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Hot Dog! Hot eats and cool beats in Western Branch

june-july 2018 • vol. 2, no. 4


2 western branch magazine

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western branch magazine 3

We get in depth


16

july

what's inside?

2018


feature

10

Ray's Dog House is an institution in Western Branch. You can get your fix of a hot dog with chili or sausage and sauerkraut, along with good oldfashioned friendship and service.

26

Conductor Daniel W. Boothe is a Western Branch resident who has been deployed to Afghanistan but these days takes a calmer tone as director of Symphonicity.

In the news The population is growing in Western Branch and North Suffolk, and that requires health care options. Bon Secours is in the process of delivering.

Where am I? So you think you know Western Branch? Test your knowledge of its landmarks with this photo quiz. You could win a $25 gift card.

Hot Dog! Hot eats and cool beats in Western Branch

june-july 2018 • vol. 2, no. 4

photo by Tracy Agnew

on the cover

Advertising rates and information available upon request. Subscriptions are $20 annually in-state; $25 annually out-of-state; $30 for international subscriptions. Please make checks payable to Suffolk Publications, LLC P.O. Box 1220, Suffolk, VA 23439

On the road See how to submit your photos to this photographic feature that showcases your travels.

Public servant Roland Butler Jr. is a frequently requested physical therapist at InMotion.

15 25 28


july

2018 EDITORIAL Tracy Agnew Editor Alex Perry Staff Writer news@westernbranchmagazine.com

ADVERTISING

Earl Jones Marketing Consultant Lindsay Richardson Marketing Consultant Dana Snow Marketing Consultant Kandyce Kirkland Marketing Consultant sales@westernbranchmagazine.com

PRODUCTION Troy Cooper Designer

ADMINISTRATION John Carr Publisher

Cathy Daughtrey Business Manager Hope Rose Production

editor's note Hot dogs and health care If you’re like me, there’s nothing that can make you feel better than a good hot dog slathered in mustard, onions and chili, with some hot French fries, plentiful ketchup and a bubbly soda nearby. Those kinds of hot dogs are best served from a community institution that’s been around for decades. For many folks in Western Branch, that’s Ray’s Dog House. Ray and Cindy are an adorable couple who started the Dog House after both of them spent years in education. Don’t let the name fool you — they seem like they’re very much in love, so I doubt Ray ever gets put in the dog house. In addition to my usual M.O.&C. order, you can also get deli mustard, ketchup, relish, sauerkraut, cheese or slaw on your dog. And you’ve got to respect a place that keeps Texas Pete on the table for any critical hot-sauce needs that may arise. You can read all about this pretty cool couple and their pretty hot dogs in this edition of Western Branch magazine. Another guy with a cool head is Daniel Boothe, a Western Branch resident who his conductor and music director of Symphonicity, the Symphony Orchestra of Virginia Beach. He might have a cool job now, but it wasn’t always that way. He was a musician in the U.S. Air Force for several years, which might sound like a gravy assignment. But Boothe deployed to Qatar and Afghanistan and describes having to take cover from rockets and having concerts canceled due to expected attacks on the base. He eventually left for Symphonicity and found the perfect solution that allows him to continue serving his country while still having a slightly less heart-pounding job. With the growing population in Western Branch, one thing that’s certain is that all members of that population will eventually require health care of one form or another. And you can learn about a couple of great pieces of news on that front in this edition, as well. There’s Roland Butler Jr., a physical therapist who’s doing a great job helping his patients at Bon Secours InMotion Physical Therapy on Taylor Road. There’s also the news that Bon Secours hopes to build a new hospital in the Harbour View area of North Suffolk sometime in the near future, pending approvals. We hope you’ll enjoy this edition, and please take Western Branch magazine with you on your vacations this summer and snap a photo. You can get more information about that on page 25. God bless, Tracy Agnew, Editor Western Branch Magazine is published six times per year by Suffolk Publications, LLC. P.O. Box 1220, Suffolk, VA 23439 www.suffolklivingmag.com • (757) 539-3437


western branch magazine 7

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8 western branch magazine

around the branch

Tech-apalooza JUNE 23

Tech-a-palooza will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the North Suffolk Library, 2000 Bennetts Creek Park Road. Take a trip down memory lane with retro video games, get up close to new technology with a 3D printing demonstration, test your wits with tech trivia, get hands-on with crafts, and more.


western branch magazine 9 ONGOING

Get your shag on with Boogie on the Bay Shag Club, a Portsmouth-based organization dedicated to promoting and preserving shag dancing and beach music. Weekly dance socials are held from 6 to 9:30 p.m. every Friday night at Big Woody’s Bar & Grill, 4200 Portsmouth Blvd. There is no cover, and new friends are always welcome. Visit www. boogieonthebay.com or call 967-7740.

ONGOING

The Old Dominion University Tri-Cities Center, 1070 University Blvd., Portsmouth, has an exhibit of art from local public school students on display. The center is open from 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, except university holidays.

ONGOING

The Dunedin Civic League meets monthly on the first Monday at the Aldersgate campus of New Creation United Methodist Church, 4320 Bruce Road, Chesapeake.

ONGOING

The Russell Memorial Library, 2808 Taylor Road, Chesapeake, holds “Hot Topics” from 10 a.m. to noon every Wednesday. Come engage in conversation about current events with other interested people.

ONGOING

Cars for Christ and Country will be held at New Creation United Methodist Church, 4320 Bruce Road, Chesapeake, on the second Monday of each month through October. Enthusiasts will gather in the church parking lot to display their classic and modified cars, hot rods, trucks, motorcycles and more. The event begins at 4:30 p.m. and continues through dusk.

June 18

“Four Finger Frenzy” will be held from 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. at the Russell Memorial Library, 2808 Taylor Road. Strap on your ukulele and learn to perform popular songs from Twentyone Pilots and Bruno Mars while also learning to properly read nots, chord charts and strumming patterns.

June 19

The Mix Book Club will meet from 6 to 7:45 p.m. at the Churchland branch of Portsmouth Public Library, 4934 High St. W. The group meets every third Tuesday of the month to discuss a variety of cultures, authors and books. Call 686-2538 for more information.

June 20

“Fermentation 202” will be held from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Churchland branch of Portsmouth Public Library, 4934 High St. W. Adults are invited to learn fermentation techniques, including the process of making kefir. There is no cost, but registration is required. Call Aren at 686-2538.

Editor’s Note: We’d love to hear about what’s going on in the Western Branch community! Send your events to be included in this calendar to news@westernbranchmagazine.com.

June 21

A lecture sponsored by the Friends of the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum will be held from 3 to 5:45 p.m. at the Churchland branch of Portsmouth Public Library, 4934 High St. W. Contact Diane Cripps, curator of the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum, at 393-8591 or crippsd@portsmouthva.gov.

June 21

Magic: The Library Gathering will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the North Suffolk Library, 2000 Bennetts Creek Park Road. Free starter decks for new players will be provided, and participation cards will be given out at the end of each meeting.

June 26

Learn about animal adaptations with presenters from First Landing State Park from 11 a.m. to noon at the Russell Memorial Library, 2808 Taylor Road. Discover how animals change and survive. All ages are welcome. Call 410-7024 for more information.

June 26

The Adult Coloring Society will meet from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Churchland branch of Portsmouth Public Library, 4934 High St. W.

June 27

The monthly movie and raffle will be held at the Churchland branch of Portsmouth Public Library, 4934 High St. W. Enjoy a movie, snack on popcorn and enter to win a gift basket loaded with snacks and prizes. The event takes place from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

July 2

Kids in grades kindergarten through eighth will enjoy learning about the science of solving crimes from 11 a.m. to noon at the Russell Memorial Library, 2808 Taylor Road. Finger-printing and chromatography will be available for experimentation. Call 410-7024 for more information.

July 5

Magic: The Library Gathering will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the North Suffolk Library, 2000 Bennetts Creek Park Road. Free starter decks for new players will be provided, and participation cards will be given out at the end of each meeting.

July 9

Adults are invited to join professional art instructor Pamela Barcita for a beginners’ watercolor class from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30

p.m. at the Churchland branch of Portsmouth Public Library, 4934 High St. W. All materials are provided. There is no cost, but registration is required. Call Aren at 6862538.

July 10

The Adult Coloring Society will meet from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Churchland branch of Portsmouth Public Library, 4934 High St. W.

July 17

The Mix Book Club will meet from 6 to 7:45 p.m. at the Churchland branch of Portsmouth Public Library, 4934 High St. W. The group meets every third Tuesday of the month to discuss a variety of cultures, authors and books. Call 686-2538 for more information.

July 17

Sign language instructor Jose Gonzalez will teach conversational sign language from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Churchland branch of Portsmouth Public Library, 4934 High St. W. This is the first part of a two-part series. Call 686-2538. July 19 Magic: The Library Gathering will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the North Suffolk Library, 2000 Bennetts Creek Park Road. Free starter decks for new players will be provided, and participation cards will be given out at the end of each meeting.

July 23

Kids in grades kindergarten through eighth will enjoy learning about Rube Goldberg Machines from 11 a.m. to noon at the Russell Memorial Library, 2808 Taylor Road. Team up and get to work with other young inventors to create simple or complex machine solutions to life’s pesky little problems. Call 410-7024 for more information.

July 24

Craft a decorative flower pen at the Churchland branch of Portsmouth Public Library, 4934 High St. W. Drop in anytime between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Supplies are provided, and there is no charge. Call Aren at 686-2538 for more information.

August 14

The Adult Coloring Society will meet from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Churchland branch of Portsmouth Public Library, 4934 High St. W.


10 western branch magazine

Have baton, will conduct Story by Phyllis Speidell Photos by John H. Sheally II

A unique and upbeat man of music, Daniel W. Boothe brings a medley of experiences and talents to his first season as conductor and music director of Symphonicity, the Symphony Orchestra of Virginia Beach. Now a resident of Western Branch, Boothe is man con brio, radiating that energy as a performer, conductor, composer, captain in the U.S. Air National Guard, family man and neighbor who considers himself a “regular, average guy.” It all started back in 1983, when Boothe was a 5-year-old with a pair of improvised drumsticks banging on his Lite-Brite box and any available pot lid. He learned to read music early from his older brother, who played trumpet. His father was serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, and the family lived in a trailer in a rural area in Salisbury, Md. Money was tight, but his parents instilled values, including the value of money, in the boys and managed to save enough to buy a drum set for him when he was 10 years old. In spite of his middle-school band director’s cautions that no one from their community — ever — had been selected, Boothe auditioned for the All-State Band. He made the band that year and for the next five years after that, working to stay ahead, gaining and retaining his position as a principal player. “I was a drummer with a passion for marching bands and a desire to go wherever the music took me,” he said. The music took him the University of West Virginia to major in

See Conductor page 11


western branch magazine 11 CONDUCTOR continued from page 10

symphonic percussion (learning steel pan, Japanese taiko, African drumming and Balinese gamelan as well) and then to George Mason University for a master’s degree in conducting. Then he earned a Bachelor of Music Composition, magna cum laude, from Radford University. USA-TODAY News recognized him as one of the top 20 collegiate scholars in the country, and he earned a place in the Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities. Numerous fellowships and prizes followed, including the prestigious David Effron Conducting Fellowship at Chautauqua, N.Y. All the while, his career was taking off in diverse directions simultaneously. As a percussionist, he performed with jazz, Dixieland and pop groups as well as with symphonies, operas and ballets all over the eastern United States. He conducted numerous philharmonic orchestras, brass bands and wind ensembles. He taught at the University of Virginia’s College at Wise and was director of percussion at Radford University, among other jobs. Refusing to limit himself to a single genre, he goes by different names for different gigs — Dan Boothe, Daniel W. Boothe or Daniel William Boothe. After marrying Andrea, a vocalist and flute player who teaches in Virginia Beach and writes lyrics for some of his compositions, Boothe took a long look at his future. “I wasn’t sure I was ready to take the family on a journey up the tumultuous ladder of a conductor’s career,” he said. “I wanted to be part of something that was art for art’s sake and, much as I love teaching and children, I wanted to work with professional musicians.” He saw a notice for a position as a conductor with Air Force bands — and life changed. With 13 military veterans in his family, he felt pulled in that direction and, he said, “In the Air Force, the musicians are all professionals and, although we are combat trained, our work is as full-time musicians.” A month late in applying, he talked his way into the selection process and, in 2009, See Conductor page 12

Daniel W. Boothe has conducted musical groups in a variety of settings, including in the U.S. Air Force.


12 western branch magazine

Daniel W. Boothe directed the U.S. Air Force Band.

CONDUCTOR continued from page 11

won a national audition for a conductor with the U.S. Air Force Bands. Three months of officer and combat training later, he assumed command of the "Band of Flight" at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio. Life took another turn, however, when he impressed the chief of staff there, who sent him to the Department of Defense Information School to become a public affairs officer. Boothe graduated with honors and took a job at the Pentagon. He was further from music but on a stable career path where, he said, he could take care of his family — now including four children. “Shoot up the career elevator not the ladder,” he quipped.

Deployed to Qatar and Afghanistan, he was on the flight line in September 2014, when the rockets came screaming in. He thought his life was about to change again. “You only have eight to 11 seconds to find cover when you hear them,” he said. “We ran for cover and I sheared my ankle muscles. I hit the deck and thought what a change this was from leading a symphony orchestra in New York.” “In Kabul, our concerts had been canceled because of an expected attack on the base and we had to detour through the worst parts of the city. I wondered if the children rushing out to us carried sticky bombs and if the man opening his umbrella was disguising a weapon or signaling an

attack,” he remembered. “I also wondered if this was my long term future, performing concerts with weapons at our sides.” Life did change, again, when Boothe earned the U.S. Air Force Outstanding Communication Company Grade Officer of the Year and accepted a job at the Pentagon for the 23rd Secretary of the Air Force. “It was incredible but as far from my musical goals as I could get,” he said. “Then I found Symphonicity, a genuine community orchestra very professionally run. I was about to be transferred back to the premier Air Force band so I had to do some soul searching. I felt a calling to Symphonicity, even though I would be See Conductor page 13


western branch magazine 13 CONDUCTOR continued from page 12

taking a pay cut, and signed with them in May 2017. I don’t know any other conductors like me — liking and participating in a wide variety of genre. Symphonicity is like that too — it’s a good fit.” When a job as public affairs officer also opened at the Washington, D.C., Air National Guard he applied and entered the Air National Guard on Sept. 5, 2017, the day after he left active duty in the Air Force. Holding both jobs seemed the perfect solution, he thought, perhaps divine intervention. So why settle in Western Branch when your work is in Virginia Beach and Washington? “Neighbors make a neighborhood,” he said. “And as soon as we drove into the neighborhood and saw its quaint charm, quiet, proximity to schools and conveniences, we knew we would find the right home. “Our daughter is falling in love with Western Branch Intermediate School,” he added. “We hope to be active contributors to this community for many years to come — Lord willing, maybe even for all the years to come.”

Beautiful places to see


14 western branch magazine

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western branch magazine 15

where am i?

I

n each edition the Western Branch Magazine staff provides a challenge of sorts, testing how much of Western Branch you really know. We photograph some location in Western Branch that is readily accessible and open to the public, and see if you can tell us where it is. If you know where this photo was taken, submit your answer, along with your name and contact information to news@westernbranchmagazine.com. If you’re right, you will be entered for a chance to win a $25 gift card. So, if you know where this is, let us know. If you’re right, you could be a winner. Go out and enjoy Western Branch!


16 western branch magazine

feature story

A hot dog house in Western Branch Story and photos by Tracy Agnew

Ray’s Dog House is the kind of place that, when you find someone who has never been there, you feel compelled to rectify the situation immediately. Such was the case on a Friday early in June, when Josh White found out his coworker, Mike Yow, had never had the pleasure of having a hot dog from Ray and Cindy Carson. Soon, the pair had taken up residence at a table near the front of the shop, and Cindy was chatting with them before she had even taken their order. “I do a lot of work, and when I’m around, I stop in,” White said. “I brought him to let him experience it.” Ray’s Dog House is just that — more of an experience than an actual restaurant. They might serve upwards of 170 hot dogs a day, but Ray’s is much more than just a place to get your fill. “It’s a gathering place for people,” Ray said. “A lot of my customers come in two or three times a week. We have so many customers that we know when they’re sick, we know when they’re celebrating.” Ray and Cindy started Ray’s Dog House after he retired as the lower school headmaster at Nansemond-Suffolk Academy. He needed something to do, so they remodeled their house. When that was done, he still needed something to do.

See DOG HOUSE page 18


western branch magazine 17


18 western branch magazine

DOG HOUSE continued from page 16

“A friend of mine owned this shopping center,” Ray said of the . The friend offered the spot. The only question was what to put there. Ray looked around and figured there weren’t many hot dog spots. The ones that did exist at the time were quite a ways away. “I decided that a good little hot dog place on this side would be good,” he said. He set about opening his hot dog place, and of course, two other hot dog joints popped up nearby before he could open. “I said, ‘What in the world have I gotten myself into?’” he recalled recently. But he forged ahead, confident that the venture would still allow him some leisure time. “I was going to be on the golf course every day at 2:30,” he said. “And I haven’t been on the golf course since.” The place opened on a Saturday in 1998 — they’ll celebrate their 20th anniversary this year — and it’s been nonstop ever since. “There was a line out the door,” Ray said. Ray’s serves a variety of ways to get your See DOG HOUSE page 19

At top, an order of fries with an all-beef hot dog with mustard, onions and chili is standard fare at Ray's Dog House. Above, a customer made the dogs and dog house for Ray and Cindy, but they rarely have to use them.


western branch magazine 19 DOG HOUSE continued from page 18

dog on. There’s Coney Island, pork and beef, all beef, hot and sweet smoked sausage, bratwurst, footlongs and even quarterpounders. Toppings include two different types of mustard, ketchup, onions, chili, relish, sauerkraut, cheese or slaw. And, of course, they couldn’t get away without putting Texas Pete on each table. There’s also subs, sandwiches and local favorites like the “square dog,” a Smithfield melt, Ray’s Club and Troy’s Club. Suffice it to say that each of those clubs has three different kinds of meat, and the restaurant prides itself on serving all Boar’s Head products. Buns and hot dogs come out of the steamer before being warmed on the grill and embellished with fresh toppings prepared that morning. French fries or chips are available on the side, and a rotating selection of desserts allows folks to round out their meal with something sweet. But the truly important part of Ray’s has nothing to do with the food. “It’s a place where friends meet and greet each other,” said Cindy, who has been married to Ray going on 52 years. She’s also retired from education, most recently as a music teacher at Alliance Christian School. “We’re really blessed, because they have become our friends,” Cindy said of the customers. Ray said the eatery strives for personalized service. “We try to know each customer by name, and they get immediate attention when they come in,” he said. “We wanted a place where families could come and eat,” Ray adds, noting that they don’t serve alcohol. Oftentimes, the personalized See DOG HOUSE page 21

Mark Abraham is a regular customer at Ray's Dog House. He enjoys his order with mustard, onions and chili.


20 western branch magazine


western branch magazine 21

Opposite page, Cindy serves Josh White and Mike Yow with her usual friendliness. Above, Ray grills a dog. Below, a server at the restaurant shows off her custom apron. DOG HOUSE continued from page 19

service comes from Ray or Cindy themselves. “Cindy is a very warm-hearted person with tremendous personality,” Ray says lovingly. But he hints that he likes to talk, too: “A lot of times Cindy will get after me, because I’m talking instead of working.” Just as much as the community supports the business, the business tries to support the community. “We try to do things to support them,” Ray said. “We make contributions to Little League and people who need help.” In addition to their customers, Ray and Cindy have a wonderful staff who make sure the restaurant runs smoothly, including Troy, Tammy, Patrick and Jack. The place gets crazy at times, but the Carsons wouldn’t have it any other way. “From 11:30 to 2:30, it can be very crazy at times,” Cindy said. “It’s like an old hometown gathering place, and we’ve been the beneficiaries of it.”


22 western branch magazine

in the news

From staff reports Submitted image

A new Bon Secours hospital will be built in North Suffolk on the campus of Bon Secours Health Center at Harbour View, the health system announced Monday. Bon Secours Virginia Health System on June 1 notified the state of its intent to establish a hospital by transferring up to

25 hospital beds and up to four operating rooms from Bon Secours Maryview Medical Center in Portsmouth to Bon Secours Health Center at Harbour View, according to a press release. “Since our opening in 1999, we have continually responded to the growing community need for health care ser-

vices by bringing new outpatient services and attracting new physician groups to Bon Secours Harbour View,” said Toni Ardabell, chief executive officer for Bon Secours Virginia Health System. “As the population has grown, the next logical step is to bring inpatient care to the campus.”


western branch magazine 23

New hospital planned in Harbour View

An artist's rendering of a proposed new hospital in Harbour View.

Members of Bon Secours leadership are working with the architectural team determine the exact location on the health center’s campus and finalize the cost, the press release stated. In addition to improving access to care and improving the patient experience in a new facility, the new hospital will allow Bon Secours’ patients to obtain inpatient care in the

communities in which they live, rather than seeking care at facilities outside the Bon Secours Maryview and Bon Secours Harbour View service areas. Bon Secours Maryview will continue to operate comprehensive inpatient and outpatient services on the Portsmouth campus and will place an increased focus on the Bon Secours Maryview campus to

address the needs of an aging community that requires more complex medical care and longer hospital stays. The health system will file the formal certificate of public need request to the state in July, the press release stated. More details will be available at that time. Bon Secours anticipates learning the health commissioner’s decision in late 2018.


24 western branch magazine

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western branch magazine 25

on the road

We want your photos! These photos are from regular readers of Suffolk Living magazine, sister to Western Branch magazine. When you take Western Branch on vacation this summer, this could be you! Just take a copy along and take a photo with the magazine on your trip. Send it to news@ westernbranchmagazine. com.


26 western branch magazine

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Taking a trip? Take a copy of Western Branch Magazine with you on your next vacation and snap some photos.

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public servant

Physical therapist leads patients to progress Story and photos by Alex Perry

Sheila Fish faced a steep recovery after her March 5 surgery on her right shoulder. It was her second surgery in seven months to repair a complete tear of the rotator cuff, and she needed to get back to healthy. She and her husband, Vernon Fish, had one request: they wanted Roland Butler Jr. to be her one and only physical therapist. “It was the way he evaluated me,” Fish said about Butler. “He was compassionate and caring right from the evaluation, and you can tell that he’s got knowledge for rotator cuffs.”

Butler is the clinical director for Bon Secours InMotion Physical Therapy at the Taylor Road facility that opened in January. He will reach 12 years with Bon Secours this July after serving in the Air Force and retiring as a master sergeant. Football, basketball and softball helped keep him fit during his military service but also led to an injury that required a knee replacement. It was during his rehabilitation that he got his first appreciation for physical therapy. “I decided that I would go back to

school after I returned,” he said. Butler earned a Bachelor of Science degree in exercise sports science from Texas State University in 2002, followed by a Bachelor of Science degree in allied health sciences from the University of Texas Health Science Center in 2004, where he received a Master of Physical Therapy two years later. The father of three has lived in the Chesapeake Square area with his wife, Isabel Butler, since 2008. The new InMotion Physical Therapy has 7,000 square feet of See THERAPIST page 29


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Roland Butler Jr. helps a patient through her exercises at Bon Secours InMotion Physical Therapy. THerapist continued from page 28

space on Taylor Road, more than triple what was available at the former Chesapeake Square facility. Butler has the advantage of state-ofthe-art equipment at the new facility, from a Keiser machine and leg press to low level laser therapy for chronic pain. He said the pristine look of the place helps build confidence in the 10 to 12 patients he and his staff treat daily, ranging from children up to age 95, he said. “Sometimes they come in tense or nervous, especially if it’s their first time here, but we try to make them feel comfortable,” said Rehab Technician Arrington Gavin. It helps that patients respond well to Butler’s detailed-oriented coaching on everything from pain management to range-of-motion exercises. “Roland is a perfectionist when he gets his hands on a patient,” according to Rehab Technician Sharron Savage, who’s worked with him for more than a

decade. Each patient’s rehabilitation is tailored to the injury and is as fast or slow as the patient requires. A lot of it is convincing the patient to keep up with the rehabilitation outside of the sessions, and Butler manages that by showing them how each stretch, step and lift leads to progress. “You can’t force them to do anything they don’t want to do, but you can guide them in the right direction,” he said. According to doctor’s orders, Fish started her physical therapy the day after her surgery and has spent at least two hours each week with Roland. She was impressed by how he’s helped her manage pain with tricks like kinesio tape. “I used a full stretch property to help decrease the tension in the muscle around her deltoids,” he said. Fish said her pain went from a 9 on a scale of 1 to 10 all the way down to an easy 2. “I was actually starting to sleep well

for the first time in two years,” she said. Roland was excited about her rehabilitation. It was a slow process at first, but she eventually grew in confidence despite the second surgery. He explained that repeat surgeries can sometimes make patients cynical about the possibilities of recovery. He can relate to that, considering he’s had multiple knee surgeries himself. “The Lord gave you what you had in the past so you can use it today,” he said. “I can relate to them in that way. I can say, ‘This is what I felt when I did my therapy.’” Fish has been a believer of Roland’s since Day 1 and has kept up with her rehab routines at home. She got even more good news on May 17 when Roland confirmed how much her range of motion for her right arm has improved. “You did it,” Roland told Fish. Fish immediately corrected him: “You mean we did it.”


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Last Edition’s Where Am I? It looks like we picked a tough one this time where am i? around! The distinctive weathervane, depicting a farmhouse and silo, I is located on top of a gazebo at Bill Jessee Park at The Riverfront off North James Drive in the Riverfront at Harbour View neighborhood. Samantha Gragg was the only person to get the right answer, so we’ll be sending her a $25 gift card. You can win, too, if you keep your eyes peeled throughout Western Branch. Check page 15 for this edition’s challenge. western branch magazine 17

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n each edition the Western Branch Magazine staff provides a challenge of sorts, testing how much of Western Branch you really know. We photograph some location in Western Branch that is readily accessible and open to the public, and see if you can tell us where it is. If you know where this photo was taken, submit your answer, along with your name and contact information to news@westernbranchmagazine.com. If you’re right, you will be entered for a chance to win a $25 gift card. So, if you know where this is, let us know. If you’re right, you could be a winner. Go out and enjoy Western Branch!

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We'd lOVe to see it. If you're a photog and have some cool shots of the Western Branch area, submit them to our Through the Lens feature. news@westernbranchmagazine.com

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scrapbook

Clarence “Ace” Parker attended Churchland High School and Woodrow Wilson High School. He was a fivesport star in the early 1930s and became an All-American in football and also played baseball and basketball at Duke University. The Brooklyn Dodgers of the NFL drafted him in 1937, but he chose to play baseball with the Philadelphia Athletics. He later joined the Dodgers and played quarterback in the first televised pro football game, where the Dodgers beat the Eagles. He was NFL MVP in 1940. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and then played baseball with the Durham Bulls and Portsmouth Cubs. He coached baseball and football at Duke and was inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame in 1972. — Courtesy of “Truckin’ on the Western Branch” by Phyllis Speidell, John H. Sheally II and Karla Smith


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Western Branch Magazine June-July 2018  
Western Branch Magazine June-July 2018  
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