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suffolk summer markets, mutts and remote control planes

july/august 2012 • vol. 3, no. 4


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contents | july-aug. 2012

EDITORIAL R.E. Spears III Editor Tracy Agnew News Editor Matthew A. Ward Staff Writer Beth Beck Land Staff Writer news@suffolklivingmag.com

ADVERTISING Sue Holley Marketing Consultant Sue Barnes Marketing Consultant Earl Jones Marketing Consultant Tina Louise Harris Marketing Consultant sales@suffolklivingmag.com

PRODUCTION Troy Cooper Designer Suffolk Living is published six times per year by Suffolk Publications, LLC. P.O. Box 1220, Suffolk, VA 23439 www.suffolklivingmag.com (757) 539-3437

Advertising rates and information available upon request. Subscriptions are $16 annually in-state; $20 annually out-of-state; $24 for international subscriptions. Please make checks payable to Suffolk Publications, LLC PO Box 1220, Suffolk, VA 23439

Inside this edition

7

Suffolk Events

Suffolk sees a rebound in defense employment

T

he growing bastion of Department of Defense offices and related contractors in North Suffolk known as “Pentagon South” has grown significantly in recent months. The U.S. Navy announced in June that it would move four technology-related com-

mands to the empty buildings that were vacated by the U.S. Joint Forces Command when it was shuttered last year. The new commands — Naval Network Warfare Command, NNWC Global Network Operations Center Detachment, Navy Cyber Defense Operations Command and Navy

20

Airplanes buzz around the skies over a field near Chuckatuck just about anytime the sun is out and the skies are calm. Loops, snap rolls, hammerheads, spins and stalls are all part of the regular program, just like in any air show around the country. The difference here is that the pilots keep their feet planted firmly on the ground.

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Get to know: Kay Hurley

Nobody in Suffolk puts a sweeter face on the plight of abandoned and abused pets than Kay Hurley. As the spokeswoman for the Suffolk Humane Society, Hurley gives a voice to those who have none. Her own menagerie testifies to that love put into action.

Suffolk Exposure

28

One great way to see your city in a new way is to go out with a camera and the specific direction to look at things with a fresh perspective. The Suffolk Photo Walk gave photographers of all skill levels a chance to do just that. Take a look at what they found along the way.

33

suffolk living 35

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Have you seen this image around Suffolk? Guess the location correctly and you could win a $25 gift certificate.

where am I?

I

n each edition the Suffolk Living staff provides a challenge of sorts, testing how much of Suffolk you really know. We photograph some location in Suffolk that is readily accessible and open to the public, and see if you can tell us where it is. If you know where this photo was taken, submit your answer, along with your name and contact information to news@suffolklivingmag.com. If you’re right, you will be entered for a chance to win a $25 gift certificate to any one of our partner advertisers. So, if you know where this is, let us know. If you’re right, you could be a winner. Go out and enjoy Suffolk!

su ffo lk

liv in gm

ag .co m

suffolker summ d ts an ts , m ut m ar ke e co nt ro l re m ot pl an es

Farm-fresh fare

Suffolk’s downtown farmers’ market has moved into new digs under the pavilion behind the Suffolk Visitor Center at the corner of Constance and Main. The location might be different this year, but the great selection of produce and crafts will be familiar to anyone who has visited the market at its previous locations.

With more and more jobs coming to North Suffolk's "Pentagon South," the area is looking as strong as ever.

‘Pentagon South’

Scorching summer temperatures are no match for the cool fun that’s available around Suffolk for the rest of the season. Live music, fine arts and tasty treats are all part of the perfect Suffolk summer. Check the calendar and make your plans now.

up in the sky ...

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18 suffolk living

in the news

On the cover: Photograph by Troy Cooper

ju ly/ au

.4 l. 3, no 12 • vo gu st 20


6 suffolk living

ols blic Scho u P k l o f f Su lates the congratu taff on a an d s students done! job well

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what to do 7/16 — “It’s Ancient Greek to Me” with Darci Tucker Location: North Suffolk Library, 2000 Bennett’s Creek Park Road Darci Tucker brings to life several of Aesop’s tales to introduce the world of the ancient Greeks during a free event for school-age children or older. The event will be at 6:30 p.m. at the North Suffolk Library. Continuing through 7/20 — TGIF summer concert series Location: Constant’s Wharf Park Each Friday evening throughout the summer is highlighted by a different musical genre, including salsa, bluegrass, rock and roll, country, dance, beach music and more. The events are free and open to the public and run from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Call 514-7267 for more information.

TGIF summer concert series

7/21 — Great Dismal Swamp Safari – Life After Wildfire Location: Meet at the Suffolk Visitor Center, 524 N. Main St. A four-hour adventure will show participants that the Great Dismal Swamp is anything but dismal. The safari will showcase the history, lore, vegetation and wildlife of one of the few remaining American wildernesses. There will also be a brief walk at Lake Drummond and Washington Ditch. Cost is $10 for adults and $8 for seniors, military and children ages nine through 12. Reservations are required. Participants will meet at the visitor center at 9:30 a.m. For more information or to register, call 514-4130. 7/21 — One-Person Show by C. Edward Vann Location: Suffolk Art Gallery, 118 Bosley Ave. Admire the work of C. Edward Vann, winner of the 2011 Suffolk Art League Juried Art Show, at the Suffolk Art Gallery. Admission is free. Suffolk Art Gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, One-Person Show by C. Edward Vann

Great Dismal Swamp Safari – Life After Wildfire

Network with us See what we’re up to on Facebook. Need more information 757-539-3437 • suffolklivingmag.com

Send us your news To submit your calendar or news item, simply email it to: news@suffolklivingmag.com


8 suffolk living

what to do

Canoe Excursion of Lake Drummond

call 514-7284. 7/28 — Canoe Excursion of Lake Drummond Location: Meet at the Suffolk Visitor Center, 524 N. Main St. Experience the unusual and breathtaking Lake Drummond, a 3,108-acre bowl-shaped lake located near the center of the Great Dismal Swamp. Participants will meet at the visitor center at 10 a.m., and the tour lasts half the day. The cost is $35 per person and includes equipment rental. Reservations are required. For more information or to register, call 514-4130. Continuing through 8/2 — Summer Art Days Location: Suffolk Art Gallery, 118 Bosley Ave. The Suffolk Art League will host Summer Art Days Thursdays through Aug. 2 at the Suffolk Art Gallery, 118 Bosley Ave. The session for ages 5 to 8 will be from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Ages 9 to 14 will meet from 1

to 3 p.m. Registration is $1 per session per child, and registration begins 30 minutes before the session begins. For more information, call the league at 925Memorial Day Ceremony 0448 or the gallery at 514-7284. 8/3-8/31 — TGIF concert series Location: Bennett's Creek Park, 3000 Bennett's Creek Park Road Each Friday evening throughout the summer is highlighted by a different musical genre, including salsa, bluegrass, rock and roll, country, dance, beach music and more. The events are free and open to the public and run from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Call 514-7267 for more information. 8/4 — Historic Downtown Suffolk Narrated Bus Tour Location: Meet at the Suffolk Visitor Center, 524 N. Main St. Suffolk’s rich history, which dates back to the early 17th century, can even now be traced through the city’s historic homes and neighborhoods, churches and Civil

War trails. Guided by a Suffolk historian, participants will meet the people and places that made Suffolk the city it is today. The cost is $8 for adults and $6 for seniors, military and children ages 9 through 12. Participants will meet at the visitor center at 2 p.m. Reservations are required. For more information or to register, call 514-4130. 8/4 — Legends of Main Street: A Suffolk Ghost Walk Location: Meet at the Suffolk Visitor Center, 524 N. Main St. Here’s your chance for a hair-raising encounter with the spirited side of Suffolk. Participants will meet at 7:30 p.m. at the visitor center and follow a costumed guide through the shadows of historic Main Street, discovering stories, legends and “unexplained occurrences” by lantern light. The cost is $10 for adults and $8 for seniors, military and children ages 9 through 12. Reservations are required. For more information or to register, call 514-4130.

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what to do 8/6-8/10 — Color Explosions! Art Camps Location: Suffolk Art Gallery, 118 Bosley Ave. Encourage your child’s imagination at the Color Explosions! Art Camp, sponsored by the Suffolk Art League. Color will be the theme that will inspire students to create artwork using a variety of mediums and techniques. The cost is $45 for league members and $55 for nonmembers. The fee includes all materials and a light snack. Sessions run Aug. 8-10. Children ages 6 to 9 will attend classes from 10 a.m. to noon and children ages 8 to 12 will attend from 1 to 3 p.m. Register by July 30 by calling 925-0448 or visiting www.suffolkartleague.org. 8/7 — National Night Out Celebration Location: Citywide Help bring back a sense of nostalgia and a feeling of safety and security by getting involved in National Night Out events across the city. The free drug- and crime-prevention event will spread the message of neighborhood unity, awareness, safety and policecommunity partnerships. For more information, contact Diana Klink at 514-4104. 8/11 — Great Dismal Swamp Safari – Life After Wildfire Location: Meet at the Suffolk Visitor Center, 524 N. Main St. A four-hour adventure will show participants that the Great Dismal Swamp is anything but dismal. The safari will showcase the history, lore, vegetation and wildlife of one of the few remaining American wildernesses. There will also be a brief walk at Lake Drummond and Washington Ditch. Cost is $10 for adults and $8 for seniors, military and children ages 9 through 12. Reservations are required. Participants will meet at the visitor center at 9:30 a.m. For more information or to register, call 514-4130. 8/18 — Legends of Main Street: A Suffolk Ghost Walk Location: Meet at the Suffolk Visitor Center, 524 N. Main St. Here’s your chance for a hair-raising encounter with the spirited side of Suffolk. Participants will meet at 7:30 p.m. at the visitor center and follow a costumed guide through the shadows of historic Main Street, discovering stories, legends and “unexplained occurrences” by lantern light. The cost is $10 for adults and $8 for seniors, military and children ages 9 through 12. Reservations are required. For more information or to register, call 514-4130.

Nansemond Indian Pow Wow

8/18-8/19 — Nansemond Indian PowWow Location: Lone Star Lakes, 1 Bob House Parkway Join the Nansemond Indians for a celebration of the tribe’s cultural heritage. The two-day powwow features music, dance, authentic crafts and food. For more information, call 514-7250. Continuing through 9/1 — Harbour View Community Farmers’ Market Location: Corner of Hampton Roads Parkway and Harbour View Boulevard The Harbour View Community Farmers’ Market is held Thursdays from 3:30 to 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. near the corner of Hampton

Roads Parkway and Harbour View Boulevard. Russell’s Seafood will offer fresh seafood, Batten Bay Farms will offer organic vegetables and Broken Arrows Farm will offer grass-fed beef and all-natural chickens. Continuing through 9/29 — Suffolk Farmers’ Market Location: Suffolk Visitor Pavilion, 524 N. Main St. The Suffolk Farmers’ Market is held Wednesdays from 3 to 6 p.m., Fridays from 4 to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon at the Suffolk Visitor Center Pavilion, 524 N. Main St. A variety of special events are planned during the Saturday sessions, including live music, petting zoos and information. For more information, call 514-4130.


10 suffolk living

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12 suffolk living

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13

suffolk scene

Relay for life

The Suffolk Rockin’ Relay for Life was held May 18-19 at Bennett’s Creek Park. Teams raised money for months in preparation for the all-night event, which includes onsite fundraisers, activities, survivor recognitions and the emotional Luminaria Ceremony, where participants light candles in honor of or in memory of those who have had cancer. Clockwise from above, cancer survivors take the first lap around the track at the beginning of the Relay; the Alpha Kappa Alphas decorated their tent in their signature pink and green in preparation for Relay; the Power Play team poses for a picture as Relay gets under way; Lauren Hardee, Brooke Wharam and Morgan Phelps organized the Bruin's Bravest team. Photos by Tracy agnew


14 suffolk living

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suffolk scene

Police Unity Tour

Hundreds of bicycle-mounted law enforcement officers departed from Suffolk’s Vintage Tavern on May 10 during the 2012 Police Unity Tour, bringing public awareness to fallen police officers. Clockwise from below: Jim O’Donnell of Miami Dade County, Fla., and Chris Comeaux of St. Tammany Parish, La., do their stretches; the cyclists head out onto Bridge Road; Mike Gray of St. Augustine, Fla., and Jo Saville of Rochester, N.Y.; getting some last-minute fuel in their stomachs are Sheila Seago of Key West, Fla., and Kelly Kazmierczak of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Photos by Matthew A. Ward


16 suffolk living

suffolk scene

Suffolk Graduations

Above left, King's Fork High School graduates Garrison Coates, Matthew Hommell, Joshua Ramirez and Nicolas Nielsen show off their diplomas after their commencement ceremony on June 16. Above right, triplets Laura, LeeAnn and Christine Quiroga, all honors graduates, show off their Lakeland High School diplomas after their graduation ceremony on the same day. Opposite page, clockwise from top left, Nansemond River High School graduates Justice Rinaldi, Rachel Matthews, Regine Reid and Janae Pickett were all smiles after their graduation ceremony June 16; Nansemond-Suffolk Academy graduates carry the banners during the march; and First Baptist Christian School graduates await the beginning of the ceremony. Photos by tracy agnew and R.E. Spears III

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suffolk living

17

suffolk scene


18 suffolk living

in the news

‘Pentagon South’ Suffolk sees a rebound in defense employment

story by Tracy Agnew

T

he growing bastion of Department of Defense offices and related contractors in North Suffolk known as “Pentagon South” has grown significantly in recent months. The U.S. Navy announced in June that it would move four technology-related com-

mands to the empty buildings that were vacated by the U.S. Joint Forces Command when it was shuttered last year. The new commands — Naval Network Warfare Command, NNWC Global Network Operations Center Detachment, Navy Cyber Defense Operations Command and Navy See PENTAGON page 19


suffolk living

PENTAGON continued from page 18

Cyber Forces — include about 1,000 jobs and an estimated annual payroll of $88.9 million. The commands, which are moving from Norfolk and Virginia Beach, are set to be in place by June 2013. “It just puts Suffolk right there where we need to be,” said Mayor Linda T. Johnson during a City Council meeting where the new jobs were announced. JFCOM was closed in August 2011. However, many of the personnel and duties were taken up by Joint and Coalition Warfighting, which now includes about 1,100 employees at the same site. Still, several buildings persisted in remaining empty, and local, state and federal officials worked hard to fill them. Those are the ones into which the new Navy commands will move, bringing the site to approximately the same number of employees as before. In addition, a prominent defense contractor close by recently received a

19

in the news contract to manufacture the first batch of Miniature Air-Launched Decoy Jammers. Cobham Composite Products has about 30 jobs dedicated to the project, with more possible in the future. The devices, which weigh less than 300 pounds each, can be mounted to the outside of any aircraft. They can then be sent up to a range of 575 miles and programmed to mimic any type of aircraft on the enemy’s radar. “They can make it look like a bomber, a jet, anything they want from a radar point of view,” said Gregg Strangways, director of Gregg Strangways — Director of operations, cobham composite products operations at the Suffolk facility. “The more confusion you can create with the enemy, the better off your safety is with your actual pilots and infantry.” Cobham is manufacturing the shells of the devices, which then are sent to a Raytheon facility to be fitted with the technology that makes them work. ←

“The more confusion you can create with the enemy, the better off your safety is with your actual pilots and infantry.”


up in the sky‌ 20 suffolk living

Chuckatuck airstrip is home to a fleet of fliers


suffolk living

21

Ray Goodwin works to start the engine of his model airplane this spring at the Hampton Roads Radio Control Club’s airstrip near Lone Star Lakes Park in Chuckatuck. The club’s members range from teenagers to octogenarians, and their aircraft run the gamut from homemade to prefabricated kits.

story by Matthew A. Ward photography by R.E. Spears III

A

lofty love of flying binds members of an aviation group who meet to share their passion at an airfield near Chuckatuck on a regular basis. Some are highly accomplished at aerobatics — loops, barrel rolls, spins — and many own considerably more than one aircraft. When they fly, however, their feet remain firmly planted on the ground, while necks crane upward, eyes skirt the wide blue yonder, and thumbs never stop twiddling. According to club lore, Hampton Roads Radio Control Inc., now with 90-odd mem-

bers, came into existence when 14 radiocontrolled airplane enthusiasts met at a local hobby shop on April 21, 1977. They met with the intention of forming a group that would allow them pursue their hobby together. On May 6, 1977, HRRC became a chartered club of the Academy of Model Aeronautics. One recent Wednesday at the Pembroke Lane airfield, which the city of Suffolk helped the club establish a little over 20 years ago, members held a community outreach event

with kids from the Lone Star Lakes youth camp. “Probably for the last four or five years, they will come out here and we will do some demonstrations and put a couple of trainers up with a ‘buddy box,’” Club Vice President Mills Staylor says. For many of the youngsters — even though an experienced pilot was also plugged into the buddy-box controls, at the ready to correct any abrupt nosedives or death spirals — it was their first time flying a radio-controlled plane. See airplanes page 22


22 suffolk living

Dom DePolo of Western Branch, a retired naval officer, hand-built this dual-engine model himself. It is one of the few two-engine airplanes that flies from the Suffolk field.

AIRPLANES continued from page 21

“We let them do some loops, maybe a little roll,” Staylor adds. “Generally that’s determined on the age.” Staylor says he built and flew model planes as a boy, but dropped the hobby for many years before rediscovering it as a father-son activity when his son, now a mechanical engineer, was 10 or 11. “We started flying, then he went to college and I got out of it for eight to 10 years,” Staylor explains. His love for radio-controlled aircraft was reignited again when he retired, and he hasn’t looked back (and rarely down). HRRC members fly all manner of model planes — with internal combustion engines, glowplug engines feeding on nitro-methanol, and electric-powered ones. The aircraft come ready to fly, almost ready to fly (some assembly required, like the furniture from Ikea), in balsa-andhardwood kits, or are made from scratch. Electric starter planes can be had for less than $200, but the more elaborate models can cost from $5,000 anywhere up to $20,000 and above. “I build them from construction foam,” says Rick Parsons, a practitioner of the scratch-built method, looking more biker than aviator with silver ponytail and chain wallet. “It comes from the days when I was on a Social Security check, so I built out of necessity.” Parsons works out of his spare bedroom, and has “probably about 20” planes. He was taken aback when one of his construction-foam creations recently beat out a field of moresophisticated models to win an award for best military aircraft. “This one it took me about a month and a half (to build),” he says, motioning with his chin See airplanes page 23


suffolk living

23

Three generations of the Harrell family — from left, James Harrell, 17-year-old J.D. Harrell and Jimmy Harrell — enjoy flying model airplanes together in Chuckatuck as members of the Hampton Roads Radio Control Club.

airplanes continued from page 22

toward a smart-looking foam aircraft on the grass beside him. “I usually put together a foam aircraft in a week or two.” One of the club’s youngest members is Josh McCreary, 12. Today he’s flying an electric Extra 300 and a nitro-powered Twist. He joined the club about four months ago and earned his wings about three months later. “It’s just fun,” McCreary says. But learning to fly takes “a little bit of time,” and “is kind of tedious at certain times, especially when you’ve got 15 mile-an-hour winds.” Kenny Rodgers says learning to fly is a lot quicker for the steely nerved. “If a person’s got nerves of steel, they can get out there and go with it,” he says. “If you’ve got a little nerves in your system, it can take a little longer.” Wes Baxter, 80, enjoyed flying as a kid, “and then took a break to raise a family, then started again,” he says. Today, he devotes “probably 50 percent of the week” to his hobby. “Gives me something to do, and it’s good, clean fun,” Baxter adds. Dom DePolo, a 30-year veteran of radiocontrolled planes, learned to fly the real thing in the Navy, “When you can no longer fly full-

scale planes, you look for something to keep yourself interested,” he says. Club members share their hobby, such as with the youth camp kids, out of a sense of gratitude for the joy flying brings them, DePolo says. “I think it’s my personal philosophy that we are blessed to be able to do what we do,” he says. “There are a lot of people out there who don’t have that ability, and we just like to share.” He says the club is “not just a club, it’s more like a brother or sisterhood,” and it helps keep the spirit of aviation strong at a time when “general aviation in the community is in a little bit of a slump.” “If you can keep that interest in a young child, who knows … maybe (they will be) a future transport pilot, or passenger pilot, or air traffic controller,” DePolo adds. Proving that radio-controlled aircraft aren’t off limits to the ladies, Christina Achterhof has been flying with the club for three years. “My husband got into it, and him and half a dozen of these guys talked me into flying,” she says. “It’s a little different. I have to put up with all these guys when I’m out here flying. I

wouldn’t trade them for the world, though.” Achterhof was flying a nitro-fuelled plane on this particular day. She has seven others at home, she says, plus another two still in boxes. “It’s the freedom, and knowing that there’s a time to take it up and bring it down safely, or there’s a time to say, ‘I give up,’ and just crash,” she muses. One of the club’s most enthusiastic radiocontrolled aircraft builders and fliers — and that’s really saying something — is its president, Bob Howell, an earthbound aviator for 35 years. “My brother came down from Michigan and brought an airplane,” Howell says, a whine starting up in the background as someone cranks a nitro engine. “When I saw his, I said, ‘I’m going to get into it!’” One of the founding 14, Howell explains that fellowship is “extremely important” to the club’s endurance. As is the ever-present hunger for refinement that members all seem to thrive on. “We’re trying to improve on everything,” Howell says. “We like to accept challenges.” ←


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get to know

a voice for the animals


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Kay Hurley is the public face of the Suffolk Humane Society story by Tracy Agnew photography by Troy Cooper

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eing the type of person who likes to stay in the background doesn’t work out so well when you’re passionate about something. Such is the case for Kay Hurley, the director of community outreach for the Suffolk Humane Society. She had become an expert on avoiding publicity or notoriety of any kind until the organization formed in 2007, and she was one of its first members. “I had to get involved with that,” she said. “The first year, there were four of us, and we did a lot.” Before she knew it, Hurley found herself the co-chair the first year of Mutt Strut, now the society’s signature fundraising event. She also became responsible for the public relations position, which requires talking to the media regularly for stories about society activities and humane education. But before she was the point person for all things animal in Suffolk, she was dealing with a different type of education — human education. Hurley was a teacher at Forest Glen High School for four years. She then went to Old Dominion University for her master’s degree and later spent another two years in front of the classroom, this time at Norfolk Catholic High School. She then moved to association work,

spending 20 years at the Tidewater Builders Association. That work meshed well with another interest of hers — renovating older homes. Hurley first went to work on her parents’ old farmhouse in the Holland area, knocking out walls and doing all manner of other refurbishments after a tree damaged the home during Hurricane Isabel. “My options were to fix it up or let it go,” she said. “At the time, it was probably a pretty crazy thing to do.” But she couldn’t bear to let go of the tranquil estate where she first cultivated her love for animals. “Growing up on a farm, there are no neighbors,” she said. “I played with my pets, and I read a lot of books. I can’t remember not having a dog.” Hurley finished working on her parents’ house, and they died in 2005. She still owns the house, where she and her husband sometimes go for weekend getaways and family get-togethers. She has a 31-year-old stepdaughter. But in addition to her human child, there are plenty of others to keep her busy. “I have never chosen a pet in my life,” she said. “They’ve always chosen me.” Her dog Gracie, a 13-year-old terrier, was found as a puppy near the Midtown Tunnel on Christmas Eve. Peanut was

fostered from Suffolk Animal Control, and wound up getting adopted. Millie, a beagle/basset hound mix, was discovered abandoned on the Eastern Shore. Sadie, a beagle, was inherited when Hurley’s brother passed away in 2009. The couple also has four cats — Bighead, Kayla, Romeo and Racing Stripe, who was acquired when neighbors moved and left the cat behind. It is that kind of thoughtlessness that Hurley and the Suffolk Humane Society are working to fight against. “Animals cannot do it for themselves,” she said. “They are completely helpless. I truly believe however we treat the most helpless — children, the elderly, the sick — says everything about us as a community.” That’s why Hurley, and the humane society, have listed humane education among their top priorities. “Children have to understand compassion,” she said. “Companion animals are such amazing creatures. They’re intelligent, they have personalities, and dogs are so incredibly loyal.” Hurley says she is trying to move more into the background at Suffolk Humane while newer volunteers pick up some of the workload. But her pioneering leadership will be remembered by dogs and cats all over Suffolk. ←


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get to know: dog safety

story by Tracy Agnew photography by R.E. Spears III

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ummer can be a fun time for humans and pets alike, but it presents special challenges and dangers to members of the animal persuasion. Kay Hurley, director of community outreach for the Suffolk Humane Society, had a handful of tips for keeping your pet healthy and happy during the summertime. Most importantly, never leave any animal unattended in a car. During the summer, even outside temperatures in the 80s — mild by Hampton Roads summer standards — can result in temperatures inside a closed car well above 100 degrees. Such temperatures can mean a miserable death for an animal within minutes of being left. “It’s never a good idea to leave your pet in a car,” she said. “Hopefully, most people are aware of that now.” In addition, dogs and cats should be given extra, fresh water during the summer, even those that stay indoors. Dogs should never be kept on chains, but if you must, Hurley

summer pet care Take steps to keep Fido cool

says, ensure the dog has plenty of fresh water and food. “It makes a dog vulnerable and tends to make a dog more aggressive,” she said, explaining why it’s inhumane to leave a dog on a chain. “We wouldn’t want to be on a chain.” She said even dogs that stay outdoors with water should be brought inside during an especially oppressive heat wave. Owners should watch their dogs closely while they’re walking them or playing with them. “Think that the pet is going to be tired before it exhibits symptoms,” she said. But the heat can affect animals in more ways than just their body temperature. Owners should take care that they’re not walking their dogs on hot pavement that can burn the pads on the animals’ paws. “A dog will want to go with you regardless,” she said. Finally, dogs and cats both should be checked for ticks regularly during the summer. If one is found, consult your veterinarian on the best way to remove it. ←


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"A light unto my path" by Marsha Mears

suffolk exposure

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ince 2009, the Suffolk Photo Walk has provided a great opportunity for photographers of all abilities to find and capture some of the city’s most photogenic scenery and people. Photo Walk is sponsored by Westminster Reformed Presbyterian Church to give local photographers a chance to connect with each other and to remind

the people of Suffolk how beautiful their city is, according to organizers. It was the brainchild of Mark Chambers, the church’s director of worship and arts, and it has proved a popular outreach for the community. Nine photographers participated in the Photo Walk this spring. Their work will be judged, and it will be displayed

at Shooting Star Gallery on North Main Street during the weekend of Peanut Fest. For more information about the showing or to learn more about how to participate in Photo Walk, visit Suffolk Photo Walk on Facebook. Meanwhile, take a look at some of our favorite Photo Walk images on the following pages.


suffolk living 29 "Suffolk's stories at yard sales" by Dawn Day

Untitled by Jim Wetherbee

Untitled by Jim Wetherbee

"The perfect picture" by Wesley Wetherbee


30 suffolk living "Lader me BE" by Marsha Mears

"Bark!" by Wesley Wetherbee

"Industry window" by Hope Wilburn


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"The Chop Shop" by Hope Wilburn


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where am I?

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n each edition the Suffolk Living staff provides a challenge of sorts, testing how much of Suffolk you really know. We photograph some location in Suffolk that is readily accessible and open to the public, and see if you can tell us where it is. If you know where this photo was taken, submit your answer, along with your name and contact information to news@suffolklivingmag.com. If you’re right, you will be entered for a chance to win a $25 gift certificate to any one of our partner advertisers. So, if you know where this is, let us know. If you’re right, you could be a winner. Go out and enjoy Suffolk!


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farm-fresh fare The farmers’ market: The cacophony of color draws you in. But once you’ve been enticed by the yellows and reds and deep greens, then there’s the smell of fresh produce waiting to be thumped, plucked and picked. Come, have a look around.


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Grilled Corn Summer Salad Ingredients 43 ears white corn, shucked, husked and cleaned 43 yellow squash, cut in half lengthwise and seeded 42 Roma tomatoes, seeded and chopped 41 small red onion, finely chopped 41/3 cup basil, chopped 43 Tbs. pomegranate vinegar 43 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for drizzling vegetables 41/2 tsp. honey (optional) 4Salt and pepper to taste Directions 4Preheat outdoor grill to high heat and lightly coat grill grates with oil. If you don’t have an outdoor barbecue setup, an indoor grill pan works great, too! Just heat grill pan over high heat. 4Drizzle extra virgin olive on corn and squash. 4Place corn and squash (cut side down) on the grill. Cook until the kernels are tender and slightly charred, turning occasionally, about 20 minutes. Cook squash until slightly tender and also slightly charred, about 5 to 10 minutes, turning 30 to 45 degrees to get perfect grill marks halfway through the grilling process. 4While the vegetables are cooling, whisk together the pomegranate vinegar, olive oil, honey, salt and pepper in a small bowl. 4When the corn is cool, cut the kernels off the cob, cutting close to the cob with a sharp knife. Cut the squash into half-inch dices. Place basil, corn, and squash into a large bowl. Pour dressing over vegetables and toss to combine. 4Serve cold or at room temperature.


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Swiss Chard & Beef

Suffolk’s downtown farmers’ market has been a fixture since the summer of 2005, and some of the vendors there, like Robert Noriega, above, have been participating ever since it started. He brings produce to sell at the downtown market in the new pavilion behind the Visitor Center from Noriega Farms, where he raises a variety of crops on a compact four acres. By now, he’s pretty much got things down to a science. He plants new crops every two or three weeks through the season. The plan helps keep the workload down come harvest time and assures him that he won’t be overloaded with squash or potatoes or green beans at any one time. “I can bring everything fresh,” he says. But it’s still hard work — even harder, he admits, than the home improvement business he ran for 37 years. The farmers’ market gives Cami Barnes, left, of JC3 Family Farm in Suffolk, a chance to lay out a bounteous spread of yellow squash, green corn and cabbage, orange peaches, red potatoes and more onto carefully spread, country-themed tablecloths while her daughter prepares tiny blackboards with the day’s prices. There’s a feeling that the ladies’ work is carefully rehearsed, and Barnes shows an easy interaction with customers who stop by the booth, even as a storm appears to be blowing in. “I’m the Jam Lady,” she laughs. “I’m known for my jams and baked breads.” The Farmers’ Market is open Wednesdays from 3 to 6 p.m., Fridays from 4 to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Barnes and Noriega both shared their favorite recipes for the produce they were selling recently. See them on this page and the adjacent page.

Ingredients 43 yellow potatoes, cubed 41 lb. beef, cut into bite-sized pieces 41 lb. Swiss chard 41 lg. green onion, cut into half moons 43 or 4 cloves garlic, chopped 4Cooking oil 4½ tsp. cumin powder 4Salt & pepper to taste Directions 4Sauté beef in oil with garlic, cumin powder, salt and pepper. Add about one-quarter cup of water, and cook about 15 minutes. 4Add potatoes and onions. 4When potatoes are about tender, add chopped Swiss chard. 4Dish is ready when chard is tender. Make sure there is liquid in the pan while you’re cooking the chard, and taste it to see whether you need more seasoning. 4This dish goes well with rice.


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index of advertisers Academy Animal Clinic......36 Autumn Care....................10 Bayport Credit Union..........4 Bronco Federal Credit Union...39 Celebration Church...........14 Chorey & Associates..........40 Davis Lakes.........................7 D.B. Bowles Jewelers.........6 Dr. Jett, Dr. Sellers..............37 Duke Automotive.........10, 19 East End Baptist Church....36 Edward Jones...................14 Ellen Drames.......................2 Farmer's Bank.....................6 Franklin Incubator..............14 Harbour Veterinary Office..14 Isle of Wight Academy.......12 Ivor Furniture....................14 Johnson's Gardens.............8 Massage Envy....................12 Mega 'Dors & Windows.....8 Mike Duman......................37 Nancy’s Calico Patch..........16

Nansemond Suffolk Academy...........................12 Obici House......................12 Rawlings Mechanical.........10 RL Howell & Associates....16 Smithfield & Isle of Wight...27 J.T. Hearn Furniture Heritage Antiques Coastal RV Olde World Tea Company The Christmas Store Taste of Smithfield Ham Shop & Cafe State Farm Insurance Ken Deloach......................12 Suffolk Pest Control............14 Suffolk Public Schools..........6 Suffolk Sheet Metal............12 T&L's Land Works..............17 Uniquely Leo's...................37 Village at Woods Edge.......3 Womble Generator............37 Woodard Orthodontics.......9

Last edition’s Where Am I?

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The trick with the May/ June edition of the Where Am I? photo contest was to correctly identify which side of the Nansemond River the photographer was standing on when he snapped the shot. There were quite a few folks who recognized the stop signs that had where am I? I been erected when the King’s Highway Bridge was demolished, leaving two dead ends across the river from each other. Fewer guessed the vantage point was looking from the Driver side to the Chuckatuck side of the river. Suffolk dentist Ralph L. Howell Jr. was one of those who got the answer right, and he was chosen randomly as this edition’s winner. He will receive a $25 gift certificate to the advertiser of his choice as his prize. This month’s photo appears on Page 32. suffolk living 27

n each edition the Suffolk Living staff provides a challenge of sorts, testing how much of Suffolk you really know. We photograph some location in Suffolk that is readily accessible and open to the public, and see if you can tell us where it is. If you know where this photo was taken, submit your answer, along with your name and contact information to news@ suffolklivingmag.com. If you’re right, you will be entered for a chance to win a $25 gift certificate to any one of our partner advertisers.

So, if you know where this is, let us know. If you’re right, you could be a winner. Go out and enjoy Suffolk!

HOURS OF OPERATION


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scrapbook

Camp Matoaka: Girls gather for a photo in front of a cabin at Camp Matoaka on Lake Prince. The camp was a Girl Scout camp that operated on 90 acres from the 1930s until 1981. Georgie “Buck” Harris was director of the camp for most of its existence. The camp is gone now, and the buildings have been removed, but memories live in the hearts and minds of many former Girl Scouts. — Photo courtesy of the Suffolk-Nansemond Historical Society


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There’s an old expression about never having a second chance to make a good first impression. And while first impressions are important, they’re really not that big a deal in the long run if you can’t keep making a good impression. Bronco has been treating our members with great care for over 70 years. Every person who comes through our doors is like family and always will be. So if you’re looking for a place where you can feel at home, give people like Suffolk Branch Manager Diane Johnson an opportunity to make a great impression on you—every single time you visit or call.

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Suffolk Living Magazine July-Aug. 2012