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DIVE INTO SACRAMENTO & ITS SURROUNDING AREAS

FEBRUARY 12 – 26, 2019

# 311

YOUTH CODE HOWLS FROM BEYOND

SMALL AS ALISTEN, GIANT AND CHANGE A LIFE

O, CANADA! ROAD TRIPPING IN THE PROVINCES

PISSCAT THE NEW NORMAL

NATE CURRY HELLA POSITIVE

+

BROOKLYN BUZZ BAND BEACH FOSSILS COMES TO DAVIS SACRAMENTO JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL TURNS 21

FREE

CUPCAKES & BEER SOUNDS LIKE VALENTINE’S DAY TO US


2708 J Street SACRAMENTO 916.441.4693 HARLOWS.COM * ALL Thursday 8PM $20adv 21+ Friday

FEB 14

TJ UPSHAW, DE APOLLO, NICK LAVELLE

LOVETOWN II

Sunday

TACOCAT

8PM $15adv 21+

Sunday

LOW! TIX

LUND + GUCCIHIGHWATERS

FEB 16

6PM $16adv all ages

GUARDIN, CORY WELLS

Tuesday

MAGIC CITY HIPPIES

FEB 18

7PM $15adv all ages

LOW! TIX

FEB 21 + FEB 22

THE PALMS

THE JIMMY DORE O S LD SHOW LIVE OUT

6:30 & 2PM $25adv 18+ Friday

WYCLEF JEAN

FEB 21

10:30PM $32.50adv 21+

fri FEB 21 9:30PM | 21+

KALI STREETZ, DRE’, JU$T PAID & MORE

sun MAR 1 6PM | ALL AGES

HABIBI

RUDY DE ANDA

2

MOLLY SARLE

Thursday

FEB 27

7PM $20adv 21+ Friday

FEB 28 5:30PM $25 all ages

Saturday

MAR 7

8PM $16adv 21+

BADFISH:

SUBLIME TRIBUTE

Wednesday

MAR 11

TROPIDELIC, LAW

6PM $15adv all ages

COMBO CHIMBITA, Y LA BAMBA

Saturday

MAR 14

8PM $20adv 21+

SAN CHA

DUSTBOWL REVIVAL

3.15 3.16 3.17 3.18 3.19 3.20 3.21 3.25 3.27 3.28 3.29 4.01 4.03 4.04 4.09 4.11 4.15 4.19 4.20 4.30 5.02 5.05 5.06 5.14 5.30 6.02 6.06 6.07 6.09 6.12 6.28

JARED & THE MILL

LOW! TIX

LAS CAFETERAS

Saturday

FEB 29

8PM $20adv 21+

SOLD OUT

6PM $25 all ages

fri FEB 14 9PM | 21+

LOWER DENS AMI DANG

ERIC GALES sat FEB 15 6:30PM | ALL AGES

sun FEB 16 7PM | 21+

LOW! TIX

CHURCH OF MISERY BLACK WIZARD, WIZARD RIFLE

MUSTACHE HARBOR THE YACHT ROCK EXPLOSION!

MAOLI

CRSB, EAZY DUB

DRAKE BELL ZACH VAN DYCK

METALACHI

HEAVY METAL MARIACHI CLOWNVIS PRESLEY

COMING SOON

Sunday

THE HONEST

LOW! TIX

GayC/DC Dan Deacon Summer Salt Fantastic Negrito Yob Tainted Love Heartless Shing02 & the Chee-Hoos Wonder Bread 5 Petty Theft The Detroit Cobras Big Kahuna’s Nite Out of Montreal This Charming Band Mod Sun Pop Rocks Code Orange The James Hunter Six Poliça Agent Orange Goodie Mob ft. Cee-Lo Green Mudhoney Margaret Glaspy Groundation Melt-Banana Fuzz The Blasters Yung Pinch Southern Culture on the Skids Nikka Costa Electric Six

wed FEB 19 5:30PM | ALL AGES

BLUES & BOURBON / CD RELEASE PARTY

OCCUPY THE TREES, THE SEAFLOOR CINEMA

FLEETWOOD MAC VS. ABBA TRIBUTE

ODE TO SATURDAY, CELSIUS, LEVI MOSES

PART TIME, GARY WILSON BRYSON CONE

MARK HUMMEL’S DEEP BASEMENT SHAKERS

sat FEB 22 6PM | ALL AGES

sun FEB 23 6PM | ALL AGES

tue FEB 25 6PM | ALL AGES

wed FEB 26 5:30PM | ALL AGES

fri FEB 28 8PM | 21+

SOLD OUT

ALL THINGS INDIE SHOWCASE

TRE SOLID

7PM $15adv 21+

MAR 1

thu FEB 13 7PM | ALL AGES

2708 J Street

FEB 26

9PM $15adv 21+

ANDY SHAUF

7PM $17adv all ages

Wednesday

FEB 15

Friday

MAR 6

FEB 23

CAMILLA COVINGTON, IGWE AKA

Saturday

7PM $20adv 21+

TIMES ARE DOOR TIMES*

FEB 22

8PM $22adv 21+

HARRIS RUDMAN, NATE CURRY

6:30PM $15adv all ages

MAR 4

Saturday

ADRIAN MARCEL

FEB 13

Wednesday

LOS RETROS, KWE$T AUSTN

wed MAR 4 5:30PM | ALL AGES BLUES & BOURBON

THE PISTOFFERSON BROTHERS

LOW! TIX

THE RED PEARS

LUNA LUNA

fri MAR 6 6:30PM | ALL AGES

sun MAR 8 7PM | 21+

MULHERIN

AEQUOREA, BLUE OAKS

THE COUNTERMEN

ZACK VILLERE

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

HELLADUSTY

BLACKWATER HOLYLIGHT

BLUES & BOURBON

AARON MORENO & FRIENDS

mon MAR 9 6PM | ALL AGES CHRIS OW RENZEMA LTIX! RY COX

SHIGETO LIVE ENSEMBLE

fri MAR 13 8PM | 21+ THE STONE FOXES STRANGE VINE

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


Give Keep

HOLIDAY SEASON S H O P THISor To LOCAL to CUSTOM JEWELRY, REPAIR AND ARTISAN GIFTS

LOCALLY MADE VALENTINE’S DAY GIFTS

LITTLE RELICS LITTLE RELICS

BOUTIQUE 1111 24th St. #103 & GALLERIA Midtown Sacramento 95816

1/2

PAGE

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1/4th

PAGE

Ad SizeS for every Budget!

Contact Us Now for Rates

916.441.3803

info@submergemag.com 1/8th

PAGE

SubmergeMag.com

1/12th

PAGE

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

3


1517 21 st Street Sacramento

Holydiversac.com

All Ages & Bar Music Venue

FRI FEBRUARY 14 • 7PM

SAT FEBRUARY 15 • 8PM • 21+

THU FEBRUARY 2O • 6:3OPM

FRI FEBRUARY 21 • 7PM plus special guest

Mandy Harris Williams

SAT FEBRUARY 22 • 7PM

SUN FEBRUARY 23 • 6PM plus special guests

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

MON FEBRUARY 24 • 7PM

THU FEBRUARY 27 • 7PM

SUN MARCH 1 • 6:3OPM

PIMP TOBI, TEEJAYX6 THU MARCH 5 • 7PM

SUN MARCH 8 • 7PM

WED MARCH 11 • 7PM

GYMSHORTS and TWOMPSAX

NOBIGDYL.

FRI FEBRUARY 28 • 7PM

SAT FEBRUARY 29 • 6:3OPM

P.MO AND THE NEW CROWNS

FRI MARCH 6 • 7PM 4

SAT MARCH 7 • 7PM

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


1517 21 st Street Sacramento Holydiversac.com

FRI MARCH 13 • 7PM

WED MARCH 18 • 7PM

THU MARCH 19 • 7PM

ng Servi

ow gle sh n i s y r at eve

FRI MARCH 2O • 7PM

coming soon

SAT MARCH 21 • 7PM

MON MARCH 23 • 7PM

FRI MARCH 27 • 6:3OPM WITH SPECIAL GUEST LITTLE STRANGER

SAT MARCH 28 • 7PM

SUN MARCH 29 • 7PM

THU APRIL 2 • 7PM

FRI APRIL 3 • 7PM

SAT APRIL 4 • 7PM

SUN APRIL 5 • 6PM

SubmergeMag.com

FEBRUARY 16: GIRLS sold out THE MOVEMENT APRIL 25: HOLLYN APRIL 26: FEBRUARY 18: ARMS AKIMBO sold out IANN DIOR APRIL 29: FEBRUARY 26: HOT CHELLE RAE sold out OLIVIA O’BRIEN APRIL 3O: BLITZKID MAY 1: MARCH 12: LIL DEBBIE sold out CITY MORGUE MAY 2: AMERICAN HEAD CHARGE MARCH 14: sold out MAY 3: KNUCKLE PUCK CHRISTIAN DEATH MARCH 22: MAY 12: TWITCH ANGRY MOON HOOCH APRIL 7: OH, ROSE MAY 16: SWALLOW APRIL 9: PRO-PAIN THE SUN APRIL 1O: PHANGS MAY 17: FATHER APRIL 15: MAY 19: GREER THE BIRTHDAY MAY 27: ANTI-FLAG MASSACRE APRIL 17 & 18: MAY 29: GREEN JELLY MAY 31: FLOTSAM LYNCH MOB & JETSAM APRIL 22: JULY 1O: POWERGOVE DEVIN THE DUDE APRIL 23: DARKEST HOUR SEPTEMBER 14: AMARANTHE APRIL 24: OCTOBER 18: STRAWBERRY

SO MUCH Issue 311 LIGHT, • February 12 – February 26, 2020 CATBAMBOO AND ROMAN PILOT

5


Serving Netillo’s Takos! 1630 J Street SACRAMENTO (916) 476-5076 Thursday February 13 7:30pm | $22 | all ages

the delta bombers

Bobby Zoppi

Reckless Ones

$1 OFF ALL BEERS ALL DAY LONG

plus special guests

plus special guest

Saturday February 29 | 7:30pm | $16 | all ages

Friday February 14 7:30pm | $20 | all ages

The Aggrolites

Marty O’Reilly

& the Old Soul Orchestra Saturday February 15 | 7:30pm | $15 | all ages OF MOTHER HIPS

Greg Loiacono

Thursday February 20 | 7:30pm | free | all ages

The Overcoats

Zephyr and Band of Coyotes plus

Thursday March 5 | 7:30pm | $12 | all ages

Boy Named Banjo me&you

plus guests

Friday March 6 7:30pm | $10 | all ages

Ezra Bell

plus special guest

The Sam Chase Sunday February 23 7:30pm | $15 | all ages

Saturday March 7 7pm | free

UFC 248

Zach Deputy

Adesanya vs

Romero

Monday February 24 | 7:30pm | $12 | all ages

Mike & The Moonpies

COMING SOON:

Quaker City Night Hawks

6

Mar 21 Mar 29 Apr 1 Apr 5

Sunday March 8 7:30pm | $22 | all ages

Hot Snakes

Camilo Septimo Kolohe Kai (sold out) Apr 16&17 Casey Donahew Apr 26 Mikel Erentxun

plus special guests

Kills Birds

Jason Boland

Apr 14

May 10 Jim Lauderdale

Flipturn Jason Hawk Harris Corb Lund

Apr 15

May 23 Supersuckers

& The Stragglers

Tuesdays!

$1 TACOS +

Wednesday February 26 7:30pm | $12 | all ages

Jerrod Niemann

Taco

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

June 4

Gondwana

plus guests

me&you

STARTING AT 10PM

FVME

DJs OASIS JOSEPH ONE & FRIENDS

DJs every Friday , Saturda y STARTING AT 10PM

21 TVs your spot for free

UFC PPV,

nba & nhl

BOOK YOUR NEXT EVENT AT GOLDFIELD!

Corporate Events, Private Parties, Birthday’s & More F O R M O R E I N F O V I S I T G O L D F I E L DT R A D I N G P O S T. CO M

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


COFOUNDER/ EDITOR IN CHIEF/ ART DIRECTOR

311 2020 Submerge: an independently owned entertainment/lifestyle publication available for free biweekly throughout the greater Sacramento area.

FEBRUARY 12 – 26

22

16

Melissa Welliver melissa@ submergemag.com COFOUNDER/ ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Jonathan Carabba jonathan@ submergemag.com SENIOR EDITOR

James Barone ASSISTANT EDITOR

Ryan Prado

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Ellen Baker, Robin Bacior, Robert Berry, Syrah Caparas, Michael Cella, Bocephus Chigger, Ronnie Cline, Justin Cox, Alia Cruz, Miranda Culp, Brittney Delgado, Josh Fernandez, Lovelle Harris, Mollie Hawkins, Tyler Horst, Ryan Kaika, Niki Kangas, Nur Kausar, Grant Miner, Olivia Monahan, John Phillips, Paul Piazza, Claudia Rivas, Daniel Romandia, Andrew Russell, Bailey Snow, Jacob Sprecher, Richard St. Ofle CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Wesley Davis, Evan Duran, Dillon Flowers, Julia E. Heath, Jon Hermison, Paul Piazza, Tyrel Tesch

18

Submerge

P.O. Box 160282 Sacramento, California 95816

916.441.3803 info@ submergemag.com

24 07

DIVE IN

18

PISSCAT

08

THE STREAM

20

CALENDAR

09

OPTIMISTIC PESSIMIST

22

YOUTH CODE

10

OUTSIDE THE 9-TO-5

DESTINATION: CANADA

24

NATE CURRY

12

SUBMERGE YOUR SENSES

26

THE SHALLOW END

16

ISE LYFE'S SMALL AS A GIANT EXHIBIT

SubmergeMag.com

Content is property of Submerge and may not be reproduced without permission. Submerge is both owned and published by Submerge Media. All opinions expressed throughout Submerge are those of the author and do not necessarily mean we all share those opinions. Feel free to take a copy or two for free, but please don’t remove our papers or throw them away. Submerge welcomes letters of all kinds, whether they are full of love or hate. We want to know what is on your mind, so feel free to contact us via snail mail at P.O. Box 160282, Sacramento, California 95816. Or you can email us at info@submergemag.com.

SUBMERGEMAG.COM Follow us on Twitter & Instagram! @SubmergeMag PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER

FRONT COVER PHOTO OF NATE CURRY BY BAEGOD BACK COVER PHOTO OF YOUTH CODE COURTESY OF SARA TAYLOR

DIVE IN PATIENCE IS A VIRTUE

SHOWS AT SAC STATE SPONSORED BY UNIQUE PROGRAMS

FOR MORE INFO: WWW.SACSTATEUNIQUE.COM OR CALL: (916)278–6997 LECTURE

MELISSA WELLIVER melissa@submergemag.com For this issue, we have three solid music features, and it turns out everyone involved was super passionate about what or who they wrote about and have wanted to cover them for years. Luckily, we’re still here and in print, so we finally get to do so! On our front cover is Nate Curry, someone who I’ve wanted to feature forever but missed the opportunity around his latest release, Self Distraction (released August 2019). Our contributor Ryan Kaika felt the same way and continually brought up Curry, but we were both faced with bad timing. We wanted to feature Curry when there was a show we could plug. On occasion, we tend to find out about the shows too late, or in the case of when he opened for Hobo Johnson, the show instantly sold out. With his upcoming Valentine’s Day show at Harlow’s on Feb. 14, and with a solid local bill featuring Harris Rudman, Igwe Aka and Camilla Covington, we had to jump on the opportunity even if the show is only a few days into the issue. At least his story gets told and lives on forever (since we post our features to our website). Please read up on how Nate Curry is elevating the local hip-hop scene starting on page 24. Local hardcore punk band, Pisscat, was someone who was always on my radar. I mean, with a name like Pisscat, you don’t ever forget it. I remember our contributor Justin Cox brought them up in 2015 around their release Convenience and Chaos. I know we were both keeping our eyes on an album release show, but I’m not quite sure what happened. Luckily they’re back with a new EP, A Normal Life, so we finally get to feature the band that Cox has been a fan of forever but has also gone on and formed a band-to-band relationship with. Read up on Pisscat starting on page 18, and catch their release show at Café Colonial on Feb. 28 with bands Omnigul, Original State, Good Shit and No Pressure. Last but not least, our back cover, Youth Code, has been one of my favorite bands ever since discovering them when Chelsea Wolfe brought her Hiss Spun North American Tour to Ace of Spades back in November 2017. Our contributor Andrew Russell really wanted to interview Youth Code for that tour, but I thought it was a better idea to interview Wolfe, since she had a new album out and was from here. After I witnessed Youth Code’s amazing performance, I knew that the next time they came to town, we had to feature them. This interview came together at the very last second, and I couldn’t be more excited to land an interview with Sara Taylor (see page 22). I cannot wait to see them when they open for Refused and METZ at Ace of Spades on March 8! Read. Learn. Do rad things, Melissa Welliver

BOOTS RILEY THUR • FEB 13 • 7:30P • UNIVERSITY UNION BALLROOM FREE: rapper, community organizer, and writer/director of the film Sorry to Bother You

COMEDY

NOONER

BLACK GREEK COMEDY SHOWCASE HOSTED BY E. CLARK (KAPPA ALPHA PSI)

WED • FEB 19 • 12:00P • UNIVERSITY UNION REDWOOD ROOM FREE: Afro soul concert

THUR • FEB 20 • 7:30P • UNIVERSITY UNION BALLROOM FREE: feat. stand up by LeLe Mason (Delta Sigma Theta), Steph Sanders (Kappa Alpha Psi), Kanisha Buss (Zeta Phi Beta), Kente Scott (Alpha Phi Alpha), and music by DJ Quelly Quell

NOONER

EVENT

WED • FEB 26 • 12:00P • UNIVERSITY UNION REDWOOD ROOM FREE: instructed by Melissa Muganzo, featuring music from Beyonce’s The Lion King: The Gift soundtrack

THUR • FEB 27 • 7:00P • UNIVERSITY UNION BALLROOM Stage production, edited by Eve Ensler of The Vagina Monologues, Tickets are $5 Sac State students, $7 Community College Students, and $10 General Admission, available online at www.SacStateUNIQUE.com or at the ASI Student Shop.

NOONER

NOONER

SACRAMENTO TAIKO DAN WED • MAR 4 • 12:00P • UNIVERSITY UNION REDWOOD ROOM FREE: traditional Japanese drumming

MONA V WED • MAR 11 • 12:00P • UNIVERSITY UNION REDWOOD ROOM FREE: soul singer-songwriter

Sculptural work by Sarah Perez that blends the organic & the geometric.

Exhibit Dates: February 17–March 12 Reception: Thursday, February 20, 6:00–8:00 pm Show and receptions are free and open to the public. Hours: Monday–Friday, 10:30 am–3:30 pm + Special Evening Hours Wednesdays & Thursdays, 5:00–8:00 pm

University Union, 2nd Floor—Sacramento State, 6000 J Street For more info, call (916) 278-6997 or visit www.theuniversityunion.com/gallery

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

7


LOCATED ABOVE SOLOMON’S

ROCK 730 K STREET11

99

THE RUSS

QUICK NEWS UPDATES FROM SACRAMENTO’S ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RESTAURANT SCENES

THE STREAM

JONATHAN CARABBA

Send regional news tips to info@submergemag.com

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HOT PASTRAMI ON RYE W/ MUSTARD OR RUSSIAN DRESSING MAKE IT A REUBEN W/ SAUERKRAUT & MELTED SWISS + 1.99 ADD CHOPPED LIVER + 1.99 ADD DOUBLE MEAT + 4.99

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SMOKED STURGEON, MELTED CHEDDAR WITH HORSERADISH CREAM AND PICKLED ONIONS ON ANY BAGEL

SATURDAY, FEB 15 8pm • $10 THE BIG KENNY

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ALL AVAILABLE W/PUSHKIN’S GF RYE + 2.88 ALL FISH SUSTAINABLY SOURCED BY SUNH FISH

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DILL PICKLE COLESLAW POTATO SALAD BAG OF CHIPS

SATURDAY, FEB 22 5-8pm • $10

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66

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266 /488 233

AMERICANA RAMBLE SERIES WITH RICHARD MARCH

2ND&4TH SATURDAYS 11am-2pm

FEB 22 • MAR 14 • MAR 28 • APR 11 WITH

DISCO BRUNCH

DJ SHAUN SLAUGHTER BOTTOMLESS MIMOSAS

BLOODY MARYS, FAIR TRADE COFFEE, HOUSE-SMOKED LOX, FRESH BAGELS, SCRAMBLES AND MORE....

1ST& 3RD SUNDAYS 11am-2pm

FEB 16 • MAR 1 • MAR 15 • APR 5

RECORD CLUB BRUNCH

WITH

DJ RODERICK SPINNING 45s

1ST THURSDAYS

6-9pm MAR 5 • APR 2 • MAY 7

LYRICS SELECT $5 COVER

Riotmaker

1ST FRIDAYS 8pm-MIDNIGHT MAR 6 • APR 3 • MAY 1

MOON DUST DANCE PARTY WITH DJ LARRY RODRIGUEZ

DISCO, FUNK, SOUL, REGGAE & MORE... NO COVER! FULL BAR, LATE NIGHT SNACKS

TOY ROOM GALLERY ART SHOW NOW THRU MAR 14

“VISUAL FEAST” BY MICK SHELDON

HAPPY$2HOUR MON-FRI • 2-5PM PABST $5 CRAFT BEER $6 WINE & COCKTAILS + SNACKS

8

Jim's Good Food

Local reggae/rock band Riotmaker is set to release their new EP Between Love and Light this Saturday, Feb. 15 at PowerHouse Pub (614 Sutter St., Ste. D, Folsom) alongside fellow locals Arden Park Roots. The EP features guest spots from Tyler Campbell of Arden Park Roots and Bles Bundy from Shakedown. If you can’t make the release show, which kicks off at 9 p.m. and is 21-plus, the new EP will be available on all major digital distribution outlets on Feb. 15, along with Riotmaker’s entire catalogue. Look up Riotmakermusic.com for more. The highly anticipated new restaurant from chef Michael Thiemann and crew, Jim’s Good Food is now open at 1420 16th St. #300, in the space formerly occupied by Coconut’s Fish Cafe. Thiemann and crew are best known for opening the vegetarian restaurant Mother (which is now closed) and Empress Tavern (which is still kicking out amazing food). According to the new restaurant’s Facebook page, Jim’s is “a new breed of American diner. A casual comfortable place serving delicious food, done with care, without the fuss.” Check out their menu and hours online at Jims.restaurant. Organizers of Sacramento Beer Week have announced events will run from April 24– May 3 this year, with the opening event on Friday, April 24 once again being the wildly popular Sac Mac + Brew Review, where local restaurants and brewers team up to offer mac and cheese pairings where both judges and attendees vote for their favorites. Keep an eye on Sacbeerweek.com for more developments.

OPEN MIC NIGHT

AFTERNOON DELIGHT

Sacramento Roller Derby

1288

THE TERRI

FRIDAY, FEB 14 7-11pm • $10+ donation THE BUD

Sac Mac + Brew Review

ZACKY FARMS ROASTED TURKEY W/ COLESLAW, MUSTARD OR RUSSIAN DRESSING ON SOURDOUGH ADD MELTED SWISS + 1.11 ADD AVOCADO + 1.99

THAT COMEDY NIGHT 1322 WITH ALL SANDWICHES SERVED WITH A PICKLE SPEAR, SIDE OF COLESLAW, AND BAGEL CHIPS

Please support the advertisers that support Submerge! This publication would not be possible without our wonderful advertisers. Visit them and tell ‘em Submerge is the reason.

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

Action Bronson

The Midtown building that houses beloved local bar and venue The Press Club (2030 P St.) has new owners. Bret Bair and his wife Karen Hampson Bair bought the building (which also has apartments on the third floor and office space on the second) for $2 million in early January, according to an article in the Sacramento Business Journal. Bret has helped open and run other local venues like Ace of Spades and Holy Diver, and Karen has previous music venue experience in England, most recently leaving her job in San Francisco with Indiegogo. I can’t say for sure, but I have a gut feeling they don’t plan on changing too much right away. They’ve got a lot of love for and history with The Press Club (they’ve told me so much during a recent conversation), so if anything I could see them putting some TLC into the place, but only time will tell. Keep up with Press happenings at Facebook.com/thepressclub. The Wienery, a longtime hot dog eatery in East Sacramento located at 715 56th St., has closed and will be replaced by a vegan cafe called Pure Soul Plant Based Eats. They’ll offer comfort food classics re-mixed like chicken-free fried chicken sandwiches, cheeseless mac and cheese, burgers using Beyond Meat patties, as well as other healthy options like veggie-filled Buddha bowls. No opening date announced as of press time, so keep an eye out on Puresoulpbcafe.com or on their socials for more on that.

Sacramento Roller Derby returns with their opening bout for the 2020 season on Saturday, Feb. 29 at The Rink (2900 Bradshaw Road). It’s a doubleheader! Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and general admission tickets are $15 for adults, $8 for kids 8–12, and free for 7 and under. Look up Sacramentorollerderby.com for more on what to expect. International hip-hop sensation and highly loveable foodie television show host Action Bronson just announced he’ll be touring through Sacramento on Wednesday, April 1, when his Great Bambino Tour will stop at Ace of Spades (1417 R St.). I’d suggest snagging tickets to this one right away as it will likely sell out. They’re on sale for $35 a piece now through Aceofspadessac.com or at the venue’s box office (call (916) 930-0220 or check their website for hours). I wonder where Action will eat when he’s in town? Will he cruise a few blocks down to Beast + Bounty (1701 R St.) to peep the dope portrait of himself hanging on the wall by local artist John Horton? Here’s to hoping he does.

A K O O Z A B O T G N I D R O C AC A NIGH

DIE F T OF IN

OLK PO

P!

, y a d r u S at 2 9 Fe b . ACC

TOBAZ OR D I N G

OOKA.C

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THE OPTIMISTIC PESSIMIST BOCEPHUS’ RUN BOCEPHUS CHIGGER bocephus@submergemag.com My dear readers … I have not been completely honest with you. I’ve presented myself as a member of your community, one of your tribe. But it’s all been a lie. I didn’t originally come here to entertain you every other week with witticisms that can sometimes seem out of this world. I came here to escape a cruel system on another world; the witticisms I brought with me were a bonus. Right now, you are probably pretty confused, which is a writing trick I was taught by one of your fellow humans when I first arrived. When writing for an audience, I’m supposed to get you hooked by tantalizing or confusing you. Your brains love that kind of shit, but I digress; I came here to finally tell you the truth and so now I will. Forty Earth years ago, I was born on the planet Dyelan in the city of Dyelan to a lovely three-eyed, green mother named Friga and a purple spotted chap whom people affectionately referred to as Dirg. I lived there to the age of 25 before escaping to Earth 15 years ago, where I have remained in hiding ever since for reasons I am about to explain. This is my story. The planet of Dyelan is a strange place. Much of the surface is covered in volcanoes that spit hot fire from time to time, leaving very little land to actually live on. Eking out a living is hard when magma covers most of everything, but most Dyelanians don’t need much to survive, and we love to share. We are peaceful creatures, more prone to sleeping than fighting, really. We enjoy good food, good conversation and good music above all else, but we have a dark secret that no one likes to think about or discuss on Dyelan. It’s that secret that forced me to come to your planet and stay hidden as a human for all these years. To put it simply, I would have died if I stayed. No one on Dyelan lives past the age of 30. It’s not like our natural life expectancy is 30 years or anything either; no one is allowed to get older than 30. You see, on Dyelan, we don’t have many rules, but we do have one big one: In order to provide Dyelanians with enough land for everyone, we must sacrifice our lives at the age of 30 for the common good. On your 30th birthday in Dyelan, you are taken to an auditorium where you enter an arena to float to the ceiling and let a bright light disintegrate your body. It’s very similar to the concept of “Carousel” in the 1970’s sci-fi classic, Logan’s Run, but on

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Dyelan, we call it, “Merry-Go-Round,” instead. Most Dyelanians these days think it sucks, but what are ya gonna do? Sure, we’ve since learned how to travel to other planets and created the technology to look like the creatures we visit, but tradition is tradition and many Dyelanians have a hard time getting past that. Well, that and the light that bursts our bodies to smithereens when we turn 30. The rule was the rule and that’s how it always was going to be until I decided to leave. I am the first and only Dyelanian to live past 30. When my time started getting close, I decided I wasn’t done yet and started putting an escape plan together. I underwent space flight training, became a pilot and took delivery jobs around the galaxy to learn all the possible routes for my escape. On my 25th birthday, I celebrated with friends and left in the middle of the night without ever saying goodbye. It was a hard thing to do; Dyelan was something of a paradise and no one had moved away before, but I’d be dead in a few years if I stayed and couldn’t afford to have anyone find out where I was going. With a tear in my eye, I set my nav system for Earth and prepared for my new life here. It took a few years to get here, but once I did, I got myself a job that fit my former lifestyle and started as a writer for Submerge Magazine. I’ve had to keep my secret this whole time to prevent my whereabouts from being discovered. If the Dyelanians had found me, it would have meant certain death. This would be a painful, agonizing death the likes of which you couldn’t possibly imagine, but thankfully, I don’t have to worry any longer. Though it has never been properly executed in the history of my planet, the rule has one caveat: If a Dyelanian is able to avoid the “MerryGo-Round” and live to the ripe old age of 40, they will no longer have to die. Some have tried to do it, but none were able to escape their fate; they all eventually faced the “Merry-Go-Round” before their 31st birthdays. Well, I am proud to say that I have done it, my friends. I officially turned 40 years old this month, and though my body has been ravaged by the passage of time, it has not faced disintegration by death ray. While I could go back, after all of these years, Earth feels more like home than Dyelan ever was. If it’s cool with you guys, I think I might stay for awhile longer.

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Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

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OUTSIDE THE 9-TO-5 WILD WEST COASTLINES AND THE MOUNTAINOUS TRANS-CANADA HIGHWAY WORDS ELLEN V. BAKER

Brushing the teeth with a view | Photo by Ellen V. Baker

Preparing to ride in Whistler, British Columbia | Photo by Shawn Griffin

A typical breakfast on the road | Photo by Shawn Griffin

Climbing at Lake Louise, Alberta | Photo by Ellen V. Baker

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Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

I’ve done it twice now—the drive to Canada. The first time I decided to make the drive, I was packed and on the road within an hour. It was a dramatic time in my life with relationship struggles and career nightmares. I didn’t put much thought into my decisions; I just did what came to mind but, hey, I had a grand ol’ time. The second time I drove to Canada, four years later, a loosely planned mission was set in place. My partner and I scheduled a climbing trip for September in which our ultimate destination would be Squamish, British Columbia. Western Canada is known for its rainy summer season, and with our trip on the tail end of summer, we thought it wise to bring our mountain bikes along in case the rock was too wet to climb. Departure day arrived and we loaded the bikes onto the hitch rack; placed the cooking essentials, climbing gear and bike gear into the top box; and set up the full size bed in the back of my 2005 Toyota Prius. That’s right, a four-door hatchback. My Prius and I, we’ve had a good decade together exploring the western states. With a month dedicated to the trip, our itinerary was pretty flexible, but staying at hotels and Airbnbs for a month isn’t ideal to a traveler’s wallet. We planned to camp for a portion of the trip, but we knew rain could be a hindrance, so a healthy mix between Airbnb, camping and car camping would suffice. We planned to parallel the ocean until we arrived at a friend’s place in Salem, Oregon, but we didn’t even make it out of California that day. That’s the beauty of the unplanned excursion: There are no rules, no deadlines, no expectations—but you better have a place to crash in case all else fails. The beauty of car camping is that it can be done on a weekend, for a few weeks, for a month or for years. Our trip ended up consisting of two phenomenal segments: The first was the West Coast drive from Santa Cruz, California to Whistler, British Columbia. The second, due to those anticipated rains, took us east on the Trans-Canada Highway to Calgary, Alberta. For my fellow road trip enthusiasts, if you get the chance to partake on either of these trips, I highly recommend it.

WEST COASTLINES The direct drive to Vancouver from Sacramento really isn’t that bad; two eight-hour days will get you there but with some extra time, and driving along the coast is definitely worth it. We began in Santa Cruz, a perfect gateway to California State Route 1, which would lead us to Highway 101 north through Washington. What typically takes about six hours took us a little over nine to arrive in Eureka, just south of the Oregon border. The Prius was cozy that night, and the warm sunrise lifted our eyes the following day. After exploring the small town in the morning over coffee and matcha, we hit the road heading north. Adding an extra two hours to stay on the coast from Eureka to Salem, Oregon, is a must. This coastline is some of the most beautiful, wild landscape I have ever encountered. I’ve driven this stretch twice now and would do it again in a heartbeat. We began mountain biking once we arrived in Salem and ditched the coastlines to shred in Sandy and Mt. Hood in Oregon, and Tiger Mountain and Bellingham in Washington. After about a week of exploring the western United States, we popped over to Squamish, British Columbia—a two-hour stroll in the car from Bellingham. Basically, we finished our coffee and were there. TR ANS - C ANADA HIGHWAY MOUNTAIN BIKE TOUR After a few climbing days in Squamish, the rains came in strong, leading to a few changes in plans, as expected. We headed north to Whistler for a wet day of riding and east from there. The Trans-Canada Highway spans through all 10 provinces of Canada, equalling about 4,860 miles, but we enjoyed the 500-mile stretch from north of Whistler to Calgary. We planned to stop at every mountain bike resort possible. Our main stops were Kamloops, Revelstoke, Golden, Banff and Calgary, and we took about two weeks to complete the 500 miles. The Trans-Canada Highway winds through luscious forests and unexpected small towns, and over the steep rocky mountains. The land is pristine and healthy—every morning, I woke up excited to drive and see more. The mountain biking in Canada is phenomenal, but so are the views, the hikes and the animals. The Trans-Canada Highway is more accessible than you think—go check it out!

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


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Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

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Get Hands-on at This Upcoming Intro to Synths Workshop • Feb. 29 Are you a fan of electronic music or simply want to rack-up some new skills on a new instrument? Look no further, the Library of MusicLandria (2181 Sixth Ave.) is hosting an introductory class on the basic functions of synthesizers on Feb. 29, which will be taught by Dumbledog, a local electronic musician. The synthesizer is an instrument used to fluctuate different syntheses by using dials to create sound and audio signals. MusicLandria is a non-profit organization—recognized as a music instrument library, that was created in 2014 by music enthusiast Buddy Hale—with a mission to put eager learners next to new instruments and offer inexpensive hands-on classes throughout the month. Different workshops at varying skill levels take place at this library to connect the Sacramento community to new sounds and tools one might not have available. While the organization offers these classes for free, they encourage a donation of $10, but it is not required. This specific one-hour workshop that starts at 6 p.m. will be followed by a Q&A with Dumbledog on the ins-and-outs of the synth dials and more in-depth details. To register for the event, RSVP by emailing rachel@musiclandria.com or visit Facebook.com/libraryofmusiclandria.

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The Sacramento Jewish Film Festival Returns for the 21st Year! • Feb. 19–23

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Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

The 21st annual Sacramento Jewish Film Festival returns to the Crest Theatre (1013 K St.) with a fourday showcase of films and discussions on Feb. 19, 20, 22 and 23. Throughout the days, different films will be covering people like Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir and the famous Holocaust survivor and sex therapist Dr. Ruth Westheimer. Others will portray topics like an organization from Israel that has been helping California residents with relief after the Camp Fire in 2018, or how a teacher forms an Israeli-Palestinian orchestra in a high school, despite the cultural differences. While most films have a depiction of how Jewish people fight opposition, some try to stay lighthearted through the acts of love. In one of the films, a Jewish woman is battling with self-identity within her JewishMexican culture and falling in love with a man that isn’t Jewish. Tickets for this event vary in price but a festival pass can be purchased for $150 ($120 for students and seniors), which gives you access to the viewing of each film and each reception. Individual day tickets and solo movie tickets can also be purchased. Don’t miss out on the showing of 13 films, along with discussions with filmmakers during the four day event. For more information, visit Jewishsac.org or Crestsacramento.com. Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


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Jackrabbit Brewing and Freeport Bakery Team Up for Beer & Cupcake Pairing • Feb. 13–17 Love is in the air throughout the Valentine’s Day weekend during this suds and cupcake collaboration event between Freeport Bakery and Jackrabbit Brewing Company. Satisfy your cravings and your sweet tooth with four pairings of varying brews and mini cupcakes, some infusing the boozy hops in the frosting of the concoctions. Pairings like a zesty lemon poppyseed cupcake topped with a pale ale ganache along with a Saison Farmhouse Ale or a carrot flavored cupcake with an Abbey Ale cream cheese paired with Bad Habit Belgian Abbey Ale are enough to make your tastebuds sing. The two other mini cakes on the exclusive menu will boast a buttermilk cupcake with caramel buttercream topped with pretzels served with a glass of Table Manners Winter Wheat Wine, and finish off with a fudge cupcake topped with Grandma’s Cherry Cacao sipped with a Super Moon Cherry Cacao Dessert Stout. Times for the events vary per day and will take place inside the taproom of the Jackrabbit Brewing Company (1323 Terminal St., West Sacramento). Gather a group to enjoy the event or go solo to savor some tasty treats and craft beers. As you sip and eat at this 21-plus event, immerse yourself in the fun of playing with the vintage video games in the room, compete in a friendly game of foosball or cornhole or heat up the fun with a board game. Pick your event date and pre-register at Jackrabbitbrewingcompany.com.

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Brooklyn Indie Rock Buzz Band Beach Fossils Come to Mondavi Center in Davis • Feb. 22

Jam out at this indie rock winter concert hosted by the ASUCD Entertainment Council at the Mondavi Center’s Jackson Hall located at UC Davis, where Brooklyn-based Beach Fossils will be performing with support from Urbanation (Bianca Ocampo) a Bay Area multi-instrument artist who will be accompanied on stage by guitarist and keyboardist Josh Frazier, bassist Christian Lofaso and drummer Tessa Piccillo. One can expect Beach Fossils to play hits from their latest album Somersault like fan-favorites “This Year,” “Down the Line” and “Social Jetlag.” With the help of Jonathan Rago of California indie rock group Foxygen, Somersault focuses on life in New York City and the cultural differences band frontman Dustin Payseur would see around the city, while also nodding to political views and oppositions like in the song “Saint Ivy,” which has over 300,000 views on YouTube. Experimenting with different instruments and genre sounds orchestra, electronic and pop, the band, who has more than a million monthly listeners JEFFlike MAYRY | SHADOW SELF TIGER ONhave CANVAS | 48”X48” | 2019 on Spotify,OIL will everyone on their feet with a lively performance, an event you’ll regret missing if you don’t snag yourself some tickets before it’s too late. This concert on Saturday, Feb. 22 begins at 6 p.m. and offers general admission tickets for $37 ($27 for students). To purchase tickets or for more information, visit Mondaviarts.org.

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Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

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Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

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Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

SATURDAY AUG 15

SMALL TOWN MURDER SOouldt

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ART ON A MISSION TO EXPOSE, END AND RECTIFY LONG-TERM PRISON SENTENCING OF CHILDREN ISE LYFE EXPLAINS HIS LITTLE GIANT PROJECT WORDS NUR KAUSAR

A

t the far end of a large exhibit room on the second floor of the California Museum, a child’s voice plays with subtitles on a dark screen. He talks about life in solitary confinement and how the prison guards don’t take his ankle irons off even to take a shower. Perhaps if he were present, it would have been difficult to make eye contact. Yet several “lifers”—or people sentenced to 20-plus years to life in prison before they were 18—shared their experiences at the opening of the multimedia exhibit by artist Ise Lyfe called Small as a Giant, and it was hard not to watch them and want to hear more. And to want to do something positive to help after hearing their stories. Ke Lam, reentry coordinator with the Asian Prisoner Support Community (APSC) and one of the subjects in the exhibit, says he does his work to save other young people who are immigrants and didn’t know they could lose their resident status after doing time. APSC provides direct support to Asian and Pacific Islander (API) prisoners and raises awareness about the growing number of APIs being imprisoned, detained and deported. Lam, a Vietnamese refugee, was sentenced at 17 and served a prison sentence at San Quentin. ICE detained him after his release from prison, but he was able to remain in the United States. “My job is to stand up and give voice to the voiceless,” Lam says. The focus and impact of child imprisonment in poor communities and communities of color in America is a central theme throughout the exhibit. As participants walk through the exhibit hall, they are hit with facts like, “For every one white youth, there are 4.5 Latino youth, and 11.6 Black youth facing prosecution as adults.” Lyfe doesn’t shy away from this country’s long history and repercussions of child imprisonment, laying out key dates and facts both on the Small as a Giant website and in the exhibit itself.

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“A starting point is for us all to admit that we are afraid of children, and we are particularly afraid of black children and brown children because we see them as monsters. To be honest with that is a starting point,” he says. “The juvenile justice system began as a way to deal with America’s wayward white youth. In the mid-1800s when it started, there was no concept of what we now call a Latino immigrant or people living in the projects of East L.A. Black people were enslaved, and natives were imprisoned. Now we see a black kid with a gun, he is labeled a gang member or a terrorist. But when a white youth does it, he must have a mental illness, otherwise it’s out of his nature to be violent, which isn’t true. It wasn’t until the Emancipation Proclamation and the influx of Latin Americans and Asians and the issue to control the children of these new populations that we see mass incarceration. It becomes a kennel for children.” Lyfe’s goal is to shed light on this human rights issue, support communities to better understand the plight of children in the justice system, and to move people to act and to protect children, our most vulnerable members of society. Lyfe hopes the project will be used as a tool and statement to influence and empower voters, communities, politicians and stakeholders to change attitude, policies and laws. “If you’re on the wrong side of this issue, you get a lot of flak,” Lyfe says. “But if you’re on the right side, you often don’t get the attention. This is to show there is someone who did pardon someone, voters who voted in a certain way to help and people can go and see that and be part of that history.” Lyfe is one of the leading spoken word artists in America, as well as a justice advocate, author and lecturer. Originally from Oakland, he now resides in Los Angeles and has done projects on other human rights issues such as housing (look up Brighter than Blight, 2013, exhibited in Oakland). “I was unaware, as someone who has been in

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

this work for 20 years, that children were being sentenced to life in prison,” Lyfe says about why he decided to take on the subject. “If I wasn’t fully informed, there are probably people throughout the state and beyond who didn’t know about the issue or how to get involved. That’s what initially sparked it.” Lyfe says what stood out wasn’t just an individual case, but this realization after speaking to juvenile “lifers” that in the late ‘90s the justice system was egregiously giving children life in prison. Lyfe captured more than 50 stories through photography, audio and narrative. “I knew I had to think about where it was going to go up,” he says of the vast multimedia exhibit that has now traveled to several cities across California. “I knew we were going to go inside institutions and community spaces. I determined how we would build it physically, and then I knew what stories I could tell. Most people are coming from a space of trauma, so when we came in talking to people on the inside, I decided I was going to take photographs of the child even inside the adult. We worked together to capture them in a really vulnerable, really youthful state. For anyone who was willing to be vulnerable, they went in knowing that was the environment we were going to take this in.” Lyfe notes that he’ll be taking the exhibit to San Quentin Prison, along with feedback from the shows, so the subjects of the photographs can see and hear how it’s going on the outside. Beyond visiting the exhibit, which runs through March 15, Lyfe says the simplest thing that he encourages people to do is to be part of the conversation.

“A starting point is for us all to admit that we are afraid of children, and we are particularly afraid of black children and brown children because we see them as monsters. To be honest with that is a starting point.” – Artist and Activist Ise Lyfe

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


Above: Ise Lyfe

“If you’re a teacher, talk to your students about it,” he says. “I was in first grade in 1989 and graduated high school in 2001. Through that time none of my teachers talked to me about the crack epidemic, and that’s just odd. It’s the equivalent of going to school in Cambodia in 1968 and not talking about the war.” Lyfe adds, “And even if you’re in your job—a garbage person, a firefighter—find out what your policy is of hiring formerly incarcerated people. Your argument and debate should be informed. I understand if you land on the side of still believing a young person should be imprisoned for a certain crime, but sit through the exhibit first.” Lyfe notes that Small as a Giant is also an avenue for people to get connected to the various organizations around the country that are already engaging in reform, advocacy and helping people on the inside—everything from support groups to people creating care packages and writing letters to the imprisoned, to movements for providing feminine hygiene products to girls and women who do not have access in prison. California State Senator Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley) introduced Senate Bill 889 on Jan. 28, which would raise the age that young people in California are tried as adults to 20 from 18. This new legislation comes on the heels of several bills passed over the last few years in California that have helped incarcerated youth. “When teenagers make serious mistakes and commit crimes, state prison is not the answer,” Skinner said in a press release. “Processing teenagers through the juvenile justice system will help ensure they receive the appropriate education, counseling, treatment and rehabilitation services necessary to achieve real public safety outcomes.” Lyfe says another big issue being considered is not handing down life sentencing for anyone under 25, on which he feels more moderate, and understands if people are on the fence. SubmergeMag.com

“I hear a 22-year-old gets life in prison and she committed murder when she was 22,” Lyfe says. “When you hear about her getting life, it seems maybe even sensible to some people. But I have witnessed the reality, and I have sat next to a woman who is 70 and is still in there. Do you think after 50 years she shouldn’t have the right to go home?” Small as a Giant shares the many laws that have passed to help decrease youth incarceration across the country and in California, and Lyfe is quick to note that progress should not be downplayed. “I think Californians may say, ‘Look how progressive we are, look how liberal we are,’” Lyfe says. “The whole time I was growing up, California was a Republican, conservative state that was tough on crime. The way people voted on everything from affirmative action to housing to crime was conservative. What we are seeing through one generation of experience is a shift in the hearts and minds of the people who are part of the seventh largest economy in the world. It is a positive shift in history. We were not always this way. And when we look east and west, north and south to other states, we share that story of California. It was something we grew into and not something we naturally had.” Lyfe plans to take Small as a Giant on the road to other states. He says in California, people who see the exhibit generally have a moderate to liberal perspective on the issue, but he has found that some states are 100 years behind. “There are some states that have banned life in prison but the judge will give 120 years,” he says. “This is our work and our plan is to become a national model Join the conversation. Visit of what’s Small as a Giant at the possible.” California Museum in Sacramento through March 15, and at Smallasagiant.com.

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Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

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PUNK ROCK FOR YOUR NORMAL LIFE

PISSCAT IS THE HARDCORE PUNK BAND SACRAMENTO DESERVES WORDS JUSTIN COX • PHOTO REBECCA MCINTIRE

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ccasionally, I get a chance to write about a band I’ve gotten to know personally in Sacramento’s punk scene. In writing up those interviews, I tend to quell my excitement and make a point to stay out of their narrative. But with Pisscat—a three-piece punk band from Sacramento whose new EP, A Normal Life, comes out later this month—I can’t create such distance. I know the band too well and, simply put, I’m here to tell you about them because they rule. My band (The Polyorchids) played the release show for their last EP, 2015’s Convenience and Chaos, which also featured four tracks from their debut, Smashed and Rehashed. The following year, our bands did a small tour together, cramming amps into our cars and flopping on floors in a run of cities surrounding Lake Tahoe. They blew me away nightly. Pisscat plays a punishing brand of hardcore punk, dynamic in its style, but gimmick-free and direct above all else. The band features Jake Deane on guitar and vocals, Dustin Love on bass and vocals and Brandon James on drums. The three are essentially lifelong friends, having met back at Louis Pasteur Middle School in Orangevale, where they and a fourth member would pick up their instruments and form their first few bands: Mutiny Beef, Malady of Discontent and Final Heist.

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“We went through several lead guitar players,” says Love. “Then after high school, we became a three-piece.” Final Heist dissolved around 2010, and a few years passed before the three regrouped and formed Pisscat. In our recent FaceTime interview, Deane and James squabbled casually over the specific dates while Love chilled quietly between them—a pretty decent snapshot of their individual personalities, to be honest. The three have a sibling-like rhythm that can only come from knowing a person since childhood. Pisscat makes zero attempt to characterize themselves as anything other than exactly what they are. When I ask them one of those music journalist-type questions like, “What does A Normal Life represent in the evolution of Pisscat as a band?” the answer is basically a shrug. “We don’t have any specific motivations for changing up the sound or anything,” says Love. “We just write songs we like and want to play.” The new EP has five songs, ranging from under a minute to two minutes and 46 seconds in length, and all of the tracks ride directly into one another—the next snapping into gear before the feedback from the previous recedes. It’s an EP in keeping with their previous work, but it has its new elements, too, whether they contrived them or not. Deane’s voice dips to hellish new lows on the sludgy “Quicksand” before flipping the script into a full-speed, bouncy and anthemic final minute.

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

Pisscat is meticulous in their songwriting and slow with their output, obsessing not only about arrangements, but also lyrics, most of which come at you in fitful screams. A common thread is working-class struggle, blunt and brash in its delivery, but never preachy. These are songs about the frustrations of daily monotony, soul-sucking jobs, ingrained consumerism, shitty bosses— all delivered with the art of a perfected punch. A song like “Limp Wristed” takes just 41 seconds to expand beyond a chronic injury, to the debilitating effects it can have on playing music, to masking pain and boredom with drugs and alcohol, to the crippling uncertainty that comes with not having a solution to the problem. And then there’s “Boxes,” which is a sprint through the buildings, devices and spreadsheet cells that set the foundation for many of our professional lives. Boxes built society Our standardized anxiety Boxes give us storage space For all the stuff we need to waste A Pisscat song is dynamic to its core, changing from one thing to another from the four-count clack of James’ drum sticks to the ringing feedback of the final chord. They are among the best punk bands in Sacramento, and we’re lucky to have them. Following is an abridged version of our recent conversation. Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


You guys met in middle school. Did you already play your instruments? Brandon James: What happened is nobody played drums and they said you got to play drums. Jake sold me his dad’s drum set for $100. Jake Dean: We used my dad’s instruments. It made sense for Brandon to play drums because he’s so loud. I played guitar and Dustin played guitar for a bit, too. Dustin Love: Basically I wasn’t very good at guitar so bass seemed like the best choice. The first Pisscat EP was completely lost when your home-recording device failed. What happened there? DL: Smashed and Rehashed featured songs from older bands we played in. We already had these songs, but we wanted to start a new band. We were pretty much done recording it, but then the hard drive failed. JD: Smashed and Rehashed is a double entendre. These were rehashed songs and we had to re-record them. BJ: The cover of Smashed and Rehashed is us breaking the old recording device because that’s rock ‘n’ roll. JD: I actually found a piece of that thing in the front yard the other day. How did you end up recording the version you eventually put out? DL: We bought something to record straight to the computer. It’s the same thing we used with Convenience and Chaos later. A Normal Life is Pisscat’s third release, but it’s the first that you did in a studio. How was that different? DL: I wanted to do it in the studio because it’s a pain in the ass. BJ: Everybody knows Earth Tone [Studios] is dope. We had heard a lot of good things and a lot of the quality albums Pat [Hills] recorded. I busted out all of the drums one after another. Once I was done in the drum room, I was done. I didn’t do anything the second day except hang out. JD: It was fun. Slow pace, easy. We did it last summer. It was hot as fuck. “Limp Wrist” is about chronic pain you’ve battled in your strumming hand, Jake. How is that feeling these days? JD: It’s, you know—it’s not limp now, but it’s not what it used to be. How do I navigate it? I just do. I stretch it. I don’t do anything special, but I did learn some stretches I still use I guess. SubmergeMag.com

“Boxes” is the first song that Dustin carries as the primary voice. What’s the story behind that song? DL: I work in an office, so that’s where it started. I like my job, but I think a lot of people I work with don’t like theirs. That’s kind of how it started, and then the second verse is more about consumerism—working a job you hate so you can buy stuff from people who hate their jobs, too. How does a Pisscat song come together? JD: We try to bring something fully formed, I guess. We all have input from each other. The songs are better when everyone has a say. Even after we’re finished we add more. DL: But sometimes it’s just an idea, a verse and a chorus. BJ: We’ll learn the parts and then we jam on them. When we’re jamming I pretty much do whatever, but I reel it in as we get the parts down. JD: We try to make them not feel boring. Sometimes it’s just a minimal change from verse to verse that not everyone even picks up on. We try to change it up. The songs on A Normal Life ride directly into one another without silence. What was behind that decision? DL: It feels like a live set. You keep the energy going instead of just having a collection of songs. BJ: It’s the same thing we did for Convenience and Chaos. Tell us about the release show on Feb. 28. JD: We invited bands that we like, but bands we don’t play with all the time. We wanted to make a different show and make some new friends. We’re just going to play our set. Each side is going to get played in its order. What is Pisscat up to in 2020? JD: We’re going to do some short out-of-town weekend things—a couple of shows here and there. And hopefully our next EP will come out sooner than the next four years.

904 15th Street 443.2797 Between I & J • Downtown Sacramento

TORCHCLUB.NET

FEBRUARY 13 - 28

THUR

13 FRI

14 SATURDAY FEB 29TH 7PM | The Rink

Bruin Trouble v Faultline Derby Devilz

Sacramento Junior Roller Derby Exhibition

SACRAMENTOROLLERDERBY.COM

FARROW AND THE PEACH LEAVES 9PM

LUV SONGS WITH DANA MORET 5:30PM

PETER PETTY & HIS DOUBLE P REVUE 9PM

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LOOSE ENGINES 5:30PM

SUN

BLUES JAM 4PM

15 ELEMENT BRASS BAND 9PM 16

FRONT THE BAND 8PM

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SOUR DIESEL JAMS 8PM

TUE RICHARD MARCH & FRIENDS 5:30PM

WED

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ADAM VARONA 5:30PM

DAVID ROSALES AND HIS BAND OF SCOUNDRELS 8:30PM

THUR

MIND X 5:30PM

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THE FEROCIOUS FEW, MOTEL DRIVE 9PM

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MIDTOWN CREEPERS 5:30PM

SAT

THE STUFF 5:30PM

SUN

BLUES JAM 4PM

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DANIEL CASTRO 9PM

22 EARLES OF NEWTWON 9PM 23

TUES

FRONT THE BAND 8PM MATT RAINEY 5:30PM

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FAT TUESDAY CELEBRATION WITH BIG CHIEFS 8:30PM WED

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THUR Catch Pisscat’s EP release show at Café Colonial (3520 Stockton Blvd.) on Friday, Feb. 28 with Omnigul, Original State, Good Shit and No Pressure. Just $5 at the door, and the show starts at 8 p.m.

MIND X 5:30PM

27 FRI

28

PISTOFFERSONS & FRIENDS 5:30PM

JONEMERY & THE UNCONVENTIONALS 9PM MIND X 5:30PM

CITY OF TREES BRASS BAND, SAM ELIOTT’S SPIRIT DISCO 9PM

JIMMY PAILER & CO. 5:30PM

THE NICKEL SLOTS, SOUTH SAN LUCAS

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

9PM

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MUSIC, COMEDY & MISC. CALENDAR

FEBRUARY 12 – 26

SUBMERGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR

2.12 WEDNESDAY

The Club Car The Double Shots, 7:30 p.m. Crest Theatre Steel Pulse, 6:30 p.m. Goldfield Horrorpops, 7:30 p.m. (Sold Out) Harris Center Al Di Meola, 7:30 p.m. Holy Diver Bodysnatcher, Great American Ghost, Born a New, Distinguisher, The Willow, 6:30 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Live Blues Jam Session, 8 p.m. Opera House Saloon Love and Theft, Ariel Jean, McKenna Faith, 8 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Knocked Down, The Left Hand, Defyant Circle, 8:30 p.m. The Press Club Eighties Night w/ DJ Bryan Hawk, 9 p.m. The Starlet Room Blues & Bourbon: Matt Rainey & the Dippin’ Sauce, 5:30 p.m. Torch Club Ballin’ That Jack, 5:30 p.m.; Shoofly Complex, 9 p.m.

2.13 THURSDAY

Ace of Spades Ekali, 7 p.m. Armadillo Music Karma Loading, 7 p.m. B Street at The Sofia Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas, 7 p.m. Cafe Colonial Devon I Evans, Spacewalker, AndYes, Andru Defeye, Paul Willis, 8 p.m. The Club Car Songwriters Showcase, 8 p.m. Foothills Event Center Center For The Arts Presents: Riders in the Sky, 6:30 p.m. Fox & Goose Michael B. Justis, 8 p.m. Goldfield Jerrod Niemann, Bobby Zoppi, 7:30 p.m. Harlow’s Adrian Marcel, TJ Upshaw, De Apollo, Nick LaVelle, 7 p.m. Harris Center Georgia On My Mind: Celebrating the Music of Ray Charles, 7:30 p.m. Holy Diver Spite, Varials, Orthodox, Unity TX, Dealer, Saltwound, 6 p.m. Kupros Jenn Rogar, 7 p.m. Old Ironsides The Bongo Furies, Sour Diesel, 7:30 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Megan Smith, 10 p.m. The Press Club The Drowns, Mob Rule, Black Crosses, 8 p.m. Shady Lady Big Sticky Mess, 9 p.m. Shine Jazz Jam, 8 p.m. The Starlet Room The Honest (EP Release), The Seafloor Cinema, Occupy the Trees, 7 p.m. Torch Club Mind X, 5:30 p.m.; Farrow and the Peach Leaves, 9 p.m.

Berryessa Brewing Co. Christopher Brown, 5 p.m. The Boardwalk The Quireboys, Charlie Bonnet III and the Folkin’ Gasholes, Cardboard Ringo, SMF Band, Red White and Vinyl, 6:30 p.m. The Brick Cut-Rate Druggist, Arguments, Strange Vine, 8:30 p.m. Capitol Garage Capitol Friday’s Reggae Night w/ DJ Veyn, 10 p.m. The Club Car Val Starr and the Blues Rocket, 8 p.m. The Colony Shit Coffins, Astral Butcher, Rise and Strike, Cold Trap, 8 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Dansu, 9 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Two20, 9:30 p.m. Fox & Goose The Bruberries, Gheni, 9 p.m. Golden Bear DJ CrookOne and Guests, 10 p.m. Goldfield Marty O’Reilly & the Old Soul Orchestra, 7:30 p.m. Harlow’s Harris Rudman, Nate Curry, Camilla Covington, Igwe Aka, 6:30 p.m. Holy Diver Ross the Boss, Blood Oath Ritual, 7 p.m. Kupros Ross Hammond, 5 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge William Mylar’s Hippie Hour, 5:30 p.m.; Cluster Phunk, 9 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Landline, Rainer Rose, 8 p.m. Mondavi Center: Ann E. Pitzer Center Zofomoma, 7 p.m. Old Ironsides Ruby Cocktails, Dynna & the Cherry Kings, 8 p.m. On the Y Anhedonia, Sever All, Perception, 8 p.m. Opera House Saloon Streets of Bakersfield, 9 p.m. Palms Playhouse Dirty Cello, 8 p.m. The Park Ultra Lounge DJ Elements, DJ Eddie Edul, 9:30 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. Placerville Public House The Tepid Club of Cool, 8 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Thunder Cover, 10 p.m. The Press Club DJ Rue, 9 p.m. Red Hawk Casino Audioboxx, 9:30 p.m. The Russ Room at Solomon’s Fundraiser for Sac Safe Space & Engage Inc feat. Devon Evans (of The Wailers), The Philharmonik, LaTour, Grace Loescher, Jeanette Sem, AndYes, Andru Defeye and More, 7 p.m. Shady Lady Tone Mosaic, 9 p.m. Shine Valentines Day Funk Love Party w/ Bro Brocean, 8 p.m. The Starlet Room Fleetwood Mac vs. ABBA Tribute, 9 p.m. Thunder Valley Casino Resort Wang Chung, Jack Hues & Nick Feldman, Big Country, China Crisis, DJ Bobby G, 8 p.m. Torch Club Luv Songs w/ Dana Moret, 5:30 p.m.; Peter Petty & His Double P Revue, 9 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. LoveSnack: A Naughty MicroCircus Valentine’s Day Party, 6 p.m.

.15 2 2.14 SATURDAY

FRIDAY

Bar 101 Seth Prinz, 9:30 p.m. B Street at The Sofia Mumbo Gumbo’s 30th Anniversary Party, 7 p.m.

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Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

Ace of Spades Fake Love (Drake Party) feat. HOF, 7:30 p.m. Armadillo Music Opineismyname, 7 p.m. B Street at The Sofia Dennis Johnson and The Mississippi Ramblers, 7 p.m. Bar 101 The O’Mally Sisters, 9 p.m.

Berryessa Brewing Co. Misner and Smith, 3 p.m. The Boardwalk Dead in Spain, 7:30 p.m. The Brick California Riot Act, Roswell, Power Dragon, 9 p.m. Cafe Colonial The O’Mulligans, Jerk!, The Enlows, Addalemon, 8 p.m. The Club Car Nate Esway Band, Jessica Lynn and Broken Spoke, 8 p.m. The Colony Band of Coyotes, Deadbeat Deity, Sweet Myths, Over Motion, 8 p.m. Crooked Lane Brewing Co. Tattered and Tied, 7 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Neon Playboys, 9 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Four Barrel, 9:30 p.m. Fox & Goose Toad Mortons, Bad Barnacles, 9 p.m. G Street WunderBar Danger Force 5, Gamma People, 9 p.m. Goldfield Greg Loiacono, 7:30 p.m. Harlow’s Tacocat, 8 p.m. Harris Center The Folsom Lake Symphony, 7:30 p.m. (Sold Out) Holy Diver Emo Night Sacramento, 8 p.m. Laughs Unlimited Riot, 3:30 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Lee Bob Watson, Steve Wyreman, Josh Lippi, 8 p.m. Mondavi Center: Jackson Hall Ladysmith Black Mambazo, 2 p.m. Nicholson’s MusiCafe Ukulele SingAlong, 11:30 a.m.; Free Ukulele Class, 1 p.m. Old Ironsides Delta Mystics, 9 p.m. Opera House Saloon Unauthorized Rolling Stones, 9 p.m. Palms Playhouse Tempest, 7:30 p.m. Placerville Public House The L-dawg Band, 8 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Arden Park Roots, Riotmaker (EP Release), 9 p.m. The Press Club DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9 p.m. Red Hawk Casino Audioboxx, 10 p.m. Riving Loom David Dondero, Hank and Lulu, 8 p.m. The Russ Room at Solomon’s Love Is Greater Than War: Art & Live Music feat. Drifts, Tyler Miles, Mourning Mountains, Jako and More, 7 p.m. SacYard Community Tap House The Charities, 6 p.m. Shady Lady S.T.R.Q., 9 p.m. Shine The Desmond Barrett Experience, 8 p.m. The Side Door The Golden Cadillacs, 7 p.m. The Starlet Room Ode to Saturday, Celsius, Levi Moses, 6:30 p.m. Thunder Valley Casino Resort Larry D. , The Dazz Band, One-Way, Yarbrough & Peoples, DJ Gino, 7:30 p.m. Torch Club Loose Engines, 5:30 p.m.; Element Brass Band, 9 p.m.

2.16 SUNDAY

Ace of Spades Led Zeppelin 2, 7 p.m. B Street at The Sofia Waipuna, 8 p.m. Berryessa Brewing Co. The Casual Coalition, 2 p.m. Blue Note Brewing Co. Empty Wagon, 3 p.m. Cafe Colonial Problem With Dragons, Killer Couture, Astral Cult, 8 p.m. The Colony Godstomper, Human Obliteration, Poop, Snuff, ...And for What?, Knife Edge Death Match, 8 p.m.

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


Folsom Hotel Saloon Acoustic Sundaze w/ Josh Thompson, 3 p.m. Harlow’s Lund, Guccihighwaters, Guardin, Cory Wells, 6 p.m. Holy Diver The Movement, Josh Heinrichs, Indubious, 7 p.m. (Sold Out) Laughs Unlimited Voice Over, 3 p.m. Midtown BarFly Factor IX w/ DJ Hawk, DJ CarnieRobber and Guests, 9 p.m. The Park Ultra Lounge 4B, 9:30 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Laurie Morvan, 3 p.m. The Press Club Sunday Night Soul Party w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9 p.m. The Red Room Audio Waffle: Endometrium Cuntplow, 80Kv, Sharkiface, Protofrustration, Fletcher Pratt, Crank Static, 12 p.m. Red Hawk Casino Random Strangers, 1 p.m. SacYard Community Tap House Deytrippers, 3 p.m. The Starlet Room Part Time, Gary Wilson, Bryson Cone, 7 p.m. Torch Club Blues Jam, 4 p.m.; Front the Band, 8 p.m.

2.17 MONDAY

LowBrau Motown on Mondays w/ DJ Epik, 9 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Nebraska Mondays w/ Orange Nut & Ghiadub, 7:30 p.m. Old Ironsides Heath Williamson & Friends, 5:30 p.m. The Starlet Room Blues & Bourbon: Mark Hummel’s Deep Basement Shakers (Album Release), 5:30 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Grateful Dead Monday w/ Ballin’ That Jack, 6 p.m.

2.18 TUESDAY

The Flamingo House Salt Acid Phat Beats w/ Alexx Gold & Anthonyromero, 9 p.m. Foothills Event Center Center For The Arts Presents: Ladysmith Black Mambazo, 6:30 p.m. Harlow’s Magic City Hippies, The Palms, 7 p.m. Holy Diver Iann Dior, Landon Cube, Poorstacy, 7 p.m. (Sold Out) Kupros Michael Ray, 5 p.m. North Natomas Library Sacramento Guitar Society: Strum For Fun, 3:30 p.m. The Press Club Night School, 9 p.m. Torch Club Richard March & Friends, 5:30 p.m.; Sour Diesel Jams, 8 p.m.

2.19 WEDNESDAY

The Club Car The Double Shots, 7:30 p.m. Dante Club Les Chanteuses w/ Shelley Burns, Beth Duncan, Carolyne Swayze & Others, 7 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Open Mic Jam, 9 p.m. Fountainhead Brewing Co. Acoustic Night w/ Roni Yadao, 6:30 p.m. Holy Diver Local Showcase w/ We Predict A Riot, Vohlrahven, Archonic, Full Metal Hippies, MethodOne, 6:30 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Live Blues Jam Session, 8 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Jazz Jam w/ Host Josh Wisterman, 8 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Eazy Dub, Occupy The Trees, Amahjra, 8:30 p.m. The Press Club Eighties Night w/ DJ Bryan Hawk, 9 p.m. Sacramento State: University Union Redwood Room Nooner w/ OG, 12 p.m. The Starlet Room Blues & Bourbon: Mark Hummel’s Deep Basement Shakers (CD Release), 5:30 p.m.

SubmergeMag.com

Torch Club Adam Varona, 5:30 p.m.; David Rosales and His Band of Scoundrels, 8:30 p.m.

2.20 THURSDAY

Ace of Spades Skillet, From Ashes to New, Ledger, 6 p.m. (Sold Out) Armadillo Music Raqia, 7 p.m. B Street at The Sofia Marcia Ball & Sonny Landreth’s Mardi Gras Party, 7 p.m. The Boardwalk Scott Joss, Chris Gentry, Jennifer Belle, 8 p.m. Cafe Colonial Open Mic w/ Host Marty Taters, 7:30 p.m. The Club Car Songwriters Showcase, 8 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Jessica Malone, 7 p.m.; DJ Uncle Hank, 9 p.m. Fox & Goose Solidarity, 8 p.m. Goldfield Overcoats, Band of Coyotes, DJ Zephyr, 7:30 p.m. Holy Diver Fenix Flexin, 7 p.m. Kupros Allie Marcel, 7 p.m. Library Of MusicLandria Women & Allies Music Night, 7 p.m. Old Ironsides Open Acoustic Jam, 8 p.m. Palms Playhouse Michael Doucet and Sarah Quintana, 7 p.m. The Park Ultra Lounge AC Slater, 10 p.m. Powerhouse Pub North Forty, 9:30 p.m. The Press Club Throwback Thursday w/ DJ Sweet Boy, 9 p.m. The Russ Room at Solomon’s The Eclectic Soul Project, 8 p.m. SacYard Community Tap House Petunia and the Vipers, 6 p.m. Shady Lady Harley White Jr. Orchestra, 9 p.m. Shine Jazz Jam, 8 p.m. The Silver Orange Sick Burn, Los Huaycos, Your Friends, Las Pulgas, 7 p.m. Torch Club Mind X, 5:30 p.m.; The Ferocious Few, Motel Drive, 9 p.m.

2.21 FRIDAY

Ace of Spades Gasolina feat. FVME, 7:30 p.m. Armadillo Music Busy Lighthouse, 8 p.m. Auburn State Theatre Molly’s Revenge, 8 p.m. B Street at The Sofia Barry Zito, 7 p.m. Berryessa Brewing Co. Scott Guberman, 5 p.m. The Brick Aequorea, Year Of The Cobra, Horseneck, 9 p.m. Capitol Garage Capitol Friday’s Reggae Night w/ DJ Veyn, 10 p.m. The Club Car Xstadic, 8 p.m. Crest Theatre Albert Cummings, 6:30 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Radio Memory, 9 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Lantz Lazwell & the Vibe Tribe, 9:30 p.m. Fox & Goose Pressure Lounge, The Depths, Sugarbeasts, 9 p.m. Golden Bear DJ CrookOne and Guests, 10 p.m. Harlow’s The Jimmy Dore Show Live, 6:30 p.m. (Sold Out); Wyclef Jean, 10:30 p.m. (Sold Out) Holy Diver Terror, The Warriors, Creeping Death, Dare, These Streets, 7 p.m. Kupros Ross Hammond, 5 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge William Mylar’s Hippie Hour, 5:30 p.m. Mills Station Arts and Cultural Center A Night of Poetry and Song w/ Gabe Becker & Guests, 6 p.m. Old Ironsides The Halcones, The Machetes, Warp 11, 7:30 p.m. On The Y Doris, Fornis, Mechanizm, 8 p.m. Opera House Saloon Journey Revisited, 9 p.m.

Palms Playhouse Led Kaapana and Fran Guidry, 7 p.m. The Park Ultra Lounge DJ Politik, DJ Eddie Edul, 9:30 p.m. Placerville Public House Jessica Malone, Jonny Mojo, 8 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Fast Times, 10 p.m. The Press Club DJ Rue, 9 p.m. Red Hawk Casino Brodie Stewart Band, 9:30 p.m. The Russ Room at Solomon’s Moon Dust Dance Party w/ DJ Larry Ridriguez, 8 p.m. SacYard Community Tap House The Backburners, 6 p.m. Shady Lady Boca do Rio, 9 p.m. Shine Turtle Rock, Sparrow, 8 p.m. Sophia’s Thai Kitchen Lazer Funk w/ DJs Todd Shima and Rockwell, 9 p.m. The Starlet Room All Things Indie Showcase feat. Tre Solid, Kali Streetz, Dre’, Ju$t Paid & More, 9:30 p.m. Thunder Valley Casino Resort The Guess Who, 7:30 p.m. Torch Club Midtown Creepers, 5:30 p.m; Daniel Castro, 9 p.m.

2.22 SATURDAY

Ace of Spades No Scrubs: A Hip Hop / R&B 2000’s Party, 7:30 p.m. Armadillo Music Frank Barter, 8 p.m. Berryessa Brewing Co. Petunia and the Vipers, 3 p.m. The Boardwalk Sleep/Speak, Smack’d Up, The Measure, Kind Eyes, Shorelines, Dead Things, 6:30 p.m. The Brick The Nickel Slots, JonEmery & The Unconventionals, 9 p.m. Cafe Colonial & Colonial Theatre T.S.O.L, The Avengers, The Lewd, Kicker, Sick Burn, Class System feat. Punk Rock Flea Market!, 6 p.m. The Club Car Chill, 8 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Back 220, 9 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon The Mach 5, 9:30 p.m. Foothills Event Center Center For The Arts Presents: Sonny Landreth, Marcia Ball, 7 p.m. Fox & Goose The Vintage Find, The Know Trio, 9 p.m. Golden 1 Center Blake Shelton, The Bellamy Brothers, John Anderson, Trace Adkins, Lauren Alaina, 5:30 p.m. Harlow’s The Jimmy Dore Show Live, 2 p.m. (Sold Out); Andy Shauf, Molly Sarle, 8 p.m. Harris Center A Celebration of African & African-American Music w/ The FLC Commercial Music Ensemble, The FLC Jazz Choir & More, 7:30 p.m. Holy Diver Horseneck (Album Release), Kill The Precedent, Ghost Mesa, Dustin Burke, Eyes Eternal, 7 p.m. Laughs Unlimited Bad Caddies, 3:30 p.m. McClatchy High School Camellia Symphony Orchestra: Cosmic Power of Sound, 7:30 p.m. Mondavi Center: Jackson Hall Beach Fossils, Urbanation, 6 p.m. Nicholson’s MusiCafe Ukulele SingAlong, 11:30 a.m.; Free Ukulele Class, 1 p.m. Old Ironsides Knock Knock, The GetSets, Poly Holiday, 8 p.m. Opera House Saloon Midnight Players, 9:30 p.m. Palms Playhouse Rhythmtown Jive, 7:30 p.m. Placerville Public House Jackson Whale, 8 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Dueling Pianos, 6 p.m.; Pop Fiction, 9 p.m. The Press Club DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9 p.m. Red Hawk Casino Island of Black & White, 10 p.m. The Russ Room at Solomon’s Americana Ramble Series w/ Richard March, 5 p.m. SacYard Community Tap House Noize Club, 6 p.m. Shady Lady Joe Mazzafero, 9 p.m. Shine August Jazz Band, 8 p.m. The Side Door Jeanne Munoz and Erin Costa w/ Doug Pauly & Guests, 7 p.m.

Sophia’s Thai Kitchen Terminally Chill w/ DJ Phantacat, 9 p.m. The Starlet Room Los Retros, Kwe$t, Austn, 6 p.m. Thunder Valley Casino Resort Arrival From Sweden (ABBA Tribute), 7:30 p.m. Torch Club The Stuff, 5:30 p.m.; Earles of Newtown, 9 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Ross Hammond, 6 p.m.

2.23 SUNDAY

Berryessa Brewing Co. The Golden Cadillacs, 3 p.m. Blue Note Brewing Co. Tattered and Tied, 3 p.m. B Street at The Sofia Sammy Miller and The Congregation, 8 p.m. Foothills Event Center Center For The Arts Presents: David Bromberg Quintet, 6:30 p.m. Goldfield Zach Deputy, 7:30 p.m. Harlow’s Badfish (Sublime Tribute), Tropidelic, LAW, 7 p.m. Harris Center Great Composers Chamber Music Series: Beethoven’s Birthday Part 1, 2 p.m. Holy Diver Silent Planet, Currents, Invent, Animate, Greyhaven, 6 p.m. Laughs Unlimited Four Barrel, 3 p.m. LowBrau The Würst Rock N’ Roll Matinee w/ Th’ Losin Streaks, DJ’s Sum-Bum & JonVonRonk, 5 p.m. Midtown BarFly Factor IX w/ DJ Hawk, DJ CarnieRobber and Guests, 9 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Dennis Jones, 3 p.m. The Press Club Sunday Night Soul Party w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9 p.m. Red Hawk Casino Flat Busted, 1 p.m. The Starlet Room The Red Pears, The Countermen, 6 p.m. Torch Club Blues Jam, 4 p.m.; Front the Band, 8 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Grateful Sundays w/ Todd Gardner and Friends, 6 p.m.

2.24 MONDAY

Dante Club Byron Colborn 9-Piece: Birth of the Cool, 7 p.m. Goldfield Mike & the Moonpies, Quaker City Night Hawks, 7:30 p.m. Holy Diver Ramirez, 7 p.m. LowBrau Motown on Mondays w/ DJ Epik, 9 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Nebraska Mondays, 7:30 p.m. Old Ironsides Heath Williamson & Friends, 5:30 p.m. Rio Americano Performing Arts Center Rio Band w/ Sammy Miller and The Congregation, 7 p.m.

2.25 TUESDAY

Cosumnes River College Recital Hall No Mirrors: A Black History Month Choral Celebration, 7 p.m. Crest Theatre Joshua Radin & Friends w/ Ben Kweller and William Fitzsimmons, 8 p.m. The Flamingo House Salt Acid Phat Beats feat. Darby & Friends, 9 p.m. Harris Center JD Souther, 7:30 p.m. Holy Diver Local Showcase w/ The Numinous, Who Wants The Crown, PS Lockdown, Die Criminal, Shane Grenert 7 p.m. Kupros Kyle Rowland, 5 p.m. Mulvaney’s B&L 7th Annual Mardi Gras Second Line w/ Element Brass Band, 4:30 p.m. North Natomas Library Sacramento Guitar Society: Strum For Fun, 3:30 p.m. The Press Club Night School, 9 p.m. Shady Lady Element Brass Band, 9 p.m.

The Starlet Room Luna Luna, Helladusty, 6 p.m. Torch Club Matt Rainey, 5:30 p.m.; Fat Tuesday Celebration w/ Big Chiefs, 8:30 p.m.

2.26 WEDNESDAY

B Street at The Sofia Tom Paxton and The DonJuans, 7 p.m. The Club Car The Double Shots, 7:30 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Open Mic Jam, 9 p.m. Goldfield Delta Bombers, Reckless Ones, 7:30 p.m. Harlow’s Combo Chimbita, Y La Bamba, San Cha, 7 p.m. Harris Center International Guitar Night: Mike Dawes, Olli Soikkeli, Jim “Kimo” West, Cenk Erdogan, 7:30 p.m. Holy Diver Olivia O’Brien, 7 p.m. (Sold Out) Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Live Blues Jam Session, 8 p.m. The Press Club Emo Night Sacramento, 8 p.m. Shady Lady Destiny Molina Jam Session, 9 p.m. The Starlet Room Blues & Bourbon: Aaron Moreno & Friends, 6 p.m. Torch Club Jimmy Pailer & Co., 5:30 p.m.; The Nickel Slots, South San Lucas, 9 p.m.

Comedy Crooked Lane Brewing Co. Comedy Night w/ Chelsea Bearce, Chad Opitz, Roman Spinale, Feb. 20, 8 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Standup Saloon Hosted by Jason Anderson, Mondays, 8 p.m. JB’s Lounge & Grill Wild’N Out Wednesday Night Open Mic Comedy, Wednesdays, 9 p.m. Laughs Unlimited Capitol City Comedy w/ Mike Betancourt, Shannon Battle, Nick Larson, Danielle Arce & More, Feb. 12, 7:30 p.m. Pre Valentine’s Day Show w/ Mark Snipes, Drew Shafer, Aurora Singh, Wendy Lewis, Robert Omoto & More, Feb. 13, 8 p.m. Tony Baker, Keenan Baker, Ian Levy, Feb. 14 - 16, Fri. & Sat, 8 & 10:30 p.m.; Sun., 7 p.m Ladies Night w/ Kristen Frisk, Nicole Eichenberg, Aja Mae, Tina San Lucas & More, Feb. 19, 8 p.m. Say It Loud Comedy w/ Javon Whitlock, Tatiana, Kellz Barksdale & More, Feb. 20, 8 p.m. Connor McSpadden, Nick Larson, Terrell (Big T) Butler, Feb. 21 - 23, Fri. & Sat, 8 & 10:30 p.m.; Sun., 7 p.m Luna’s Cafe Open Mic Comedy w/ Hosts Jaime Fernandez and Michael Cella, Tuesdays, 8 p.m. McClatchy High School Says You! Live in Sacramento, Feb. 15, 3 p.m. On the Y Open Mic Comedy w/ Guest Hosts, Thursdays, 8:30 p.m. Punch Line There Goes the Neighborhood Comedy Tour, Feb. 12, 8 p.m. Mortified: Doomed Valentine’s Show w/ Scott Lifton, Matt Skopak, Mary Van Note & More, Feb. 13, 8 p.m. Laurie Kilmartin, Tony Camin, Ray Molina, Feb. 14 - 16, Fri. & Sat, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m.; Sun., 7:30 p.m. Makeup & Mimosas: Drag Brunch with a Punch!, Feb. 16, 11 a.m. Tinkle Time: A Comedy Extravaganza w/ Kris Tinkle, Feb. 19, 8 p.m. Sacramento Comedy Showcase, Feb. 20, 8 p.m. Pauly Shore, Brenton Biddlecomb, Cheryl the Soccer Mom, Feb. 21 - 22, Fri. & Sat, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Liz Grant: It’s Not Them, It’s Us, Feb. 23, 7:30 p.m. Matt Ritter Presents: The Comedians at Law, Feb. 26, 8 p.m. The Russ Room at Solomon’s That Comedy Night w/ Del Van Dyke, Feb. 13, 8 p.m. Sacramento Comedy Spot Open Mic, Sundays and Mondays, 8 p.m.

Improv Taste Test & Harold Night, Wednesdays, 7 - 10 p.m. Thursday Scramble & Improv Jam, Thursdays, 8 - 10 p.m. Anti-Cooperation League, Saturdays, 9 p.m. Sacramento State: University Union Ballroom Black Greek Comedy Showcase w/ LeLe Mason, Steph Sanders, Kanisha Buss, Kente Scott, Feb. 20, 7:30 p.m. STAB! Comedy Theater Comedy Open Mic, Thursdays, 9 p.m. STAB! Podcast Panel Show, Fridays, 10 p.m. Late Week Leftovers Open Mic, Sundays, 8 p.m. Neil Hamburger, Mike the Entertainer, Feb. 14, 9 p.m.

Misc. 1409 Del Paso Blvd. Uptown Market on the Boulevard, Saturdays, 12 - 5 p.m. 8th and W Streets Certified Farmers Market, Sundays, 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. 20th Street (Between J and L) Midtown Farmers Market, Saturdays, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Ace of Spades RAW Artists Sacramento Presents: Premiere, Feb. 19, 7 p.m. B Street at The Sofia Popcorn Falls by James Hindman, Through Feb. 23 Blue Cue Trivia Night, Wednesdays, 9 p.m. The Boxing Donkey Trivia Night, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Capitol Garage Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, Wednesdays, 8:30 p.m. Dinner and a Drag Show, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. Country Club Plaza Certified Farmers Market, Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Crest Theatre & Esquire IMAX Theater The 21st Sacramento Jewish Film Festival, Feb. 19 - 23 Crocker Art Museum Black History Month Free Family Festival, Feb. 16, 12 p.m. Granville Redmond: The Eloquent Palette, Through May 17 Cool Clay: Recent Acquisitions of Contemporary Ceramics, Through July 19, 2020 Crooked Lane Brewing Co. Trivia Night, Wednesdays, 6 p.m. Florin Road & 65th Street Certified Farmers Market, Thursdays, 8 a.m. 12 p.m. Fox & Goose Pub Quiz, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Golden 1 Center Disney on Ice Presents: Mickey’s Search Party, Feb. 13 - 17 Highwater The Trivia Factory, Mondays, 7 p.m. Historic Old Folsom Farmers Market, Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Kupros Craft House Triviology, Sundays, 7:30 p.m. KVIE Studios Artist Reception for Franceska Gamez’s Daydream, Feb. 13, 6 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Poetry Unplugged, Thursdays, 8 p.m. Sac Unified Poetry Slam, Feb. 21, 8 p.m. Midtown BarFly Salsa Lessons, Wednesdays, 8 p.m. Sacramento State: University Union Ballroom Free Lecture w/ Boots Riley, Feb. 13, 7:30 p.m. Shine Thee Word Thing Hosted by Lob Instagon feat. Laura Martin, Feb. 12, 7:30 p.m. Strikes Unlimited (Rocklin) Let’s Get Quzzical: Trivia Game Show Experience, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Sunrise Light Rail Station Certified Farmers Market, Saturdays, 8 a.m. 12 p.m. Sutter Health Park: Under the Big Top Cirque du Soleil: Amaluna, Through March 1 Tower Brewing Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Cribbage Night, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Trivia Night, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Yolo Brewing Co. Trivia Night, Tuesdays, 6 p.m.

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

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Photo by Cody Ross Cowan Photo by Mel issa Wel liver

Photo by Melissa Welliver

Photo by Cody

Ross Cowan

RELENTLESS MACHINERY

YOUTH CODE’S SARA TAYLOR FINDS CREATIVE WELLBEING IN VIOLENT MUSIC FOR AN ALIENATED WORLD WORDS ANDREW C. RUSSELL

B

efore industrial music claimed a mass youth audience in the ‘90s, thanks in part to the danceable brutalism of Nine Inch Nails and the parent-scaring theatricality of Marilyn Manson, it belonged to a much larger, less-publicized musical underground, just one untamed species among others as disparate as hardcore punk and extreme metal, wedded only in their total cutoff from the pop world. Industrial itself would’ve seemed the hardest sell at the time suspended as it was between early experimental, synth, dance music and unsettling, hellish imagery. Decades later, as genre boundaries blur and the term “underground” becomes a more useful description aesthetically than territorially, industrial hardcore/EBM group Youth Code thrives happily outside of the concept of scene. Though they have more in common with their ‘80s forebears like Front 242 and Skinny Puppy the de-balkanization of the streaming age has won them

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fandom amongst punks, metalheads, goths, hip-hoppers and synth-poppers, leading to collaborations with Chelsea Wolfe, Refused, AFI and Clipping, not to mention praise from industrial OGs Front Line Assembly and Psychic TV. Youth Code, a duo consisting of couple Sara Taylor and Ryan George, formed in Los Angeles on a whim in 2012, sparked by an impulsive claim from Taylor that she had a band ready to perform at an impending record store showcase. George had been a figure on the straight-edge punk scene some years prior, but he had an itch to dabble in electronics, and as a new couple, the two had bonded over a mutual adoration of sonically adventurous ‘80s industrial. Nearly eight years later, after two albums, numerous EPs, an impressive amount of collaborations and a formidable touring schedule, Youth Code is a more energetic beast than ever. Later releases have shed some of the classic ‘80s industrial trappings in favor of more brutality and speed—their raw and mechanically enhanced

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

energy spiked with the adrenaline and panic of the online rage age. Just listen to 2016’s “The Dust of Fallen Rome,” or their 2018 single collab with HEALTH, “INNOCENCE,” to feel the full brunt of their art. Taylor’s vocals have a frightening power, harsh to the extreme, the sound of a tormented cyborg soul attempting to crack the heavens from the razored depths of the digital wasteland. But for all of Youth Code’s hostile trappings, they are ultimately fueled by their central relationship, both personal and artistic. A mutual love for their music, a shared instinct for spontaneity and a constantly renewed energy to attack every track, performance or development with the same ferocity. Ahead of their March show at Ace of Spades as part of their 2020 North American tour with Swedish punk icons Refused, we got the chance to speak with Sara Taylor about Youth Code’s particular brand of dystopian hardcore. Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


I’ve been curious since I first heard your music—you have a very intense and harsh vocal delivery. Do you have a special method of training or protecting your voice? No. If anything, I’m probably very, very horrible to my vocal cords. You can hear how I sound in our conversation right now [laughs]. I’ve smoked since I was 13. The thing I’m trying to do now is I’m trying to figure out how to direct screaming in a more melodic sense, like Trent Reznor. It’s a harsh tone, but it’s singing. I’m trying to figure that out. My voice for sure has suffered from these years of doing this, especially at the beginning of it. I think now I have a more clear sense of direction between what’s gonna kill me and what’s going to let it be sustained. It’s gotten to a level where I feel pretty comfortable with my screaming. And you find a different push when you’re live that doesn’t exist in the studio. In the studio I can do maybe two songs before I blow my voice out, but live, there are like, endorphins that get me to scream better. I don’t know how to describe it. There’s been a lot of analysis of industrial in recent years, books written and so forth. The genre has a lot to say about humanity/ inhumanity, alienation, mechanization and so forth. Do any of these ideas resonate with you or the group in particular? What drew you to this music originally? I enjoy the theory behind certain genres, but mine is pretty simplistic. For me personally, any influence I took was from the kind of music my father liked. My father was a very big influence on what I was into musically. I attempted to rebel against my parents by listening to metal. I liked the aggression of it. I still do. But my father was into stuff like Depeche Mode, and I liked the sound that could be generated from electronic music. So industrial, when I stumbled upon it, at the early age of like, 10, 11 years old, it was like a perfect blend of the aggression I liked and also the electronic, more out-there sounds that piqued my interest. I never really looked at industrial as being something that had a message embedded in the way it was created. I see it as a continuous exploration in how far you can push the limits of sound. When Ryan and I first got together, one of our very first times hanging out, before we were even a band, we just sat around listening to Skinny Puppy really loud. We both just knew the type of stuff that we liked and were drawn to. We didn’t get into the theory behind it. But on the same token, I feel like now more than ever, because of the way we as humans are progressing into being more advanced with technology, I think the genre does encapsulate a lot of what’s going on with the world. You’ve had a pretty hectic touring schedule since your last album, Commitment to Complications, came out in 2016. How do you balance that with creating new material? We were always a band that from the beginning, up until now, just came out of the woodwork, like tour, record, tour, record. It’s been really nice the past four years. We’re still sort of touring on Commitment to Complication because we haven’t made any announcements as to what’s in the works right now. But it’s been nice to be able to step back and focus on what’s going on with us personally; we started Youth Code less than a year into being in a relationship. So to be consistently and constantly working, back to back—start dating, make a tape, then you make a 7-inch, then you make a record, then you tour all the time. We definitely have been recording stuff and hope to have a record out before the end of the year. We have about 16 to 17 demos done. There’s this sort of forgetfulness about how people want content. They don’t think about how much they’re pushing. The artist becomes afraid, thinking, “Are people going to forget me if I don’t do things instantly?” I don’t think we focus enough on the mental health of people who are creating, thinking about if they’re in a good state.

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I get that. You see that especially now with younger artists that are dying or overdosing. It makes perfect sense to me, as someone who’s been hypersensitive my entire life, why a lot of these people are burning out as quickly as they are, is because everyone just wants to consume, consume, consume, and no-one stops and goes, “Hey, are you doing okay?” A lot of these artists get wrapped up in really bad substance abuse problems. It’s super important to give people space for their mental wellbeing. You’ve had the chance to collaborate or tour with a lot of your heroes. Anyone in particular that had you the most excited? At the beginning of this, we had no idea that people in Front Line Assembly or Skinny Puppy, any of these people who seemed so far up out of reach. As far as people we’ve asked to work with, we’ve only reached out to a few people directly to collaborate with us. Like on the last record, we had Todd [Jones] from Nails, who’s an amazing guitarist— super sick riffs—and Ben [Falgoust] from Goatwhore, who I’ve known of since I was like 19, and I’ve always been excited about how he does stuff. So to bring them into what we were doing and see how they can contribute to our music which is aggressive, but decidedly not metal, was really fucking awesome. I’m excited about everyone we get to work with, to be honest. What have you been listening to, and what’s your favorite record? Mechanical Animals by Marilyn Manson is my number one record of all time. Right now, I like a lot of new black metal that’s coming out, but I feel like I need to do more homework on it, because I don’t exactly know all the beliefs of everyone, so I don’t want to end up promoting something I don’t like. It’s hard—even if they’re talking about dragons, you know, it might be a metaphor for something really shitty. I’ve also been listening to a lot of power pop lately. Ryan got me into a lot of power pop and mod stuff, and I’ve just started opening my ears to a lot of it, like Wreckless Eric and The Only Ones. It’s nice to take influences from weird places that one would never expect to relate to our music. As far as other new music … I haven’t worked at a record store in like six years, so I don’t stay as much on top of everything current, and I’m so head-first into creating music that I kind have just listen to my old staples. I’m sure that I’ll get shit on a lot for it, but Orgy’s second See Youth Code live alongside record, Vapor Transmission? Refused and METZ at Ace of Spades I still listen to that pretty (1417 R St., Sacramento) on Sunday, much once a day. I’m pretty March 8. Doors open at 7 p.m. For much the same idiot as I was tickets go to Aceofspadessac.com. when I was a teenager.

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

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NIGHT OUT WITH NATE CURRY

THE TRANSFORMATION OF AN ARTIST, AND HOW HE HOPES THE ELEVATE SACRAMENTO'S HIP-HOP SCENE WORDS RYAN KAIKA • PHOTO BECKY PASSPORT

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Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

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hopped out of my friend’s car in a hurry, just in time for an interview with Sacramento’s very own Nate Curry. I quickly recognized the 26-year-old singer, songwriter, rapper and producer strutting down the street by his colorful attire and full facial hair, true to the man himself: yellow sweatpants and a yellow crew neck sweatshirt, a poofy orange beanie, clean white Nikes and his flowing, brown, James Harden-adjacent beard. Rolling up with an outfit similar to those he wore on the cover of his latest EP, Self Distraction (released in 2019), the hip-hop up-and-comer, born nearby in Davis, is slowly winning hearts nationwide after catching attention locally from years of work in the Sacramento hip-hop scene, earning himself a lofty post as the favorite artist of your favorite rapper (Mozzy, P-Lo and SOB x RBE, to name a few fans according to Curry). Unfortunately—or perhaps fortunately—for myself and the rising hip-hop head, the coffee shop that we pulled up to happened to be closed. Feeling like I had given Curry a “Cold Shoulder” of my own, we quickly walked to find the nearest spot to chat about his recent musical successes and career-at-large—mainly his experience touring with Hobo Johnson, his thoughts on rap and hiphop as a whole, as well as how he fits in (or rather stands out) in such a competitive landscape. On our walk to the eventual interview spot—in typical fashion—he answered a call from a friend, and from what I heard (as I frantically searched for the nearest bar) were a few words about upcoming tour plans. Curry has been leading an exciting life, but he would definitely tell you himself that the main reason for that is his patience and humility, the boring parts of hip-hop. Setting up at Capitol Hop Shop, Curry eased the mood early on, saying, “It’s not like I have a mastermind, but I just noticed a pattern. People know me as a funny dude and all my songs are dance-y and upbeat,” continuing (after taking a bite from a heap of pulled pork-topped fries), “but when you listen to my songs they’re either sad or serious issues and the way I kind of explain it on tour … depression … anxiety … addiction [are all] very real … but I want to give [people] something to sing-along and dance to and chant with … It’s like therapy, but fun therapy.” Curry finishes his thought with the witty remark, “It’s like me tricking myself into being smart.” As with most artists, there tends to be a deeper story beneath the bright and flashy surface. For Curry, “tricking himself into being smart,” and hopefully his fans too, is a big part of it. Reflecting on his recent tour, Curry admits that while his vibe differs drastically from Johnson’s it gave him insight into new audiences. Style aside, the increasingly popular Johnson saw something in Curry and invited him along the 30-city journey. Curry begins telling me about a stop in Atlanta that shows his ease of improv by saying, “my keyboard set just broke down … but that literally made the show [in a strange way] … My homie DJed sitting from the floor and it worked out great.” Quotes like these prove that Curry is clearly meant to be a performer and under the spotlight is where he shines. Growing up the son of Sacramento producer SBVCE (pronounced “space”), formerly of the rap group The CUF, or as Curry describes, “Sacramento underground hip-hop dudes—the ‘f*ck this job’ type,” Curry blossomed in the shine of rap music. Learning at a young age, he began rapping at three and producing music at 12 in a house

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


of learned-and-lived rappers. Curry speaks highly of his father’s impact on his ability to perform, saying, “The biggest thing I got from [living among rappers] was my stage presence.” Charisma aside, the logistical mindset of maintaining patience in an industry often so immediate was also learned as a result of SBVCE’s hustle. SBVCE co-founded the label Bedroom Trap Entertainment alongside fellow Sacramento artist Baegod in 2013, and now Curry is a key member of the label as well, helping to establish Sacramento as a warming hotbed for artists looking to breakthrough. Humility is clearly another trait passed down and perhaps seen first hand. “I’m kind of socially awkward,” Curry says. “But when it comes to getting on stage, I don’t know what it is … I just snap.” That snap I’m sure is quite liberating, but it’s a snap nonetheless, and if you’ve seen him perform live (or followed his social media presence), you’ll quickly realize his persona, or as he aptly describes it: “not too corny, not too gangster.” The hip-hop community in Sacramento knows Curry now, but it wasn’t always like this, and it took about 10 years of Soundcloud releases to make it to a cross-country tour. Repping the moniker Takticz initially in his career before transitioning to Yungbrehh and finally finding a voice that could lift him higher through the music charts and minds of hip-hop junkies, he finally dropped the act and repped his own name—Nate Curry. Finding that style took time though and Curry points to the 2017 song “Balance” as a shift in mindset. “At that point in my life it was me trying to get myself on the right track, trying to motivate myself and if I’m on stage saying all these things I have to do them …‘cause back in the day those hip-hop heads would boo you off the stage if you’re not really about what you’re talking about,” Curry says about the club-y, yet self-motivating track. Another thing he learned from his time in the industry—aligning words with actions. More than a mental shift, the song was a launching point for the Nate Curry sound, pinpointing his preferred, self-described “airy voice,” that is the calling card for Curry’s captivating lyrics. He went on to describe his songwriting that accompanies that “airy” voice as, “Transparency mixed with catchiness, but catchiness mixed with originality,” the epitome of balance. “I thought, ‘This is where I want to go …’ I couldn’t figure out who I was, and in a way I was trying to please [random people],” Curry says about his mindset before the revelation from that song. “It was almost right when I met my girl, I changed my name to my [current] name and started writing more catchy, meaningful music, that I would listen to.” Not long after this, his 2017 hit track, “Cold Shoulder,” dropped. “That’s literally the reason why I’m able to still write and have a fan base,” Curry admits about the song that’s generated more than 600,000 plays on Spotify. While the aforementioned “Balance,” maintains a modest view count on YouTube, “Cold Shoulder,” confidently brushed past the earlier video’s numbers. Set in snowy Lake Tahoe, the nonchalant track features Curry and

SubmergeMag.com

his girlfriend dancing coolly in picturesque winter landscapes. Asking why he thought that particular video did so well (considering it was released two years after the song) he answers, “It looked so big … We were in the snow for like 13 hours,” to which I interject, “That’s awesome,” before Nate corrects me. “It was horrible!” he says. “But what it did was make people do that second thumb tap.” That social media “second thumb tap” is an area where Curry has had tremendous success over the last three years, and especially since the drop of his definitive EP Self Distraction. Discussing the contorting of mind and voice as an artist, Curry poses the question: “How can I be successful in music and not feel trapped as a human? “You don’t need a clique … You just gotta click with yourself,” he follows up, discussing his transformation—a noticeable one heard in the production and quality of his newest EP. In Curry fashion, it’s well represented by Northern California with the likes of Sacramento artists Harris Rudman and Igwe Aka and the Oakland-born Haiti Babii. Each artist shines alongside Curry, who shows his true hip-hop vibe throughout the entire tracklist, which he says is inspired by the likes of Erykah Badu, A Tribe Called Quest, Mos Def and J Dilla. Curry’s good friend (and video game teammate/rival) Harris Rudman adds a verse midway as Curry’s cushy vocals set the mood on the second track “Hate to See It.” The third track is again at ease with Curry’s voice as Haiti Babii comes in at the halfway point to change the tempo with rhymes that run with the beat on “Active.” For the fourth track, “Primero,” Curry says, admitting to me of his initial hesitation, shows a slightly different side to his music with a hypnotic and dancehall feel to it. Aka comes through in vintage style on the fifth track “Unbothered (Sorry),” before Curry finishes the EP off solo with “Temporary Fix,” his most played song on streaming platforms (with over 770 thousand plays on Spotify currently). “I see a bunch of people supporting people, and not just for the support back,” Curry says. “Everyone’s giving everyone a chance. That’s the hardest part: just getting someone to give you a chance. It definitely wasn’t like that.” As we paid the bill, Curry left me with one last memorable quote (describing his music fittingly in food terms), pondering aloud, “How can I have a weird ass entrée, that looks hella good?” We left the bar and walked back to Curry’s car, near the original coffee shop we planned to meet at. The mood was less frantic than on the way there, which I’d attribute to Curry’s laid back demeanor leading the way. He confided in me about future music saying that, “I want it to be hella positive … which is gonna be tough … ‘Cause I want people to twerk to it.” Quite the classic ending to a night out with Sacramento’s self-distracted yet highly focused hip-hop icon.

See Nate Curry live at Harlow’s (2708 J St., Sacramento) on Friday, Feb. 14 (y’know, Valentine’s Day) as part of Love Town II. Also performing will be Harris Rudman, Igwe Aka and Camilla Covington. This is an all-ages show, and doors open at 6:30 p.m. To get tickets, go to Lovetownsac.com.

how! Brand New S Rippe d from Tweet the s!

April 5

One Show – 7:00 PM Tickets: $47-67

Crest Theatre 1013 K Street Sacramento crestsacramento.com

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

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ACCORDING TO BAZOOKA

CELEBRATING THEIR LATEST ALBUM

THE DEVIL’S IN THE DETAILS

AccordingToBazooka.com

Saturday February 29

Two Rivers Cider Co.

Friday March 27

Luna’s Café

Saturday March 28

First Street Café

Friday April 17

Bar 101

4331 Attawa Avenue, Sacramento

1414 16th Street, Sacramento

free / 6 p.m. 21+ or with adult dogs okay!

Plus Guest 5 Star Alcatraz

440 First Street, Benicia

101 Main Street, Roseville

DUSTBOWL REVIVAL JARED & THE MILL HARLOW’S • 2708 J STREET • SACRAMENTO • 21 & OVER • 8:00PM

$10 / 8 p.m. all ages

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free / 9 p.m. all ages

THURSDAY

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THE DETROIT COBRAS / SARAH SHOOK & THE DISARMERS HARLOW’S • 2708 J STREET • SACRAMENTO • 21 & OVER • 8:00PM

DEKE DICKERSON & THE ECCO-FONICS TWILIGHT DRIFTERS • DJ POPULUXE

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JUST DOING IT JAMES BARONE jb@submergemag.com

free / 7 p.m. all ages

2 5 TH A N N I V E R S A R Y N O R T H A M E R I C A N T O U R 2 0 2 0

HARLOW’S • 2708 J STREET • SACRAMENTO •

THE SHALLOW END

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

There are more than 7 billion people on Earth. That’s a lot. I mean, seriously. It’s so fucking many. And, as a population, and this goes down to every one of us, we’re not doing a great job of holding our shit together. Look at the people we’ve elected as leaders … not just here at home, but worldwide. Granted, some of the people in positions of leadership didn’t get there by the most legitimate or peaceful means. There are tyrants and dictators—and wannabe versions of both—who rule with iron fists and their populaces are more or less powerless to do anything about that. But before I go too far down that road, I should say this column is not about the global rise of

we just had a ball or that spinny thing you’d sit on and twirl until you vomited. DJ Cartoon Panda makes that shit look lame as fuck. Unicorns are also really in as far as baby stuff is concerned, at least that’s how it seemed from our initial perusal, and as a fantasy nerd, it really excites me that I’ll have every opportunity to make Baby Barone look like a magical narwhal. Speaking of, narwhals are also pretty en vogue, and why wouldn’t they be? They’re the unicorns of the sea, and who knows, maybe our child will even grow up in a world that still has a few narwhals left. That’s my hope, anyway. To be honest, I have a lot of hopes for the

strongmen heads of state. It’s not about the environment, either, but we’re making a mess of that too. I read an article on Weather.com today about the “concerning” weather patterns across the United States this winter. California’s northern and central valley, as well as the Sierra Nevadas, have been dry this season, but the Southwest has been exceptionally arid with large swaths of the region experiencing severe or exceptional drought, as per the Weather Channel. Meanwhile, down in Antarctica, the world’s coldest continent set a record temperature of 65 degrees, “just days after the Earth saw its warmest January on record,” according to the Washington Post. More evidence of climate change in action? Probably, but I’m not a scientist. However, I don’t have to have a Ph.D to surmise that all that shit we put into the air, or all the plastic that’s just floating around in the ocean isn’t healthy for us or the other little critters we share the planet with. This is all my worry-wart way to preface that my wife and I are expecting our first child, and we’re really excited about it. Like, over the moon excited. Honestly, I didn’t realize how excited I was until one night, we decided to go walk around a department store just to get out of the apartment for a bit, and I suggested we check out all the baby shit (there’s a lot of fucking baby shit). There’s so much awesome stuff! I saw a little DJ panda or something with turntables that made noise. When I was a kid,

little biscuit. That’s even more exciting than all the cool baby stuff, or the possibility that I’ll be able to show him/her/pronoun of choice how to play Magic: The Gathering when they’re older. I hope that Mary and I will provide an environment that our child will have a positive effect on the world around it. I guess that’s all I can really hope for. It doesn’t feel like a really good time to try to bring another person into this world. Honestly, I don’t know how anyone raises a child these days, with all the forces competing for our attention. My parents never had to worry about internet trolls, fake news or who knows what digital monsters lurking around the corner poisoning my mind or making my life a living hell. Also, we’re kind of broke as hell and living in a one-bedroom apartment, which I suppose are a lot more pressing concerns than, you know, SOCIETY. It’s just easier to worry about the big things, you know? The things you’re not expected to have answers for. But most of my elders have confided in me that, as far as having a baby goes, there’s never really a good time. If you keep waiting for the right moment to start a family, you’ll probably never go for it. That seems like pretty sage advice. I guess it’s more of a matter of what you do as opposed to how you’re going to do it. “You just do it,” a good friend and father told me. So I guess that’s where we’re at. We’re doing it. Holy fuck. We’re doing it.

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


SubmergeMag.com

Issue 311 • February 12 – February 26, 2020

27


DIVE INTO SACRAMENTO & ITS SURROUNDING AREAS

FEBRUARY 12 – 26, 2019

# 311

SMALL AS ALISTEN, GIANT AND CHANGE A LIFE

NATE CURRY HELLA POSITIVE O, CANADA! ROAD TRIPPING IN THE PROVINCES

PISSCAT THE NEW NORMAL

YOUTH CODE +

HOWLS FROM BEYOND

BROOKLYN BUZZ BAND BEACH FOSSILS COMES TO DAVIS SACRAMENTO JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL TURNS 21

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CUPCAKES & BEER SOUNDS LIKE VALENTINE’S DAY TO US

Profile for Submerge Magazine

Submerge Magazine: Issue 311 (February 12 - Feburary 26, 2020)  

Issue 311 features exclusive interviews with Sacramento singer, songwriter, rapper and producer Nate Curry, who will play Harlow's on Feb. 1...

Submerge Magazine: Issue 311 (February 12 - Feburary 26, 2020)  

Issue 311 features exclusive interviews with Sacramento singer, songwriter, rapper and producer Nate Curry, who will play Harlow's on Feb. 1...

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