do not come in an easy to open, plastic-lined paper packet. As My Cousin Vinny put it, “Real grits take at least 20 minutes to cook”. In fact, they take a couple hours, but it’s worth every simmering second.So get rid of the Quaker Instant Grits and mosey on down to the rice isle. Grits can usually be found either here or in the baking isle. If you’re lucky enough to live near a locally produce market or farmer’s market, 99% of the time you’ll find more than enough grits in stock. Some local favorites include Anson Mills grits and Charleston’s Favorite Stone Ground Grits. Now that you have the dry goods, make sure you have some fresh chicken stock, milk, cream and butter. Oh yes, you’re making these the way God intended. Measure out your dry grits (1 cup of dry grits makes roughly 2 servings) and clean them by placing them in a bowl and filling the bowl with

water until the water is an inch or so above the grits. Skim off the chaff and drain. Don’t worry, it doesn’t have to be completely dry, just get it as close as possible. Now, dump the wet grits into a pot and pour in twice as much chicken stock as grits. Bring this to a boil, then reduce to mediumlow. Now add equal portions cream and milk up to 2 and ½ times the amount of grits. So, if I was making this recipe for two, I would have used 1 cup dry grits, 2 ½ cups chicken stock, 1 ¾ cups cream and 1 ¾ cups milk. Add salt and pepper to taste, then sit back and let it simmer. The longer the grits simmer, the richer they’ll be. Typical time is 20-30 minutes, but some of the best grits sit for an hour to two hours at low to medium-low heat, just soaking up that cream and milk. Right before you serve the grits up, stir in a healthy pat of butter and, if you’re feeling a little wild, grate a handful of parmesan or cheddar cheese over the top. Play with and perfect this dish to your liking. The recipe is purposefully simple for the sole reason that it’s up to each southern girl to come up with her own special twist on this Southern Classic.


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In South Carolina, perhaps more than any other state, we go back to our home in dreams and memories, hoping it remains what it was on a lazy, still summer’s day twenty years ago.


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The History of Shagging “Women are always right.” Some might say that’s true for everything, but that’s definitely true for shagging. Invented in the late 1930s in Myrtle Beach, the Carolina shag is the state dance of South Carolina. It’s a type of swing dance and has the same rhythm as east coast swing; 1 and 2, 3 and 4, 5, 6 or triple step, triple step, rock step. The shag is always accompanied by beach music, a staple of the coastal southeast.

Basic steps

The basic steps of shagging start with the count; 1 and 2, 3 and 4, 5, 6. To help dancers remember their footing, instructors will often point out that “women are always right,” since women start with their right foot first, while men start with the left. After

mastering the timing, dancers are introduced to their partners. Women use their right hand and men use their left hand to hold on to each other and both should gently bend their hands as though they are holding a drink.

Making turns

The last step to shagging is mastering the turns. When it comes to turning, the man will always lead. When ready, the men should give a signal to the women and turn them under their arms, and then follow with their own under-arm turn. And that’s it! Once you’ve mastered the basic steps, you’re ready to go out and hit the many shagging events held across South Carolina on a regular basis throughout the spring, summer and fall.


I’m a Carolina girl. I like when men open the door and pull out a chair.


Neighborhoods 1. Neighborhoods are where we all grew up a long time ago. Today, because of golf courses, shopping areas, subdivisions, jobs, schools, and a transient society, a neighborhood means different things to different folks. 2. Neighborhoods can be as small as a dozen or so houses, and be as many as thousands of homes. 3. Neighborhoods are common, and perhaps close to universal, since most people in urbanized areas would probably consider themselves to be living in one. 4. Neighborhoods are convenient, and always accessible, since you are already in your neighborhood when you walk out your door. 5. Successful neighborhood action frequently requires little specialized technical skill, and often little or no money. Action may call for an investment of time, but material costs are often low. 6. With neighborhood action, compared to activity on larger scales, results are more likely to be visible and quickly forthcoming. The streets are generally

cleaner; the crosswalks are painted; the trees are planted; a festival draws a crowd. 7. Visible and swift results are indicators of success; and since success is reinforcing, the probability of subsequent neighborhood action is increased 8. Because neighborhood action usually involves others, such actions create or strengthen connections and relationships with other neighbors, leading in turn to a variety of potentially positive effects, often hard to predict. 9. Over and above these community advantages, neighborhood activity may simply be enjoyable and fun for those taking part. But in addition to these benefits, considerable research indicates that strong and cohesive neighborhoods and communities are linked – quite possibly causally linked – to decreases in crime, better outcomes for children, and improved physical and mental health. The social support that a strong neighborhood may provide can serve as a buffer against various forms of adversity. Sometimes a neighborhood isn’t a neighborhood until an event occurs, which draws people together, to become “neighbors”.


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Anything to do with South Carolina resonates with me, because I’m a Carolinian.


Visiting Murrells Inlet South Carolina

Murrells Inlet, located along the northern coastline of South Carolina just below Myrtle Beach, is as rife with history as many of the more well-known cities of the south. Although it was a popular site for rice plantations in the 18th and 19th centuries, the community did not officially receive recognition as a town until their first post office was established in 1913. The origin of the name is unknown, though local legends attribute it to vague stories of pirates which used to frequent the quiet, protected inlet. The residents of Murrells Inlet Before the rice barons arrived, Murrells Inlet was home to several different native American tribes, followed by Spanish explorers in the 1500s and early English colonists in the 1600s. However, when the plantations arrived, the entire landscape of this unassuming inlet turned upside down. Once a thick maritime forest, most of the coastal land was cleared for rice fields and by 1850, almost 47 million pounds of rice were being shipped out of the port.

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During the 1800s, residents of the larger cities, such as Columbia, would make an annual trek to Murrells Inlet to escape the oppressive heat of the city, much like the residents of Charleston would travel to Sullivan’s Island. The summer residents would take a train to either Conway or Georgetown, then catch the steamboat which docked at the Wachesaw river landing. From there, it was horses and carts until they reached their cottages.

Murrells Inlet and the Civil War

Murrells Inlet was hit hard by the Civil War. Union warships knew that the inlet was a popular port along the South Carolina coast and would frequently attack the Confederacy’s blockade runners as they attempted to sneak cotton and rice to England in exchange for weapons, food and medicine. The rice plantations suffered, but might have survived if not for the 1893 Sea Islands hurricane, a category three which wiped out the last of the stable rice crops. By 1916, the last commercial rice grower in Murrells Inlet closed their doors for the last time. Fortunately, commercial fishing was starting to take hold in the community and as early as 1914, deep sea charter fishing trips were being offered for $5 a person, a price which included the captain, a 20 foot skiff, and a full day of fishing. www.Discover.sc Online Magazine | 2009 55


The Huntingtons come to Murrells Inlet

The small town’s commerce received a huge boost in the early 1920s when Archer Milton Huntington of New York decided to build his estate in Murrells Inlet. The 9,000 acre plantation required almost all of the small Town’s craftsmen in order to be built. Brick masons, landscapers, carpenters and painters worked day and night on Huntington’s home, as well the church, medical clinic and community center, which Huntington had built for the residents of nearby Sandy Island. The main residence, named “Atalaya”, was a sight to behold, with 36 rooms, 22 fireplaces and even a special room for oyster shucking. Huntington’s wife, Anna Hyatt, was a skilled sculptor and the gardens around the main house were filled with her nationally acclaimed works. Visitors can still see the Huntington’s property, which is now the Huntington Beach State Park, and admire Anna Hyatt’s gardens in sculptures in what is now known as Brookgreen Gardens.

Dining in Murrells Inlet

Today, Murrells Inlet is known for its excellent cuisine and in fact, a section along its shoreline is known as “Restaurant Row”. The close proximity of marinas, seafood markets and charter boats practically guarantee that you’re going to get the freshest fish available and the influence of southern cuisine is obvious in the menu selections. However, the small town feel is not lost to commercialism in Murrells Inlet. Residents are happy to talk about the earlier days of their town and will gladly share tales of ghost ships and rogue pirates as you take in the ocean breeze on a gently sagging front porch. Whether you come to Murrells Inlet for the dining, the history or the breathtaking art, this sleepy little town has something for everyone and will surely surprise you with its endless array of entertaining and educational things to do.


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Final Words

I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past. Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799)

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