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any control, the only other real necessity is the power to constantly keep in mind the need for being cautious. If the solo rider used his imagination he would realize the folly of passing on a corner; he is likely to cross the path of the traffic in either direction moving along the road into which he is turning. The Driver’s Duty Demands Concentration Before dealing with the applications of imagination as applied to motorcycle control, the question of concentration demands mention. People who travel by train have only to think at intervals about the journey, as when they stop at stations to see whether they ought to get out, and so on. The driver, on the other hand, has to keep his mind on the job of controlling the train, from the time he starts until the trip is finished. The road user, whether vehicular or pedestrian, is in the position of the train driver, not the passenger, and so ought to keep his mind on the business of controlling the actions of his vehicle or of himself. In other words, the motorist, or, for that matter, anybody using the road, has a definite responsibility, and must, therefore keep his or her mind on that task all the time. It is useless to think just at the moment when danger is at hand; think consistently, act accordingly, and danger will not arise. Coming back to the matter of imagination. Think of a crowded town street with buses, trams and pedestrians dodging hither and thither. Ignoring for the moment consideration of the actions of other vehicle drivers, it needs but little imagination to picture the consequences of too high a speed for quick stopping at the moment of an ill-judged dash by a pedestrian. If one keeps in mind the fact that somebody may try to cross the road in a moment of forgetfulness, and consequently dangerously, it will help the driver to be ready to do the right thing without the need for a sudden “rush of thought to the head” occasioned by an unexpected happening. When it is ever present in one’s mind that every other road user may make a mistake at an unexpected moment, then the task of traffic driving becomes straightforward. Constant thought about the matter in mind – driving – is far less tiring mentally than occasional lapses alternated with a wild confusion of ideas when an emergency arises. In the mind of the driver following this combination there will doubtless be annoyance on account of the foolish signalling, but his imagination should prompt a slowing down until the riders course is definitely known. The SAM Observer January 2013

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Profile for Suffolk-Advanced-Motorcyclists

The SAM Observer  

The January 2013 edition of "The SAM Observer"

The SAM Observer  

The January 2013 edition of "The SAM Observer"

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