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SUFFIELD ACADEMY BOARD OF TRUSTEES Frederic B. Powers III ’83, P’14, President | Greenwich, Connecticut Jackson W. Robinson ’60, Vice President | Boston, Massachusetts Charles Cahn III P’18, Headmaster | Suffield, Connecticut

Susan W. Autuori P’06, ’08, ’10, ’13 | West Hartford, Connecticut Nancy A. Brooks ’87 | Boston, Massachusetts Cindy M. Burke P’13, ’15, ’17, ’19 | East Longmeadow, Massachusetts Jared Carillo ’00 | Glastonbury, Connecticut Andrew C. Chase | Deerfield, Massachusetts Kate O. Cleary ’88 | Cambridge, Massachusetts Michael J. Daly ’59, Trustee Emeritus | Charlotte, North Carolina George B. Daniels ’71 | New York, New York Matthew P. Fine ’95 | Riverside, Connecticut Samuel S. Fuller ’41, GP’04, ’05, ’06, ’08, ’09, Trustee Emeritus | Suffield, Connecticut Dr. Michael Gingold P’16, ’18 | West Hartford, Connecticut Valisha Graves ’81 | Brooklyn, New York Walter Harrison | Hartford, Connecticut Kathy G. Hoffman P’13 | Avon, Connecticut Christopher M. Houlihan P’05 | New York, New York Christopher T. Jensen P’07, ’09, ’11 | Riverside, Connecticut Andrew Kotchen ‘90 | Irvington, New York Kenneth H. Landis P’16 | New York, New York Philip Mactaggart P’17 | Millbrook, New York Jeffrey K. McElnea ’67, P’12 | New York, New York James P. Michel P’12, ’17 | Bloomfield, Connecticut Patricia Q. Moore P’09, ’14 | McLean, Virginia Tracy Orr O’Keefe ’85 | Westfield, New Jersey Monica Shay P’18 | Southborough, Massachusetts Steven R. Sheresky P’12 | Rye, New York Hope G. Smith P’12 | Locust Valley, New York Daniel R. Tisch ’69, P’02 | New York, New York John M. Tremaine ’66, P’03, Trustee Emeritus | New Canaan, Connecticut Suzy B. Vogler P’11 | San Francisco, California Jeffrey White ’65 | Westport, Connecticut

ART & DESIGN DIRECTOR Tobye Cook Seck ’88, P’16 CREATIVE DIRECTOR Hillary Rockwell Cahn ’88, P’18 EDITORIAL STAFF Hillary Rockwell Cahn ’88, P’18, Linda Colo, Tobye Cook Seck ’88, P’16, Charles Cahn III P’18, Kris Halpin, Jonathan Medwid ‘96, Alison Vigneau PHOTO CONTRIBUTORS Hillary Rockwell Cahn ’88, P’18, Peyton Cahn ‘18, Tobye Cook Seck ’88, P’16, Ben Diep ‘85, Theresa Dowling P’19, Sam Gifford, Eva Hafner ’18, John Marinelli, Jim Metzger, Jenn Mooney P’17, Panfoto Photography, Aubrey Sanford ’18, Risley Sports Photography, Margrete Skaugen ’17, Kim Wiggin P’06 CONTRIBUTORS Charles Cahn III P’18, Nkosi Cooper ’19, Tobye Cook Seck ’88, P’16, Ben Diep ’87, Eliza Gregory ’19, Stephen Hannock P’19, Russ Hearn ’01, William Hunnewell ’19, Miles Johnson ’16, Isabel Kokko ’19, Kristi Kokko ’17, Lindsay Martin ’92, Betsy McComb P’04, ’06, Jonathan Medwid ’96, Harry Melendez III ’07, Ryder Mosby ‘17, Emma Phillips ‘19, Phil Riegel ’87, The Association of Boarding Schools (TABS), Carlos Salguero ’18, Jake Selbst ’18, Savannah Tompkins ’19, Anna Wilson ’17 SUFFIELD is published by the Marketing and Communications Department of Suffield Academy for alumni, parents, and friends of the school. All publications rights reserved. Contents may be reproduced or reprinted only by permission of the editor. Opinions expressed do not reflect the official position of Suffield Academy. Comments may be addressed to Marketing & Communications at marketing@suffieldacademy.org SUFFIELD is printed by Allied Printing Services, Inc. About Allied: FSC Certified, EPA Partnership & ISO 9001. The fundamental principle of Allied’s environmental policy is to minimize any negative impact to the environment, while conserving natural resources. Using educational and administrative controls, we continuously assess our processes and practices to identify areas for education in energy, waste, and emissions.

ON THE COVER

Suffield’s students, faculty, and staff celebrated the

Brewster and Stiles projects with an all-school photo.

SU FFI E L D A C A D E M Y . O R G

MISSION Suffield Academy is a coeducational, independent secondary school serving a diverse community of boarding and day students. Our school has a tradition of academic excellence combined with a strong work ethic. A commitment to scholarship and a respect for individual differences guide our teaching and curriculum. We engender among our students a sense of responsibility, and they are challenged to grow in a structured and nurturing environment. The entire academic, athletic, and extracurricular experience prepares our students for a lifetime of learning, leadership, and active citizenship. NON-DISCRIMINATION Suffield Academy does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, religion, creed, national or ethnic origin, citizenship, physical attributes, disability, age, or sexual orientation. We administer our admissions, financial aid, educational, athletic, extracurricular, and other policies so that each student is equally accorded all the rights, privileges, programs, and facilities made available by the school. Copyright 2016 | Suffield Academy, Suffield, Connecticut 06078


FEATURES 6 THE NEW BREWSTER SUFFIELD celebrates the expansion of Brewster Hall and its impact on campus life

24 DEFYING TRENDS Examining the close-to-home ratio of New England’s domestic boarding school students and ten Suffield students who defy that trend

38 BALANCE How this year’s school theme is unfolding on campus

CAMPUS NEWS 2 Headmaster’s Column 3 New Trustees 4 The Suffield Oxbow 10 Campus Events 36 Ghana Trip 2015 33 Circle of Care 16 Reunion 2015 42 Chapel Series 48 Sports Overview 54 Performing Arts 64 Alums in the News

PROFILES ALUMNI 22 Ben Diep ’85: Square Peg in a Round Hole 45 Lindsay Martin ’92: Simply Delicious CLASS AGENT 53 Russ Hearn ’01 LEGACY 58 Tobye Cook Seck ’88 and Miles Johnson ’16

CLASS NOTES 65 News from the Classes of 1948-2015

SUFFIELD

FALL | WINTER 2015-16


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CHARLES CAHN III

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N AN AUGUST MORNING LAST SUMMER I WAS CATCHING UP ON SOME CORRESPONDENCE IN FULLER HALL WHEN MY PHONE RANG. “MR. CAHN, YOU LIKELY DON’T REMEMBER ME,” I HEARD.

“YOU WERE MY JV BASKETBALL COACH IN 1996. I WASN’T ALL THAT GOOD, BUT I WAS A JUNIOR AND IT WAS IMPORTANT TO ME. YOU GAVE ME THE CHOICE OF BEING ON JV OR THIRDS. I NEVER FORGOT IT.” He reminded me why a family issue forced him to leave Suffield that winter and how he got to be a starter in a game against Westminster before he departed. I could not believe how clearly he recalled it all. “I just wanted to reach out and tell you I was happy you are the headmaster,” he said. For some reason, that moment years ago at Suffield was etched permanently in his life story.

The Cahn family: Charlie, Peyton, Harrison, and Hillary

I was reminded of this at October’s reunion when members of the Class of 1965 were recounting events from 50 years ago as if they just happened. They were telling me who lived in each room on both floors of Fuller Hall. The clarity of their recollections was remarkable—detailed stories about classmates and teachers. What is it about Suffield that makes these recollections so vivid? Why do I not remember my secondary school years at Gilman in the same way? Part of the answer, I think, is the intensity of life here is unusual. The majority of our students are away from their parents at a relatively young age. The schedule is unrelenting—with classes every Saturday morning, family-style meals, and evening commitments. It accelerates growth and forces collaboration.

Another part is the quality of the mentoring here. Our faculty members connect with students at the heart level and have the energy to be inspirational. I see this as headmaster and as a Suffield parent. These claims have helped shape a central part of the leadership philosophy. Essentially, boarding school life is unique and not for everyone. You can’t fake it. Success requires being fully committed. At Suffield it requires high-energy people who are encouraging and nurturing. Healthy, strong schools like ours are not led by envy; they embrace who they are and always strive to improve. As our motto says, esse quam videri: to be rather than to seem. Suffield combines world-class facilities with humane, encouraging educators.

“HEALTHY, STRONG SCHOOLS LIKE OURS ARE NOT LED BY ENVY; THEY EMBRACE WHO THEY ARE AND ALWAYS STRIVE TO IMPROVE.”

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A note from parents who brought their daughters for interviews reflects just what I am focusing on here. Here’s part of what they wrote: It is obvious that what was an already beautiful campus has been dramatically strengthened and upgraded with amazing new facilities, especially the new Brewster Hall. But what most impressed us was the warm, genuine, and down-to-earth Suffield culture that permeates the school. Our daughters felt immediately at home at Suffield, and that’s the true test of whether a school fits our girls and our family. We already know Suffield has excellent academics, athletics, and arts. What we are really looking for is a school with a community where we can envision our daughters happily growing, exploring, developing, and excelling. It is clear to us that Suffield would offer them that opportunity. New memories are being made each day here, ones that will be vividly recalled decades from now at reunions in Brewster Hall. This is a great environment benefitting from a crystal clear philosophy of how to best help people navigate the adolescent years.


New Trustees THREE PEOPLE JOINED SUFFIELD’S BOARD OF TRUSTEES AT THE FALL 2015 MEETING. SUFFIELD HAS 30 TRUSTEES AND THERE ARE SEVEN BOARD COMMITTEES. THE TRUSTEES HAVE A DIVERSE MIXTURE OF PROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL BACKGROUNDS THAT INCLUDES ALUMNI, CURRENT AND PAST PARENTS, AND EDUCATORS. ANDREW KOTCHEN ’90 WILL BEGIN SERVING AS A TRUSTEE AT THE WINTER 2016 MEETING AND WILL BE PROFILED IN THE NEXT ISSUE OF SUFFIELD.

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ARED CARILLO ‘00 is principal of Carillo & Howland, an affiliate of Smith Brothers, an insurance company located in Somers and Windsor Locks, Connecticut. They provide customized personal and commercial insurance products. Jared is a graduate of Trinity College (BA) and University of Hartford (MBA). He has been a member of Suffield’s Alumni Council of Advisors and has made the school a priority in several ways. Jared lives in Glastonbury with his wife Morgen and their three daughters: Addison, Catherine, and Bailey. He serves on Suffield’s Marketing & Communications Committee and the Budget, Finance & Audit Committee.

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ONICA SHAY P’18 lives in Southborough, Massachusetts. A native of Southern California, she worked in Movies-for-Television Development for ABC Entertainment and Sitcom Development for Fox Television. She studied communications at the University of Southern California and completed her bachelor’s degree in English and creative writing at Boston College. She was a trustee for the Summit Montessori School in Framingham, Massachusetts where she chaired the development, marketing, strategic planning, and governance committees. She actively serves as co-chair of the Annual Fund at Fay School. She and her husband Jim have two daughters: India ’18 and Sophia. Monica is on Suffield’s Long Range Planning and Development Committees.

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AMES MICHELL P’12, ‘17 is operations manager at Access Health Connecticut. He is also board president at Jumoke Academy in Hartford, and was previously an audit director in Aetna’s finance department and chair of the board of education in Bloomfield. His older son Alex graduated in 2012, and younger son Jacob is in the Class of 2017. Born in Haiti, James is a graduate of Brooklyn College and the Barney School of Finance at University of Hartford. James spent nine years as chief financial officer for the Metropolitan District Commission in Hartford and 10 years working for the New York State Insurance Department as a senior insurance auditor. He is on Suffield’s Investment and Budget, Finance & Audit Committees.

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the Suffield

OXBOW

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RENOWNED CONTEMPORARY LUMINIST PAINTER, STEPHEN HANNOCK’S WORK IS FOUND IN PRESTIGIOUS PUBLIC COLLECTIONS WORLDWIDE INCLUDING THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART (WASHINGTON, D.C.), THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM, WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART (SAN DIEGO), AND THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

(BOSTON) AMONG MANY OTHERS.

Stephen Hannock P’19 is most recognized for compositions of atmospheric landscapes—compositions of flooded rivers, nocturnes and large vistas—which often incorporate text inscriptions that relate to family, friends, or events of daily life. He creates a unique luminosity by building up layers of paint on the canvas, sandpaper-polishing it, applying new layers of paint, and polishing again. This is the case with The Oxbow for Suffield Academy. Stephen’s Suffield piece started out as a straight forward archival digital print, laminated in three 6’x 3’ sections. “ ...But I got a little carried away and did significant painting and writing throughout the composition,” he said. The “Oxbow” place is a quarter-mile-wide nook in the Connecticut River that bisects the Holyoke Mountain Range. The location was

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The composition has become a signature of mine; almost a self-portrait. I’ve painted more than two dozen such pieces over the years.”


The Suffield Oxbow

made famous by the 1836 Thomas Cole masterpiece (View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm—The Oxbow); considered by many scholars to be the most important American painting of the 19th century. It was this painting that inspired Hannock’s own Oxbow series. A highlight of Cole’s painting is his self-portrait in the foreground: the artist at his easel looking back at the viewer. Stephen said, “In response to this, while knowing that Cole never lived in the area, I developed my own composition. But instead of including a physical likeness/self-portrait, I wove a written diary throughout the cornfields. As I’d lived in the Northampton-Amherst area for 17 years—beginning with an exchange program at Smith from Bowdoin—I had plenty of stories.” (Stephen is an alumnus of Deerfield Academy and Bowdoin College.) His first Oxbow was painted in 1994 and is in the collection of the Smith College Museum of Art. He commented, “The composition has become a signature of mine; almost a self-portrait. I’ve painted more than two dozen such pieces over the years.” These paintings include the largest (at 9’x12’) in the collection of and on view at the Metropolitan Museum for 12 years, as well as The Oxbow for Frank Moore and Dan Hodermarsky, recently acquired by the Yale University Art Gallery. Stephen Hannock with daughter Georgia ‘19

Stephen was inspired to make this for Suffield because he enthusiastically believes in Charlie Cahn’s leadership and how Suffield’s faculty engages with the students. “This place is remarkable,” he said. “From the supportive community atmosphere to the recent top-flight construction—Suffield is clearly firing on all cylinders. As a place of learning, the school is a true inspiration.” He concluded by saying, “Georgia and I, along with our entire family, are really proud to be part of Suffield and happy to contribute in whatever small way we can to the new Brewster Hall and to the school in general.”

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the new

BREWSTER

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NCE A CORNERSTONE OF THE AMERICAN HOME, THE TRADITIONAL FAMILY MEAL IS NOW ALMOST OBSOLETE. IN TODAY’S WORLD WHERE BOTH PARENTS OFTEN GO

TO WORK AND KIDS HAVE BUSY SCHEDULES WITH SCHOOL, HOMEWORK, AND AN ARRAY OF AFTERNOON ACTIVITIES, FINDING TIME FOR A GATHERING AT THE TABLE SEEMS NEARLY IMPOSSIBLE. YET OVER THE PAST SEVERAL YEARS RESEARCHERS HAVE CONFIRMED WHAT PARENTS HAVE KNOWN FOR A LONG TIME: SHARING A FAMILY MEAL IS GOOD FOR THE SPIRIT AND BRAIN. IT IS A TIME TO RELAX, LAUGH, TELL STORIES, AND CATCH UP ON UPS AND DOWNS. SIT-DOWN LUNCH IS A TREASURED SUFFIELD TRADITION, AND THE RECENTLY COMPLETED EXPANSION OF THE DINING HALL MAKES IT POSSIBLE FOR THE ENTIRE STUDENT BODY AND FACULTY TO COMFORTABLY JOIN TOGETHER EACH DAY. IN MANY WAYS BREWSTER RESTS AT THE HEART OF SUFFIELD’S CAMPUS, CONNECTING THE ACADEMIC AND RESIDENTIAL QUADRANGLES.


BREWSTER REMAINS a place where memories are built and traditions maintained The new Brewster Hall opened in time for the start of the 20152016 academic year. This beautiful building, originally constructed in 1960, grew from 27,000 to 40,000 square feet. Its use has remained the same over the past 54 years: a dining room, kitchen, lobby, and faculty lounge on the main floor, a twelvebed dormitory and faculty apartment on the top floor, and a student union on the bottom level. The expanded student union has a fully-stocked snack bar, a media lounge, a large social area, the Suffield bookstore and mailroom, the day student locker area, and the Dean of Students’ Offices. The terraces outside of Brewster are also inviting areas for students to congregate. The projects were made possible by several major gifts. Some led to newly named spaces such as the Koo Family Dining Room and Rego Terrace. In this issue of SUFFIELD we look at how the new kitchen and dining spaces are impacting school life. We asked students about their favorite aspects of the new building and spent time discussing its impact with various members of the community. Director of Food Services Sean Hennessey has led Brewster’s kitchen for nearly 22 years. Connecting time-honored traditions with a state-of-the-art renovation, he enthusiastically spoke about

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the benefits of the new building. “The servery area adds a functional space separate from the dining hall and eliminates congestion in and out of the kitchen,” he said. “It provides easier access to the deli and salad bar while the one-sided hot meal station is a more efficient way of serving meals. Relocating the dish room was also effective, providing a cleaner and safer working space for the dish crew during high volume meals.” A new loading dock allows trucks to deliver supply pallets swiftly with independent access to Brewster from Main Street. With the additional resource of an elevator, the off-loading and storage process of food items moves rapidly, allocating more time to meal service preparation. The kitchen itself is noticeably improved, with independent work stations, a spacious layout, and increased storage. Sean noted, “It was important that this renovation maintained a good balance between safety, functionality, and community.” Student involvement in dining services is a long-standing tradition at Suffield and adds significantly to the sense of community and the overall experience. Serving on lunch dish crew, for example, is a popular role with many students and sustains lasting memories. Members of the dining services staff work closely with students, and this has a positive outcome for the community. “I spoke to


a kitchen staff member at another school who said he could easily go an entire year without ever even seeing a student,” Sean said. “My experience here is so different. It is nice that former students and faculty come back and ask about us. They know us. We are integrated into the community. Dish crew has a lasting impact on alumni.” The expanded dining hall provides more space for preparation and specialty work. It is important that nutritional options are readily available so students learn how to make healthy choices in their diet. The rhythm and regularity of special offerings at Suffield create satisfaction. These items include grilled chicken at every salad bar meal, freshly baked pizza in newly installed commercial ovens, Thursday morning omelets, and a “sandwich of the day” during buffet style lunches on Wednesdays. Over the past decade, Suffield has provided greater access to the dining room and longer meal times. More recently, the dining hall is open during the academic day to include a “grazing period” between meals. Available to the community are fruits, cereals, coffee, and juices. This at first provided modest challenges in preparing the space for formal sit-down meals, yet it added a positive atmosphere and additional space for students to convene during their academic day. Although the concept of providing access to food between meals is mixed among Suffield’s peers, the experience has proven to be a positive aspect of the program. With its addition and renovation, Brewster Hall remains a place where memories are built and traditions maintained. It is a gathering ground for the community to share meals and interact positively with one another.

WE ASKED STUDENTS AND FACULTY MEMBERS FOR ANONYMOUS THOUGHTS ABOUT THEIR FAVORITE FEATURES IN THE NEW DINING ROOM. ANSWERS RANGED FROM AESTHETIC ENHANCEMENTS TO ENHANCED FOOD OPTIONS TO THE INSTALLATION OF AIR CONDITIONING. HERE IS A SAMPLING OF REPLIES: Elevator Herb wall New Cupola Pizza oven Air conditioning Cappuccino machine Cool, modern lighting USB ports in the wall Frozen yogurt machine No delivery trucks in sight The barn doors into the servery New terrace overlooking walkway The little blue zipper on the plastic wrap Soy milk and almond milk refrigerator Handicap accessibility buttons on doors

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On Campus Terrace Dedication: Ben Rego ’07 On November 14, 2015, Suffield welcomed Ben Rego ’07 and his family back to campus for the dedication of the Rego Terrace. Located just outside the new entrance to Brewster Hall, the Rego Terrace serves as a central location for the Suffield community to convene outside of the student union and dining room. In response to the dedication Ben said, “I would like to thank Suffield Academy for bestowing this incredible honor on me with the naming of Rego Terrace on Stiles Walk. With this being the new center of campus, Bermudians should be immensely proud to have this presence and legacy here at Suffield Academy. I am so very grateful for the support of my family in this endeavor and look forward to continuing my strong connection with Suffield in the many exciting years to come.” Ben was joined by his father Buddy Rego and wife Jenny Rego, his mother Jenny West and her husband Andrew, as well as his grandparents, Allan and Gillian Gray. On campus for the first time since Ben’s commencement in 2007, the family enjoyed a campus tour followed by a luncheon in Cone Lounge with Headmaster Charles Cahn III, Phil Riegel ’87, Amy and Chris Pentz, and classmate Harry Melendez III ’07. In addition to this most recent contribution to Suffield, Ben has served on the Alumni Council of Advisors, is a strong supporter of Suffield’s boys’ squash program, and has aided Harry in coordinating alumni events in Boston and Bermuda.

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01 Allan and Gillian Gray with Ben Rego ‘07 02 Andrew and Jenny West, Jenny and Buddy Rego, Ben Rego ‘07, Headmaster Charles Cahn III, Gillian and Allan Gray

Koo Family Dining Room The renovated and expended dining room in Brewster Hall was named in honor of Andre and Jana Koo, parents of Andre Jr. ‘14. They generously supported the construction project. Andre Jr. studied at Suffield for three years and now attends New York University’s Stern School of Business. The Koos are grateful for the role Suffield played in their son’s life, and Andre Jr. recently visited campus to see his former teachers. Andre said, “Jana and I think Charlie Cahn played a crucial role in our son’s development at a vital time in his life, and we want to support his vision for the school. We are happy we could help transform Brewster Hall into a multidimensional, high quality space at Suffield.”

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News Legacy Students Suffield has a great tradition of legacies (children of alumni) enrolling at the school, symbolizing the powerful experiences students and families have on campus. There are 29 legacy students this year. There are also 60 siblings enrolled and two students with grandparents who attended Suffield. The 29 legacies are shown here. Front row, left to right Harry Hildreth ‘17, Amelia Hern ‘17, Kyle Reddish ‘16, Olivia Stanley ‘16, John Mellekas ‘19, Miles Johnson ‘16, Susan Mellekas ‘16, Riley Miles ‘17, Audrey DeFresne ‘18, Eva Hafner ‘18, Olivia Alfano ‘19, Carlin Molander ‘18, Izzy Dutranoit ‘19, Megan Varney ‘17, Peyton Cahn ‘18, Gavin Mastella ‘19, Kate Killam ‘19, Owen Kinne ‘18, Tom Killam ‘19, Chris Campbell ‘19, Andrew Budge ‘19 Back row, left to right Nick Vardakas ‘18, Luc Dutranoit ‘17, Casey Kaplan ‘17, Sarah Raymond ‘16, Caroline Pape ‘16, Annabelle Pape ‘16, John Killam ‘18, Conor Keough ’16, Colin Pittorie ‘16

The WALKS Foundation 2016 will mark the 50th anniversary of the WALKS Foundation. WALKS is a consortium of five Greater Hartford independent schools that work together to provide educational opportunities for deserving students. In addition to raising money from corporate and individual donors to provide financial aid, WALKS hosts an annual Constitutional Essay Contest and awards community service prizes to students at each school named in recognition of the Barnes family, who have supported the foundation for many years. Betty Barnes P’75 was a Suffield trustee from 1974 to 1987. Suffield has three WALKS scholars this year: Tahj Herring ’16, Shannelle Watson ’16, and Bailey Hyland ’18. The 60th anniversary celebration for WALKS will be held at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford on October 18. Left to right Headmaster Charles Cahn III, Bailey Hyland ‘18, Tahj Herring ‘16, and Shannelle Watson ‘16

Special Olympics On September 19, Suffield’s cross country team joined Special Olympic athletes for a unified 5k run, followed by a 3k race open to Special Olympic athletes and all of the Suffield community. Initiated last year as a project in Suffield’s Leadership Program, this was a return visit for Special Olympic athletes who came from around the state in support of the race. Divided in groups and equally matched, each team included members of Suffield’s boys’ and girls’ cross country and Special Olympic athletes.

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On Campus

Parents’ Weekend Parents and families of Suffield students visited campus for a series of activities from October 9 to 11. In addition to meetings with teachers, parents attended athletic contests, a Performing Arts Showcase, and a discussion prompted by various school leaders. Headmaster Charlie Cahn gave the State of the School presentation and noted that a primary reason for Suffield’s success is the shared sense of values between parents and the school. He said, “Our clarity about being an academically challenging school that is encouraging and nurturing has helped lead Suffield to great success.”

From left to right, top Eres Portman ‘19 with mother Erin; Jordan Slade ‘19 with parents Brent and Nicola Middle Andew Li ‘16 with parents Alfie Li and Jessica Xiao Bottom Sedley Benitz ‘18 with father Tim; Russlyn and Matt Seiler, parents of Catty Seiler ‘16


Suffield Families

Grandparents’ Day Suffield welcomed a record-breaking 162 grandparents to campus on October 20 in celebration of Grandparents’ Day. The day included classroom visits, lunch in Brewster Hall, and an address from Headmaster Charlie Cahn. Suffield students also had the opportunity to have their photo taken with their grandparents on Brewster’s new balcony. It was an eventful time shared by generations. Thank you to the 162 grandparents who took time to attend on a beautiful fall day.

From left to right, top Graham Shannon ‘16 with grandfather Merritt McDonough; Aubrey Sanford ‘18 with grandparents Paulette and George Sanford, and Isabel Munoz-Sune ‘18 with grandparents Joan and Jeremy Berg. Middle Max and Ben Toczydlowski ‘17 with grandparents Dee and Bob Romejko. Bottom Audrey ‘19 and Hannah ‘17 Arthur with grandmother Dorothy Russo; Georgia Hannock ‘19 with grandparents Liz Hannock (blue) and Janet and Jim Watkins


On Campus

Alumni Sports Day On September 12, as new and returning students arrived on campus, alumni also returned for Alumni Sports Day. Water polo, cross country, and soccer welcomed Suffield’s former athletes to join the annual alumni games. These games serve as a platform that bonds students and alumni of multiple generations, connecting Suffield’s past with Suffield’s present and future. Prior to the start of the soccer game, alumni gathered at center field where Jim Knight ’73 presented a generous donation to coach Ricky Warren and the soccer program. In memory of their late son, Christopher James Knight ’99, Jim and his wife Risa recognized the special impact that soccer at Suffield had on Chris. Having played one season at the Tiger level and two seasons on junior varsity, Chris played his final season on varsity. He had a passion for the game and a love for his team. “Chris loved being on the varsity soccer team,” Jim said. “It was a special group of players. They were the honor guard at his funeral and all attended his wake. It is something my wife and I will never forget. All of this and Chris’ love for the game is why we give back to the program.” Alumni Sports Day is not a competition. It is an opportunity for alumni to come home to Suffield, share old memories, and catch up on current events. Jim and his son represent the heart of Suffield’s athletics and the alumni organization. At Suffield, being on a team does not end at Commencement. From left to right, top left Coach Ricky Warren with Emilio Rocha ‘13, John Watson ‘71 and Jim Knight ‘73. Top right, front Scott Owsiany ‘84, Paul Dean ‘84, Piet Shettle, Emilio Rocha ‘13, Nick Tavares ‘10, John Watson ‘71, Jonathan Medwid ‘96, and Jim Knight ‘73; back Joe Fleming ‘92, Art Shettle ‘83, varsity boys’ soccer coach Ricky Warren, Paul Faude ‘10, Nick Hudson ‘13, Jay Gately ‘90, Brian Hetzel ‘97, Adam Pistel ‘08, Jack Patterson ‘13, Jared Dubey ‘00, Jordan Dubey ‘04, and Kevin Burke ‘91. Bottom left Members of the Suffield Academy cross country team and alumni, parents, and faculty who ran the cross country course on Alumni Sports Day. Bottom right Kaison Ifill ‘15.

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Alumni Sports & Events

11th Annual Golf Outing On September 18, alumni and parents gathered at Suffield Country Club for the 11th Annual Golf Outing. Traditionally played in a scramble format, players of all skill levels enjoy a day on the links. The outing comprised a number of activities including a putting contest, 30-yard chipping contest, long drive and closest to the pin holes, and a fun marshmallow drive competition. Participants received several gifts including Suffield Academy Tervis tumblers and driver head covers. While the central focus of the day was on fun and camaraderie, there was a prize for the group posting the lowest score. Two groups finished with a score of 57: Robin Mayo P’17, Ryan Duffy, Sean Lafferty, and Bob Reilly; and John Lavelle, Tom Duffy, Paul Vumback, and Brendan Boyle. A buffet dinner followed the golf, and participants were warmly greeted by Head Pro Stan McLennan P’18. This was John Bonavita’s P’18 first time playing in the outing, and he commented that “it was a great chance for a new parent to meet alumni, faculty, and other parents!” Jonathan Medwid ’96, a frequent player in the outing, said, “I look forward to this event every year. It is always great to spend an afternoon on the golf course with old friends while welcoming new people to the Suffield community.” Sponsors of the outing included Pretzelmaker, Footjoy, Kellogg’s, Coca-Cola, Windsor Marketing Group, The Hoffman Auto Group, Cordes Orthodontics, Carillo & Howland Insurance, Westfield Bank, the Kim and the Thrall families, Spikeball, Trillium Santin ’07, and Mr. and Mrs. Stan McLennan P’18. From left to right, top left, kneeling Scott Owsiany ’84, Paul Dean ’84, Geoff Hoyt ’84, Kevin Kinne ‘84, P’18, Jonathan Medwid ’96, Phil Riegel ’87, and Byron Bailey P’12, ’16; standing Dennis and Zita Kinne P’82, ’84, ’86, ’89, Barry Cleary P’02, ’05, Wayne Patterson P’13, Kelly Kinne Patterson ’82, P’13, Darcy Biathrow P’19, Gordon and Gretchen Lunsford P’19, Paul Vumback, Sean Lafferty, Ryan Duffy, Ray Daddario P’17, Lee Vardakas ’82, P’18, Tucker Killam ’80, P’18, ‘19, ‘19, Mike and Lorraine Mancini, George Skakel P’16, Joe McLaughlin ’77, Monica Chung, Bob Reilly, Jordan Choi, Steve Fox ’74, P’06, Headmaster Charlie Cahn, Paul Kalill P’17, Nate Baska, Brendan Boyle, John Lavelle, John Bonavita P’18, Joe Palomba ’80, Mark Palomba ’77, Jim Knight ’73, Ann Molander Monighetti P’88, ’91, Nick Deni P’15, Frank Mitchell P’10, Ray Miller P’14, ’17, Ali Salehi P’12, Rob Flynn P’15, ’19, Bill Moryto P’16, ’18, Bill Dowd P’12, Joe Thrall P’07, ’09, ’13, ’18, and Emmanuel Sardinia. Top right Headmaster Charlie Cahn, Jordan Choi, Monica Chung, Joe McLaughlin ‘77. Bottom left Paul Dean ‘84, Geoff Hoyt ‘84, Scott Owsiany ‘84, and Kevin Kinne ‘84, P’18. Bottom right Joe Palomba ‘80, P’10, ‘11, Frank Mitchell P’10.

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15

A fun-filled Reunion weekend brought over 275 alumni back to the Suffield campus. The events kicked off on Friday, October 9, with a reception at Gay Mansion where alumni caught up with their classmates as well as former and current faculty members. Some notable former faculty members in attendance were Gerry LaPlante, Dennis Kinne, George Pervear, and Abe Samii. Saturday’s events included Sunrise Yoga at the new Hillary Rockwell Cahn ’88 Balance Barn, the Courtney Robinson ’88 Memorial 5K Run, student-led campus tours, a Class Agent Meeting, Headmaster Charles Cahn III’s State of the School, a bench dedication for Mark Loether ’64, and an alumni tailgate while the Tigers competed on the athletic fields. On Saturday evening, a bench dedication took place on Stiles Walk for Henry Thevenin ’10 and the Class of 1965 (celebrating their 50th Reunion) rang the Bell to commemorate the event. Following Headmaster Cahn’s remarks about Suffield’s history and the shared bonds of everyone in Brewster Hall, alumni enjoyed dinner and dancing as they reminisced about their years at the school. The Band of Love, led by Jay Cook ’78, performed throughout the evening. The weekend ended with a brunch in Brewster Hall on Sunday, October 11. Suffield thanks all alumni and their families for being part of a memorable and successful Reunion. REUNION AWARDS First to Register: David Sambor ’10 Furthest Traveled: Francisco Pujals ’10 from Managua, Nicaragua Courtney Robinson ‘88 Memorial Run: Ashley Arnold Horacek ’85 and Andy Glover ’85 Trustee Award: Awarded to the class of 1965 for donating the most dollars to the 2014-2015 Annual Fund Fuller Cup: Awarded to the Class of 1965 for having the highest percentage of donors to the 2014-2015 Annual Fund. Reunion Attendance Award: Class of 2010

Fall | Winter 2015-16 17


2000

2010

2005

2000

1990

1985

1980


1975

1970 Class by name (listed by row, from left to right)

2010 Front Nick Tavares, Billy Glidden, Atiq Lucas, Evan Ciecimirski and Shane Cranmore; Middle Amanda Cianci, Max Vicino, Basi Ugarte, Francisco Pujals, Shang Wu, Megan Madden, Melanie Watson, Chelsea Lines, Kyle Clark, Constance Turner, Joe Sosothikul; Back Tyler Arnold, Joe McGovern, Tommy Leonard, Schuyler Holden, Alyssa Palomba, Joy Russolillo, Matt Tolosky, Sheree Morrison, Rachel Adelsberger, Taylor Endress, Connor Bray, Trish Kearney, Katherine Sacco, Colin Dowd, Mackenzie Coombs, Taylor Walston, Michelle Autuori, Ginny McDermott, Everest Wein, Mary Mitchell, Paul Faude, Chloe Terres, David Sambor 2005 Front Ashley Kozlowski, Addie Kozlowski, Carolyn Rosca Johnson, Colin Dudunake; Middle Harley Saftler, Andrew Yuan; Back Ryan Allen, David Appleby, Jake Donnelly, Wade Colli, Greg Snow 2000 Front Betsy Cowan, Meghan O’Reilly Giampaolo, Manny Simons, Carmine Petrone; Back Meagan Ward Jenkins, Mike Pohorylo, Kristin Harvey

1990 Front Kelli Chamberlain Tosone, Robin Simone Wilson, Nikki Pervear Varney, Christie Lynch Michaud, John McMorris; Second Gianna Viola, James Ruggiero, Eric Shepard; Third Rob Malley, Andrew Kotchen, Keith Franco, Robert Yap; Back Sami Ladah, Tim Carpenter, Peter DaPuzzo, Steve Canter 1985 Front Tracy Orr O’Keefe, Tom Fontana, Diane Gravel, Alexander Glover, Jack Way; Second Leroy Darby, Vanessa Jones Buirski, Ashley Arnold Horacek, Richard Nunez; Third Dana Reid, Dan Noble, Kerri Meredith, Jackie Levin; Back Ben Diep, Aaron Buckwalter, John Hess, Chuck McGavern 1980 Front Michele Lang Blair, Lisa Keney Rarus, Tucker Killam, Tom Blessis; Second Andrew Sutphin, Stephanie Thomases Hutchison, John Swanson, Joe Palomba; Back Ted Brown, Bryan Day, Graham Lewis

1970 Front Ed Morgan, Alan Harvey, Charlie Gallucci; Back Vic Berard, Brett Vianney, Jeremy Wood, John Bishop 1965 (left) Front George Pervear, Rick Hirschmann, Bob McFadden, John Pritchard, Ed Link; Second Jack Meier, Terry Staples, Butch Fuller, Peter Kinnear; Third John Monacella, John Celentano, Jeff White, John Malcolm; Back Bill Kelly, Tim Hemingway, Larry Hyde, Steve Terni, Dave Keeney, George Richardson. 1965 (center) Jim Lo Dolce and Bill Kelly 1950 Bruce LaRue 1964 Front Paul Wessells, Lynda Wessells, Amy Loether, Nancy McConnell, Nick McConnell; Middle Peter Larom, Nat Stevens, John Malcolm; Back Jon Booth, Walter Thompson, Tom Webster, Ned Smith, Oakford Acton

1975 Front Clarke Hood, Joe Campanelli, Douglas Porter; Middle Brad Richardson, Bob Eveleigh, Mark Teed; Back Fred Stevens, John Shepherd, Jim Siragusa, Doug Hupp

1965

1960 1965

1950

1964


20 SUFFIELD


I had a fabulous time at Reunion! It was great to see my Suffield Academy family and the jaw-dropping additions made to campus. The official ribbon cutting of the Henry Thevenin ’10 bench was a special moment for me and my fellow classmates. It is a wonderful accent to a truly special place.” Atiq Lucas ’10

Fall | Winter 2015-16 21


S Q UA RE P EG IN A

ROUND HOLE

BY J ONATHAN MEDWID ’96


ALUMNI PROFILE

BEN DIEP ’85

LEFT THE RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN DURING HIS FRESHMAN YEAR AND RETURNED HOME TO NEW YORK CITY TO START A BUSINESS WITH HIS FATHER.

TOGETHER THEY LAUNCHED HONG COLOR LAB PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICES. WHAT WAS INITIALLY MEANT TO BE A TEMPORARY HIATUS FROM PAINTING LASTED NEARLY 20 YEARS UNTIL BEN STARTED HIS OWN LAB, COLOR SPACE IMAGING, TO FOCUS ON APPLYING HIS PAINTERLY TECHNIQUE TO THE WORK OF FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHERS. NOW 10 YEARS LATER, BEN REMAINS AT WORK IN PHOTOGRAPHY. Ben is a master printer, producing exhibition and limited edition photographic prints for museums and private art collections. He currently specializes in Photoshop and the digital process. With over 30 years in the business, he has gained the trust and friendship of many artists who use photography as their medium, collaborating with them in the creative process. The connections he has forged with these artists inspired him to take the collaborative process a step further. As a result, he and his wife, Mairead, began planning an art gallery, which they now run together. Square Peg Gallery is a contemporary art gallery in the river town of Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. It grew out of an interest in providing a venue for discussion and exchange of ideas about photography and art. Over the years the original concept evolved, and in October 2015 Ben and his wife opened the gallery with an expanded mission: to exhibit artwork in all mediums and create opportunities for discussion, education, and exchange of ideas in the visual arts, writing, and music. Ben said, “The process of creating a work of art is usually very internal and personal but the paradox is that art is meant to be seen while literature, poetry, and music are meant to be heard.” His hope is that the gallery, and those with whom he collaborates, will provide the necessary exposure and conversational platform for artists to share their ideas with each other in addition to a broader outside audience. Having gone to RISD to study painting, Ben never intended on staying in photography. Yet after working with artists in that medium he realized there is a great deal of crossover between painting and photography. Ben explained, “I discovered that I was applying the same approach to photography as I had learned in painting. My way of seeing was the same as the way I approached building an image in the darkroom or in Photoshop. My work is an accumulation of ideas forming the way I see in life and the way I see in art. I am continually learning and being influenced by my peers and other artists with whom I collaborate. Through the casual format of conversation and discussion, exciting ideas are given birth and transformed across various mediums.” A member of the National Junior Tennis League in New York, Ben was the first-ever recipient of the Arthur Ashe scholarship. Under this scholarship, Ben attended Suffield for four years. He says that he is ever grateful for the generosity and opportunity that was bestowed upon him to attend Suffield. “Most importantly,” he stated, “I am grateful to the many faculty who took me in as a member of the community and an extension of their own families.

Their trust and support opened my eyes and heart to a world full of possibilities and gave me the gift of seeing, learning, and discovering myself.” He credits the Suffield experience with molding him into the person he is today and believes the generosity he received at Suffield made him a more generous person in his own life. Ben remembers arriving on campus, checking into the Bissell House dorm as a freshman, and being warmly welcomed by faculty members Gordy Glover and George Pervear on the football field that same day. He also remembers staying at Liz and Eric Erickson’s home during March break while he completed a painting exhibition in his senior year. They shared what Ben referred to as a “gourmet meal” of ramen with baked beans and hot dogs from a can while they conversed about Eric’s studies in theology and Ben’s progress in the studio. As a young immigrant from Vietnam, Ben faced many challenges at Suffield, and he recalls the rigor of his classes. He also often recalls things said to him by his teachers that apply to his life and work. “My teachers are my role models,” he explained, “and I wish I could still have those conversations with them. They each affected my life in many ways, and some had a great influence on me. I often find myself having moments when I wonder what Mario Vincenti and Gordy Glover would think or say about something I am working on or contemplating. When I experience these moments, I wish I could enter into a dialogue with them.” Ben met Mario Vincenti and Bill Butcher during his freshman year, but only took his first official art class as a senior to fulfill the art graduation requirement. Before then he was focused only on academics. Yet in his freshman year, he went to the art studio to ask if he could do some sketching in his spare time and if there was a way he could learn more about drawing without registering for a class. He was given paper and pencils and so began his oneon-one learning with Mario Vincenti. Mario’s words still resonate in his mind, and he often finds himself using the same vocabulary Mario used when describing a painting or photograph now in his gallery. With respect and admiration Ben comments, “Mario changed my life by teaching me how to see and observe, and as a result my life is richer and more fulfilled.” It has been 30 years since Ben Diep graduated from Suffield Academy. The traditions are timeless and he still remembers the words spoken by his role models all these years later. Suffield’s legacy is filled by so many personal stories and unique personalities. The experience is influential, often life changing, and undoubtedly unique—just like a square peg in a round hole.

WW W. SQ UAREPEG G ALLERY . C O M Fall | Winter 2015-16 23


BY JONATHAN MEDWID ’96

M

OST AMERICAN STUDENTS IN BOARDING SCHOOLS LIVE WITHIN TWO HOURS OF THEIR CAMPUS. HERE WE MEET TEN STUDENTS WHO DEFY THIS TREND. THEY ARE BOARDERS WITHOUT BORDERS,

AND THEY COME A LONG WAY FROM THEIR HOMES TO ATTEND SUFFIELD ACADEMY.

One of Suffield’s greatest strengths is the broad geographic diversity of its student body. From 20 American states and 35 countries, students come to our campus in north central Connecticut and join an educational community steeped in history. They learn of Suffield from alumni, parents, educational consultants, middle schools, and of course the internet. The result is a remarkable study in community, as people of different backgrounds are thrown together in intense, productive ways. The common perception of American boarding school is that it is an east coast phenomenon. This is where the preponderance of schools reside and where the tradition of attending boarding school is most common. The perception in this case is largely true, as indicated by recent data from The Association of Boarding Schools (TABS)—illustrated on pages 28-29. Given that the majority of North American boarding schools are clustered in the New England and Mid-Atlantic states, the close-to-home enrollment pattern means the highest number of boarding students come from and study in these regions. Most North American boarding students are drawn from five American states: New York (11.5%), Massachusetts (10.4%), Pennsylvania (9.9%), Connecticut (7.3%), and New Jersey (6.7%). More than half of North American boarding students attend school in just four (4) US states—Massachusetts, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and New Hampshire. In light of these findings it is interesting that ten new students joined the Suffield Academy community in 2015 from Colorado, Minnesota, Mississippi, Wyoming, Texas, California, Illinois, and rural Baldwin, New York. We thought it would be interesting to hear their stories.

24 SUFFIELD


Fall | Winter 2015-16 25


WILLIAM

EMMA

There were 25 boarding school students from Wyoming in 2015. Yes, that’s 25, or 0.01% of Wyoming high school-aged students. Emma Phillips ’19 is proudly one of them. From Wilson, Wyoming, Emma says that there is still a flawed perception out West that New England boarding schools are disciplinary schools. “Most kids back home ask me, ‘What did you do wrong that made your parents send you to New England?’” For Emma, being sent to New England is anything but punishment. “Suffield is very warm and welcoming,” she said. “Adapting to life at Suffield has not been very difficult at all.” Emma was born in Wilton, Connecticut, but moved to Wyoming in 2007 as a first-grader. Her mother Theresa is originally from Ridgefield, Connecticut, and attended a small parochial school in Danbury. Although she says the schools in Wyoming are fine, Emma felt she was living in a bubble and wanted to branch out and try boarding school. There are two boarding schools in Jackson Hole, but Emma and her family thought they were too small and close to home. They heard about Suffield from noted educational consultant Matthew Greene, a former member of Suffield’s Board of Trustees and their friend Suffield alumnus Rose Yap Thomas ’89. Emma and her parents were looking for a small- to medium-sized school with diversity, challenging academics, and a well-developed sports program. Most importantly, while being over 2,000 miles away from home they were looking for a school where Emma would feel like part of a family. When it came to choosing Suffield over any other school visited in the Northeast, Emma said her decision was easy, “When visiting other schools, the students did not even pick up their heads and acknowledge me when we passed each other on the sidewalks.” Her mother mentioned the same experience. “We were very impressed by Suffield’s campus, the welcome we received, the visual arts department (Emma loves photography), and the overall sense that the faculty really works together to create a strong platform for learning and leadership.” California actually has a relatively large number of students in boarding schools, although many of the 2,000 in these schools are enrolled on the West Coast at places like Cate, Thacher, Webb, and Stevenson. Ryder Mosby ’17, from Carpinteria, wanted to come East. In fact, Ryder always wanted to attend a boarding school. She is an only child, fiercely independent. Having spent many youthful summers at camp in Maine, Ryder enjoyed the experience of being away from home and meeting new people. Her mom attended Hotchkiss and this gave Ryder some idea of what New England boarding schools were like. Although there are plenty of local private schools near her home in California, Ryder enjoyed the idea of opening herself up to the value that distance from home could provide. Ryder’s revisit to Suffield was on a day without

26 SUFFIELD

WHEN VISITING OTHER SCHOOLS, THE STUDENTS DID NOT EVEN PICK UP THEIR HEADS AND ACKNOWLEDGE ME WHEN WE PASSED EACH OTHER ON THE SIDEWALKS.


RYDER

classes, and this left her with a fully genuine impression of the school. She recalled, “I saw the real deal, the actual school and not the school as shown in a magazine or on a website. I felt a warm and inviting atmosphere. The students were friendly, but most importantly they seemed happy and safe.” Ryder and her parents were looking for an environment that would embrace her and challenge her to grow into her own independent self. The personal touches during their visit and the interaction with the headmaster, faculty, and students were the influential factors in making the decision to attend Suffield. Her father, John, noted that its close proximity to a major airport was something he liked, but it was ultimately and entirely Ryder’s decision to attend Suffield.

THE STUDENTS WERE FRIENDLY, BUT MOST IMPORTANTLY THEY SEEMED HAPPY AND SAFE.

NKOSI

Less than 1.5% of high school-aged students in Minnesota attend boarding school, but William Hunnewell ‘19 is one of the 148 who chose this path. William is from Edina, Minnesota, and he is an autonomous young man who embraces new opportunities. He did not like the schools in Minnesota and it was his idea to look into something different. His father Willard grew up in the Boston area and attended South Kent School. Although Willard was familiar with New England private schools, William and his mother were not. For William’s mom, born and raised in Minnesota, it was a very difficult decision to consider sending their youngest son away to school. They were referred to Suffield by John Gray, an educational consultant in Greater Boston. Like many others, William had some preconceived stereotypes of New England private schools. He was expecting to see students dressed in Vineyard Vines, khaki pants, and sweaters tied around their necks but was relieved at what he and his parents found while visiting Suffield. His mother Kim recalled, “We liked the nurturing atmosphere, and it seemed as though Suffield really cared about its students. The parents and teachers we met were engaging and answered our questions honestly. They asked the right questions and really listened to what William had to say. Personally, I liked that it was easy to get to and near a major airport.” Kim went on to explain, “We chose to send William to boarding school because he wanted the experience. He had been at the same private school in Minnesota since he was four-years-old. William is very independent and embraces many new opportunities. As he toured Suffield and met people, he decided it was definitely something he wanted to do.” While more than 3,000 boarding school students come from New York, less than a handful come from the town of Baldwin, about 30 miles from New York City. Nkosi Cooper ’19 is one of them. Passionate about basketball, he discovered Suffield at a basketball showcase in Florida through an organization called Inspiring Young Minds. He has also had to explain to friends that boarding schools are remarkable places, not penalties. “New England schools have strong athletics and academics,” he said, “and both are equally important

Fall | Winter 2015-16 27


defying trends

FIG. 1: NUMBER OF BOARDERS THAT HAIL FROM US STATES

WA

MAP KEY MT

OR

MINIMAL

MODERATE

LOW

HIGH

ID

WY

NV

HOW FAR ARE YOU FROM SUFFIELD ACADEMY? US CITY

ASPEN, COLORADO

MILES FROM SUFFIELD

HOURS BY CAR

2,083

30

140

2.5

EDINA, MINNESOTA

1,323

20

MADISON, MISSISSIPPI

1,351

20

CARPINTERIA, CALIFORNIA

2,979

43

WILSON, WYOMING

2,282

33

RIVERWOODS, ILLINOIS

939

14

TELLURIDE, COLORADO

2,216

33

DALLAS, TEXAS

1,688

25

BALDWIN, NEW YORK

28 SUFFIELD

UT

CA

CO AZ NM

AK


MAP DATA COURTESY OF THE ASSOCIATION OF BOARDING SCHOOLS (TABS)

ME VT

NY

ND MN

PA WI

NJ

SD

NH

MA

CT

RI

DC

MI

DE MD

IA

NE

OH IN

IL KS

KY

MO

NC

TN OK

VA

WV

SC

AR

AL LA

TX

GA

MS FL

Fall | Winter 2015-16 29


SAVANNAH

to me.” His mother Constance recalled, “After researching the school and visiting, we ultimately chose Suffield for its combination of outstanding academics and top basketball program. It was our ideal to have a school that combined both. Our next consideration was proximity to home (New York).” Nkosi said that his older brother attended an Ivy League school and felt that he was not as well-prepared as the students who attended prep schools. Nkosi and his parents liked the idea of attending a private school because they saw a good opportunity for academic growth and preparation for studies at top colleges. From Colorado, 388 students are in boarding school, split between eastern and western schools. Eliza Gregory ’19 wanted to come east. From Aspen, Eliza visited Suffield and found a school set in a thriving small town located just minutes from a major airport. In many ways it reminded her of home. “The Leadership Program, experiential learning, Balance Barn, high ropes course, climbing wall, and an alpine ski team were all natural extensions of the community I grew up in,” she said. Eliza’s mom also noted, “A small item with a huge impact to me was the faculty and staff brochure we were given during our visits. This was a unique touch and spoke to us about how Suffield stood behind, supported, and was proud of its staff. Every contact seemed to have the best interest of our child with the overall health of the school community at the forefront. Everyone

EVERYONE WAS PASSIONATE ABOUT THE SUFFIELD EXPERIENCE AND TRULY BELIEVED IN THE SCHOOL'S LEADERSHIP AND MISSION. was passionate about the Suffield experience and truly believed in the school’s leadership and mission.” Eliza’s mother grew up in Connecticut and is a product of New England boarding schools, although it was a family friend and placement director at Aspen Country Day (Eliza’s former school) who helped them find Suffield. Eliza and her parents were very particular in their search, and with overwhelming positive support and feedback it was clear to them that the Suffield experience would provide a solid opportunity and platform for Eliza’s overall development as a person and student. Eliza said, “Other schools brand themselves as a welcoming, friendly community, but that was not what I found when I visited them. However, Suffield really is just that.” Savannah Tompkins ’19, from Telluride, is another one of the 1.4% of high school students from Colorado going to boarding school. Savannah was not sure she wanted to go away. She loves her local community and describes herself as a homebody. Her father grew up in Chappaqua, New York, and her mother grew up in Southbury, Connecticut. Her sister attended a New England boarding school and had what Savannah described as a mediocre experience. Yet Savannah wanted to look at Suffield. Her

ELIZA


JAKE

grandfather (Jay Tompkins ’60) attended and was a long-serving trustee, and her uncle (David Tompkins ’58) is a graduate as well. Savannah showed up on campus with her parents for a visit last winter and was immediately glad she did. “The people at Suffield were really friendly,” she said, “and the campus had a really good vibe. I liked it more than I expected. It is obviously quite a bit different than Telluride, but I am adjusting well and really glad I am here.” Less that 1% of high school students in Texas attend boarding school (933 of them). Anna Wilson ’17 happily moved in as a new sophomore in 2014. She had been at Hockaday School, an all-girls day school in Dallas from pre-kindergarten when she decided she was ready for a change. Having spent several summers in Vermont with her family from the Northeast, Anna chose the boarding school path largely by her own design. “My last school (Hockaday), was very competitive,” she said, “and it felt like we were all competing against each other. Suffield is very challenging but we are encouraged to work together. It feels like we are collaborating with each other here rather than competing.” A friend of the family, Paul Amadio, who had formerly done some consulting to independent schools and prospective students, helped with their serach. They described the type of environment they were seeking. Anna’s mother Rebecca recounted, “We were pleasantly surprised that there are hidden gems like Suffield—a smaller school that can offer top academics, arts, and athletics to the students who are seeking such challenges. As parents, we loved the supportive community, structured boarding program, and rigorous academic curriculum. I think Suffield provides a safe and supportive environment for students to explore and grow as students and young adults, without the crushing external pressures kids in other programs experience. Ultimately, it was Anna’s decision and she said that Suffield just felt like the right place for her.” It is a similar story in Illinois, where only 1.1% of high school students go to boarding school. In 2015, this was 811 students including Jake Selbst ’18. From the town of Riverwoods outside of Chicago, Jake is passionate about lacrosse. His parents, Susie and David, are passionate about supporting their son’s interests. In mid-January 2015, while attending a showcase in Florida, Jake and his parents came to the very strong conclusion that he needed a different path and trajectory than what was offered at his local public high school. Originally from New York and still with family on the East Coast, Jake’s dad enlisted the advice of a client and friend, Alec Coxe ’67, a Suffield alum and former member of Suffield’s Board of Trustees. Alec spoke devotedly about Suffield and they were intrigued. Jake and his parents felt a more disciplined, nurturing, and smaller academic environment might be exactly what he needed. They said, “Suffield was the only school we applied to last year because we felt that it would be the perfect fit for our son. Everything about the school felt so right to us. Each person we were in

SUFFIELD IS VERY CHALLENGING BUT WE ARE ENCOURAGED TO WORK TOGETHER.

ANNA

Fall | Winter 2015-16 31


ISABEL & KIRSTI contact with was extremely encouraging and supportive yet also realistic that getting into Suffield would not be easy. We felt a strong connection to Thomas Foote (boys’ lacrosse coach), Sam Stone, and Sean Atkins in admissions and felt especially supported by Headmaster Charlie Cahn. After talking with him and others, Suffield felt like the right place for Jake.”

Less than 0.03%; that is how many high school students from Mississippi go to boarding school. Of these 48 students, two (Kirsti ’17 and Isabel Kokko ’19) go to Suffield. The sisters, from Madison, Mississippi, agree that schools in Mississippi are weaker than those in New England. Their mother, Katie, is Canadian and attended Hotchkiss. Katie knew these schools offered a much stronger education and that it might be something for her children to consider. She said, “We chose a prep school education for our children as we believe that education is more than academics alone. To be successfully independent is not something that automatically happens once a certain age is reached. An environment that encourages students to stretch themselves yet still provides checks and balances when needed allows a child to test who they are and gives them the practice to successfully launch into college and life.” Kirsti and Isabel were looking for a school where they would both feel comfortable and welcomed while not overwhelmed with stress or competition. One of their criteria when looking for schools was a sit-down lunch. This separated Suffield from many of the other schools. There was a sense of community they felt was different than at any of the other schools they visited. “No other schools had what Suffield does. We were looking for a school that cared about the individual,” Kirsti said. They were looking for a community-based environment like they were used to in the South. They were seeking a diverse curriculum and a community that was open-minded to making new friends and accepting new people. Isabel remarked, “Suffield works very hard at making people feel safe and motivated.” Katie concluded, “Suffield strikes a fine balance between providing a rigorous curriculum, fostering independence, and yet at the same time providing plenty of programs so that individual students do not get lost in the shuffle, and a community is built.”

NO OTHER SCHOOLS HAD WHAT SUFFIELD DOES. WE WERE LOOKING FOR A SCHOOL THAT CARED ABOUT THE INDIVIDUAL.

As the enrollment of domestic students in American boarding schools becomes more geographically concentrated, students like these 10 have stories and backgrounds that further enrich our community. Their reasons for looking varied greatly—from family connections to less fulsome options in their nearby communities—but their reasons for choosing Suffield all centered around consistent themes. These included the close attention each student receives, the strong sense of community, the strong leadership of the school and sense of purpose, and the beauty of the campus and facilities. Suffield feels very fortunate to have these students and families as part of our school community.

32 SUFFIELD


JUST CAUSE

SUFFIELD and CIRCLE OF CARE


ONE BIG POINT THAT CIRCLE OF CARE LIKES TO EMPHASIZE IS THAT THEIR MISSION IS TO HELP CHILDREN WITH CANCER AND NOT JUST CANCER AS A WHOLE. CIRCLE OF CARE IS A LOCAL CHARITY, AND STUDENTS FROM SUFFIELD HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO SEE THEIR EFFORTS ACTIVELY MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THESE CHILDREN’S LIVES.” Carlos Salguero ’18


EACH YEAR

the Suffield community votes to select a charitable organization and lends its support to that cause. This year’s elected charity is Connecticut’s own Circle of Care, founded in 2003 by three mothers of surviving pediatric cancer patients: Dawn Ladenheim, Pam Chin, and Liz Salguero P’18. For over 10 years, Circle of Care has earned a reputation for being a reliable and impactful provider of practical, financial, and emotional support directly to children with cancer and their families. Its mission is to provide everyday essentials to ease the burden of hospitalization, facilitate research, and immediate support through the difficult days following a cancer diagnosis. Now a sophomore Carlos Salguero, knows the significance of Circle of Care. He explained, “When I was two years old, I was diagnosed with leukemia. After three years of chemotherapy and treatment, I was finally again in good condition and my cancer was in remission. Before I had even decided to come to Suffield, I knew I wanted to bring a piece of Circle of Care to the school that I chose. When I found out that Suffield selected a charity every year to represent, my friend Eva Hafner ’18 and I presented Circle of Care to the student council for consideration.” Circle of Care has a unique combination of six programs that address the non-medical needs of children with cancer. For example, Bags of Love offers a day-of-diagnosis care package filled with day-to-day necessities, comfort items, and vital resources that help ease a child’s immediate transition to in-hospital treatment. A secondary program called Emergency Funds helps cover unexpected out-of-pocket costs not covered by insurance plans such as parking fees and gas, childcare for siblings, or financial emergencies like overdue mortgages, co-pays, or utility bills. On Saturday, November 7, Suffield’s student council held its first of three school-wide major fundraisers in support of this year’s charity. The Color Course consisted of a hay jump, limbo, army crawl, maze, and concluded with a chilling waterslide down Bell Hill. First through the course was 10 year old Marion, a pediatric cancer patient representing Circle of Care. Collaborating with creative teams and designers, Suffield students will help transform Marion’s bedroom for her return home later this year. Initiated by Circle of Care, Art From The Heart provides pediatric cancer patients with long hospital stays something to look forward to while Suffield students learn the impact of making a difference outside of their own community. “One big point that Circle of Care likes to emphasize is that their mission is to help children with cancer and not just cancer as a whole. Circle of Care is a local charity, and students from Suffield have the opportunity to see their efforts actively make a difference in these children’s lives.” Carlos Salguero ’18 For more information about Circle of Care, visit: www.thecircleofcare.org.

Fall | Winter 2015-16 35


joy I smiled for 10 days straight. Joe Islam ‘16

love When we first walked into the church the kids ran up and hugged me right away. It made me so happy to meet such wonderful kids. I felt immediately loved by them. Maggy Skaugen ‘17

friendship Watching the relationships grow between our students and the Ghanaian children has been extraordinary—these are special friendships built without boundaries. Kim Wiggin P‘06, Program Director


appreciation What struck me most about the people in Ghana was how much they appreciate the simple and important things in life, and how much love they show for others. Peyton Cahn ‘18

Nine Suffield students and four adults traveled to Ghana over the Thanksgiving break to work at the JoshKrisDan Home in Old Ningo, an orphanage established 20 years ago by John Moritz ’74. Originally in support of the Hearts of the Father Outreach program, this was the third visit to the home by a Suffield group. In addition to a variety of painting projects throughout the facility, the group spent time sharing crafts, music, dance, and playing futbol with the residents and staff at the home. They also had the opportunity to see the progress currently underway on the primary school being built with funds raised by Suffield in the 2013-14 school year. While traveling to the Cape Coast Castle the group learned about the role Ghana played in the Atlantic slave trade and also shared an afternoon of African dance and drumming with local children in the capital of Accra. The trip ended with a traditional Thanksgiving dinner prepared for everyone, complete with pumpkin pies. SUFFIELD asked students who attended to share their photos and respond with what the trip to Ghana meant to them.

gratitude

reflection

I’ve never been so overjoyed and grateful until I saw their faces.

Reflecting back on our Ghana trip, I am speechless. It was an amazing experience. From the kids we met at the orphanage to the Suffield students—everyone was simply happy.

Aubrey Sanford ’18

Eva Hafner ’18

family They are our brothers and sisters. Not a day goes by that we don’t think of our family in Ningo. They taught us to appreciate everything we are so blessed to have. Katherine Kalill ‘17


38 SUFFIELD


BY JONATHAN MEDWID ’96


BALANCE

DO NOT FORGET WHO YOU ARE OR KEEP THINGS IN PERSPECTIVE.

O

VER THE PAST DECADE SUFFIELD HAS HAD AN ANNUAL SCHOOL THEME IT EXAMINES OVER THE COURSE OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR. THE PHILOSOPHY OF THIS PROGRAM IS BASED ON HAVING A SHARED INTELLECTUAL EXPERIENCE AND RAISING AWARENESS OF PERTINENT AND TIMELY ISSUES. COMPONENTS INCLUDE A SPEAKER SERIES, CHARITY FUNDRAISER, FILM AND DISCUSSION PROGRAM, AND COMMUNITY TEXT. PAST THEMES FOCUSED ON COURAGE, LOYALTY, GRATITUDE, IDENTITY, AND

CONVICTION. THIS YEAR SUFFIELD IS EXPLORING THE CONCEPT OF BALANCE. THE GOAL IS TO EMBRACE FACTORS THAT ENHANCE STABILITY AND STEADINESS.

As a noun, balance refers to the condition in which opposing elements are momentarily equal. Used as a verb, balance is the action that puts these opposing elements into a steady or equal position. It is therefore simultaneously both an action and a state of being. Maintaining it is an ongoing process. It is easy to get caught up in the busyness of daily life and forget to find time for self care. We get stuck in our heads, planning for the future or dissecting the past rather than paying mindful attention to the present moment. Life at Suffield is rigorous and demanding for students and faculty, with classes beginning at 8 a.m. six days a week, daily athletics, evening activities, and study halls. At Suffield, teachers are coaches, advisors, and dorm parents. They live on campus with their families and their personal time is shared, making this a unique environment and intimate community. In this high-paced infrastructure, it is easy to forget what day of the week it is and lose touch with individualism and self—where you come from and who you are. At a higher level of consciousness, one’s attitude toward practicing balance has a profound impact on success. More than twenty years ago Suffield was the first school in the US to require laptop computers, but today’s world carries such technology in its pocket. Information and media are at our fingertips in real time without delay. While these advancements emerge rapidly, the challenge of remaining connected to one’s self and spirit is a constant in everyday life. In 2014, Suffield demonstrated its commitment to health and wellness by opening the Balance Barn, a 2,000-square-foot healthy lifestyle center on the western tip of campus. Yoga, meditation, and mindfulness exercises are held regularly. Because being busy has become such a deeply engrained practice, it seems forgotten that it is in fact a choice. This year’s school theme recognizes how easy it is to be disconnected from the present moment and become unbalanced. Our messages are

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2015-16 School Theme

WHERE YOU COME FROM. BE CALM AND SLOW DOWN. BELIEVE IN YOURSELF.

about getting back to the center. Our theme is about appreciating the value of family, friends, health, and spirit. These must be handled carefully, like a glass ball as retired CEO of Coca-Cola Brian Dyson said in a commencement speech at Georgia Tech: Imagine life as a game in which you are juggling some five balls in the air. You name them Work, Family, Health, Friends, and Spirit and you are keeping all of these in the air. You will soon understand that Work is a rubber ball. If you drop it, it will bounce back. But the other four balls—Family, Friends, Health and Spirit—are made of glass. If you drop one of these, they will be irrevocably scuffed or damaged or even shattered. They will be never the same. You must understand that and strive for balance in your life. Work efficiently during office hours and leave on time. Give the required time to your family, friends, and have proper rest. Value has a value only if it is valued. One example of programs related to the theme include The Joshua Show, which was performed at Suffield in November. Featuring multiple styles of poetry, live music, physical comedy, and tap dancing, the 50-minute performance served as a hiatus from Suffield’s fast-paced schedule. A trip to Ghana over Thanksgiving break supporting the Hearts of the Father Outreach program, the Color Course run for Circle of Care, Grandparents’ Day in October, and the Special Olympics run in September were additional offerings that demonstrate acts of mindfulness by members of the Suffield community. In the classroom, teachers implement the school theme through methods like a written self-portrait in Melinda Fuller’s art classes. In his portrait Jimmy Turner ’16 wrote, “Family > Everything. There are many distractions and negative things in life, but family will always be there.” Academic Dean Sara Yeagar addressed the value of balance during Convocation, while also remarking on the marvels of technology and how far it has advanced in her own lifetime. With references to her DVR recorder, in-flight wireless internet, and comparing a cell phone to her grandmother’s rotary telephone, Sara lamented that the magic of technology is largely wasted on us if we forget how to appreciate it. She asked that we all slow down and see the world as a small child. “They happily see the world as it is,” she said, “not as they wish it to be. Do not forget who you are or where you come from. Be calm and keep things in perspective. Slow down. Believe in yourself.” This year’s school theme embraces the fact that balance is both a noun and a verb. It is an ongoing process requiring constant attention and care. While we juggle so many things all at once at Suffield, at work, and in our personal lives, it is important to remember that “value has value only if it is valued.”

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Chapel SCOTT FRIED THE WORDS IN MY POCKETS An international award-winning speaker, author, and HIV/AIDS educator, Scott Fried believes that people metaphorically tuck away secret words in their pockets. These represent a portrait of the inner self, a collection of fears and intimate feelings. Scott’s essential message was that because many fear rejection, they keep these words—their real identities—suppressed. Scott recounted the history of his life, how in his young twenties he was infected by the HIV virus, and of the many friends who lost their lives to AIDS. His presentation—covering challenging, sensitive topics—was intense, inspiring, and optimistic. He imparted powerful messages including the notion that what sometimes rests beneath a teenager’s silence is an awkward question he or she is too scared to ask. He feels these need to be uncovered, and “our pockets need to be emptied.” Scott’s talk and Suffield’s engaging response to it symbolized how in this community it is okay to ask these questions.

LIEUTENANT COLONEL MIKE COUSINS P’19 AMERICA’S CITIZEN SOLDIERS Suffield honored Veterans Day with a visit from Lieutenant Colonel Mike Cousins P’19 of Westfield, Massachusetts. Representing America’s Citizen Soldiers, Lt. Col. Cousins is one of many men and women who continually put their lives on hold in order to serve our country. He shared first-hand accounts of his service and involvement with Close Air Support during Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003. After presenting a training video of an A-10 aircraft assault in preparation for the Afghan war, Mike addressed Suffield with a talk about leadership. “Teaching the ability to recognize the traits of leadership is an important attribute of the Suffield Academy education, and this is why I sent my son to this school,” he said. The Leadership Program is an important element of a Suffield education aimed at helping students develop skills and habits that will enable them to have a positive impact on the world. Mike Cousins’ talk gave the Suffield community a chance to appreciate the men and women who serve the United States of America.

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Chapel: Finding Balance in Everyday Life

PETER VANLAW FOR THE LIFE OF ME Filmmaker Peter Vanlaw presented parts of his documentary film, For the Life of Me. Following a heart attack and compelled to validate unknown aspects of his family’s heritage, Vanlaw explored his past and dissolved a secret that had been held by his family for over 50 years; Vanlaw discovered that he was Jewish. For the Life of Me is the emotional discovery of Vanlaw’s hidden Jewish heritage, a personal history that reaches people on many levels. The documentary film is the manifest of family photos and reels of 16mm film, a portrait of his mother’s mental illness, a grandparent’s suicide, and the lasting damage caused by the Holocaust. His research encompassed a timeline from California to pre-war Germany, Europe, Asia, and beyond. The work is an intriguing indictment of the pain caused by repressed family secrets. On the topic of anti-Semitism, Vanlaw urged that it is important to unravel and understand history so that it is not relived by ignorance. The talk was funded by proceeds from an endowment fund established in memory of Headmaster Charlie Cahn’s mother (Barbara Cahn) to expose students to issues of genocide around the world.

JAMES CROTTY A LIFE WORTH LIVING Author, writer, and co-founder of Monk: The Mobile Magazine, James Marshall Crotty is an articulate evangelist for liberal arts education. He spoke about themes including “cultural capital” and “creating a life worth living.” A middle child and uninterested in becoming a future leader, a lawyer, or a doctor, Crotty recounted his youthful journeys as a seeker, discovering his own identity through experimentation, meditation, and self-reflection. He advised the student body to tether learning with passion and make individual choices based on deeply rooted questions. “Do not be afraid to take risks and make your own decisions,” he told the community. Speaking to Suffield’s own future leaders, Jim Crotty urged them all to be active participants in life, challenge culture and identity, and make a conscious effort to create a life worth living.

ROBERT SICILIANO THE SERIOUS BUSINESS OF SOCIAL MEDIA Robert Siciliano discussed digital communication and online footprints specifically related to maintaining a positive Object-Relational Mapping (ORM). In this modern era dominated by social media, Siciliano urged the Suffield community to act responsibly. Led by the computer initiative in 1993, Suffield Academy was the first school requiring every student to own a laptop computer. Technology has evolved almost unrecognizably since then and these devices have become as dangerous as they are innovative. Now living in a cyberspace world of online predators, thieves, and hackers, one must act cautiously in order to protect private information and personal boundaries. Describing the scene, Siciliano declared, “Social media is serious business. Beware of its dangers.” Not only referring to hackers, email phishing, or sinister malware, he warned about other consequences tied to an active and poorly represented presence within social media. He mentioned that social media can impact areas like college admissions and employment. His essential point was that everything posted online is public and needs to be handled with care. Personal information must remain private. While technology advances to optimize and sustain the World Wide Web, the appropriateness of its use must also continue to advance within its subculture. Siciliano’s message is clear: whether online or in real life it is most important to respect others, protect yourself, and act responsibility.

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Chapel: Finding Balance in Everyday Life

THE JOSHUA SHOW BE AUTHENTIC

“Be authentic,” proclaimed Joshua Holden with a bright and proud smile. The Joshua Show features multiple styles of puppetry, live music, physical comedy, and tap dancing. In this 50-minute performance, Joshua entertained the audience and put a smile on their faces. “Life is way too short to be judging yourself,” he exclaimed as he pulled Mr. Nicholas, a sock puppet, from his suitcase. Created in 2010, The Joshua Show is a combination of music, puppetry, and art in the form of a hipster Mr. Rogers. The overarching theme centers on finding joy in everyday life, respecting honest feelings, and celebrating our differences. Joshua Holden is a New York City based award-winning international puppeteer and actor whose mission is to simply spread joy as an entertainer and friend. He reminded Suffield that there is value in being yourself, that it is okay to be unique, and that there is merit in being authentic.

Hello, Newman.

NO LABELS PROBLEM SOLVER CONVENTION Over Columbus Day weekend, a group of Suffield students joined more than 1,500 voters from across 37 states in attending the No Labels national Problem Solver Convention in Manchester, New Hampshire. No Labels is a citizen group that looks to spark an open, bi-partisan exchange of ideas across the country. No Labels promotes unification and challenges the 2016 elected president to embrace large goals that included creating 25 million new jobs over the next 10 years, balancing the federal budget by 2030, securing Social Security and Medicare for another 75 years, and making America’s energy secure by 2024. In addition to everyday people, Hollywood celebrities and eight of the 2016 Presidential candidates were in attendance. Conor Keough ’16 shook hands with Donald Trump and secured this photo with Wayne Knight, better known as “Newman” from the television series Seinfeld.

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K Simply Delicious LINDSAY MARTIN ’92 | SMALLBATCH.COM BY PHIL RIEGEL ’87

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K Vermont and granola seem to conjure up the same happy thoughts. Simple, relaxed, honest, easy—true for the state as well as the snack. If we were to choose the perfect place for a granola company, right here, nestled in the beautiful Green Mountains would be it. Small Batch Organics, an ideal snack from an ideal state—of place and mind.

Lindsay Martin ’92

embodies all that I find attractive and welcoming about Vermont. She is warm and inviting, cares about her community, the environment, the sources of her food, cooking, skiing, and of course being outdoors. I can say that traveling to meet her in Peru, Vermont last summer to learn about her burgeoning granola business, Small Batch Organics, was a pretty good day at “work”! To say Lindsay took the road less traveled through high school and college is an understatement. She started her high school career at the heralded ski racing school, Green Mountain Valley School (GMVS) in Waitsfield, Vermont. Lindsay competed in the Junior Olympics and was on track to race at the highest levels when an injury sidelined her and ended her ski-racing for that year. Prior to GMVS, Lindsay lived in the Philippines with her parents. At the time of her injury they were transitioning to Thailand so going “home” to school was not really an option. Lindsay’s father, Paul Martin ‘61, had always thought of Suffield as a second home, and thus Lindsay arrived at Suffield for the start of her sophomore year. Lindsay had a challenging transition to Suffield. She recalls, “My sophomore year was the first year of my life that sports were not my main focus. It was a very sad hurdle for me. I worked on building scenery for plays instead of playing soccer that fall which I found interesting and fulfilling, but as winter approached, the thought of not skiing competitively for the first time was very difficult. I will never forget the support that Rocky gave me and how excited he was to try and coach me back into competitive ski racing, but my spirit was just too shattered. Ultimately Suffield did not work out for me that year, but I did feel a great amount of support and community spirit while I was there. That is why, in my junior year, when my parents learned of another move on the horizon, and I was looking at my sixth new school in five years, returning to Suffield was a perfect option.” Lindsay remained at Suffield through graduation and remembers, “Mr. Hoffacker had a lasting impression on me my senior year. He was determined that I realize my talent in writing. Although I never became an author, he gave me confidence in myself. I received honorable mention at graduation for the English award. Indulging my creative side definitely helped move me down my path to becoming a chef.” Upon graduation, Lindsay went to The University of Southern California but eventually decided that her true passion was cooking and completed her college education at the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, New York. After graduating, Lindsay continued on at the CIA’s Napa California campus to focus directly on Pastry Arts.

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The experience in Napa landed Lindsay a job offer as assistant pastry chef at an acclaimed Philadelphia restaurant. “I was packing my bags and heading to Philadelphia when I received a random call from the head chef at Fidelity Investments, offering me a position as private chef for the Johnson family. It was a really great opportunity with better pay and hours, more creative license. It wasn’t hard to say yes.” After six years as a private chef, Lindsay decided it was time for a change and took her considerable talents to Peru, Vermont where her parents and two sisters had settled. Not one to sit idle, Lindsay has since opened a farm stand in an old sugar shack, a café/bakery, and later a general store. When an unsolicited buyer came in and made Lindsay an offer on the store, she thought it was time to launch Small Batch Organics, as her granola was the one product that loyal customers repeatedly asked for.

Small Batch Organics is an organic, gluten-free granola company located in Manchester, Vermont. We make delicious granola and irresistible granola bark. At Small Batch, we are dedicated to supporting small farms and other artisan food produces and source many of our ingredients directly, creating true ingredient transparency.

Small Batch Organics’ certified organic and gluten-free kitchen was completed last summer and production has started on a line of granola and granola bark. Lindsay is dedicated to sourcing ingredients directly from farms and artisan producers across the country. She comments, “I always got great feedback on our granola and bark. It was appealing to me to start a small local company that supports other small companies and farmers. We are all in this together and share the mindset that it is important to create quality food with complete transparency of ingredient sourcing.” Small Batch Organics granola can now be found in over 40 locations and in HomeGoods stores across the country. If you see it on the shelves, grab several bags! Lindsay gave me some to take home, and I guarantee it is the best granola you will ever have.

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RS

GE I T

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Aki Ohtaka ’16

Trevor Lyne ’16

SOCCER

GIRLS’ A young girls’ varsity soccer team had a successful season highlighted by victories over Deerfield, Hopkins, and Millbrook. Senior captains Emma Tryon, Nina Maggi, and Sarah Raymond were the only seniors on the team and helped guide a team filled with freshmen and sophomore starters. Along with Repka, sophomores Bridget Carey and Lexi Mnich led the midfield. Up front, the Tigers were led by Raymond, Kayla Rosenkranz ’17, Hattie Bauchiero ‘18, Niah Samboy ’19, and leading goal scorer Natalie Castonguay ’19. The defense was anchored by Emma Phillips ’19, Katherine Schmitz ’19, Molly McGrath ’19, and Jen Ungerleider ’18, who were in front of goalkeepers Dana Mills ’18 and Alayna Miller ’17. Maggi, Tori Repka ’18, and Kate Rookey ’18 contributed in numerous positions. Seventeen returners will build on the strong finish in 2016.

Tori Repka ’18 Lexi Mnich ’18 Jenn Ungerleider ’18

Led by a strong 10-member senior class, Suffield returned to the New England tournament in 2015 and finished with a 10-6-4 record. Highlights included a quarterfinal tournament win at St. Mark’s and exciting regular season victories over Deerfield, Westminster, Wilbraham, Williston, and Canterbury. Captained by seniors Trevor Lyne, Oyikwan Asante, and Aki Ohtaka as well as junior Alex Clarke, Suffield showed skill and talent throughout the season. Many of the players were four-year members of the program and their cohesion was obvious as they navigated their challenging schedule. The team will miss the seniors, from forwards Inigo Ugarte, Oyikwan Asante, Femi Adetola, Cole Rogalin, and Save Boonsong to midfielders Aki Ohtaka and Joe Islam and backs Kyle Barrett, Trevor Lyne, and Jake Mnich. A strong group of 11 returning varsity players will help the Tigers build on this season’s success in 2016.

Oyikwan Asante ’16

BOYS’

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FOOTBALL

Fourteen members of the Class of 2016 led Suffield’s football team to a 7-2 record and eighth straight New England Championship Bowl game appearance. Regular season victories were notched over Deerfield, Worcester, Cushing, Exeter, Andover, Taft, and Loomis. The only defeats came in the regular season against Choate and in the Wayne Sanborn Bowl against ISL Champion Lawrence Academy. Captains Tahj Herring, JJ Kang, Hunter Newman, Sean Pahls, and Jimmy Turner helped lead the way for the Tigers along with the other nine members of the Class of 2016: Keith Coleman, Mac Dickerson, Tiquan Ewell, Brad Klimczyk, Marquez Jackson, Nick Pelligrini, Kyle Reddish, Justice Seales, and Colin Thorne. Zach Mooney ‘17, Matt de Haan ‘17, LJ Luba ‘17, Nick Mayo ‘17, Justin Levsky ‘18, Ben Bonavita ‘18, Elijah Hutchinson ‘18, Tim Bell ‘19, and Peter Gulbin ‘19 also played important roles in the team’s success. From left to right: Top Tahj Herring ’16, Hunter Newman ’16, Tahj Herring ’16, Jimmy Turner ‘16, Elijah Hutchinson ’18. Bottom Nick Pellegrini ’16, Marques Jackson ’16, Mac Dickerson ‘16, Keith Coleman ’16.

VOLLEYBALL

Suffield had a 14-3 season record and earned the top seed in New England Class B tournament this season. Captains Katie Kuzmeski and Lauren Bonk were part of a five-member senior class, joined by Claire Diao, Ally DiMauro, and Emma Landis. Juniors Ryder Mosby, Isabelle Ricke, Anna Wilson, and Riley Miles also played key roles, along with sophomores Susannah Johnson and Sara Swanson, and freshman Paityn Bergstol. The team raced to a 12-0 record highlighted by multiple victories over Worcester, Wilbraham, and Kingswood, and other wins against Berkshire, Pomfret, Williston, Ethel Walker, Canterbury, and Marianapolis. In the New England tournament Suffield dropped a five-set match to Middlesex. The future is very bright for the Tigers as eight varsity players will return next season. Top left Ryder Mosbey ’17, Lauren Bonk ’16 Top right Katie Kuzmeski ’16, Susannah Johnson ’18, Isabelle Ricke ’17 Bottom Katie Kuzmeski ’16, Susannah Johnson ’18, Isabelle Ricke ’17, Lauren Bonk ’16 50 SUFFIELD


Bailey Hyland ’18

Maura Eagan ’16

FIELD HOCKEY

Five seniors helped lead this year’s varsity field hockey team in a season highlighted by several early victories and a 4-1 win over Kingswood in the concluding game under the lights at Suffield. The seniors—Katie Burns, Maura Eagan, Melissa Malley, Kaitlyn Nigro, and Angela Vecchiarelli—all served as captains and showed persistence and leadership in helping guide the team. Several players who played major roles this season will return in 2016, including Isabella Boonstra ’18, Becca Collins ’17, Alexis Corcoran ’17, Cari Cyr ’17, Caroline Gingold ’18, Georgia Hannock ’19, Lauren Henzy ’17, Bailey Hyland ’18, Katherine Kalill ’17, Kate Killam ’19, Lane Repka ’17, and India Shay ’18. Bailey Hyland and Kaitlyn Nigro played in the season-ending WNEPSAA all-star game.

Cameron Auchinachie ’17

Brendan Liao ’17

WATER POLO

Boys’ Water Polo had a 17-4 record and earned second place in the New England championships. The Tigers defeated Loomis in the semis before falling to Brunswick in the finals. Team captains were Quinn Egan ’16, Ralph Koo ’16, Cameron Auchinachie ’17, and Brandon Liao ’17. Egan and Koo earned all-tournament honors at New Englands. Other varsity players included Jonah Perry ’17, Cian Beaulieu ’18, Niklas Hess ’16, Sasha Derby ’18, Harry Hildreth ’17, Evgenli Kagan ’18, Melvin Ku ’18, Andrew Robataille ’17, and goalies John Kuzmeski ’17 and Henry Albright ’16. The Tigers rolled through the regular season with victories over schools including Choate, Brunswick, Hotchkiss, Exeter, Deerfield, and Hopkins. Brunswick and Suffield led league play all season and it was fitting that the tournament ended with these teams vying for the championship. Fall | Winter 2015-16 51


Izzy Dutranoit ’19 Casey Kaplan ’17

CROSS COUNTRY

BOYS’

Led by senior captains Kiersten Ness , Adriana Caceres Ruiz, and Caroline Ricke, the girls’ cross country team had an undefeated regular season and finished second in the New England championships. Izzy Dutranoit ’19, Kiersten Ness, and Casey Kaplan ’17 earned All-New England honors. Other consistent varsity runners included Amelia Hern ’17, Caroline Ricke, Becca Bauer ’19, and Adriana Caceres Ruiz. Season highlights were a first place finish in the Gordy Glover Invitational, a third place finish at the Shaler Invitational, and dual meet victories over Taft, Miss Porter’s, Williston, and Berkshire. While the Tigers will miss seniors Ness, Caceres Ruiz, Ricke, Julianna Lamm, and Elena Gullo next season, the returning roster includes several talented runners and the future is bright for the team.

Daniel Krasemann ’19 Ben Godin ’17

GIRLS’

Captained by Daniel Bennett ’16, Kevin Doten ’16, and Peter Kelley ’17, the boys’ cross country team finished 10th at the New England championships. The top runners were Daniel Krasemann ’19 (who finished 10th) and Ben Godin ’17 (12th). Both qualified to race in the NEPSTA All-Stars meet and earned All-New England honors. Other consistent varsity performers were Mike Robidoux ’18, Shane Donahue ’19, Jonathan Walker ’19, Milo Marcus ’18, Daniel Mittelman ’18, and Will Moryto ’16. The season was highlighted by a second place finish at the Gordy Glover Invitation at Suffield, a fifth place finish at the Shaler Invitational at Williston, and dual meet victories over Berkshire, Millbrook, and Salisbury. Other seniors on this year’s team were Alex Flug, Colin Pittorie, and Max Teitelman. The Tigers return many runners in 2016 and look to build on 2015 momentum.


by Betsy McComb P’04, ’06

Class Agent

RUSS HEARN ’01

As Suffield continues to evolve, all alumni benefit. I hope they are as proud as I am to be a Suffield alumnus.”

RUSS AND HIS TWIN BROTHER GREG ARE CLASS AGENTS AND GRADUATES OF THE CLASS OF 2001. THEY LEARNED OF SUFFIELD THROUGH THEIR COUSINS WHO ATTENDED THE ACADEMY: TODD AUGUST ’78, CAROLYN TRIBBLE HUDKINS ’94, AND CHRISTINE TRIBBLE MCCREA ’96. “In 1997, my parents realized that my brother Greg and I had a good experience coming from public school into Watkinson School in Hartford for grades 6-8, but they knew a larger school with a more comprehensive program would be a better fit for us. While the focus on athletics made me a bit skeptical, the overall mission of Suffield and the structure of its program, which is much the same today as it was when we were there, turned out for the best. Suffield allowed me to grow my interest in computers and technology while working on my other academic subjects.” As a day student, Russ remembers, and still has difficulty explaining to others, exactly how immersive his experience at Suffield was in all ways. “Despite the fact that I never lived on campus, I was fully involved in the community from morning until evening six days a week. The ability to participate in academics, cross country, track and field, The Bell, and student council kept me quite busy. I also remember when the campus transitioned from a data network, involving many jury-rigged wires, to being the first campus where students could test a laptop with Wi-fi on Bell Hill in 2001.” When asked which faculty members influenced him the most, Russ recalls, “I learned a lot from Dean Ellerton who served as my advisor and taught me all of the basics of networking as he built Suffield’s technology infrastructure. I still use these basics day to day and it is what ultimately led me to my career.” Russ ran cross-country and track all four years at Suffield. “While I was never one of the top runners on the teams, with Coach Laura Amble’s encouragement I always made progress and we kept getting better each year, culminating in a winning season my senior year.” Russ really enjoyed working with technology but claims that he did not excel at math and science, yet says he always appreciated Hat Thomsen’s humor and teaching style. Russ is a very humble person, and just for the record, he received the Computer Science Award and the Class of 1947 Extra Class

Achievement Prize at graduation. “Suffield’s structure has always helped remind me there is more to life than technology. It is still vital to be a good citizen of the communities in which we live and work and to always make time for physical fitness. As a problem solver, I have had some of my greatest revelations while at the gym or on a run.” In 2005, Russ received his bachelor of science in information technology from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, New York. “I entered college right before the dot com bust. It was a rough time to see the industry in perils, but after having taken computer science at Suffield, I realized that I was not cut out to write code full-time which helped me select a school with an information technology program. After graduating from RPI, I moved to Silicon Valley to work for Cisco where I began to focus on supporting information security technologies.” Now as a security solutions architect at Cisco Advanced Services, Russ leads teams of engineers on large network security identity deployments for Fortune 500 organizations and assists with business development, training, and mentoring. Russ resides in Dallas, Texas, but is rarely there as he travels for work over 100,000 miles per year. He has been a Class Agent for nine years and also serves on the Alumni Council of Advisors. “I continue to volunteer as a Class Agent to do whatever I possibly can for the school. I enjoy getting to correspond with and sometimes even visit many of my classmates through my travels for work. I get back to campus twice a year for the Council meetings and love to share photos and details of what’s new with fellow alumni I see along the way.” “While so much has changed physically on campus, the school has the same program and mission it did when I was there. As Suffield continues to evolve, all alumni benefit. I hope they are as proud as I am to be a Suffield alumnus.”

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Spring Awakening

Fall 2015 Musical

From December 10 to 12, Suffield’s stage raised its curtain to a performance of Spring Awakening. The winner of eight Tony Awards including Best Musical, Spring Awakening celebrates the unforgettable journey from youth to adulthood with a power, poignancy, and passion that you will never forget. Adapted from Frank Wedekind’s 1891 expressionist play about the trials, tears, and exhilaration of the teen years, Spring Awakening takes its inspiration from one of literature’s most controversial masterpieces and fuses it with contemporary rock music. Spring Awakening has book and lyrics by Steven Sater and music by Duncan Sheik. Suffield’s Performing Arts Chair Tom Dugan directed the 26-member cast, with vocal direction by Chelsea Kane ‘09, musical direction by Tom Gotwals, choreography by Matt Wiggin ‘06, and lighting design by Simon Park ‘16. The Janice Seaverns Performing Arts Center holds up to 200 people and the show was sold out on all three nights of its performance. Tom Dugan remarked on the success of the show and its impact on campus, “I am proud that the Suffield students, faculty, parents, and students embraced this challenging and thought-provoking piece of musical theater. The company treated it with dignity. We hoped to acknowledge some of the challenges teenagers face and emphasize they are not alone in their journey through adolescence. Producing Spring Awakening at Suffield reflects the school’s values of openness, acceptance, communication, and the importance of family and education. Acknowledging that the plot and thematic elements exist in the lives of teenagers made Spring Awakening intriguing to the entire community.”

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01 Spring Awakening cast and crew 02 Arianna Saxton ‘18, Abigail Mulhearn ‘17, Ashley Sarris ‘17, Amelia Hern ‘17, Mia White ‘18, Katherine Kalill ‘17, Sarah Longhi ‘19, Samantha Warren ‘18, Isabella Attianese ‘18 03 Alex Flug ‘16 04 Ben Toczydlowski ‘17, Sarah Longhi ‘19, Arianna Saxton ‘18, Miles Johnson ‘16, Chris Donohue ‘17, Katherine Kalill ‘17, David Gingold ‘16, Jack Samenuk ‘18, Dominic Colangelo ‘19, Ashley Sarris ‘17, Mia White ‘18, Graham Shannon ‘17 05 Riley Miles ‘17 06 David Gingold ‘16, Chris Donohue ‘17, Miles Johnson ‘16. Fall | Winter 2015-16 55


Performing Arts Showcase

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01 top row: Miles Johnson ‘16, Graham Shannon ‘17, Ben Toczydlowski ‘17, Rob Johnson ‘17, Nick Mayo ‘17, Marquez Jackson ‘16, Michael Robidoux ‘18, William Robidoux ’16, Bailey Hyland ‘18, Yasmin Geradeau ‘16, Isabel Munoz-Sune ‘18; bottom row: Riley Miles ‘17, Catty Seiler ‘16, Leticia Sadilina ‘18, Jenna Polidoro ‘18, Mia White ‘18, Bella De Simone ‘16, Gabi De Simone ‘19, Katherine Kalill ‘17, Emma Sephton ‘18, Millie Geo ‘19 02 Charlie Park ‘19, Amelia Hern ‘17, Kaitlyn Nigro ‘16, John Caezza ‘19 03 Sam Cuda ‘18 04 John Killam ‘18, Pat Cordes ‘18, Kevin Kuzmeski ‘18 05 Joe Islam ‘16, Jim Krueger ‘16 06 Michael Sattan ‘19, Joe Islam ‘16 07 Eliza Gregory ‘19, Samantha Warren ‘18 08 Jim Krueger ‘16, Thomas Killam ‘19 56 SUFFIELD


ENTER

FOR A CHANCE TO WIN 2016 AUDI A3 CABRIOLET

THE SUFFIELD ACADEMY PARENTS’ ASSOCIATION RAFFLE 2016 AUDI A3 CABRIOLET Number of tickets

@ $100 each $

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Name (print) ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone  (state regulations require one name only)

Address  City _________________________________________________________________ State ________________________________________ Zip 

PCheck (payable to Suffield Academy) PCharge my PVISA PMC PAMEX PDISCOVER Name on card (print) _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Card # __________________________________________________________________________________________________CVV Code  Billing Address ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Expiration Date  Signature _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Email:  Please mail ticket request to Auction Committee Suffield Academy, 185 North Main Street Suffield, Connecticut 06078 For all raffle inquiries or to order tickets by phone please call Penn Sullivan at 860.386.4465 or email psullivan@suffieldacademy.org CAR NOT REDEEMABLE FOR CASH Tickets cost $100 each. Drawing to be held on Friday, April 22, 2016, at 9:00 p.m. at Suffield Academy. Winner need not be present. Tickets are limited to 1,000 and will be sold on a first come, first served basis. All ticket monies received after the 1,000th will be returned to purchaser. All federal, state, and local taxes, fees, and surcharges are the responsibility of the winner and must be paid before winner takes receipt of the car. Winner is responsible for vehicle transfer and registration. Fall | Winter 2015-16 57


L E G A C Y Profile BY JONATHAN MEDWID ’96

T O B Y E C O O K S E C K ’ 8 8 and M I L E S J O H N S O N ’ 1 6

T

OBYE COOK SECK GRADUATED FROM SUFFIELD ACADEMY IN 1988. ONE OF HER THREE SONS, MILES JOHNSON, WILL GRADUATE IN MAY WITH THE CLASS OF 2016. TOBYE IS ONE OF SIX SIBLINGS, AND FOUR OF THEM ARE GRADUATES OF SUFFIELD. HER TWO BROTHERS (JAY ’78 AND JOHN ’82) AND ONE OF HER SISTERS (DEANNA ’83) ATTENDED

SUFFIELD BEFORE HER. APPOINTED IN 2010, TOBYE IS THE ART AND DESIGN DIRECTOR FOR SUFFIELD’S MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT WHILE MILES CURRENTLY HOLDS FOUR LEADERSHIP POSITIONS: SENIOR CLASS VICE PRESIDENT, MULTICULTURAL ASSOCIATION LEADER, PERFORMING ARTS CENTER MANAGER, AND HEAD WAITER. THEY

BOTH CHERISH THEIR TIME AT SUFFIELD AND ARE PROUD TO BE FEATURED IN THIS LEGACY PROFILE.

58 SUFFIELD


me a lot of guidance and encouraged me to embody leadership. I learned to accept all that Suffield has to offer and get the most out of the experience, try new things, and learn more about myself.”

Cook kids as Suffield students: Jay ’78, John ’82, Deanna ’83, and Tobye ’88

“As the youngest in my family, my siblings were my heroes,” Tobye said. “They loved Suffield, and I naturally wanted to follow in their footsteps. I was accepted to both Hotchkiss and Pomfret but felt at home at Suffield.” Socially and academically, Tobye recognizes that Suffield had a big impact on her life. She entered as a junior and found that making friendships happened quickly and effortlessly. “I met amazing and memorable people in those two years during the most impressionable time of my life,” she said. “To name a few, I remember laughing fits in the dining hall with Lee Baldwin ’88, singing on the steps of Brewster with Robin Miller ’88, long talks with my very sweet roommate Jennifer Rowe ’88, and blasting Bob Marley with Alex Steinman ’87 and Blake Schulman ’87.” Academically, Tobye admits to being challenged, but she quickly figured out that her teachers were more accessible than she imagined and provided her the help she needed to succeed. As a student at Suffield, Tobye was passionate about writing and spent a lot of time working with faculty member Ned Ide ’80. She describes herself as being very shy and reserved and also really enjoyed long-time teacher Gordy Glover’s English classes. Excelling as a student, Tobye later studied studio arts and art history at Humboldt State University in California. She says that returning to Suffield as part of the faculty has been a deeply positive experience. “Stephanie Greco ’88 was the marketing and communications director when I was hired and she really helped me refine my skills,” Tobye said. “She was a strong leader and got the best out of me. This is the most creative job I have ever had, and I really enjoy working with the students. I have also loved working with Hillary Rockwell Cahn ’88, P’18. Over the years, our relationship has grown professionally and in profound ways. Her mindfulness greatly balances my creative process.” While his mother’s favorite place on campus was the photo lab, which used to be located on the ground floor of Holcomb Hall, Miles’ favorite place is Tisch Field House, where he thrives on school spirit. Entering as a sophomore, Miles primarily chose Suffield because of the great experience his mother had, but also because he wanted to be challenged. At Suffield, academic work is difficult and classes are rigorous. On top of that, a typical Suffield student competes in three sports; one in each season. “The overall structure of the school asks a lot of its students,” Miles said, “but if you’re not pushing yourself what are you doing?” Sean Atkins is Miles’ advisor and they have known each other for over five years. They have a close relationship and Miles respects Sean as a mentor. Miles explained, “Mr. Atkins has given

The Suffield community is a diverse culture and provides opportunity for personal exploration and growth. As one of the leaders of the multicultural association, Miles admits that he never before took the time to fully embrace his ethnic heritage and background, and that Suffield influenced him to explore his family history. A mix of several different nationalities, Miles promotes the importance of knowing who you are and where you come from. “Defining yourself,” he said, “can be very difficult and frustrating. Searching to find your core values helps, but it can too often only be the beginning of self-discovery. The wide range of diversity at Suffield inspired me to recognize that.”

THE OVERALL STRUCTURE OF THE SCHOOL ASKS A LOT OF STUDENTS... BUT IF YOU’RE NOT PUSHING YOURSELF WHAT ARE YOU DOING? Next year Miles will attend Johnson & Wales University in Providence, Rhode Island, and plans to double major in culinary arts and business. Like his mother, he is passionate and engaged in following his interests. The positive experience working in the kitchen at Suffield has been another example of self-discovery. He has grown to appreciate the camaraderie forged in the kitchen, just as he has on the athletic fields and in the classroom. When asked about his favorite school memories Miles replied, “All of the relationships that I’ve made here—the community aspect of Suffield is such that all the students and teachers grow on you. I will truly miss all my friends and teachers.” Tobye says she is very proud of her son and it has been a rewarding experience to see him grow over the past three years. “Being part of this small, hard-working, and fun community has made our relationship stronger. Although I am so excited for him to move on to college, I am really going to miss seeing him on campus every day after he graduates. I feel honored to share the Suffield experience with him.”


Make Every Day an Extraordinary Opportunity

SUFFIELDACADEMY.ORG/DONATE YOUR 2016

ANNUAL FUND DONATION

IMMEDIATELY SUPPORTS

SUFFIELD’S HIGHEST

PRIORITIES:

> FINANCIAL AID > ACADEMICS > ATHLETICS > VISUAL ARTS

> PERFORMING ARTS

> FACULTY DEVELOPMENT > STUDENT LIFE > BUILDINGS & GROUNDS Please make your donation before June 30, 2016


A L U MN I R E CE PTIONS Members of Suffield’s extended community gathered with prospective families at recent events in New York, Bermuda, Shanghai, Beijing, and Seoul. The receptions symbolized the extensive interest in Suffield and loyal support of alumni and parents. More than 1,000 students applied last year and even more are applying in 2016 as part the largest-ever applicant pool. The charitable support from alumni and parents has led to major investment in the school, enhancing the experience of Suffield’s students and faculty. Forty-two percent of alumni and nearly 90% of parents joined the entire faculty in supporting the 2015 Annual Fund. The reception and dinner in Seoul were hosted by Ms. Seong Yeon Won and Mr. Sang Yeon Kim P’16, presidents of this year’s Korean Parents’ Association. Board President Fred Powers ‘83 and his wife Lauren P’14 hosted the Manhattan event at the New York Athletic Club. In addition to the receptions in China Headmaster Charles Cahn III spoke with several groups about American boarding schools and Suffield, including an interview on China Central Television (CCTV). The Bermuda event was hosted by Nick and Karen Warren P’19.

NEW YO RK CI TY

01

02

03

04

ASIA

BERMUDA

01

02 {All photo id’s read from left to right} NEW YORK CITY 01 Matt Fine ‘95, Michael Tisch ‘02, Renna Brown-Taher, Dan Tisch ‘69, P’02. 02 Brinley Ford Ehlers ‘86 with Ann and George Samenuk P’09, ‘18. 03 front row Charles Ferguson ‘09, Ginny McDermott ‘10, Michelle Autuori ‘10, Kyle Vigneault ‘09, Alex Olsen ‘09; back row Rip Furniss ‘08, Tim Bautz ‘09, Jeff Papai ‘09, Adam Pistel ‘08, Matt Werblin ‘08, Khadim Diouf ‘07, Scott Furlaud ‘07, Sam Stone ‘09. 04 Lorenzo Bernardez ’11, Sean Atkins. BERMUDA front row Teresa Misurale P‘17, Nick Lines ‘08, Mickey Johnson P‘88, Donna-Mae Fletcher P‘09, ‘15, Karen Warren P‘18; second row Sallie Singleton P‘99, Amy Samenuk ‘09, Conor Morrison ‘08, Derek Singleton P‘99, Barbara Johnson P‘88, Annette Bosch Budge ‘86, P‘19; third row Phil Riegel ’87, Buddy Rego P‘07, John Young ‘89, Judy Shrubb P‘07, Ann Durhager P‘17, ‘18, Jodi Daly P‘18, Jenny West P‘07, Alison Morrison P‘08, ‘12, Mary Faulkenberry P‘04, Rees Fletcher P‘09, ‘15; back row Mark Wilcox P‘19, John Singleton ‘99, Matt Shrubb ‘07, Jenny Rego P‘07, Ben Rego ‘07, Brent Slade P‘19, Nicola Slade P‘19, Roger Marshall P‘15, ‘19, Matthew Smith. ASIA 01 Headmaster Charlie Cahn with James Park ‘11, Chris Bae ‘07, Hyun Jin Park ‘09, and YK Kim ‘09. 02 Suffield parents and students with Headmaster Charlie Cahn at the Novotel Ambassador Hotel in Seoul.

Fall | Winter 2015-16 61


Thank You Alumni Class Agents

62 SUFFIELD


2015

Nick Alfano Sarah Apkin Mike Barit Hannah Bellorado Abby Blyler Olivia Caligiuri Rhi Fletcher Brad Gibson Andy Guo Owen Hern Pierson Holliday Gray Johnson Jahi Locke Emily Lowe Marysa Massoia Kim Meunier Endy Morales Sarah Pickup Kelly Taylor Ingunn Ukvitne Ali Veitch Christian Wilkins

2014

Kevin Cournoyer Julie Doten Sam Feldman Charlotte Hinrichs Shivang Jhunjhnuwala Briana Matthews Brice McAllister Zach McCormick Jono Nelson Alexis Sarris Denny Smythe Izzy Thompson

2013

Georgina Blakeley Andrés Fernández Vílchez Jay Fields Jamie Johnson Wynn Mason Chris McCormick Paul Metscher Noel Nakamura Jay O’Brien Jay Prasad Emilio Rocha Mike Simmons

2012

Reed Barbe Katherine Battle Colin E Dowd William Evangelakos Jameson Everett Josh Galant David Huang Taylor Jett Connor Kaplan Caroline Leonard Izzy McDonald Alex Porter Carly Smith

2011

Joe Begley Serge Derby Kachenta Descartes Colin E Dowd Karoline Hegbom Didi McDonald Shamier Settle Lester Taylor

2010

Michelle Autuori Justine de Chazal Mariah Hayes Tom Leonard Alyssa Palomba Lucas Traber

2009

Tom Casey Rosemary Chandler Liz Monty Amy Samenuk Sam Stone Kyle Vigneault

2008

Becca Bathrick Kirsten Chalke Thomas Drummond-Hay Joel Glassman Rebecca Joslow Barbara Kaplan Kaela Keyes Isy Zellweger

2007

Mike DiPietro Sydney Greenberg Katy Heydinger Doar Matt Jones Harry Melendez Catherine Mis Erik Osborne Meredith Rarus Sarah Thomsen Rob Zammito

2006

Kim Autuori Alison Leonard Eric Litmer Luke McComb Gina Petrone Chris Stafford

2005

Rick Devlin Dan Fisher Steph Shaker Casey Shanley Kegelman

2004

Kate Braden Mounkhall Jake McComb Alex Naboicheck Anthony Rousseau Andrew Scully William Taylor

2003

Lindsey Pell Lydia Pillsbury Lindsay Rousseau Eric Yale

2002

Sari Biddelman Alison Carey Hilary Golas Rouse Lynx LaCroix Erin Orr Ligay

2001

Paige Diamond Kate Dineen Greg Hearn Russ Hearn Ashton Jones

2000

Michael Coleman Carmine Petrone Andrea Rich Rabatic Manny Simons Meagan Ward Jenkins

1999

Steven Darling Maura Deedy Larry Griffin Mark Soticheck Patrick Stone

1998

Mickey Allen Sarah Fletcher Meaney Sarah Hotchkiss

1997

Amy Blake Cook Lewis Dunn Brian Hetzel Danielle Therriault

1996

Tabitha Bliven Heidorn Ryan Dowd Fatimah Guienze

1986

Sean Federowicz Brinley Ford Ehlers Kristin Hostetter Pandit Niko Mosko

1985

Andy Glover Michelle Hashioka Lord Chuck McGavern Jack Way

1984

Shelley Frazier Pelletier Hossein Pourmand Scott Owsiany

1983

John Boozang Marybeth DiBuono-Riley Mike Sabellico

1982

David Carangelo Elaine Coombs Holmes Margaret Figueroa Hern Madeline Phillips

1971

Pierre Genvert Leo Letendre Doug Rebert

1970

Kit Warner Chris Weeden

1969

Greg Putnam

1968

Tyler Bumsted Tom Christian

1967

Chris Harlambakis

1966

Charlie Claggett Bruce Fletcher Chris Frost

1965

Tim Hemingway Bill Kelly

1981

1964

Leigh Murphy Bryson Tillinghast

Susan Goodwin Fera Valisha Graves Chris Kennedy Alison Welch

1994

1980

1963

1995

Eric Feijo Alison Kennedy Auciello Scott Sartwell

1993

Alexa Economou Rice Pam Eisen Lauren Roginski-Strelec Marla Zide

1992

Marigrace Canter Morris Ntsekhe Moiloa Wadiya Peterson Wynn

1991

Kim Ames Ide Pat Kennedy Julie Paganelli Bodnar

1990

Kelli Chamberlain Tosone Steve Canter Tom Hamilton Amy Newman Vaughn Courtney Wilson Nixon Bob Yap

1989

Tom Burton Michelle Motta Stewart Jed Nosal Aimee Scherer Hodgkins Rose Yap Thomas

1988

Jim Hagan Mary Carroll Graham Lewis Joe Palomba

1979

Matt Cartmell Ruth Kennedy Renee McDaniel Margolis Lisa Palomba Deni Bob Stanley

1978

Lisa Longo Ed Palomba

1977

Charlie Alfano Bob Clark Ed Kaplan

1976

Ralph Adler Scott Craig

1975

Carey Fiertz Jim Plante Fred Stevens Mark Teed

1974

Blair Childs Bud Hancock Tom Leonard

Kate Cleary Patrick Dorsey Jack Warren Jenn Yamzon Jordan

1973

1987

Chip Spear John Therriault

Betsy Coughlin Tod Jeff Martini Phil Riegel

Jody Cranmore Jim Knight

1972

Jon Booth Ned Smith Nat Stevens Tom Webster Sandy Prouty

1962

Paul Connor Andy Spector

1961

Jerry Kargman Mike Menzies

1960

David Holmes

1959

Paul Grimmeisen

1958

Mike Sheridan

1957

Ralph Jennings

1956

Peter Olin John Taylor

1955

Al Gesler Bob King

1952

Gary Miller

1951

Sam Marks

1950

Lee Miller

1949

Bob Harrison

1948

Gene Spaziani

Fall | Winter 2015-16 63


Alums in the News Casey Hill ’03 On April 26, in just his second year as head coach of the Santa Cruz Warriors, Casey Hill ’03 won the 2015 NBA D-League title, finishing the season with a league-leading 41-16 record. In 2007, Casey graduated as the third child in his family to play basketball at Trinity University in San Antonio. In 2010, he joined his father in coaching the Japan League’s Tokyo Apache. He was then hired by the NBA D-League’s Dakota Wizards as an assistant in 2011. At age 32, Casey looks forward to a bright career in the “family” business.

To d d Gat es ’88 Todd Gates ’88 MCore FTS is one of three new resistance training programs featured on Sweat Inc., a new series hosted by Jillian Michaels on Spike TV. Todd is a certified strength and conditioning coach with over eight years of experience working at the collegiate level. Founded in the spring of 2006, MCore FTS offers a fully adjustable weight bench that targets core strength, making the standard weight bench a thing of the past.

Deanna Cook ’83 With two books listed in the 2015 Parents’ Choice Awards, Deanna Cook ’83 celebrates her bright career as a children’s book author. Cooking Class, which sold out on Amazon on Black Friday, is a colorful, eye-catching cookbook packed with fun and tasty recipes that, with some supervision, even young children can prepare. Let’s Make & Play Teddy Bear Doctor is a compilation of craft and play activities that will turn any child into an expert stuffed-animal veterinarian. Deanna is the content director at Kidstir.com and specializes in writing children’s non-fiction books (see all her books at DeannaFCook.com).

64 SUFFIELD


Class Notes


01

01 The Aflanos: Charlie Jr. ’77, Charlie Sr. ’39 and Nick ’15, three generations of Suffield graduates 02 Henry Bahre ’49 receiving “Service to the Chamber and Stars in Town 2015 Milestone Membership Award” for 25+ years of service

02

03 Thomas West ’61 with Representative Lamar Smith after September hearing concerning dyslexia research within the National Science Foundation STEM program 04 Jack Jobes ’57 and Peter Olin ’56 at Jack’s home in California

03

04

1948

1949

GENE SPAZIANI

HENRY BAHRE

Gene Spaziani

The class of 1948 lost one of its members on August 27, when James E. Murphy passed away. Murphy was a postgraduate out of Branford High School and was a terrific basketball player, a big 6’5” center on our championship New England Prep School Team in 1948. Jim started at UCONN but went into the service during the Korean War and eventually graduated from Southern Connecticut State University. He lived in Meriden for the past 61 years. His classmates will remember him as the “Gentle Giant.” I remember him as a great teammate on that championship basketball team of 1948 coached by the legendary Stan Ward who eventually coached Brown University for many years.

66 SUFFIELD Class Notes

Bob Harrison

It has been a busy year for me with two grandchildren married and one new great granddaughter. Also, the Canton Chamber of Commerce “Service to Chamber Award” was renamed as the “Henry Bahre Award,” honoring me as I am one of the chamber’s founding fathers.

PAUL SILVERSMITH

We just moved back to Bloomfield, Connecticut. I have been retired almost 26 years from the Connecticut Department of Transportation. I worked a couple of part-time jobs for about 16 years then called it quits for good. My wife and I are enjoying retirement and are looking forward to two of our

grandchildren getting married in September. These will be numbers three and four with two more to go. Sixty-six years is a long time since we graduated; however, I would love to hear from any classmates.

1950 Lee Miller

JOE ADORNO

I am still working as a CPA in tax and accounting and have been for 50 years. We have four children, nine grandchildren, and our 58th anniversary was June 29th.

DAVE MEEHL

I am still living in Middletown and married to my wife Marcia for 59 years this past September. We have a son, Dave Jr, and four grandchildren. I retired from the Connecticut


Valley Hospital as the plant and facilities engineer in 1987. I continue to enjoy our Rhode Island cottage, fishing, outdoor life, Yankee baseball, and spending time with our son and grandchildren. I lost my brother, Jack ’47, two years ago. We did lots of things together and enjoyed reminiscing about fun times at Suffield. They were all enjoyable.

1951 Sam Marks

DAVE BAKER

The greatest school year that I had, I had at Suffield. I am a strong Kansas Jayhawks fan now. I love living in Lawrence, Kansas. I’ll be 82 years old in December, still upright, and I’m reading the Suffield community text, The Boys in the Boat.

1953 JACK HENRY JR.

My wife Sonja passed on March 18, 2015. We were married for 55 years.

1955

Al Gesler | Bob King

WALT HOESEL

Hello, fellow classmates of 1954 and 1955. It has been good to hear from some of you, namely John Ferguson ’56. For our 54th anniversary, I gave my wife a bracelet. Inscribed inside was “I loved you then, I love you now, I will love you forever.” That’s pretty much how I feel about Suffield! Plus, I am in awe at the continued growth at the school. Go TIGERS!

ROGER VARNUM

Sandy and I are enjoying retirement at what she calls Camp AARP in southwest Florida. It’s hard to believe that it’s been 10 years since I stopped making Vibram soles in Massachusetts. I’m one year away from wrapping up the sale of the company, which is the last man standing. I’m proud to say we’re successful, making soles for the best shoe manufacturers, and we make all the soles for our military. The company will celebrate 100 years in business in 2016. I have four daughters, six grandchildren and one great grandchild. Sandy has one daughter whom I consider my fifth daughter, and in October we walked her down the aisle in Bloomington, Indiana. All best wishes to the Class of 1955.

1956

Peter Olin | John Taylor

RON CORMIER

It’s been a difficult year healthwise; three heart attacks with stints, a broken pelvis, then collarbone. Finally, an operation called the

“Triple A.” We are in the clear now, and I hope to visit soon.

JOHN TAYLOR

Life catches up with some operations to replace all parts. My wife retired from the Brown University athletic department as a senior woman administrator after 46 years. Both of us are involved with grandchildren, with little league, and music lessons.

1957

Ralph Jennings

JACK LOCKE

I continue to work part-time as a commercial real estate appraiser because I haven’t figured out anything better.

1958 Mike Sheridan

NEIL JOHANSON

We will soon leave our Maine coast home for the warmth of Fort Lauderdale. Getting old is hell—much slower and more pain. Greetings to all!

1960 David Holmes

JACK ROBINSON

The following press release about Jack Robinson ’60 came out on September 8, 2015: Trillium Asset Management (Trillium) is pleased to announce that Jack Robinson has joined the firm as vice chair and portfolio manager. Mr. Robinson has over three decades of experience working in the field of sustainable and responsible investing (SRI), most recently at Brown Advisory. “I have known Jack Robinson for over two decades. When we worked together at Winslow Management, I learned that his long-standing commitment to SRI is built on a foundation in fundamental research, quantitative techniques, and a deep understanding of climate solutions,” said Matthew W. Patsky, Trillium’s CEO. “Jack’s experience is the perfect complement to our existing team.” In 1983, Robinson founded Winslow Management with the mission of providing green investment services to individual and institutional clients. Winslow began to focus exclusively on green investing in 1991. Under his leadership, the firm developed a unique growth investing style and became widely recognized as a leader in the green investing field. In March 2009, Winslow merged with Brown Advisory, where Robinson served as partner, portfolio manager, and head of sustainability strategies before joining Trillium. “Trillium’s first-rate investment performance, combined with its reputation for moving companies toward more sustainable

business practices—along with the opportunity to work with Matt Patsky again—made this an easy decision for me,” said Mr. Robinson. “As interest in SRI and fossil fuel free investing grows, Trillium is in an enviable position of being a pioneer in the industry. I am excited to have the opportunity to use my experience in sustainable investing to contribute to the firm’s continued growth.” Mr. Robinson serves on the Board of Abengoa Yield (NASDAQ: ABY) and as a Trustee of Suffield Academy, where he chairs the Investment Committee. He also serves on the advisory boards of Bambeco LLC, E|F|W (Energy, Food & Water) LLP, The American Council for Renewable Energy (ACORE), Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo’s Sustainability Working Group, and the Brown University Library. About Trillium Asset Management: Founded in 1982, Trillium is the oldest independent investment advisor focused exclusively on sustainable and responsible investing. Trillium manages over $2.2 billion in assets for clients including individuals, foundations, endowments, religious institutions, and other non-profits.

1962

Paul Connor | Andy Spector

CON O’LEARY

What I recall about fall was the cider and donuts after soccer games, delicious! Also, I recall Bob Melvin, our British exchange student, who wilted in our unusual September heat. He didn’t think soccer should be played in such heat—so much for the ringer we were hoping for! But he turned out to be a great guy whom we all liked.

ANDY SPECTOR

I am still working at Morgan Stanley and have been here and its predecessor firms for 28 years. I keep busy by watching my five granddaughters play sports. I am looking forward to getting back for my 55th Reunion in a couple of years.

BUZZ VICTOR

George Ann and I have just returned from a three week trip to Africa. We visited the gorillas in Rwanda, one of the most beautiful countries I have ever seen. Then, it was on to safari in Tanzania and Kenya, where the highlight was seeing a crossing of the Mara River by thousands of wildebeest. Finally, we ended up in Ethiopia where we made our way south into the Omo River area visiting numerous fascinating tribes. From 1968 to 1970, I was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Addis Ababa. The city has changed unbelievably in the last 45 years, but I was able to find the house in which I had lived. Lots of associated memories. Best to you all.

Fall | Winter 2015-16 67


1963 Sandy Prouty

DICK ANTHONY

I remember raking leaves for Wasky on work squad. Susan and I have moved to Naples, Florida. Of course we will be back to Weekapaug in the summers. I just underwent a total hip replacement necessitated by all the chemo I had. We are now four-plus years out from my stem cell transplant, and I can start to hit the golf ball again at Shelter Harbor Golf Club.

GEORGE HATHAWAY

On April 17th I was invited back to my alma mater, Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, to give a talk to students, faculty, and alumni on being a 21st century leader. It was standing room only, and the response was way beyond my expectation. The University was gracious in providing every attendee a signed copy of my latest book, Leadership Secrets for Everyone: Being a 21st Century Leader. It was an incredible honor for which I am extremely thankful.

BOB HORNE

a global economist. He spent 20 years at Wharton Econometrics Forecasting Associates (WEFA) with McKinsey and Company. He will retire at the end of this year. I have to say, even though he’s a young guy, he looks fit and lean thanks to regular yoga classes.

1964

Jon Booth | Nat Stevens Tom Webster | Ned Smith

PETER ARANGO

Mary and I have retired to a small (tiny) farm near Ashland, Oregon, where we do a lot of pasture clearing to ready the place for dog sports. Our four border collies made the trip to Oregon, as have two of my kids. I am happy to report that daughter Grayson is following in the boarding school tradition, now teaching at the Leelenau School in Michigan (Go, Blue!). I’m in the midst of revising America’s Best-Kept College Secrets, adding about 30 less visible colleges of distinction. Should any Tigers or Tiger families want to see the array of exceptional colleges currently accepting mere mortals, the website address is: www.bestkeptcollegesecrets.com

Five years into retirement and I don’t know how I had time to go to work. Grandkids, garden, boatbuilding, sailing, firewood, sawmill, and eldercare keep us busy. Middlebury, Vermont, is a great place to be. I played soccer too long and paying for it now with our friend “Arthur...itis.” I fondly remember fall soccer with “Sandy” and the five H’s... Hayman, Hayes, Hathaway, Hartigan, and Horne; along with Jordan, Closson, and Smigel.

1965

NORM KEENEY

This past March, Jenn and I had a wonderful dinner with Les Abberley and his wife, Brigitte, where we tried to catch up on the last 50 years. Great fun!

I retired from a money management and financial planning business this past June. Our daughter Jennifer and her family have been living in England for three years, so we will be visiting.

SANDY PROUTY

Sandy Vreeland shared with me a book he wrote for his children about his experiences as a young man. It has a nostalgic and humorous section about Suffield. He describes interactions with some of our favorite professors like Wasky, Woo Woo West and Mr. David. He also describes very articulately his combat tour as a Marine fighter pilot in Vietnam. He now has a law practice in Greensboro, North Carolina. I also had lunch with our long lost classmate, Geoff Greene, who, it turns out, lives next to my office in Falls Church, Virginia. You might recall Geoff was a hockey player at Suffield and played football, sharing QB duties with Bard Jones. He’s had an interesting and very productive career. After graduating from the University of Michigan, he took a brief sojourn into the ‘60s counterculture. He then received his master’s at the University of Pennsylvania and became

68 SUFFIELD Class Notes

Tim Hemingway | Bill Kelly

GERRY ELLIS

My best to class reps Bill Kelly and Tim “The Bear” Hemingway. Hello to former classmates and teammates.

BUTCH FULLER

RICK HIRSCHMANN

It was really great to return to Suffield 50 years after graduation. It’s hard to believe it has been that long. The improvement in the physical plant is remarkable. I had forgotten how beautiful it is during fall in Connecticut. Suffield is certainly a far different and better place now than it was when I was there. The happiness and esprit de corps of the current students reflect the pleasant atmosphere that exists now. Headmaster Charlie Cahn is doing a great job improving on the legacy imparted on him from Ap Seaverns. The future of the school is bright. When I reflect back on the teachers that had a huge impact on my life, people like Mason Nye, Ken Lindfors, Leon Waskiewicz, Gordon Glover, and Brad Gooch come to mind immediately. It was, of course, wonderful to reconnect with the other members of our class who returned. Those who could not make it back were missed.

TIM HEMINGWAY

What a great turnout for our 50th Reunion. It was fun catching up with everyone. It is outstanding to consider the different things our fellow classmates have done since we graduated so many years ago. Being back on campus brought back many fond memories. For those who have not been back, you would be pleased with the changes and improvements to the campus. John Gavitt went through his negatives of shots he took at school and created a CD that really captures the essence of the school and our time there. We enjoyed our time with the Class of 1964, who came back this year because they had so much fun last year. Maybe the Class of 1965 should consider doing the same. Last but not least, I beat Larry Hyde at golf, again!

LARRY HYDE

Our 50th Reunion was a memorable occasion for me. With 25 classmates, including Charlie Seaverns’ surprise visit, was more than I had anticipated; and it was fun catching up with everyone. The campus was almost unrecognizable in comparison to what our class remembered. All who funded and supported the extensive additions and renovations should be wholeheartedly congratulated for their efforts and forward thinking. As usual, the afterhours stories and musings were the high point of the weekend and will be long remembered. The golf, although not awardwinning, was great, and Bob McFadden’s tips were well received by all. The food that was prepared by the kitchen staff was remarkable; hot, tasty, well prepared, and served professionally. Finally, dancing with two of my classmates’ wives will also be remembered by this old guy for some time.

JIM LO DOLCE

I’m still practicing family medicine in the Syracuse area. I am planning to retire from primary care in the spring of 2016. I will be looking for part-time work after that. Reunion weekend was fabulous. I can’t believe it has been 50 years. By returning every five years, I have grown very fond of my classmates, many of whom I knew only superficially during my four years at Suffield. Suffield was the most important part of my personal and educational foundation and paved the way to a fulfilled personal life and very long and fruitful professional career. Anyone who missed Reunion lost out dearly. I send a thank you to all my classmates who returned, and a special thank you to all who return every five years. I also would like to give an extra special thanks to the guys from the Class of ’64 who made the effort to return for their 51st. I continue to be wowed by what Charlie Cahn and company have created out of the foundation offered by Ap. Speaking of Ap, he came back reincarnated—Charlie Seaverns is now the spitting image of Ap! It was great to see everyone.


01

02

01 Bob Horne ’63 sailing this past summer on Lake Champlain 02 Kevin McKeown ’65, mayor of Santa Monica, California, introduces community bike share 03 Buzz Victor ’62 in Rwanda this fall 04 Peter Arango ’64 and wife Mary, with son Bailey and his wife Kaity and daughter Grayson before leaving The Cate School in California

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05 Larry Hyde ’65 and Tim Hemingway ’65 back on campus for their 50th Reunion in October

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Fall | Winter 2015-16 69


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01 Archer Mayor ’69 staying active and busy in Vermont 02 Charlie Claggett ’66 with Independent Publisher Award 03 David Sperry ’69 with his daughter at her wedding this past May

KEVIN MCKEOWN

Work here in Santa Monica precluded my travel to our reunion, but I hope attendees enjoyed the 50-year-old recording of The Ticklers that I was able to provide. I’ve had a satisfying and productive year as mayor: hiring a new city manager, passing a citywide zoning code, introducing light rail and bike share and now instituting a city minimum wage that will rise to $15 an hour in a few years. I hope to make Santa Monica a national reference city for workers’ rights.

03

04 John Scott ’66 with his two kids and nieces and nephew at a wedding in Maine this summer 05 Peter Montgomery ’72 featured in Town Vibe in Litchfield County, Connecticut, for non-traditional method of preparing apple cider

1966

Charlie Claggett | Bruce Fletcher | Chris Frost

MICHAEL BRAUN

My daughter Keetch is a photographer and has two daughters, who are five and three. My son Jake is a writer, working night jobs as a bartender in Nashville, Tennessee, to pay the rent.

CHARLIE CLAGGETT

My book Max Starkloff and the Fight for Disability Rights has won two awards. It won a bronze medal in the National Biography Category from the Independent Publisher Award (The IPPY Award), which honors the

70 SUFFIELD Class Notes

year’s best independently published titles from around the world. My book was published by the Missouri History Museum. It also won the Award of Merit for Excellence from the American Association for State and Local History, which awards achievement in the preservation and interpretation of state and local history throughout America.

JOHN DININ

I have retired to Annapolis, Maryland, where I am doing volunteer work in the economic crime field.

PAUL DOCKMAN

In the fall of 1964, I came to Suffield with a phobic dislike of football coaches and a


In Memoriam

severely sprained ankle. I thought I would substitute soccer for football. Well, that lasted less than two weeks. Fall at Suffield brings back memories of being part of the “grounds crew,” of rambling around on an old Massey (I think) 3-wheel tractor, and lining soccer and football fields. Ironically, I was in Spencer Hall with Wasky, the head football coach. I never heard one statement from him about why I did not play football.

CHRIS FROST

I have finally retired from Home Depot after 21 years.

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JOHN SCOTT

I am still practicing as a civil rights attorney in San Francisco, focusing on police misconduct. Videos are changing the landscape in this area. I still play some basketball with seniors and plan to relocate in the next year or two to the wine country (Sonoma County). My son James was recruited to play soccer at Middlebury College—this gives me an excuse to spend September and October in New England over the next few years, including next year’s 50th Reunion. I will be there with bells on!

1967

Chris Harlambakis

JEFF MCELNEA

I was pleased to celebrate a large birthday (won’t say for whose wife) with Chris and Sally Carlisle, both, in Miami and Connecticut. Too many Suffield memories—all good! Every one of us alumni should walk up Stiles Lane from Tisch to Brewster now that campus has been beautifully reinvented.

LEN RENERY

I have lived in the San Francisco Bay area for the past 35 years and have made a career of educational sales. I look back on my one year at Suffield with unparalleled warmth and can sincerely say that it was the most important and significant year of my life. I remember with fondness putting on the Suffield white shirt and black shorts and being part of a team that loved to compete and represent. How can you forget teammates like Peter Van Arsdale, Bob Hazen, Mike Lavery, Andy Tisch, Reid Vipond and, of course, one of the best players I ever played with, Solomon Gomez. I remember with not quite as much fondness getting up at 2 a.m. on a freezing December night and watering the hockey rink for a game the next day and playing the game with twigs and leaves sticking up through the surface! I’m forever grateful to those men in all of our lives who gave us such caring and brilliant tutelage. Men like Mr. Nye, Gordy Glover, Paul Sanderson, Mr. Kinne and of course, Mr. Seaverns. I eagerly await our 50th Reunion. 50th—wow!

MIKE SAWYER

I regret having to report the passing of former faculty member Sylvia D. “Sib” Sawyer on July 23, 2015. She and her husband, David Sawyer, were faculty members for many years starting in 1963. She served in a number of positions at the school including head librarian and assistant to the headmaster. She attended Smith College and Pembroke College in Brown University and served as a cryptanalyst with the US Army Signal Corps during WWII. She and her husband later taught at various schools in the Caribbean and New England before settling at Suffield. She is survived by her husband David her son Michael and wife Susan, and their children, Ian and Gregory.

01

David M. Hildreth ’34 | May 19

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Murlie Fields Bromage ’36 | July 5

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Laura V. Tenero Troy ’39 | October 10

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Frederick D. Curtin Sr. ’41 | August 27

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James L. Breese ’42 | June 8

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Mario L. Presentato ’47 | June 1

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James E. Murphy ’48 | August 27

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William A. Haskell ’49 | April 14

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Sylvia D. Sawyer, Former Librarian | July 23

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William D. Hinson ’55 | August 1

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Thomas E. Nettelbladt ’56 | September 6

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Robert W. Daly Jr. ’57 | August 18

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David T. Osowiecki ’69 | August 25

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Lee C. Roberts ’74 | August 4

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Daniel W. Gracey ’82 | June 19

16

William W. Warrick IV ’94 | August 3

Not Shown:

Betty Campbell O’Brien ’41 | July 14

Charlie Gallucci ’70 | January 11, 2016 Fall | Winter 2015-16 71


Suffield Academy’s long standing ties with ASSIST were never more evident than at their recent annual Board dinner. ASSIST was founded by former headmaster, Paul “Sandy” Sanderson. Ken and Betsy Lindfors (former headmaster and admissions associate, respectively) ran the organization from 1988 to 2003. Former faculty and parents, Bob ’79 and Anne Stanley P’12, ’16, have been at the helm ever since. Front row, left to right Ashley Gosnell, ASSIST director of development and daughter of Arthur Gosnell ’75, Robert Stanley ’79, P’13, ’16 ASSIST president, Philip Riegel ’87, and Bill Sullivan Suffield Academy faculty Back row, left to right Caroline d’Otreppe P’02, ’03 former Suffield Academy faculty, Nadine Maggi P’14, ’16 ASSIST host parent, Elena Gullo ’16 ASSIST student, Anne Stanley P’13, ’16 ASSIST school stewardship coordinator, Andrew Pilaro ’88 ASSIST board member, Andy Rarus ’79, P’07, ’11, Elise Adib-Samii Riegel ’87, Etienne d’Otreppe P’02, ’03, Lisa Rarus ’80, P’07, ’11, Robin Eastman former Suffield Academy faculty, Martin Eastman former Suffield Academy faculty, and Kristen Sullivan ’87 ASSIST program director

SCOTT SCHROEDER

Not much to report. It looks as if we dodged another hurricane in Florida this year. Our oldest daughter is graduating from FSU in ’16. She may be California bound, and our younger daughter has a couple more years at UCF and may attend graduate school in Germany. It is interesting to me that so many of my contemporaries, like me, moved down here from the North, and now have children who are Florida born natives, but we are hearing from those children that they plan to leave Florida upon college graduation. As a matter of fact, many can’t wait to leave. I suppose it makes sense when you consider that we live about 100 yards from a beautiful beach with crystal clear water, but we very rarely go there. I don’t mess around with boats, windsurfing and all that water stuff anymore—tried golf for a few months and threw the clubs away (guys down here my age grew up on local golf courses and believe three over par a disaster). So much for tropical paradise. My “thing” is to catch a cheap flight to California, grab my motorcycle out of storage and ride the mountains and deserts. That’s all for now.

1969 Greg Putnam

ARCHER MAYOR

My wife Margot and I are hale and happy, still up in Vermont, from where I keep in touch pretty regularly with my old roommate Peter Kircher. I’m still writing mystery books and have cranked out Number 26 in the Joe Gunther series, entitled The Company She Kept, for which Peter gave me a recent thumbs up. Similarly, retired headmaster (in the old days, my soccer coach) Ken Lindfors and I have been keeping in touch, and I have my fingers crossed that I’ll be able to have tea with him and Betsy

72 SUFFIELD Class Notes

sometime this fall while I’m out publicizing the new book. I’m also still working for the medical examiner as one of his death investigators. But after a few years of doing plain-clothes police work chasing down child sexual assaults, rape, and murder cases for several different agencies, I have decided to fade into semiretirement—keeping my credentials current, but no longer actively “on the job.” I had the pleasure of bumping into Tom Greene ’87 the other day, in his new guise as head of the new Vermont College of Fine Arts in Montpelier, which seems to be thriving under his skilled hand. You never know where you might bump into a Suffield grad next. Anyone in the television or movie business who needs good material, don’t be shy!

DAVID SPERRY

I’m trying to be diligent about writing something for the class notes lest I suffer the continued wrath of Greg Putnam. Putt and I continue to correspond somewhat regularly albeit usually through juvenile and salacious jokes and photos. We haven’t changed a bit since Suffield! On the homefront, my son (the doctor) has one more year of his fellowship in transplant cardiology at The Cleveland Clinic. Then he and his wife (a nurse anesthetist) could end up at any major hospital in the country that does heart transplants. My daughter Jenna and her husband just bought a house in southern New Hampshire. They married last May and are moving right along with their lives. Looks like next up will be...kids—gulp! Hard to imagine myself as a grandfather. The photo of my daughter and I at her wedding is probably my favorite photo. A wise man once said, “To a father growing old, nothing is dearer than a daughter.” No explanation is needed for classmates with daughters, right?

1970

Kit Warner | Chris Weeden

PAUL MORITZ

Still working, but spending more time on the Cape in Colorado and in Florida. Best to everyone at Suffield.

1971

Pierre Genvert | Leo Letendre | Doug Rebert

PIERRE GENVERT

Our daughter Margot ’07 is engaged and to be married next June. She met her fiance while she was at Colgate. Peggie and I have many fond memories of her time at Suffield. It was the turning point in her life.

BRIAN MORRIS

Our daughter Perry got married in May. It was a beautiful and joyous celebration. Cindy and I will celebrate our 40th wedding anniversary next year. I cannot believe how fast the years have flown by.

1974

Blair Childs | Bud Hancock | Tom Leonard

ELMAR NOETH

I just became grandfather for the second time. Susi Nöth is really sweet, just like her cousin Leilani Ai who is already 4-years-old. The wet and cold fall here in Germany always makes me miss the beautiful Indian summer in Suffield. I hope to spend the next summer in our sister city, Riverside, California, being a chaperone for a high school exchange. Looking forward to the next reunion.

RICH ROMEO

My daughter, Eva Kramer, gave birth to twins, Stella Grace and Katherine Evangeline, in April.


1975

Carey Fiertz | Jim Plante Fred Stevens | Mark Teed

BRAD RICHARDSON

Going back to Suffield after 37 years was eye-opening. It’s the same school, only much better. It was so great to see my classmates after 40 years, and I am now missing all those who were unable to attend.

1976

Ralph Adler | Scott Craig

JENNIFER CARTMELL

I am volunteering with Honor Flight Maine, handling their media and public relations. Honor Flight Maine is one of 135 Honor Flight network hubs whose mission is to transport every able WWII Veteran to visit and reflect together at the Washington, DC, memorial built in their honor. The trip the weekend of October 30th had 45 Maine veterans and 45 guardians participating. It has been an honor to be a part of this organization. On the

home front, I am gathering in the garden crops and getting ready for winter while enjoying delightful fall weather. Life is good.

CLAES-JOHAN GEIJER

There is nothing new to report here in Luxembourg, but really looking forward to our 40th Reunion next fall.

TRACY MILLIKEN FENGLER

I have very fond memories of my first year in 1974 when girls returned to Suffield. We were treated like queens—50 girls to 250 boys! I am still living in beautiful Oceanside San Diego, California. My two children are 20 and 25. I am still loving being a postpartum doula for 22 years and happily married for 31 years. I send a special shout out to my Suffield besties, Cynthia, Molly, Harry, Alex and Jennifer. Email me at: tracydoula@aol.com

CARL WHITAKER

1977

Charlie Alfano | Bob Clark | Ed Kaplan

CHARLIE ALFANO JR.

My family was privileged to attend the 2015 graduation in May. We are proud to now have three generations of Alfanos who have graduated from Suffield Academy. I think there have now been nine Alfanos who have maintained this great tradition, and we have my daughter Olivia Alfano ’19 starting as a new freshman this year. We are all so proud of our longstanding affiliation with Suffield Academy and our continued commitment to the success of this great school!

1978

Lisa Longo | Ed Palomba

I married Judy Isabel Berk on September 26, 2015 in Concord, Massachusetts. All three of my siblings who attended Suffield, Seth ’68, Gilbert ’71 and Sara ’77, were in attendance. Judy is a certified nurse midwife at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. We live together in Arlington, Massachusetts.

TODD AUGUST

There are a lot of things going on in Maryland. Tierney, our oldest, has transferred from Kentucky University back to Maryland, “FEAR THE TURTLE,” to pursue international relations and Arabic. Olivia, the youngest triplet, is a senior in high school at Rockbridge Academy

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01 Ed Kaplan ‘77, Beth Tyler ‘77 and Alumni Leadership Award Recipient Gerard Hall ‘77 after the award ceremony on May 4, 2015

03 Tracy Milliken Fengler ’76 with husband, Horst, and their two children, Kelsey and Brock

02 Class of 1977 gathering in West Hartford, Connecticut

04 Todd August ’78 and his family pictured after daughter, Mamie’s, soccer game at the US Naval Academy

Fall | Winter 2015-16 73


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01 Milo Terzich ’87 and wife, Margaret, with their children Ryan, Matthew, and Lindsay 02 Barbara and Mickey Johnson P’88 with Sandra D. Johnson ‘88 Scholarship recipients, Kyle Vigneault ‘09, and Jon Lopez ‘17 03 Jinnie Lee Schmid ’85 at “Moving Day Atlanta” hosted at Centennial Olympic Park

05 Kathleen Moran Santopietro ’86 with husband John, and their sons Max, Griffin, and Beckett

74 SUFFIELD Class Notes

06 Elise Riegel ’87, Harry Melendez III ’07, Henriette Lingelem ’14, and Chelsea Kane ’09 in Nice, France 07 Tom Hodgkins ’88, Pat Dorsey ’88 and Aya Murata ’88 gather in Washington D.C. 08 Harrison Cahn, Hillary Rockwell Cahn ’88, P’18, and Tobye Cook Seck ’88, P’16 with Julie Cunningham Cook, wife of Jay Cook ‘78, at Reunion 2015

04 James Kaiser ’82, Lee Vardakas ’82, P’18, Robert Dahms ’83, and John Killeen ’82

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09 Achim Oelgarth ‘88 with wife, Kristiane, and daughters, Helen and Josefin, visiting campus this summer from Germany

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and doing great. Toby, another triplet, attended Suffield this summer and loved it. He is now enrolled at National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) semester, hiking, backpacking, sea kayaking and sailing down Baja and Sea of California, on an 80-day trip with no phone, no lights, and no motor car. The final triplet, Mamie, is a plebe at the US Naval Academy, pictured marching in the lead and playing soccer for the women’s team. She scored in her first game.

DONNA HAYDEN

My son, Warren, is a senior at Florida Institute of Technology where he has become a licensed flight instructor in less than two and a half years. He will continue on at FIT to earn his master’s in aeronautical safety. Daughter, Caitlin, is currently on her first co-op job in Boston as a part of her B.S. program at Northeastern University. She loves NU and loves city life in Boston. Colin ’16 is now a senior at Suffield and has been a major force on the wrestling squad, which I was the manager of back in the day. My parents are proud of Colin and thrilled that the Suffield tradition in our family has carried on.

1980

Jim Hagan | Mary Carroll Graham Lewis | Joe Palomba

STEPHANIE THOMASES HUTCHINSON It was so nice to be back for…ahem, my 35th Reunion. Michele Lang Blair and I had a great time. The campus looks fabulous. While I don’t wish I was a teenager again, I sure wish I could be a current student at Suffield! We went back on Sunday and walked around the empty campus, reflecting on all the good things about our time at Suffield. Our dorm, Kulle House, brought back so many memories. Although we had a very slim showing for our class, it was still great to see every one of our classmates, especially Lisa Keney Rarus. We even made new friends with graduates from 2010. And it’s always great to see “old” faculty members, whether I had them in class or not. They never change. Let’s mobilize more of us for the 40th—thanks for hosting us, Suffield!

1982

David Carangelo | Elaine Coombs Holmes Margaret Figueroa Hern | Madeline Phillips

TARO KONO

I have just been appointed cabinet minister of the Abe Government in Japan. I am now chairman of the National Public Safety Commission; head of the National Police Force; minister in charge of administrative reform; minister in charge of civil service reform; minister of state for consumer affairs and food safety; minister of state for regulatory reform; and minister of state for disaster management. If you are related to any of the above, you know whom to call in Japan!

BILL MURDZA

My sons Andrew and Eric are now in high school. Continuing the family focus on academic growth, Andrew is flourishing at a charter school (Massachusetts Academy of Math and Science), where he will be taking classes at WPI in his senior year starting next fall. Eric has just finished taking geometry over the summer through CTY Online (Johns Hopkins Center of Talented Youth) enabling him to get a head start in the math program at our local high school. My wife of 28 years, Gina, continues to provide a supportive and guiding hand to both of their developments at this next juncture. I recently completed my third year at Biogen, serving in its information technology department as a senior engineer. Biogen continues its drive in the development of therapies for patients with multiple sclerosis, hemophilia, and soon-to-be-expected Alzheimer’s, providing relief and hope for so many. It’s been a real privilege to be part of such an important mission.

1983

John Boozang | Marybeth DiBuono-Riley Mike Sabellico

JUDY KILLAM CAMPBELL

I’ve been living in North Carolina for eight years now and still loving my teaching career at Cannon School. My daughter, Jane, is a senior at Florida Southern College. My son, Ben, will be a freshman at UNC Chapel Hill. Cannot wait for my 35th Reunion.

ART SHETTLE

I was happy to see lots of familiar faces at the recent alumni soccer game. Also happy to see that I wasn’t the oldest one playing! Looking forward to my next visit to Suffield.

1985

Andy Glover | Michelle Hashioka Lord Chuck McGavern | Jack Way

JINNIE LEE SCHMID

My company, Change Navigators, was awarded a $10,000 grant from the National Parkinson Foundation to deliver grief recovery to patients, family members, and professional caregivers. I continue to spread the word about the free workshop I’m offering with that funding.

1986

Sean Federowicz | Brinley Ford Ehlers Kristin Hostetter Pandit | Niko Mosko

TAMMY AHRENS FUNKHOUSER

I’ve been living on the Gulf Coast of Florida for six years now. Lived on charming Anna Maria Island for the first four and a half years. Then we moved a few miles inland to Bradenton, where my husband and I bought a 1925 bungalow. I have two stepdaughters and a two-year-old granddaughter—life is good!

KATHLEEN MORAN SANTOPIETRO

My family and I are in our third year of living in Charlotte, North Carolina. While we certainly miss New England, we are doing pretty well adjusting to Charlotte. All three boys, Max, Griffin, and Beckett, attend Charlotte Preparatory School. The older two are quite active in the many theatre and performing arts programs around town. My husband works for Carolinas HealthCare System, where he is the chief clinical officer for behavioral health. We can often be found at the happiest place on earth, and after years of refusing to join any social media, I do now have Instagram (username: katmomofboys). My best wishes to the Suffield community and we hope to make it back to the next reunion. It’s been a while.

1987

Betsy Coughlin Tod | Jeff Martini | Phil Riegel

DAVE ROBERTSON

I cannot believe this fall is the 30th year anniversary of the varsity soccer team’s 1985 championship season.

MILO TERZICH

I am a development manager for USA Development in Roseville, California. I am busy with three children: Ryan (19), Matthew (17), and Lindsay (13). I am also active in the California Water Fowl Association and an avid duck hunter.

1988

Kate Cleary | Patrick Dorsey Jack Warren | Jenn Yamzon Jordan

JON CONNORS

There are lots of exciting changes in the Connors’ world: our second son Declan was born in November, and our five-year-old Jack is thrilled to be a big brother! Also, I’ve recently started a full-time position with Team Rubicon, a non-profit that unites the skills and experiences of military veterans with first responders to rapidly deploy emergency response teams. Earlier this year, I went to Nepal with Team Rubicon immediately following the massive earthquakes there to provide disaster relief. It was truly a life-changing experience. Hope everyone from the Class of ’88 is doing great!

AYA MURATA

I am having a great year on sabbatical while enjoying a drastically different pace of life from the normal hustle and bustle of boarding school. A highlight has been traveling to various college campuses (the professional development component of my sabbatical now that I’m a college counselor) and catching up with my former students from Andover, but also my Suffield friends! I had a great visit with Sarah Wheeler Chingos in Maine and a fun dinner with Pat Dorsey and Tom Hodgkins

Fall | Winter 2015-16 75


down in Washington, D.C. It was wonderful to see Matt Rembe at his amazing Los Poblanos this past summer. If you are ever in New Mexico, you must stop by. Another milestone this year is that our eldest son has started 9th grade at Andover. Hope all is well with the Class of ’88!

MEGHAN WERNER MURPHY

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2015 was a big year for our family. After living in Nashville for almost eight years, we moved our family back to Northern Virginia because I got a job working in the marketing department at Volkswagen Group of America. Michael and I celebrated our 15-year wedding anniversary in September. And we welcomed our daughter Rory to the world on June 19. Our oldest daughter Willow is 14, and our son Asher is 11.

1989 Tom Burton | Michelle Motta Stewart | Jed Nosal Aimee Scherer Hodgkins | Rose Yap Thomas

JOHN YOUNG

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It’s been forever since I found the time to let everyone know what I’ve been up to. I’m still living the dream in Bermuda. My wife, Alison, and I are in the process of renovating my grandparent’s house and hope to move in sometime in September. As many of you know, my background has always been in the hospitality industry. Well, after 10 years, I left my job working for a resort in Bermuda to pursue opening my own tourist property. With the America’s Cup coming to Bermuda in 2017, we are trying to get up and running in time for this great event. You can see what we are up to on Facebook (the Ledgelets). In other news, my wife and I became new parents on November 18, 2014, to a beautiful girl named Hinson Catherine Young. Sadly, in January 2015, I lost my father to cancer. Life is good, and we are happy. I’m only sorry that I was unable to see many of my classmates for our 25th Reunion. I have a lot of love for Suffield and cherish the memories and friendships that were developed there. I keep in touch with several classmates and continue to hear from a few more every now and then. Wishing everyone from the Class of 1989 much love and happiness.

1990 01 Rory, Asher, and Willow Murphy, children of Meghan and Michael Murphy ’88 02 John Young III ‘89, Steven Spencer-Arscott ‘91 and Tom Cooper ‘74 at the Bermuda National Gallery viewing in June 03 John Young III ‘89 with daughter Hinson, born on November 18, 2014

76 SUFFIELD Class Notes

Kelli Chamberlain Tosone | Steve Canter Tom Hamilton | Amy Newman Vaughn Courtney Wilson Nixon | Bob Yap

COURTNEY WILSON NIXON

I am living in Eugene, Oregon, with my husband Jonathan and children, Maren (11) and Chase (9). We welcome Suffield Academy friends anytime.

1991

Julie Paganelli Bodnar Kim Ames Ide | Pat Kennedy

JASON FALCON

This past April, I resigned from Clark University after 16 years, and was recently hired to be the hitting coach for the College of the Holy Cross. I join the staff led by Greg DiCenzo and fellow assistant coaches Ron Rakowski and Jeff Miller. This is a very nice change for myself and family. My wife Tracy and I recently celebrated our 17th wedding anniversary this September. My oldest son Ryan is a freshman at Sutton High School. My other son, Chase, turned 10 years old this summer.

MARK KENNEDY

My son Ryan, brother of Thomas and Sean, turned five on August 3rd. He would like to thank Suffield Academy for his awesome Suffield Academy cinch bag!

1992

Marigrace Canter Morris | Ntsekhe Moiloa Wadiya Peterson Wynn

MARIGRACE CANTER MORRIS

A warm hello to the entire Suffield Academy community. We all have fond memories of our Suffield days.

1997

Amy Blake Cook | Lewis Dunn Brian Hetzel | Danielle Therriault

BRIAN HETZEL

Here are a few updates from the Class of 1997. Mike Cirelli was recently spotted with Katiana Siatras Dillon at Betsy Boardman’s wedding this fall. Betsy writes, “I had the honor of having Mike photograph my wedding last month, as well as the pleasure of having the wonderful Katiana travel all the way from Colorado to join in the festivities! I married an amazing man I met in college named Zac. We live in Saco, Maine, where Zac is an investment analyst. I recently graduated from law school and was awarded a fellowship at a legal services provider which oversees youth education. I primarily deal with special education matters, expulsions, and teacher/ administrator conduct toward students. I am just getting my feet wet but love ensuring that students get the services and education that they need and deserve. I only serve low-income individuals, which is exactly what I want to be doing. I work for the largest legal service provider in Maine called Pine Tree Legal,and it feels good to know that we make such a difference in closing the justice gap. It is a dream job for me! I work with all like-minded individuals who are extremely down-to-earth and passionate. Life could not be any better!” Well, I have to say, Betsy, you looked beautiful! I am sure Mike’s photos


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01 Class of 1990: Steve Canter, Robert Yap, Peter DaPuzzo, Andrew Kotchen, and Keith Franco enjoy some golf during their 25th Reunion weekend 02 Drew Cayce, son of Allyson D’Amico Cayce ‘89, with Patrick Kennedy ‘91 at La Lumiere School in Indiana, where Pat was a teacher and mentor to Drew 03 Marla Zide ‘93, Jake McComb ‘04, Lily Clark ‘07, Rob Dahms ‘83, Lauren Okano ‘07 and Harry Melendez III ‘07 at Camden Yards event in Baltimore 04 Ryan Kennedy, son of Mark Kennedy ‘91, showing off his birthday gift from Suffield 05 Blake Sterling, son of Elizabeth Conway Sterling ‘89, proudly wearing Suffield Academy apparel in Texas

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06 Muhammad Habibie ‘92, Achmad Mochdar, and Pratam Habibie ‘98 during fasting break gathering in Indonesia

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Fall | Winter 2015-16 77


(www.cirelliworks.com) came out well. Also, Mike and Katiana, please start aging; you are making the rest of us look bad. Ali Al-Ghanim has been a busy man doing things that sound much more important than what I am doing. He writes, “After going on my summer trip to Ibiza, Mallorca, Granada, Marbella, and Malaga in Spain, I have been quite busy at work. I was invited to attend a workshop in Singapore on SMEs and Arbitration hosted by the Commercial Law Development Program (a division of the US Department of Commerce), then helped the local IMF office facilitate a meeting. I also recently organized a bi-annual meeting for work that was held in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Next month, I am initiating an international forum with 22 participating institutions. In January, I have two separate heads of institutions meetings to plan. In May, I am organizing another bi-annual meeting. I am also considering a trip to Vienna with my wife to celebrate the new year. The weather in Kuwait has been crazy! Just before leaving to Saudi Arabia, we had two major sand storms and now a wave of huge thunderstorms.” Well, I went to work and then to the grocery store after that, so yeah that is impressive stuff, Ali.

01

Quentin Packard is the proud father of 7-month-old twins named Brayden and Charlee. Quentin and his wife Megan are living in Long Beach, New York, and enjoying their time with the two little ones. Those cheeks, though, Quentin—adorable! Quentin adds, “I lead a global marketing intelligence team responsible for helping guide and influence my company’s strategic decisions and results from our marketing/sales campaigns. The team and I deliver the work by analyzing competitor’s performance against market trends and broader micro/macro marketing trend analysis. We then provide corporate presentations and recommendations to our c-suite and cross functional senior business leaders. In January, I will have an opportunity to be a keynote speaker for the second time during my company’s annual sales kick-off event in Nashville. Last year we held a great event in Orlando, and I am thrilled to take the stage this year in Nashville.” Always the outdoorsman, I was not surprised to hear that Matty McIntire continues to shred copious amounts of corduroy while hopefully still in a puffy Adidas jacket. Matt says, “Hope you are well, bro! I am the head coach of the Flagstaff ski team in Arizona during the winters and a behavioral therapist for kids with autism in the summers. Also, I have a one year old. Here is a shot of my family.”

02

Here is a quick note from Travis Loring (Berger), “This year my wife Tara and I welcomed a baby girl, Parker Jill Loring.” Congrats, Travis, she certainly is a cutie. I have also been in touch with Megan Lawler, who has now become semi-famous in Rhode Island for her diverse doll collections. Megan says, “I never pictured myself as a doll collector, but it has really become a passion of mine. I spend a good amount of time on eBay and Craigslist looking for my next find. It usually takes 10 to 12 hours of tactical searching in order to find what I am really looking for. I do not just buy any old doll; it has to be right, as I consider these gems as part of my family. To date, I would say I have anywhere between 1,200 to 1,300 dolls of all kinds in my apartment. To be honest, my cats do not particularly care for them, but what can you do. With any luck, I will be able to complete my Furby collection within the year; some of the early ones are nearly impossible to find, but I believe in myself.” As for me, I have been busy traveling for my work as an educational consultant. I have been fortunate enough to see some spectacular places around the world and meet a lot of talented young students. I have also kept up with Carlos Centurion and Takafumi Nishimura, as we have gotten together a couple of times over the last few years. If anyone is ever in Miami, definitely make it a point to stop in at Carlos’ restaurant, Bulla Gastrobar in Coral Gables—incredible! I ran into Alex Howell at a Suffield event last year in New York City, and I am happy to say that he is doing great. I also golf with former teachers/coaches Dean Ellerton and Dan Callahan in the summer, both of whom are doing really well.

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Well, that is all for the Class of 1997 for now. Be sure to check the Class Notes section of SUFFIELD next time around for another update from the best class to roll on Bell Hill.

1999

Steven Darling | Maura Deedy | Larry Griffin | Mark Soticheck | Patrick Stone

ROB SCHNABEL

I am still living in New York designing Broadway posters and running my apparel brand. I also just got engaged!

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01 Class of 1997 Suffield Academy t-shirt

06 Travis Berger Loring ‘97 with her wife Tara and daughter Parker

02 Matt McIntire ’97 and his family in Flagstaff, Arizona

07/08 Quentin Packard’s ‘97 twins Charlie (07), and Brayden (08)

03 Mike Cirelli ’97 and Katiana Siatras Dillon ’97 at Betsy Boardman’s ’97 wedding

09 Ali Al-Graham ‘97 (second row; second from left to right) at Commercial Law Development workshop in Singapore

04 Megan Pohorylo Tucker ‘97 with her son Colin vacationing in Aruba

10 Nathaniel Keith David, son of Keith ‘98, Stella Grace Griffin, daughter of Karly David Griffin ‘01 with Jordan and Jacob, children of Jennifer Fisher Taiwo ‘01

05 Brian Hetzel ’97 and Alex Howell ’97 at the winter 2015 New York City Suffield alumni event

11 Jira Tontapanish ‘99 at Gergeti Trinity Church in Stepantsminda-Sameba, Georgia

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2000

Michael Coleman | Carmine Petrone Andrea Rich Rabatic | Manny Simons Meagan Ward Jenkins

MEAG WARD JENKINS

2015 has proved to be an exciting year. I had my second child, John Kerner Jenkins, on May 20. My daughter Tess turned three in December. I also started my own medical writing business, M. Jenkins Medical Communications, LLC, where I develop strategic and promotional content for the pharmaceutical industry. I am tired, but fulfilled. I also brought the entire family back for our 15th Reunion in October and had a great time reflecting on my years at Suffield. I was challenged academically at Suffield Academy and formed lifelong connections with both students and faculty. I feel so fortunate for the opportunity to have been educated in such a special place. See you all in 2020!

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2004

Kate Braden Mounkhall | Jake McComb Alex Naboicheck | Anthony Rousseau Andrew Scully | William Taylor

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COLIN RIENDEAU

2002

Sari Biddelman | Alison Carey Hilary Golas Rouse | Lynx LaCroix | Erin Orr Ligay

MARC CUSUMANO

I am currently working as a team member in the gas geospatial group at PSEG in New Jersey. PSEG is also reimbursing my tuition at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, where I began pursuing my second graduate degree (MBA, concentration in information systems).

2003

Lindsey Pell | Lydia Pillsbury Lindsay Rousseau | Eric Yale

MIKE ATHAS

On September 1 my wife Lauren and I welcomed the birth of our daughter, Margaret. We are calling her Margo. She is doing great, and we enjoy being parents. So far, Margo loves walks on the beach here in Sarasota, Florida.

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PETER CYRAN

Now living and working in Boston. My fiancé and I are planning for our Cape Cod wedding to take place in 2016.

ELLEN SEVIGNY

Paige Diamond | Kate Dineen | Greg Hearn Russ Hearn | Ashton Jones

2015 has been quite a big year for me so far. Over the summer I got engaged to my girlfriend Shelly Fuchs. I proposed while we were on vacation in Nantucket with some expert planning help from Ashley Hecker. Also, after five years at UBS Investment Bank, I recently joined Apollo Global Management as a principal, focused on corporate strategy and M&A.

In 2013, I helped open a new transfer High School in Brooklyn, of which I am currently the assistant principal. Research and Service High School is a public school that helps support students who might be over-age and under-credited get back on track for graduation. As I co-founded this school with my principal, it truly is a work of blood, sweat, and tears, but I would not want to be anywhere else. I still play soccer in competitive leagues throughout the city and try to travel as much as possible. I made it to Ireland last April, and I am looking forward to a trip to England this April!

03

01 Jennifer Brookes ‘00 with husband and children, Marlena (6), Jacob (4), and newborn, Morgan 02 Zoe and Hugo Simons, children of Manny ‘00 with Adam and Alex Pohorylo, children of Michael ‘00 enjoying Reunion 2015 03 Meag Ward Jenkins ‘00 and husband Andy, apple picking in Vermont with their children Tess and John

ELSIE PRICHARD PRIOR

Ian and I are proud to announce the birth of our second girl, Caroline Walker Prior, on July 20, 2015. My husband of five years, Ian Prior, and I have another daughter, Ava, who will be three this February. We are currently living in Alexandria, Virginia, where we just bought our first house. Ian is working in Washington, DC as a political strategist for the Super Pac, American Crossroads, founded by Karl Rove. I am a stay-at-home mom and loving it!

STEPHANIE HOLMES

I have officially been a New Yorker now for eight years and it’s been great (although I still need my New England fix every now and then).

I bought a small piece of land here and am building a little house. I am writing and playing music, I am the program director for Yoga in Your Park (yogainyourpark.com), and I work for an amazing organization called Acoustamata (acoustamata.com) that helps people of all ages hone the voices of leadership. Actually, my environmentalist roots and yoga got started at Suffield. I loved being part of the TREE Club. I am so grateful for my experiences at Suffield. They truly have shaped me into the person I am today. Acoustamata is an amazing way for people to gain confidence in their voice and speak their message with clarity, allowing people to stay relaxed in highpressure situations. Through outdoor yoga and coaching, we empower people to have daily and consistent passion to care for self, others, and the environment through loving awareness rather than fear, guilt, and shame. Fear, guilt, and shame actually do neurologically provide some sense of well-being, but one can get more positive effects from gratitude, pride, and human contact. It’s really cool work!

2005

Rick Devlin | Dan Fisher Steph Shaker | Casey Shanley Kegelman

ADELE KOZLOWSKI

I just got back from a great 10-year Reunion with my twin Ashley. Although there wasn’t a huge turnout for Class of 2005, it was great seeing everyone. The best part is seeing all of the teachers who are still there—Mr. Vianney, Mr. Pentz (some of my favorites). However, I didn’t get to see Rocky as I’d hoped to. Campus looks incredible, and it’s amazing how much has changed. The new dining hall and student union is to die for. I wish I could go to school there now! I can’t wait to go back and visit Suffield Academy again.


01 Elsie Prichard Prior ‘03, and husband Ian, with their children Ava (2), and newborn, Caroline 02 Kristin ‘04 and Dan Matchett ‘08 at Dan’s air show at Westover Air Reserve Base in Chicopee, Massachusetts

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03 Class of 2005: Wade Colli, Ryan Allen, Carolyn Rosca Johnson, Greg Snow, Ashley Kozlowski, Addy Kozlowski, and Colin Dudunake back on campus for their 10th Reunion 04 Matt Wiggin ‘06 launches WigginOut Fitness in New York City 05 Jamie Ansorge ‘05 recently named to the NYS Finance Committee of Hillary Clinton’s campaign for President 06 Luke McComb ’06, Will Doar ’06, Drew Betts ’06, and Louis Heilbron ’06 at Drew’s wedding

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01 Chris Setian ’09, NCAA strength and conditioning intern at University of New Hampshire

05 Julian Fletcher ‘09 represents Bermuda in the Pan Am Games in Toronto July 2015

02 Ben Rego ‘07, Connor Morrison ‘08, Matt Shrubb ‘07, and Nick Lines ‘08 at the Suffield Bermuda reception

06 Members of the Class of 2007, Peter Aldrich, Harry Melendez III, and Tom Skalkos reunite in Chicago this summer

03 Joe Martini at AT&T Stadium in October for the Patriots vs. Cowboys game

07 Ethan Wood ‘07 admiring his catch in Wyoming

04 Adam Pistel ‘08, Kim Wiggin P’06, and Khadim Diouf ‘07 at Alumni Sports Day in September 2015

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08 Julian Fletcher ‘09 competing for Bermuda in Pan Am Games in Toronto July 2015


2006

Kim Autuori | Alison Leonard | Eric Litmer Luke McComb | Gina Petrone | Chris Stafford

RON BATHRICK

I graduated from Roger Williams University School of Law. I married Jillian Zabrocky of North Haven, Connecticut, on September 19, 2015.

BRIAN SAGER

I am living and working on Nantucket as a professional photographer, shooting everything from oceanscapes, weddings, and fashion. I’ve had a busy but very rewarding past few years. This winter I’ll be working in New York City and traveling before returning to Nantucket next spring. I frequently run into other Suffield alumni on the island and am looking forward to seeing more SA friends this winter in the city!

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MATT WIGGIN

I launched my own fitness company WigginOUT Fitness in New York City. WigginOUT specializes in private, personal training and group training sessions. Visit WigginOut Fitness on Facebook for more information.

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01 Ali Vicino ‘09, Page Hayes, Adams ‘07, Bianca Molta ‘07, Bill Cargill ‘07, and Max Vicino ‘10 join bride, Alessandra Perna Carullo ‘07 and husband Mario Carullo, on their wedding day at Cipriani in New York City 02 Class of 2007 photo booth at Page Hayes Adams’ wedding with Tyler St. Pierre, Alessandra Perna, Bianca Molta, and Bill Cargill

2007

Mike DiPietro | Sydney Greenberg Katy Heydinger Doar | Matt Jones Harry Melendez | Catherine Mis | Erik Osborne Meredith Rarus | Sarah Thomsen | Rob Zammito

03 Class of 2008: Emily Cassello, Emily Mejer, Kaela Keyes, and Lindsay Life attend Liz Snow’s wedding in October on Kiawah Island, South Carolina

GREG D’ALEO

I recently earned my CPA from the state of Connecticut and launched a partnership with Alex Gazis ’09. D’Aleo and Gazis, LLC, is located in Enfield, Connecticut.

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JOE MARTINI

This past fall, I took on all of Dallas with my fellow Patriots comrades and came out victorious. Go, Pats!

MEARA MCCARTHY

I am serving as a finance officer in the Air Force and am stationed at Anderson Air Force Base in Guam. Back in June, I ran in the Nissan Flag Run 7K in Guam with over 750 runners and finished as the top female with a time of 28:40. I hope everyone in the Class of 2007 is doing well.

ETHAN WOOD

After graduating from Suffield, I earned a B.S. in fisheries biology at the University of Vermont and headed west. I now live in Jackson, Wyoming, and work as a fly-fishing guide. I am able to use my education to share my passion with people. The rivers out here in western Wyoming run cold and clear from glacial mountains, and they are full of wild trout. Even as a teenager on the lawn at

Suffield, I knew that I would find myself in the western rivers. I am always excited and fulfilled by my work when I see the smiles on the faces of the people with whom I spend my days. Come find me out here, and let’s go fishing.

have recently started an after-school program called “After School Magic” that teaches magic and juggling in schools throughout New York City. I live in Manhattan and encourage any Suffieldian passing through to get in touch!

2008

2009

Becca Bathrick | Kirsten Chalke Thomas Drummond-Hay | Joel Glassman Rebecca Joslow | Barbara Kaplan Kaela Keyes | Isy Zellweger

TOM CYRAN

I’ve moved from New York City to Cambridge, Massachusetts, and I am working in Boston for a financial investment and insurance decision-making firm.

HARRISON KRAMER

I currently work as a full-time magician and

Tom Casey | Rosemary Chandler | Liz Monty Amy Samenuk | Sam Stone | Kyle Vigneault

SAM ROBSON

I hope everyone is doing well as fall rolls into Suffield. Here is a quick update on what I’ve been up to. I’m head of logistics and executive producer at AWOL Studios, a new feature film production company in Hollywood, where I’m executive producing our first two films, the first of which we plan on shooting in the next couple of months. More exciting though, is a project I took on just a few weeks back.

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01 Henry Thevenin ’10 bench dedication during Reunion 2015 weekend (all members of Class of 2010, unless otherwise noted) Front row, left to right: Atiq Lucas, Shane Cranmore, Drew Gamere ‘93, David Sambor and Taylor Walston; Second row, left to right: Paul Faude, Megan Madden, Evan Ciecimirski, Taylor Endress, Everest Wein, Nick Tavares, Tommy Uszakiewicz, Connor Bray, Billy Glidden, Chloe Terres, Sheree Morrison, Tommy Leonard, Max Vicino, Constance Turner and Alyssa Palomba; Third row, left to right: Katherine Sacco, Trish Kearney, Basi Ugarte, Amanda Cianci, Shang Wu, Schuyler Holden, Francisco Pujals, Matt Tolosky, Griffin Murray ‘11, Michelle Autuori, Tyler Arnold, Joe McGovern, Ginny McDermott, Mary Mitchell, Chelsea Lines, Rachel Adelsberger, Joy Russolillo, Melanie Watson, and Headmaster Charlie Cahn 02 Harry Melendez III ‘07 speaking at dedication on the newly constructed Stiles Walk

My dad has suffered with Parkinson’s disease for almost 20 years and was also the biggest baseball fan I ever knew (we had weekend season tickets to the Red Sox and even attended the ’07 World Series). However, his PD got so bad that he got rid of his tickets because it was too tough for him to get around. As a result, I’m creating a partnership between MLB and Parkinson’s to raise awareness and, most importantly, research funding for this terrible disease. Anyone in the Suffield community who would like join me on this journey to battle PD, please feel free to contact me.

2010

Michelle Autuori | Justine de Chazal Mariah Hayes | Tom Leonard Alyssa Palomba | Lucas Traber

GINNY MCDERMOTT

Being back at Suffield was an unforgettable experience. It was so nice to see a lot of my classmates that I had not seen in five years. My favorite part about the weekend was the bench dedication for Henry Thevenin. The words that were shared by his classmates and teachers were so sweet, and I know he was looking down at everyone with his big smile that day. It was also so nice to be able to meet other alumni and hear about their experiences at Suffield. Thank you, Suffield, for making it such a great experience for all!

MATT TOLOSKY

It was great being back on campus for the reunion and seeing so many of my classmates and faculty from my time at Suffield. It was

84 SUFFIELD Class Notes

Joe Begley | Serge Derby | Kachenta Descartes Colin E Dowd | Karoline Hegbom | Didi McDonald Shamier Settle | Lester Taylor

assistant for a business statistics course. The knowledge, skills, and professionalism that I learned at Suffield, coupled with my past experiences at Boston University, paved the way for my success while interning at Deloitte & Touche LLP and Argopoint LLC (a legal management consulting firm) this past summer. Though my internship program at Deloitte came to an end in July, I am continuing my tenure with Argopoint. Each and every day I am appreciative and grateful to have had the opportunity to attend Suffield Academy.

DIDI MCDONALD

CAROLINE LEONARD

amazing to see how so much has changed in only five years, yet it still very much felt like home. I particularly enjoyed catching up with Ms. McCarthy and both Mr. and Mrs. Vianney, as they meant a lot to me in my time at Suffield, and I hadn’t reconnected in a long time.

2011

I started my first job in July as an IBD recruiter at Goldman Sachs.

2012

Reed Barbe | Katherine Battle | Colin Dowd William Evangelakos | Jameson Everett Josh Galant | David Huang | Taylor Jett Connor Kaplan | Caroline Leonard Izzy McDonald | Alex Porter | Carly Smith

FRANK BOLELLA

My third year at Boston University was definitely the most successful one thus far. In the fall 2014 semester, I earned a perfect 4.0 GPA in the business school’s most rigorous course load while serving as a career counselor at the school’s career center. Also during that semester, I served as the treasurer of my fraternity (Chi Phi), which further honed my leadership skills and prepared me to serve as the president for the 2015 calendar year. During spring 2015, I supplemented my duties to the fraternity and career center by becoming a teacher’s

I can’t believe we’re seniors in college, graduating to the real world this May! I’ve loved my time at Elon University so far, and I’ve decided to pursue a career in advertising in New York City after graduation. I spent this past summer in Los Angeles with an internship in fashion PR. The beaches, weather, and food were unbeatable! As for this fall, I’m interning in Durham, North Carolina, with an advertising agency called McKinney. It’s so amazing and makes me even more excited to graduate.

ANNIE PITKIN

Pitkin is the ninth player in school history to earn UAA Player of the Year honors and the first since 2010. She posted a 20-6 record with a 1.32 earned run average with nine shutouts and 20 complete games. Pitkin ranks third in NCAA Division III in strikeouts (224) and wins, and fourth in shutouts (eight). She posted a 5-1 mark with a save and a 1.45 ERA to earn UAA Championship All-Tournament Team honors. Pitkin tossed a no-hitter, the third of her career in a 12-0 win in six innings at Principia College.


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01 Xavier Pollard ’10 playing basketball his senior year at Kent State University

05 Matt Tolosky ’10, Taylor Endress ’10, and Paul Faude ’10 during Reunion weekend

02 Harry Melendez III ‘07, Shelter Wein ‘11, Katherin Perry ‘11, Colin Pascoe ‘13, Taylor Walston ‘10, Michelle Autuori ‘10, Lorenzo Bernardez ‘11, Mary Perry ‘07, and Ginny McDermott ‘10 gather prior to the Suffield at Yankee Stadium event in August

06 Class of 2012 graduates, Jazzy Salehi, Gabi Webb, Grace Vianney and Molly Stromoski, enjoy a break from working Summer Academy this summer

03 Everest ’10 and Shelter Wein ’11 hold their medals after completing the New York City Marathon in November 04 Taylor Walston ’10, Ginny McDermott ’10, Tyler Arnold ’10, Kim Autuori ’10, Sasha Derby ’18, Jacqueline Autuori ’13, Michelle Autuori ’10, and Serge Derby ’10 gather this summer in Martha’s Vineyard

07 Chris Sonberg ’12, Jazzy Salehi ’12, and Gabi Webb ’12 on a weekend trip during Summer Academy 08 Caroline Leonard ’12 at the “Pink Wall” on Melrose in Los Angeles, California

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01 Paul McCarthy ‘12 named NESCAC player of the week in September 02 James Reimer ‘13 and Matt Powers ‘14 at the Rollins College spring formal 03 Shane Hennessey ‘05, Sean Hennessey P’05, Jamie Johnson ‘13, and Chris Williamson gather in New Orleans 04 Jeremy Port ’13 at the Cliffs of Moher in County Clare, Ireland, during spring break from his semester abroad in Germany 05 Jaclyn ‘12 and Kirsten Chalke ‘08 at the Penn State vs. Indiana football game in October

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86 SUFFIELD Class Notes

06 Caroline Skofterud-Nilsen ‘14, Chelsea Kane ‘09, Harry Melendez III ‘07, and Karoline Hegbom ‘11 gather in Como, Italy, during Suffield’s spring trip 07 Members of the Class of 2014 convene at AT&T Stadium in Dallas for Alabama vs. Wisconsin college football game 08 Chris McCormick ‘13, Sarah Pickup ‘15, Livvie Calligiuri ‘15, Zach McCormick ‘14, Taylor Peucker ’11, Kim Wiggin P’06, Christian Wilkins ‘15, Kelly Taylor ‘15, Brooke Depelteau, Jeff Depelteau ‘02, Ali Vietch ‘15 09 Sarah Pickup ’15 and Ben Cooper ’14 during pre-season swimming at Hamilton College


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01 Julia Miller ‘14 and teammates at Franklin Pierce University after a 5:30 a.m. lacrosse practice

JULIA MALOOF

Undergrad at Hopkins has been stressful but definitely worth it. I’m an international studies and sociology major with a focus on global development. It’s crazy how fast the time flies. I will graduate in the spring and am currently applying to development jobs and Arabic language programs in the Middle East. I’m definitely hoping to come see Suffield again soon; I’ve heard a lot has changed since our class graduated.

2013

Georgina Blakeley | Andrés Fernández Vílchez Jay Fields | Jamie Johnson | Wynn Mason Chris McCormick | Paul Metscher Noel Nakamura | Jay O’Brien | Jay Prasad Emilio Rocha | Mike Simmons

OLIVIA FIALLO

Hello to all at Suffield! I hope the new facilities are treating faculty and students well. I have had the pleasure to stop by campus and watch the construction progress during my holiday breaks back up North. Things in Charleston, South Carolina, are going great, but time is moving so quickly. College has gone by even faster than my four years at Suffield. We have just concluded our fall break at the College of Charleston where I was able to show my brother Dominic ’12 around town and get him out of

02 Tristan Grush ‘15 and Neelam Mahtani ‘14 at The Inner Harbor in Baltimore, Maryland

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03 Josh Hillman ‘14 has traded in his running shoes for some climbing shoes

the cold weather in Ohio. As for academics, I look forward to next semester, where I will be interning with the public defender’s office in downtown Charleston. Additionally, this summer I will be traveling to Buenos Aires, Argentina, and living with a host family for three months. I will be taking Spanish courses and look forward to finally knowing my father’s native language. My younger brother, John Fiallo, is a sophomore at Loomis Chaffee this year. My family and I will be traveling to Switzerland to watch him and his teammates play hockey there for Christmas! I send my best to everyone at Suffield and am hoping to visit again soon.

JOSH HILLMAN

2014

EMILY HUDSON

Kevin Cournoyer | Julie Doten | Sam Feldman Charlotte Hinrichs | Shivang Jhunjhnuwala Briana Matthews | Brice McAllister Zach McCormick | Jono Nelson | Alexis Sarris Denny Smythe | Izzy Thompson

JASMINE BROOKS

I decided to transfer to Boston University this fall. I’m studying in the School of Theatre and I couldn’t be happier! It is so exciting to be learning from such talented professors. Even though I am enjoying BU, I miss my friends and teachers at Suffield. I hope everyone is doing well!

Red leaves and brisk air remind me of running cross country. I remember how farm views in the back fields distracted me from running pains. Both my junior and senior years started with exploring those beautiful country fields. Even if I didn’t want to run on certain days, cross country was worth doing just for the site seeing. It was the best setting to build character and learn about life from Coach Schildge. That is what every experience at Suffield was truly about, getting more in touch with the world, and with life. It all started when the leaves changed colors. Lately, I switched from running to hiking and climbing.

Undergrad life at UC Santa Barbara has been amazing thus far. As a sophomore, I now live less than a mile from the beach. Although I love the sunny weather Southern California holds, it does make me miss the beautiful colors during fall time at Suffield. I am as excited as ever to be completing my teacher training program to become a fully certified yoga instructor, and I hope that I will be able to teach at Suffield’s yoga barn in the future!

ALEXIS SARRIS

I am now a Sophomore at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York. I am a political science major and I’ve decided that I want to go to law

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01 Max Beitler ‘15 and Riggs McDermott ‘15 at a Southern Methodist University SAE event

school. I’m also in a sorority, Alpha Epsilon Phi, and couldn’t be any happier. Fall at Hofstra is beautiful, but not quite as beautiful as Suffield. I am missing everyone at Suffield and wish everyone only the best!

IZA UGARTE

I have just recently transferred to Les Roches Marbella, Spain, to study hospitality management. It has a diverse student body of around 500 people. The classes are very rigorous and hands-on. It reminds me so much of Suffield, dining hall work jobs, dish crew,vand even Mrs. McCarthy’s Spanish class. The only thing missing is a Bell Hill sunset. Shout out to my fellow classmates and Barry Cleary.

2015

Nick Alfano | Sarah Apkin | Mike Barit Hannah Bellorado | Abby Blyler | Olivia Caligiuri Rhi Fletcher | Brad Gibson | Andy Guo Owen Hern | Pierson Holliday | Gray Johnson Jahi Locke | Emily Lowe | Marysa Massoia Kim Meunier | Endy Morales | Sarah Pickup Kelly Taylor | Ingunn Ukvitne Ali Veitch | Christian Wilkins

MAX BEITLER

Looking back at Suffield, going to the Union was the most important task at hand, but I realize now that one must get their work done first. If you want to choose where you go to college, get your work done first, or your college will choose you. Sending my best to all my classmates!

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02 Family and friends support Christian Wilkins ‘15 at his first game at Clemson University

ABBY BLYLER

I have fallen in love with Middlebury. It is an extremely rigorous environment, but I am having a blast playing soccer, and the team reminds me so much of the Suffield community. They are some of the best people I have encountered, and I so look forward to coming back to Suffield to visit.

WILL BUCKFIRE

So far U of M is great. Since starting, I have become a member of the sailing team, and recently became a brother of Sigma Pi. I have also been able to enjoy the great football season we are having thanks to our new coach. Go, Blue!

ANDY COLBY

I am very happy at Gettysburg because of the unbelievable amount of free time that I have and because I can eat whenever I want. It is beautiful here in Pennsylvania. I hope all of my classmates are doing well!

KIRA DEMETRIUS

Even though it’s crazy, I miss the constant sound and smell of cutting and re-cutting the grass at Suffield, and of course, the iconic Suffield sunsets over the autumn leaves out across the mountains.

RHIANNON FLETCHER

I am loving CU Boulder and Colorado in general so far. The people are great, classes are going well and the sunshine and being outdoors is incredible. I have been on some beautiful runs, hikes, and day trips but I still miss venturing out to the solo barn back at Suffield!

ROBBIE HEUMANN

Definitely some of my best memories from Suffield are of the soccer team: beating Taft at Taft senior year, the Westy night games, and many more. I was fortunate enough to have such a great mix of players and coaches that made the experience so sublime for me. I made some of my best friends through the soccer team. I haven’t met anyone from any other school who can say they made the same relationships through any team they have been on. Being on the team was basically being part of a big family for me. It’s so rare to be part of something like that. Shout out to Coach Warren and anyone else who plays, has played or been involved with the Suffield Academy varsity soccer team.

DREW MAHONEY

The transition to Bentley has been a successful one thus far, and I am very happy with my decision. On the football front, adjusting to the speed of the game has not been easy. I am looking forward to experiencing an off-season with the program to continue helping me develop on the field. I hope all of my classmates are doing well, and I look forward to getting back on campus soon.

KIMMIE MEUNIER

I am really enjoying Santa Clara thus far, soaking up all the sun I can. I would be lying if I said I didn’t miss the fall foliage and the excitement of field hockey season, but I must say that I do not miss the snow storms. I am so jealous of the new spaces on campus that were definitely worth that long construction period. I’ll just have to come back and visit to be able to enjoy them fully. I hope all is going well at Suffield!


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01 Mike Manoogian ‘15 at Andrew Chuma ‘15 and Trent Crossan’s ‘15 Lafayette football game 02 Jackie Zhang ’15 “everyday life in New York City” 03 Emily Lowe ‘15 and Nick Alfano ‘15 enjoy the USC upset over #3 Utah at the Coliseum 04 Class of 2015: Alec Turer, Brad Gibson, Owen Hern, and Danyal Panjwani on Columbus Day weekend at Clemson football game

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05 Christian Wilkins ‘15 and Brice McAllister ‘14 with former teammates, Hunter Newman ‘16 and JJ Kang ‘16 at Suffield vs. Deerfield football game 06 Caitlin Marshall ‘15 and Sarah Apkin ‘15 at the Wake Forest vs. Elon football game 07 Mike Manoogian ‘15 will play baseball for LaSalle University 08 Rhiannon Fletcher ’15 on a hike in Colorado

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01 Endy Morales ‘15 visiting Suffield and reminiscing about the amazing sunsets on Bell Hill

ENDY MORALES

The fall season at Suffield was probably the best time of the year for me personally. The weather was perfect for football, new friends were made, and the best Bell Hill sunset pictures were taken. The fall was also great for me because it meant that my classmates and I still had a whole school year to enjoy and make the memories that will last a lifetime. Sending my best to the Class of 2015.

SARAH PICKUP

All is well up at Hamilton College so far! I have quickly fallen into the routine of classes and Hamilton life just in time to start the winter

02 Sarah Apkin ‘15 and Caitlin Marshall ‘15 support Christian Wilkins ‘15 at his game at North Carolina State on Halloween

diving season. With only a few official practices under my belt, I am excited for the season and ready to face the challenges of being a studentathlete. It is definitely nice being in the pool again with Ben Cooper ’14, and we are both looking forward to a successful season.

INGUNN UKVITNE

Hi Suffield! I hope everything is good in Connecticut. I am currently studying Arabic, Russian, and social anthropology at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, and I am having the time of my life. I have met so many incredible people. The town is incredible and although I was very uncertain and scared

03 Livvie Caliguiri ‘15, Christian Wilkins ‘15, and Montana Armata ‘13

about what I was getting myself into, I have not regretted it for a second. There is a whole network of East Coast prep school alumni here, as well as other Americans, mixed in with the brightest British minds and people from around the globe. My daily life at “uni” is a whole lot of fun and a whole lot of studying. I continue to wonder, seeing as St. Andrews is where Prince William met Kate, will I also find my prince? I hope all of you are having a great fall (or autumn as they say here). And to all seniors, don’t be afraid to make a bold college/university choice! You truly don’t know what you could be missing out on.

SUBMIT YOUR CLASS NOTES FOR THE NEXT ISSUE OF SUFFIELD SUFFIELDACADEMY.ORG/CLASSNOTES (DEADLINE IS 04.01.16)

Send your class note and photograph(s) to Harry Melendez III ’07, Director of Alumni Relations 185 North Main Street Suffield, Connecticut 06078 | hmelendez@suffieldacademy.org Note If submitting digitally through email, please send a high-quality JPEG file (preferably 1MB or larger) to suffield.magazine@gmail.com | If submitting prints through the mail, please send a photo-lab quality print

90 SUFFIELD Class Notes


S UFFI E L D

on the F I E LD

MEMBERS OF SUFFIELD’S ALUMNI MET THIS FALL FOR A BALL GAME AT THREE OF BASEBALL’S MOST HONORED STADIUMS: FENWAY PARK, WRIGLEY FIELD, AND YANKEE STADIUM. EACH GAME WAS PRECEDED BY A SOCIAL GATHERING AT A NEARBY RESTAURANT. ON AUGUST 6, ALUMNI VISITED THE YANKEE TAVERN BEFORE A TIGHT-SCORING BATTLE AGAINST THE VISITING BOSTON RED SOX. OTHER ALUMNI MET AT BERNIE’S CHICAGO ON AUGUST 8 AS THE CUBS HOSTED THE SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS. FINALLY, ALUMNI FANS IN BOSTON GATHERED AT THE YARDE HOUSE BEFORE WATCHING THEIR RED SOX DEFEAT THE ROYALS ON AUGUST 20. ALL THREE EVENTS SUCCESSFULLY REUNITED FORMER CLASSMATES AND FRIENDS AS THEY TOOK CHEER AND ENJOYED OUR NATIONAL PASTIME.

FENWAY PARK

YANKEE STADIUM

WRIGLEY FIELD

FENWAY PARK Paul Faude ‘10, Carly Keely ‘08, Amy Samenuk ‘09, Harry Melendez III ‘07, Steve Root ‘06, Kristen Keyes ‘10, Ernie Menold, Kaela Keyes ‘08, Mark Fruce ‘07, Barbara Kaplan ‘08, and Alison Leonard ‘06 YANKEE STADIUM Front row Colin Pascoe ‘13, Shelter Wein ‘11, Michelle Autuori ‘10, Mariama Perry ‘07, Ginny McDermott ‘10, Taylor Walston ‘10, and Katherine Perry ‘11 Back row Nancy and Gerry LaPlante P‘04, ‘06, Jeannie LaPlante ‘04, Craig Beall, Kristen LaPlante ‘06, Richie Freckleton ‘13, Lorenzo Bernardez ‘11, and Harry Melendez III ‘07 WRIGLEY FIELD Patrick Kennedy ‘91, Tim Kennedy ‘91, Mike DeLio ‘08, Bill Aldrich ‘74, Peter Mitchell ‘84, Mike Jacobs ‘09, Callie Aldrich ‘10, Adam Jacobs ‘09, Larry Griffin ‘99, Tom Skalkos ‘07, and Harry Melendez III ‘07

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e Weddings 01 Kyle Powers ’05 to Sara Sousa {9.5.15} 02 Mariah Gonzalez ’10 to Corporal Caleb Hayes of the United States Marine Corps. {7.28.15} 03 & 04 Will Doar ’06 to Katy Heydinger ’07 {8.8.15}

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05 Drew Betts ’06 to Amanda Camerota ’06 {7.3.15} 06 Kate Braden ‘04 to Brian Mounkhall on {6.6.15} 07 Page Adams ’07 to Peter Adams {7.24.15} 08 Elizabeth Lowden ‘96 to Erik Trotter on {10.4.14} 09 Alessandra Perna ’07 to Mario Carullo {8.29.15} 10 David Kiarsis ’05 to Sierra Kiarsis {8.22.15} 11 Aubrey Butcher ’06 to Aaron Feliciano {8.22.15} Photo courtesy of Ana Mtz and Jacob Murphy 11

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Engagements 01 Colin Riendeau ’01 to Shelly Fuchs 02 Kim Autuori ’06 to Zak Weisberg 03 Rob Schnabel ’99 to Alicia Pulver 04 Julia Imbelli ’07 to Michael Sanders 01

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01 To Ashley Beaudoin Wilkins ’03 and husband Andrew: Jacob Logan on 10.05.15 {boy} 02 To Amy Terceira ’99 and partner Anthony Garzia: Sebastien Lee Terceira Garzia on 01.11.15 {boy}

06 To Matt Fine ‘95 and wife Laurel: George Matthew and Rose Helen on 07.05.15 {twins: boy & girl} 07 To Ryan Cleary ’03 and his wife Erin: Sloane Carolyn Cleary on 11.16.15 {girl}

03 To Cassie Daniels ’07 and fiance Jose: Adrian Edward Daniels Diaz on 10.01.15 {boy}

08 To Katie Slocum Schelling ‘98 and husband Doug: Hana Theodora Slocum on 03.31.15 {girl}

04 To Jeff Beaudette ’99 and wife Lyndsey: Matthew Joseph on 10.01.15 {boy}

09 To Elsie Prichard Prior ’03 and husband Ian: Caroline Walker on 07.20.15 {girl}

05 To Larry Griffin ’99 and wife Mollie: Nicholas Lawrence on 10.05.15 {boy}

10 To Mike Athas ’03 and wife Lauren: Margare on 09.01.15 {girl}

11 To Carmine Petrone ’00 and wife Mariana: Vincent Luis on 07.26.15 {boy} 12 To Hilary Golas Rouse ’02 and husband Dave: Jack Richard on 08.20.15 {boy} 13 To Tara Klevay Slabe ’02 and husband Tim: Piper Shay on 07.07.15 {girl} 14 To Lydia Pillsbury ’03 and husband Jesse: Willa Stone on 09.28.15 {girl} 15 To Steven Darling ‘99 and wife Alison: George Samuel on 10.15.15 {boy}

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Friday, April 22, 2016

THE SUFFIELD ACADEMY PARENTS’ ASSOCIATION AUCTION IS NOW ONLINE: AUCTION.SUFFIELDACADEMY.ORG BIDDING CATEGORIES RANGE FROM LUXURIOUS VACATIONS TO SPORTING EVENTS, FINE ART, JEWELRY, AND RESTAURANTS. THERE ARE PLENTY OF ITEMS TO INTEREST EVERYONE. BID OFTEN AND WATCH YOUR ITEM(S) ONLINE. FOR QUESTIONS ABOUT THE PARENTS’ ASSOCIATION AUCTION PLEASE CONTACT: PENN SULLIVAN: PSULLIVAN@SUFFIELDACADEMY.ORG OR 860.386.4465


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Pom Pom Hat $20 Black & Orange Scarf $15

Vineyard Vines Bow tie $40 L.L. Bean Pack-A-Way Vest in Cayenne $120

Black Crew Sweatshirt $30


summer academy at suffield

FOR M ORE I N F O R M A T I O N P L E A S E C O N T A C T Ky le Vigneault , Dir e cto r o f A d mi s s i o n s fo r S u mme r A cad e my 860-386-448 2 | k vi g n e a u l t@ s u ffi e l d a ca d e my. o rg

suffieldacademy.org/summer


SUFFIELD ACADEMY 185 NORTH MAIN STREET SUFFIELD, CONNECTICUT 06078

SUFFIELD Alumni Magazine Fall/Winter 2015-16  
SUFFIELD Alumni Magazine Fall/Winter 2015-16