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DIVE INTO SACRAMENTO & ITS SURROUNDING AREAS

JANUARY 29 – FEBRUARY 12, 2020

# 310

JOHN WATERS

TOPPLING THE TYRANNY OF GOOD TASTE

THE SEAFLOOR CINEMA

EVERY NIGHT IS EMO NIGHT

THOMAS CAMPBELL THE NATURE OF SKATEBOARDING

BOOTS RILEY ONE BIG EXPRESSION

FREE THE HONEST EP RELEASE LARRY RODRIGUEZ’S “MOON DUST DANCE PARTY” CROCKER’S SILENT FILM SERIES


COMING TO GRASS VALLEY THURSDAY, FEB. 13

TUESDAY, FEB. 18

FOOTHILLS EVENT CENTER 400 IDAHO MARYLAND ROAD

FOOTHILLS EVENT CENTER 400 IDAHO MARYLAND ROAD

$40 members, $45 general public

General Admission: $50 to $55

SATURDAY, FEB. 22

SUNDAY, FEB. 23

SONNY LANDRETH & MARCIA BALL FOOTHILLS EVENT CENTER 400 IDAHO MARYLAND ROAD

FOOTHILLS EVENT CENTER 400 IDAHO MARYLAND ROAD

General Admission: $50 to $55

General Admission: $40 to $55

FRIDAY, MARCH 6

FRIDAY, MARCH 13

THE CENTER FOR THE ARTS 314 WEST MAIN STREET

THE CENTER FOR THE ARTS 314 WEST MAIN STREET

Reserved Seating: $40 to $55

$25 members, $35 general public

SATURDAY, MARCH 14

SUNDAY, MARCH 15

Opening: Marc Ford & Jackson Stokes

THE CENTER FOR THE ARTS 314 WEST MAIN STREET

THE CENTER FOR THE ARTS 314 WEST MAIN STREET

$35 members, $40 general public

Tix range from $30 to $55

THE CENTER ONTHEGO 530.274.8384

BECOME A MEMBER & SAVE

GET TICKETS NOW:

THECENTERFORTHEARTS.ORG *Ticket prices do not include applicable fees

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Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


15%OFF

SUB420

SACRAMENTO

SubmergeMag.com

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

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Serving Netillo’s Takos! 1630 J Street SACRAMENTO (916) 476-5076 Wednesday Saturday February February 812| |7pm 7:30pm | $25adv | $25| |allallages ages PLUS VALENTINES DeanEXCLUSIVE Fraser and EXTRAVAGANZA TOURBand 2020 Blak Soil

Saturday February 8 7pm | free

Horrorpops Tarrus Riley

UFC 247 Jones vs. Reyes Thursday February 6 7:30pm | $26.50 | all ages

Jerrod Niemann

Etana

Bobby Zoppi

Saturday February 8 | 7pm | $25adv | all ages PLUS Dean Fraser

Tarrus Riley

and

Blak Soil Band

STARTING AT 10PM

FVME

Friday February 14 7:30pm | $20 | all ages

Marty O’Reilly

Sunday February 9 | 7:30pm | $16adv | all ages

DJs OASIS JOSEPH ONE & FRIENDS

Saturday February 15 | 7:30pm | $15 | all ages OF MOTHER HIPS

Greg Loiacono

Logan Mize

Willie Jones Monday February 10 | 7:30pm | $15 | all ages

World / Inferno Friendship Society

The Bridge City Sinners

Zach Deputy

The Melvins

plus special guests

Hepa. Titus and Cunts

your spot for free

Monday February 24 | 7:30pm | $12 | all ages

Mike & The Moonpies

COMING SOON:

Quaker City Night Hawks

4

Delta Bombers The Aggrolites Boy Named Banjo Hot Snakes

Mar 21 Mar 29 Apr 1 Apr 5

Jason Boland

& The Stragglers

Flipturn Jason Hawk Harris Corb Lund

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

Apr 14

Camilo Septimo

Apr 16&17 Casey Donahew

Mikel Erentxun May 10 Jim Lauderdale Apr 26

DJs every Friday , Saturda y STARTING AT 10PM

21 TVs

Sunday February 23 7:30pm | $15 | all ages

Tuesday February 11 | 7:30pm | $26 | all ages

Mar 8

$1 OFF ALL BEERS ALL DAY LONG

& the Old Soul Orchestra

Mar 5

$1 TACOS +

plus special guest

plus special guest

Feb 29

Tuesdays!

Thursday February 13 7:30pm | $22 | all ages

Black Uhuru

Feb 26

Taco

UFC PPV,nhl, NBA, and the

super bowl!

BOOK YOUR NEXT EVENT AT GOLDFIELD!

Corporate Events, Private Parties, Birthday’s & More F O R M O R E I N F O V I S I T G O L D F I E L DT R A D I N G P O S T. CO M

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


SubmergeMag.com

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

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DIVE IN

A family, bicycle, and dog-friendly cider company Open

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days a week

Tue-Fri 4-9p Sat 2-9p Sun 12-7p

16

ciders on tap Founded in Sacramento in 1996

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR FRIDAY

Jan 31

SATURDAY

Feb 1

FRIDAY

Feb 7 SUNDAY

Feb 9

FRIDAY

Feb 14 MONDAY

Feb 17

FARROW AND THE PEACH LEAVES 6PM STAN & JERRY

310 2020 Submerge: an independently owned entertainment/lifestyle publication available for free biweekly throughout the greater Sacramento area.

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COFOUNDER/ ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

SENIOR EDITOR

James Barone ASSISTANT EDITOR

Ryan Prado

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Amber Amey, Ellen Baker, Robin Bacior, Robert Berry, Syrah Caparas, Michael Cella, Bocephus Chigger, Ronnie Cline, Justin Cox, Alia Cruz, Miranda Culp, Brittney Delgado, Josh Fernandez, Lovelle Harris, Mollie Hawkins, Tyler Horst, Ryan Kaika, Niki Kangas, Nur Kausar, Grant Miner, Olivia Monahan, John Phillips, Paul Piazza, Claudia Rivas, Daniel Romandia, Andrew Russell, Bailey Snow, Jacob Sprecher, Richard St. Ofle

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SHOTGUN SLIM 6PM MONTHLY BIRTHDAY PARTY:

AQUARIUS 2-6PM

LOVESNACK BURLESQUE, CONTORTION, GO-GOS AND MORE! LIVE MUSIC BY

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Wesley Davis, Evan Duran, Dillon Flowers, Julia E. Heath, Jon Hermison, Paul Piazza, Tyrel Tesch

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ZJITZJO 7PM / 18+ GRATEFUL MONDAY

Submerge

P.O. Box 160282 Sacramento, California 95816

~GRATEFUL DEAD MUSIC~

BALLIN’ THAT JACK 6PM

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CRIBBAGE CLUB 7PM/FREE

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DIVE IN

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THE SEAFLOOR CINEMA

BAD KARAOKE! 7PM/ FREE

$5 OFF SELECT FILLS

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THE STREAM

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JOHN WATERS

THURSDAYS

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OPTIMISTIC PESSIMIST

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THOMAS CAMPBELL

10

SUBMERGE YOUR SENSES

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CALENDAR

12

BOOTS RILEY

26

THE SHALLOW END

4311 Attawa Ave, Sacramento

916-228-4757 • TWORIVERSCIDER.COM KEEP UP WITH US!

@TWORIVERSCIDER

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COFOUNDER/ EDITOR IN CHIEF/ ART DIRECTOR

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6PM

TRIVIA NIGHT 7PM/FREE BAMBI VEGAN TACOS

MELISSA WELLIVER melissa@submergemag.com

Melissa Welliver melissa@ submergemag.com

~PLAYING BLUES INSPIRED MUSIC~

GROWLER “HAPPY HOUR”

THE FILM ISSUE

JANUARY 29 – FEBRUARY 12

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

All content is property of Submerge and may not be reproduced without permission. Submerge is both owned and published by Submerge Media. All opinions expressed throughout Submerge are those of the author and do not necessarily mean we all share those opinions. Feel free to take a copy or two for free, but please don’t remove our papers or throw them away. Submerge welcomes letters of all kinds, whether they are full of love or hate. We want to know what is on your mind, so feel free to contact us via snail mail at P.O. Box 160282, Sacramento, California 95816. Or you can email us at info@submergemag.com.

SUBMERGEMAG.COM Follow us on Twitter & Instagram! @SubmergeMag PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER

FRONT COVER PHOTO OF JOHN WATERS BY GREG GORMAN BACK COVER PHOTOS COURTOUSY OF THOMAS CAMPBELL

One could call this a film issue. A couple weeks ago I got word that the skateboard film Ye Olde Destruction will be doing a premiere at Midtown BarFly on Feb. 6. It’s a film by Thomas Campbell that’s shot almost entirely on 16mm film. It features skateboarders Louie Barletta, John Worthington, Eli Williams and many, many more. It even features a local fave, Omar Salazar! One thing that’s super cool about the Sacramento premiere is that it’s going to be scored live by Tommy Guerrero, Matt Rodriguez, Lee Bob Watson and Josh Lippi. Also DJing that night will be DJ Juan Love aka John Cardiel. Filmmaker Thomas Campbell, will also be in attendance. We were lucky enough to do a phone interview with him as he was driving to Utah for an art show. Check out page 20 to read our Q&A. In this issue, starting on page 12, we also interviewed Boots Riley, lead vocalist of Oakland’s The Coup and writer and director of the film Sorry to Bother You, which won the 2019 Film Independent Spirit Award for best first feature. Riley, a rapper, filmmaker and activist, will be coming to Sacramento State’s University Union Ballroom on Feb. 13 to give a lecture on race, economics and other social justice issues. Please read our feature to learn more about his upcoming projects, thoughts on joining organizations and how great art is made. The Sultan of Sleaze, the Baron of Bad Taste, the Pope of Trash, ahem, the John Waters also gave Submerge a few minutes of his time! Waters, a filmmaker, director, writer, actor and artist, will be coming to the Crest Theatre in Sacramento on Feb. 28 for a fully revamped This Filthy World, a one-man show/ documentary film. Starting on page 18 you can read our interview with this legend, where Waters discusses his annual top-10 favorite film-of-the-year lists, how he is truly able to appreciate bad taste and what we can expect from the new edition of This Filthy World. The Seafloor Cinema. They’re a great local “twinkly” emo/math rock band. OK, there isn’t much film talk here, but hey, their name does have the word Cinema! A stretch I know, but as mentioned in the story (starting on page 16) their YouTube video “In the Future There Will Be 500 Channels but Nothing to Watch” has more than 17,000 views. Be sure to read our feature to learn how this band ended up going from being an instrumental group to one with a vocalist, how they are taking a cue from Twisted Sister to pay for a new album and how they teamed up with the beloved Emo Night crew. Last but not least, to round out this de facto “film issue” check out “Submerge Your Senses” on page 10 to learn about Crocker Art Museum’s Silent Film Series and which venue in our area will host Randy’s—from cult classic show Trailer Park Boys— “Cheeseburger Picnic Tour.” Read. Learn. Do rad things, Melissa Welliver

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


FEB 6 6:30 PM The Kid

Shh! We’re watching silent films!

MAR 5 6:30 PM Nosferatu

APR 2 6:30 PM The Artist

Tickets at crockerart.org

Give Keep

THIS HOLIDAY SEASON S H O P or JEWELRY, REPAIR To CUSTOM LOCAL AND toARTISAN GIFTS LOCALLY MADE VALENTINE’S DAY GIFTS

LITTLE &BOUTIQUE RELICS GALLERIA LITTLE

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1111 24th St. #103

Midtown Sacramento 95816

916.346.4615 www.littlerelics.com Open 7 days a week

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

7


THE STREAM

SUBMERGE QUICK PICKS: FOUR FEBRUARY EVENTS YOU’VE JONATHAN CARABBA GOT TO KNOW ABOUT!

Send regional news tips to info@submergemag.com

Artist Susan Silvester’s Second Saturday Reception at Capital Public Radio • Feb. 8 We’ve been big fans of Sacramento by-way-of New York City artist Susan Silvester since we first featured her in Submerge way back in 2013, and we’re thrilled to see her still doing her thing today. Her latest exhibit, Enchanted: Spaces + Places, will open on Saturday, Feb. 8 at Capitol Public Radio (7055 Folsom Blvd.). Silvester’s style is somewhat dark, yet fairytale-like, and is full of whimsical animals, children and delightful patterns. In the past, Silvester has created sculptures and props for everything from the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade to Universal Studios. Locally, her work has been seen in galleries like Crocker Art Museum, Davis Art Center, Fe Gallery, Verge Center for the Arts and others. The artist will be on hand for the opening reception on Feb. 8, which will run from 4–6 p.m. and is free and open to all ages. Check out Susansilvester.com to learn more about the artist, and for more info on the reception visit Facebook.com/capradio and head to their “Events” page.

MONDAY, FEB 3 8-11pm

COOL KIDZ ‘80s DANCE PARTY WITH

DJ RODERICK

FULL BAR, LATE NIGHT SNACKS

2ND&4TH SATURDAYS 11am-2pm FEB 8 • FEB 22 • MAR 14 • MAR 28

DISCO BRUNCH

DJ SHAUN SLAUGHTER

WITH

BOTTOMLESS MIMOSAS

BLOODY MARYS, FAIR TRADE COFFEE, HOUSE-SMOKED LOX, FRESH BAGELS, SCRAMBLES AND MORE....

1ST& 3RD SUNDAYS 11am-2pm

FEB 2 • FEB 16 • MAR 1 • MAR 15

RECORD CLUB BRUNCH

WITH

V-Day Sacramento Presents: One Night Stand Up! • Feb. 9 V-Day Sacramento—a local grassroots movement to end violence against all women, girls, transgender, gender non-conforming and fluid identified people—is producing a one-night-only comedy show on Sunday, Feb. 9 at Cafe Colonial (3520 Stockton Blvd.), where proceeds will benefit Sacramento Take Back the Night and SWOP Sacramento (Sex Workers’ Outreach Project). Local comedians on the bill include Amy Estes, Becky Lynn, Shahera Hyatt and Diana Hong. The cover is just $10 at the door, and the venue has even agreed to donate 20 percent of all food sales. So come hungry, laugh a lot and grub your heart out all for a great cause! For more info look up Facebook.com/vdaysacramento or Vdaysacramento.org.

Becky Lynn

Shahera Hyatt

Diana Hong

DJ Larry Rodriguez’s “Moon Dust Dance Party” at The Russ Room • Feb. 14 & 28

DJ RODERICK SPINNING 45s

Sacramento’s newest venue, The Russ Room, located upstairs at Solomon’s Delicatessen (730 K St.), is kicking their calendar into high gear this month with all sorts of regular DJ events and soon-to-be a lot of live music. One of the coolest recurring nights at the venue will be the “Moon Dust Dance Party” with legendary local DJ Larry Rodriguez spinning disco, funk, soul, reggae and more. Moon Dust will take place second and fourth Fridays (Feb. 14 and 28). No cover, full bar and late night snacks. I recently caught the last few songs of local band The Big Poppies’ set at The Russ Room and I was very impressed with the sound system, the acoustics and the overall vibe of the place. Looking out the huge windows onto K Street behind the band and/or DJ is pretty cool, and the newly restored mural out front looks awesome from this vantage point. Look them up on socials (@therussroom or @solomonsdelicatessen) for more info.

2ND & 4TH FRIDAYS 8pm-MIDNIGHT FEB 14 • FEB 28 • MAR 13 • MAR 27

MOON DUST DANCE PARTY

WITH

Amy Estes

DJ LARRY RODRIGUEZ

DISCO, FUNK, SOUL, REGGAE & MORE... NO COVER! FULL BAR, LATE NIGHT SNACKS

4TH THURSDAY 6-9pm FEB 27 • MAR 26

LYRICS SELECT OPEN MIC NIGHT $5 COVER

TOY ROOM GALLERY ART SHOW NOW THRU MAR 14

“VISUAL FEAST” BY MICK SHELDON LOCATED ABOVE SOLOMON’S

730 K STREET 11 ROCK DOWNTOWN SACRAMENTO THE RUSS

SINGLE BAGEL

1

99

RESPONSIBLY SOURCED HOUSEMADE NOVA LOX OR LOCAL SMOKED STURGEON, PLAIN SCHMEAR, TOMATO, CAPERS, PICKLED ONIONS ON ANY TOASTED BAGEL OF YOUR CHOICE

99 @THERUSSROOM @SOLOMONSDELICATESSEN

PLAIN, EVERYTHING, ONION, LAVA SALT, SESAME, POPPYSEED GLUTEN FREE BAGEL + 1.99 PLAIN, EVERYTHING

8

1/2 DOZEN 10.99 BAKERS DOZEN 19.99

ADD A SCHMEAR PLAIN, GREEN ONION, DILL PICKLE + .99/4.22/7.99

THE PATTI

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99

Horseneck’s Album Release Show at Holy Diver • Feb. 22 Sacramento’s own post-hardcore/sludge outfit Horseneck are back with another banger of an album, Fever Dream, set to be released independently on Friday, Feb. 21 with an album release show the following night, Saturday, Feb. 22, at Holy Diver (1517 21st St.). The 11-track album is as heavy as it is groovy and simply sounds fantastic (the band’s own Lance Jackman pulled double duty and engineered the record at The Dock studio in Sacramento). Fever Dream features a number of fun and unexpected guest spots, from Gary U.S. Bonds—a Grammy nominated rock ‘n’ roll legend—to indie rock/folk darling Jules Baenziger from Sea of Bees. There are also sprinkles of saxophone, trumpet and cello on the record, adding to the already pleasing sonic layers. Fever Dream rips, and so will the release show, which also features Ghost Mesa, Kill the Precedent, Dustin Burke Band and Eyes Eternal. Doors open at 7 p.m., all ages are welcome, cover is just $10. Hit up Holydiversac.com to get tickets in advance. Check out our calendar section in print in this very issue or online at Submergemag.com/calendar for more concert and event listings.

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

TWO SCRAMBLED CAGE FREE EGGS WITH TOMATO, ARUGULA, AND HORSERADISH DRESSING ON YOUR CHOICE OF ANY TOASTED BAGEL OR CHALLAH ROLL ADD MELTED CHEDDAR + 1.11 ADD AVOCADO + 1.99 ADD LOX + 2.99

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


ACCORDING TO BAZOOKA

THE OPTIMISTIC PESSIMIST WE USED TO BURN WITCHES BOCEPHUS CHIGGER bocephus@submergemag.com How comfortable are you with yourself? It seems like an odd question to ask, but how much do you really know about yourself? Do you think a machine could learn those same things about you by looking at your online shopping and search history? With our current technology, companies already have computers looking for hidden patterns in our online behavior to learn things about us that we don’t want them to know, that aren’t true or that we don’t like about ourselves. Most of them use that information to sell us more junk, but what if it ends up getting used for other reasons? Online sellers like Amazon use our purchase and search history to suggest products it thinks we might want to purchase. They also look at comments and ratings we’ve made. Some online retailers even analyze things like where your cursor sits and what you click on. These companies design computer algorithms to help pitch us items they think we are likely to buy, but what happens when the machine gets it wrong? Amazon gets it right a lot of the time, but that’s not always the case. Recently, my wife and I decided to decorate a shelf in our house with several candlesticks. We decided to use different colored candles in the holders to make things more interesting, so we ordered a batch of various colored candles from Amazon. We just thought it would look nice, but apparently, multi-colored candles are also used in witchcraft. Now Amazon thinks I’m trying to be the next Harry Potter. They send me emails suggesting that I buy pentagrams, spell books and bizarre animal, mineral and vegetable extracts from them all the time. Amazon’s artificial intelligence assistant, Alexa, hasn’t fared any better in my experience. Talking to Alexa is like going on a bad date; she is always making suggestions you didn’t ask for and she never listens when you want to talk. When I ask her something, Alexa usually mishears me, even if I enunciate slowly like some sort of lunatic. The other night, my wife and I decided to watch the movie, Ed Wood. Unable to find Tim Burton’s 1994 bizarro biopic of Hollywood’s worst director anywhere else, we turned to

Alexa to help us out. I grabbed my remote, hit the microphone button to wake Alexa and said, “Ed Wood.” Alexa chirped in approval and said that she would “add wood” to my wish list. My wife gave it a go and got the same result before we gave up and typed in our query instead. Great … Amazon probably thinks we’re planning to sacrifice someone now. I can’t wait to see what suggestions I get to go along with those witches’ candles I bought and all that wood on my wish list. The examples I’ve provided are admittedly comical and of little importance in the grand scheme of things, but that might not always be the case. We need to start thinking about that. Companies like Amazon are going to continue to collect our information willy-nilly and sell it to the top bidder to cover things like the free shipping and generous return policies that drove us into their online arms and everyone else out of business in the first place. Amazon, and companies of their ilk, don’t care who they sell our information to and it’s not just people who want to sell you crap who are buying it. Some people enjoy the convenience of it all, but what happens when that information is wrong or potentially harmful? What happens when a computer decides that someone is, say … a witch, and the company sells that information off to a political campaign or an activist group? In the wrong hands, that information could lead to something a lot worse than misdirected advertising. There was a time in American history when we burned witches. It’s been awhile since we did that, but I can’t rule out a return of the practice in Trump’s America. I wish we could trust that companies like Amazon wouldn’t misrepresent us to anyone willing to pay a fee, and that people wouldn’t buy this information for nefarious reasons, but that’s not the world we live in anymore. We should make online retailers stop collecting our information and prevent them from selling it to anyone else. Until then, I’m going on Amazon to buy some bibles and watch some Kirk Cameron movies to hopefully fix this whole witch thing. Wish me luck or I just might curse you!

CELEBRATING THEIR LATEST ALBUM

THE DEVIL’S IN THE DETAILS

AccordingToBazooka.com

Sunday February 9 Monday February 10 Saturday February 29

Blue Note Brewing Co. 750 Dead Cat Alley, Woodland

NEBRASKA MONDAYS

Luna’s Café 1414 16

th

Street, Sacramento

Plus Guest Tony Galioto

Two Rivers Cider Co. 4331 Attawa Avenue, Sacramento

DUSTBOWL REVIVAL

free / 3 p.m. 21+ or with adult

$10 / 7:45 p.m. all ages

free / 6 p.m. 21+ or with adult

JARED & THE MILL

HARLOW’S • 2708 J STREET • SACRAMENTO •

21 & OVER • 8:00PM

THURSDAY

FEB 27

2 5 TH A N N I V E R S A R Y N O R T H A M E R I C A N T O U R 2 0 2 0

CHURCH OF MISERY (FROM JAPAN) BLACK WIZARD • WIZARD RIFLE

HARLOW’S • 2708 J STREET • SACRAMENTO •

BLACKWATER HOLYLIGHT

AEQUOREA

T H E STA R L E T R O O M • 270 8 J ST R EE T • S ACR A M EN TO • 21 & OV ER • 8:0 0 PM

A B ST R AC T / AT L A N T E A N CO L L EC T I V E PR E SEN T S

YOB CHROME GHOST THE DETROIT COBRAS / SARAH SHOOK & THE DISARMERS DEKE DICKERSON & THE ECCO-FONICS

HARLOW’S • 2708 J STREET • SACRAMENTO •

MAR 4

21 & OVER • 7:30PM

A B ST R AC T / AT L A N T E A N CO L L EC T I V E PR E SEN T S

HARLOW’S • 2708 J STREET • SACRAMENTO •

WEDNESDAY

21 & OVER • 8:00PM

SUNDAY

MAR 8 THURSDAY

MAR 19 SUNDAY

MAR 29

21 & OVER • 8:00PM

TWILIGHT DRIFTERS • DJ POPULUXE

SUNDAY

MAR 29

THE STA R LE T R O OM • 2708 J STR EE T • SACR A MENTO • 21 & OV ER • 8:0 0 PM

OF MONTREAL LOCATE S,1 ACID MOTHERS TEMPLE & THE MELTING PARAISO U.F.O.

HARLOW’S • 2708 J STREET • SACRAMENTO •

21 & OVER • 9:00PM

MY EDUCATION

FRIDAY

APR 3 FRIDAY

APR 10

THE STA R LE T R O OM • 2708 J STR EE T • SACR A MENTO • 21 & OV ER • 9:0 0 PM

MUDHONEY TH’ LOSIN STREAKS MELT BANANA (FROM JAPAN) ACID FAB HARLOW’S • 2708 J STREET • SACRAMENTO •

21 & OVER • 9:00PM (NICK REINHART FROM TERA MELOS)

HARLOW’S • 2708 J STREET • SACRAMENTO •

21 & OVER • 8:00PM

HARLOW’S • 2708 J STREET • SACRAMENTO •

21 & OVER • 8:00PM

SOUTHERN CULTURE ON THE SKIDS

TUESDAY

MAY 5 SATURDAY

MAY 30 TUESDAY

JUNE 9

ALL TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: ABSTRACTPRESENTS.COM & HARLOWS.COM

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SubmergeMag.com

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

9


Your Senses

WORDS BY GRANT MINER

TOUCH

Got Beads? Get Those Outfits Ready for Shannon McCabe’s Fifth Annual Mardi Gras Masked Ball at Harlow’s! Feb. 8

The Artist

Nosferatu

The Kid

OK, so Sacramento isn’t exactly the nation’s most famous deltaadjacent city, but there’s no reason we can’t celebrate Mardi Gras just like they do down in the Big Easy. To that end, Shannon McCabe, most known in the city for throwing her yearly “Vampire Ball,” is throwing a costumed Mardi Gras Masked Ball at Harlow’s (2708 J St.) on Feb. 8. Yes, bring your beads, but to truly impress you’ll need a full-on outfit replete with a feather boa, a glittering gown and, of course, a mask. The night kicks off at 6 p.m. with a real NOLA-style second line parade that snakes around the neighboring park, starring Dixieland stylings of the Double X Brass Band. The party resumes inside Harlow’s with beats from DJs Bryan Hawk and Norman Stradley, alongside Mardi Gras-themed cocktails and king cake. Next up are “voodoo performances” on the patio outside with drumming and dancing troupe Peter and the Eye of the Sphinx, followed by a burlesque performance by the Vampire Ball’s very own Sugar Cheeks backed up by the Amped entertainment dancers. Tickets are $30 in advance. For information and tickets, head to Shannonmccabe.com.

HEAR

Local Indie Rock Band, The Honest, Celebrate Release of Debut EP With Show at The Starlet Room Feb. 13

With both Holy Diver and The Press Club holding periodic emo nights, it’s never been a better time to be a guy in Sacramento who’s still listening to American Football. Stop by Harlow’s Starlet Room (2708 J St.) on Thursday, Feb. 13 to catch The Honest, one of the brightest stars in Sacramento’s emo-revival constellation, as they release their debut EP, The Things We Say Now. Before now, The Honest have released only a handful of singles and demos, some of which will appear on the new EP. One of our personal favorites is “Couch,” one of the lead singles on the new release. With a tale of lost love, quotidian slacker depression and even a voicemail intro, “Couch” has all the trappings of an emo classic. Joining The Honest on stage will be local math-rock quartet The Seafloor Cinema, as well as post-hardcore outfit A Foreign Affair. So put on your black vans, skin-tight jeans and flannels and get ready for a real good, real sad time. $10 general admission. Doors at 7 p.m., show begins at 8. Check out Thestarletroom.com for tickets and info.

SEE

Crocker Art Museum’s Silent Film Series to Include Charlie Chaplin’s The Kid & Other Classics • Feb. 6, March 5 & April 2 The Crocker Art Museum (216 O St.) is full of pictures, each worth a thousand words apiece—far more than the old-time films in their new Silent Film Series, starting on Thursday, Feb. 6. Before each film, moviegoers will be taken on a docent-led tour of the Crocker’s private collections, with each tour being customized for the film in order to place it in an artistic context. First up is Charlie Chaplin’s feature-length directorial debut, The Kid, in which he assumes his famous role of the baggy-pantsed, mustachioed Tramp, who learns to love an abandoned child he finds on the street. With slapstick humor and a touching plot, The Kid is a silent film whose emotional payoffs still hold up nearly 100 years after its initial premiere. Next, is F.W. Murnau’s German expressionist masterpiece, Nosferatu. Known today mostly for the goofy, goblin-like costuming used by lead actor Max Schreck in his portrayal of the vampire, Nosferatu’s pioneering usage of light and shadow make for a thoroughly creepy horror film that is as beautiful as it is terrifying. The third film in this trilogy is 2011’s Academy Award-winner The Artist, which (though not truly silent) details the titular Artist’s declining popularity as a silent film star at the beginning of the talkie era. Tour at 5:30 p.m., film at 6. $8 for members, $16 general admission. Visit Crockerart.org for more info.

TASTE

Randy From Cult Classic Show Trailer Park Boys Brings His “Cheeseburger Picnic Tour” To Sacramento • Feb. 9 Trailer Park Boys, everyone’s favorite Canadian mockumentary about a coterie of dirtbag mobile home residents, continues to be a cult classic 20 years after it was first released. Well, now you don’t have to keep binging on Netflix to relive the show’s glory days. Randy’s Cheeseburger Picnic, which stars the titular, always shirtless assistant park supervisor from the show, is coming to The Boardwalk (9426 Greenback Lane) on Sunday, Feb. 9 to treat fans to a meaty meet-and-greet. The show styles itself as part stand-up, part audience interaction and part game show, wherein the cheeseburger gobbling comedian spouts classic punchlines from the show, as well as new material inspired by the character. In addition to songs, skits and prizes, lucky fans might get a chance to help Randy by serving as an (assistant) assistant trailer park supervisor for a particular duty. Mega-fans can purchase a special meet-and-greet ticket at the merch table inside for $20, but for the rest of us, a taste of one of the hamburgers sold at every show will be enough to feel like one of the boys. Doors at 7 p.m., starts at 8. Tickets are $25. Check out Boardwalkrocks.com for tickets and info.

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Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


2708 J Street SACRAMENTO 916.441.4693 HARLOWS.COM * ALL Thursday 7PM $20 21+

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L a s C afetera s Lower Dens Eri c Ga les C hu rch of Mi s ery Mu s ta che Ha rbor Ma oli R. LUM. R Meta la chi GayC /DC Da n Dea con Su m m er Sa lt Fa nta s ti c Negri to Yob Ta i nted Love Hea rtles s Shi ng0 2 & the C hee-Hoos Wonder B rea d 5 Petty Thef t The Detroi t Cobra s of Montrea l Thi s C ha rm i ng B a nd Mod Su n Pop Rocks Code Ora nge The Ja m es H u nter Si x Poli ça Agent Ora nge Mu dhoney Ma rga ret Gla s py Melt-B a na na The B la s ters Southern Culture on the Skids N i kka Cos ta

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Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

11


MAKE CHANGE NOW

BOOTS RILEY ISN’T SORRY TO BOTHER YOU WORDS RICHARD ST.OFLE • PHOTO AMELIA KENNEDY

I

Now AcceptiNg AppoiNtmeNts!

f you’ve ever thought about making a list of the most prolific people ever, then Boots Riley isn’t a bad place to start. You can place him somewhere between Stephen King— who has authored 61 novels and hundreds of short stories in addition to spending time on music, philanthropy and rage-tweeting at Trump—and Ramses II, who fathered 162 children while pharaoh of Egypt. In addition to being incredibly talented and politically engaged, Riley’s relentless work ethic has him writing, directing, rapping, engaging in local activism and national politics and public speaking, with an upcoming engagement at Sacramento State’s University Ballroom on Feb. 13. Raised in Oakland, Riley started rapping in the early ‘90s with The Coup, a hip-hop group that stood out for their activism, politics and engagement in an era of opulent, materialism-obsessed Oakland rappers like MC Hammer and Tony! Toni! Toné!. The Coup quickly became the flagship for woke East Bay hip-hop, and in 2002, Vibe magazine named Boots Riley one of the 10 most influential people of the year. In addition to being the Energizer Bunny of activism, he wrote and directed his first feature film, 2018’s Sorry to Bother You, a sci-fi/fantasy flick set in an alternate universe version of Oakland, which earned Riley an Independent Spirit Award for Best First Feature. Famously rapping, “Every verse is from the cardiac,” Riley is never one to mince words. I sat down with him to talk about his upcoming projects, politics and his speaking engagement at Sac State, and his perspective on the mess we’re in. True to form, Riley didn’t disappoint.

Book oNliNe At sAcrAmeNtoBArBershop.com 2408 21st st • Sac • (916) 457-1120 Tues-Fri 9am-6pm • saT 10am-4pm

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How’d you get started—who were you as a kid and how’d that lead you here? I grew up in Oakland and started getting involved with radical organizations when I was 15 being involved with farmworkers … I got more involved in theater and started looking at ways to maybe combine the theater with the ideas that I wanted to put out there. And then Spike Lee came out, and I was like, “Oh, you could do this on a big screen,” and I went to film school. And at the same time, because of Digital Underground, Too Short, MC Hammer and Tony! Toni! Toné!, Oakland was a place where every record label was like, “Oh, we have to have a group from Oakland.” So we had a tape out, and we got signed. And then I did music for 20 something years and came back to this.

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Can you talk about the features? No. Not really. And I assume you can’t talk about the TV show either. No.

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What are you working on now? I’m writing. I have a TV show already that I’m going to production later on this year and then I have a couple of features that I’m writing.

7:45P

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

Well, it’s exciting nonetheless. Are you done with music all together? No. For the show, we’ll be doing one cool song per episode. But touring is something we won’t really be doing much of anymore.

What made you kind of jump from music to film, to writing and directing? It’s not so much of a jump. I went to film school and quit school because I got a record deal. I did theater in high school and all that kind of stuff. My grandmother ran the Oakland Ensemble Theater. It was all this one big expression. I mean, obviously, there’s some real differences in it. Like if I want to make a song, I can sit here and write something and if I wanted to be done with the song in 20 minutes from now. I can’t do that with a film. I read that you taught a class in the early 2000s in Oakland about social justice and culture and resistance. It was a lyric writing class for high school students. But before that I had a workshop at La Peña [Cultural Center]. One of my students was a 14-yearold kid named David, who went on to be in Hamilton. We did basically like a newspaper on tape where we would talk about the issues and people, go write the raps and then we recorded them, and then we got on a flatbed truck and did these things that we call guerrilla hip-hop concert. That sounds amazing. Do recordings to that exist anywhere? Yes … We call the tape The Rumble … I have a CD of it somewhere … We met somebody that worked at UC Berkeley that had a tape duplication thing and we made

a bunch of them … We’d be on the flatbed truck, and we’d give out the tapes. I understand that you’re doing a lecture at the University Ballroom on the 13 th. Tell me a little bit about that. Well, you know, as things will probably be changing in the world, so in the end, I’ll reserve the right to change what I talk about. I’m usually talking about change from the standpoint of us realizing where the crux of our power comes from. And utilizing that in order to make a change, and looking at the ways that movements have and haven’t flourished based on whether or not they used that crux of our power as the basis for the movement. So the main contradiction under capitalism is the exploitation of labor. And so if we want to change things, it will have to come from the point of us withholding labor. You can organize that in many ways because that can be used to raise wages and make living conditions better. But it can also be used for other issues that are not always seen as a labor issue. What’s an example of that? For instance, if radicals had been organizing around labor in, let’s say Ferguson for 15 years before that, then when that cop needed to be indicted, they could have just shut down a few industries in the St. Louis area and that cop would have been indicted.

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


Yes. Totally. You’re right. And some of this confusion comes from the fact that, since the beginning of what they call the new left in the 1960s, the left has been running away from class struggle. And so it’s confused people as to how power works. Do you see that as something new? But I’m saying there was a period of time, and I think that there are myriad reasons, and that’s kind of what I’ll be talking about, but obviously, there was—and it’s hard to talk about one of them without really talking about the rest of them. But in the ‘50s, you had the House on American Activities Committee and, you know, a big—in the McCarthy era with all the unions for instance, getting rid of all the radicals. And you see from then on those unions had much less teeth to them because they weren’t fighting for the same things anymore. They weren’t as ready to fight. The ones that were the most effective and the most militant were the ones that were the most effective, and the most militant since then is the only one that said we don’t care if you’re a communist, we’re fighting alongside you, and that was the longshoremen. So what would you say to a well-meaning but out-oftouch, left-leaning person who’s listening to you in the audience or reading this article and looking for advice as to how to engage? Well, you have to be involved in some sort of organization. Otherwise everything that you say on social media or to your friends, there’s nowhere for it to go. And not only do you have to be involved in some sort of organization, you need to be involved in some sort of organization that has an entry point for people that aren’t as radical as you to be able to get involved. Meaning an organization that’s involved in the movements that can create material change that happens now, but with a radical vision for building a movement. So in short, join an organization that is radical in vision and making material change now. SubmergeMag.com

You seem to kind of straddle art and activism in a really special way. Did you have a roadmap for that growing up? I didn’t have a roadmap for that. But you know, there are definitely people that I looked up to like Paul Robeson who did some of that. A lot of revolutionary leaders were poets, so there’s some connection there. But I’ve always just looked at art as communication. And I think, like, great art is made by people who are passionate about something more than just making art. In that sense, it kind of imbues your art with meaning. Yes. It makes you make choices that are based on emotion and thought, as opposed to just something aesthetically pleasing. So for me … I’ve been involved in organizations and had these ideas, and my art is a way to express that. It changes, and it’s made me change and reconsider how I’m doing that, you know, all those sorts of things. But I’ve had an uneasy, as you say, straddling of that fence … I’m always questioning. You’re always living in a place where you feel like you’re not doing enough of one thing, or doing too much of another thing. Doesn’t matter how much you flip it, but it’s always going to be there. And I’ve quit doing art. Completely? Yes. I quit. And actually, that’s when I became the telemarketer. And, you know, because we had an organization called the Young Comrades, I could do that job just like one day every couple of weeks and make enough money to keep just doing the organization. And then that organization broke up. And then I figured out I could go back to doing music.

Stop by the Sacramento State University Union Ballroom at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 13 for a special lecture event featuring Boots Riley. Expect Riley to speak about topics such as race, economics and other social justice issues. This event is brought to you by UNIQUE Programs at Sacramento State. For more info, go to Sacstateunique.com.

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

13


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Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

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Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


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Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

SMALL TOWN MURDER

15


FILTH NEVER DIES

A GIFT FOR STORYTELLING, PLACING GENIALITY OVER VITRIOL & A KEEN EYE FOR THE INAPPROPRIATE HAVE CEMENTED JOHN WATERS’ STATUS AS AMERICA’S FILTH ELDER

WORDS ANDREW C. RUSSELL • PHOTO GREG GORMAN

T

he evolution of John Waters from underground film anarchist and good taste-demolition expert to eccentric memoirist and elder statesman of American pop art has been a long and gradual one. And it’s more shocking than ever today. Pink Flamingos, his rough-hewn 1972 classic, remains a challenge to intestinal fortitude that holds its own with any of the internet shock videos younger generations dare each other to watch today. And in 2020, it’s also as likely to be glimpsed on Turner Classic Movies or amongst a stack of the Criterion DVDs as it is in a midnight screening. Whether you take it as a sign of society’s progress or as proof that we are truly living among the damned, one must ask oneself: Whither filth? Filth, trash and anarchic humor are central to the Waters persona, but the secret to his longevity lies in the fact that shock alone has never been the final nesting doll. After a run of mainstream-friendly hits starting with his self-proclaimed “Trojan horse” Hairspray (1988), his eclectic, unmistakable style has found success across numerous artistic fields, from concept art (watch out for “serious” looking monochrome photography that suddenly squirts water on unsuspecting passersby, or a portrait of Justin Bieber re-envisioned as a plastic surgery addict) to literature. Over the past four decades, he’s also put out seven well-received books, in which nearly all of his obsessions, loves, hates, heroes, turn-offs and tall (yet true) tales are brought to life with rabid enthusiasm. As Waters has continued to reveal his character over countless speaking tours, one-man shows and commencement speeches (!), the more likeable he gets, and the clearer it becomes that all of his works—even the sledgehammer-subtle affronts of his early days—are the product of careful study. Not the sort that demands rote memorization of the art-school canon; the kind that gleefully dynamites the hidebound aristocracy of taste in favor of taking the things you love seriously, and fearlessly diving into your own, uniquely warped sensibilities. Doing so has given him one of the more devoted cult followings in entertainment. It has also honed his talents long into his career; he has a near-supernatural gift for locating sites of aesthetic turbulence in any given situation and magnifying them for maximum hilarity. This gift is gloriously displayed in This Filthy World, based on a live show and documentary film that first ran in 2006 and is now set to reach Sacramento next month on a new national tour, fully revamped for our current tasteless times. The special covers a lifetime of surreal experiences and questionable interests that have made John Waters a true American original, from off-putting art to shocking crimes and seedy celebrity scandals, from the life-giving force of B-movie energy to the local folks of Baltimore that inspired some of his more outrageous on-screen characters. And in our age of particularly virulent outrage, he manages to embody the nicer side of nasty.

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Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


This Filthy World is the topic of the day, but I have to say that one of my favorite pre-Christmas stocking stuffers is your top10 favorite film-of-the-year list. Your reviews are always more exciting than the trailer. Thank you. It always gets a lot of attention, because it’s the very first top 10 list that comes out—ArtForum publishes it on Dec. 1, and most lists come out on Jan. 1. So I get a lot of bang for my buck, pushing movies that mostly aren’t on anyone’s 10-best lists. Whenever I doubt whether film still has the capacity to shock, you always manage to find the ones that do. Well, I try to surprise the audience, and so I try to pick films that would surprise me. I didn’t think I was gonna really like Joker, but I really did, so I was happy to put that in there, too. And I’m happy to remember that Todd [Phillips] , the director, started out making the GG Allin documentary, called Hated. So I love that he really clawed his way to the top and somehow got Joker through the Hollywood system. What’s usually the moment in a film for you when you realize you’re watching something special? Well, I can usually tell right away. If you’re watching a movie, and you don’t like it 40 minutes into it, you’re not gonna like it. And usually, if it’s in my 10-best list, it’s the kind I like better and better as it goes on. Or, I’m so troubled by it, that I don’t know if I hate it or like it, which would definitely be one that was on my 2019 list, The Golden Glove, the one about the serial killer. Oh God, that movie is really a shocker; I couldn’t tell how I felt about it. I decided it’s worth seeing, and it’s incredibly well done, but it’s very, very unpleasant to watch. Has anything changed radically in the state of filth since you last did the show? Well of course! With this president. You can’t really do a show called This Filthy World today without doing some filthy stuff about Trump, because he talks about people filthily, too, so I think it’s fair game. And I always say afterwards what a great country it is that I can say some of this stuff and not get the firing squad. Has it gotten more or less crazy today as it was in the ‘60s and ‘70s when you were starting out? I don’t think it has. I don’t get why there aren’t demonstrations every day! When I grew up, it seemed like even Nixon wasn’t this bad, and there were riots every day, there were bombings and carjackings, there was a lot of protests. Compared to that, I don’t see that much today. What happened to all the good kids who were walking out of school, how come they’re not? Why aren’t the bad kids walking out? The Women’s March is just one day a year—it should be everyday! Do you think, for that earlier generation, it took growing up mostly in a cocoon of solid middle class sensibility and stability to really cause the political panic and urgency of what came in the next decade when things turned out different? The ‘50s were a terrible time! People don’t remember that. Everybody had to be alike, everything was supposed to be like Father Knows Best ... oh, it was horrible! It was probably the worst decade that I grew up in. Yes, we had good cars, and rock ‘n’ roll was invented, and a lot of good things happened, but it was all because of how stupefyingly square the world was. Yeah, it was a very different time. I don’t look back at it and think, “Oh God, I wish it was like that.” I think it was better in some ways, and worse in others. I don’t think that kids aren’t having just as much fun today as I did when I was young, being hackers, or whatever it takes to be a juvenile delinquent today. Being a filth icon, do you have people constantly sending or sharing with you the latest nasty things to come up from the internet or in culture? Sometimes, but mostly my fans are smart, and they give me great presents. I know what you mean; there’s things like, you know, people have eaten shit in front of me, or taken out their Tampax and asked me to autograph it. But they’re all doing it in good humor. They all mean well, all of them. I’ve never really had anybody do anything that truly offended me. I mean, I think it was kind of funny.

SubmergeMag.com

Have you come across anything recently that threw you for a loop? Well, I don’t really understand the plushy thing. You know, I went into a leather bar they have in Baltimore, and I’m still amazed that they have a leather bar left open, because young people don’t need to be tied up ‘cause they’re gay—they’re mostly just happy with it. And there were plushies there. Plushy S&M?! So I guess the plushy fetish I don’t get. I never liked stuffed animals anyway. Much less would I want to be one or fuck one. And adult babies, I’m not marching for them, either. And there’s ecosexuals! I talk a lot about this in my show. Ecosexuals bury themselves naked and kiss the earth, lick plants while people dance around. To each their own. I guess with any of it, people have to eroticize whatever body type they end up with. Maybe that’s good. How did you develop your sense of what is wrong, taste-wise? I was raised very much to have good taste, what my parents thought was good taste. And the tyranny of good taste is what I rebelled against. But I thank them and acknowledge them in my new book, Mr. Know-It-All. I thank them for giving me the impression of good taste so I could rebel and make a career out of bad taste. But I think to appreciate bad taste, in the right way, you have to know what good taste is, and actually have good taste to appreciate it. Because “bad” bad taste, well, that’s the Trump White House. There’s nothing funny about how they decorated, there’s nothing campy; it’s just bad Jeff Koons.

February 8th 6pm

Second Line Parade, Double X Brass Band Clemon Charles Band, DJ’s Bryan Hawk and Norman Stradley, Burlesque, Beads, King Cake, Voodoo, and more...

ShannonMcCabe.com 21+

In some sense, do we need a bland, vanilla, middle class sensibility as a counterpoint in order to truly shock or get creative rebelling against it? No, definitely not. I think everybody can appreciate taboos, everybody can appreciate making fun of the rules. And every organization has rules. Liberals have more rules now than even conservatives. So, to me, I think everybody understands making fun of their own rules, and that’s how you keep a sense of humor, if you can make fun of your own rules. If you can’t, then I think you somehow become the enemy. In that sense, with all the new rules and the way things have shifted, do you think it would be a lot tougher for a renegade beginner in art such as you were to enter into the fray now? No, I think it could still happen. I think I made fun of myself first; I criticized everything I did first. I called my first movie Mondo Trasho! I think I make fun of myself, therefore I can make fun of the rules with, like, the gay world, or political correctness, even though I think I am technically politically correct. I do make fun of the fact that it seems to be just for rich people. You know, all this obsession about political correctness. A lot of it I agree with, but the radical ends of political correctness is why Trump is gonna win again. Even your most extreme work doesn’t seem too mean-spirited. Is lightheartedness the key to being as filthy as you want? Well, I don’t think I’m mean; I guess I’m mean about Trump. But most of the things I criticize are things that I like! I make fun of the art world because I like the elitism of the art world. I make fun of obscure art movies because I love feel-bad European films. I’m making fun of things I love, which is a very different turn than making fun of things you hate. What other topics can we expect in the new edition of This Filthy World? Well, I certainly talk about politics. I talk about humor, I talk about fashion, I talk about death, I talk about life. I think it’s a lot of equal-opportunity topics that I go over throughout the show. And it’s not just what’s in the book, it’s always changing. The skeleton of it may be the same, a little bit, and I do go through the movies, but it’s not so much anecdotes about making them anymore, it’s what’s happened to them—the subjects in them and what’s changed—that somehow, these movies are respectable now. Which is amazing to me ... This week on Turner Classic Movies, they’re showing Multiple Maniacs! How could that be possible? John Waters’ This Filthy World Tour comes to the Crest Theatre (1013 K St., Sacramento) on Friday, Feb. 28 at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $35 and can be purchased in advance through Crestsacramento.com.

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

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PAST IS PROLOGUE

THE SEAFLOOR CINEMA TAKES EMO INTO THE NEXT DECADE WORDS TYLER HORST • PHOTO JADE GREENBURG

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nthony OnFire walks into the building looking like a time traveler from the year 2008. His long, highlighter-colored hair is chopped up into anime character proportions, with bangs held back by a sweatband. His left wrist is practically weighted down by a nest of rubber bracelets, a la the Livestrong craze. When he sits down, he actually has to jump up for a second and pull something out of his back pocket—he’s accidentally sat down on a Game Boy Advance Pokémon game cartridge. “I’m stuck,” OnFire admits. “Everybody gets stuck at some point in their lives.” OnFire and Neil Valencia are at a café to discuss their band, The Seafloor Cinema. The other members, Justin Murry and Douglas Andreasen, can’t make it tonight. Like OnFire’s look, the band takes some of their inspiration from the bands of emo and posthardcore’s heyday in the mid-to-late aughts—bands like Fall of Troy, Good Charlotte or Kurt Travis-era Dance Gavin Dance. But the band isn’t just stuck in the past. Their latest album,

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A Metaphor for Honesty, blends these nostalgic influences with forward-thinking math-rock riffs and a strong sensibility for catchy melodies. Or, put more simply: “We like to cry. That’s our biggest inspiration,” says OnFire. Just to clear things up, when asked about his name, OnFire says, “It’s an ancient Toltec surname. I got it from my ancestors the Mayans after they rejected the Spanish.” Pause for effect. “It’s totally made up,” he admits. “It’s fun though.” “Anthony is kind of an insane person a lot of the time,” guitarist Andreasen says later on the phone, laughing. “I’m the one to bring him back down to ground level.” The Seafloor Cinema actually began as a solo project for Andreasen. Inspired by bands like Covet, Andreasen wrote and released two instrumental math-rock songs as an EP called Wherever You Are. After the songs started gaining traction online, Andreasen decided to fill out the band with Murry on bass and

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

Valencia on drums. “We were all instrumental. Never thought about singing at all,” says Valencia. “Until Justin hits us with, ‘Yeah I can try singing.’ He sings in front of us and we’re like, ‘Why didn’t you sing at first?’” Murry sings on the majority of the record, belting out melodies or softly crooning in the verses. OnFire—who didn’t join until last summer, right before the band went to Minnesota to record A Metaphor for Honesty with Tiny Moving Parts producer Gregory Lindholm—takes center stage for two emotive spoken word interludes. Though A Metaphor for Honesty was just released last August, The Seafloor Cinema is already planning to hit the studio several times this year, both for a run of singles and an entirely new album. “Basically, Doug is a psycho maniac superfiend, and because he’s straight-edge, he has all these magic powers where he can write three songs and mix and master them in one day,” explains OnFire.

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


904 15th Street 443.2797

Between I & J • Downtown Sacramento

TORCHCLUB.NET

JAN 30 - FEB 14 MIND X 5:30PM

THUR CITY OF TREES BRASS BAND,

Photo above by Eric Molyneaux But it takes more than prolific creativity to keep the band in the studio so often. They also need money. For that, The Seafloor Cinema have discovered an unlikely business model. “Twisted Sister used to frequent around and play different clubs as a cover band, and they made a lot of money, and that’s how they paid for their album and got famous. Basically, we took a cue from them, but we do Emo Night,” says OnFire. When they’re not playing their own songs, The Seafloor Cinema is packing rooms covering the likes of Panic! (when they still had the exclamation mark) At the Disco and Fall Out Boy for crowds of nostalgic millennials. Andreasen says the band was introduced to an Emo Night promoter named Marcus Leonardo through Sacramento-area bookers Bit Crusher. The band tried it out for a night and it was an instant success. Andreasen says Leonardo asked them to keep coming back for more Emo Nights, and even put them on the Emo Night tour. This year, The Seafloor Cinema is going as far as New York to play Emo Night shows. They get to play some of their own songs throughout the sets, plus they say they sell a lot of merch and tickets and squirrel away the proceeds for recording the next album. The best part is they schedule their own tours around the Emo Night dates. While other bands might shy away from doing covers, Valencia, OnFire and Andreasen agree that not only have the Emo Night shows been a huge boon to the band’s success, they’re also just a lot of fun to play. “Venues treat you like a rockstar,” Andreasen says about playing Emo Night shows. The Seafloor Cinema has also expanded its reach online thanks to a collaboration with Boketo Media, an effort by YouTuber Jarrod Alonge to give an online platform to up-and-coming artists. At publication, their video for “In the Future There Will Be 500 Channels but Nothing to Watch” has over 17,000 views on the Boketo YouTube Channel. If you’re a fan of The Seafloor Cinema, you may not realize that you are part of a club with a creative name. OnFire, who runs the band’s Twitter account, put out a poll in October 2019 asking, “What should we call our fans?” An overwhelming 74 percent of fans voted to call themselves “Pissbabies.” If nothing else, The Seafloor Cinema is having fun, and their Pissbaby fans are having fun with them. They’re still young, and with the winds of Emo Night and Boketo at their back, the band is sailing ever onward. No matter where The next Pissbaby gathering will be Thursday, they end up, they Feb. 6 at the Boardwalk (9426 Greenback say it’s all worth it Lane, Orangevale), where The Seafloor to write songs with Cinema is opening for Japanese math-rockers friends and hope they Paranoid Void, along with Enter:Villain and connect to someone, Predisposed. Show is all ages and begins at 6:30 p.m. You can also catch The Seafloor somewhere, someday. Cinema at The Starlet Room (2708 J St., “In the end, it Sacramento) on Thursday, Feb. 13 at 7 p.m. probably doesn’t For more information on these shows, visit matter, just put it out,” Facebook.com/theseafloorcinema. says OnFire. SubmergeMag.com

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LANTZ LAZWELL & THE VIBE TRIBE 9PM

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JIMMY PAILER & CO. 5:30PM

31 JOY & MADNESS 9PM THE DEY TRIPPERS 5:30PM

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JOHN CLIFTON BLUES BAND 9PM BLUES JAM 4PM

FRONT THE BAND 8PM SCOTT MCCONAHA 5:30PM

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JOE LEV & FRIENDS 8PM

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WILD WILD WETS, THE NO. 44, PETS, MY DALLAS TEENS 8:30PM

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O’MALLY SISTERS 5:30PM

MIND X 5:30PM

DRUNKEN KUNG FU 9PM

JIMMY PAILER & CO. 5:30PM

TROPICALI FLAMES 9PM

EMPTY WAGON 5:30PM

KATIE HENRY 9PM

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BLUES JAM: DON BASSEY TRIBUTE 4PM

FRONT THE BAND 8PM

WILLIAM MYLAR

HIPPIE HOUR 5:30PM

SACTOWN PLAYBOYS 8PM

BALLIN’ THAT JACK 5:30PM

SHOOFLY COMPLEX 9PM

MIND X 5:30PM

FARROW AND THE PEACH LEAVES 9PM TBA 5:30PM

PETER PETTY & HIS 14 DOUBLE P REVUE 9PM Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

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HOWEVER IT FALLS

THOMAS CAMPBELL WAXES POETIC ABOUT HIS LIFE OF ART, FILM AND SKATEBOARDING AND HIS DYSTOPIAN NEW SKATE FILM, YE OLDE DESTRUCTION WORDS BAILEY SNOW

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homas Campbell is a Renaissance man for misfits. He is a skater, a photographer, a filmmaker, an artist and a bunch of other shit. Most people want to do one thing as well as he does all of these things. Growing up in Dana Point, California, where he says “pretty much every boy and girl rode skateboards,” Campbell was exposed to it at a young age, something he credits with sparking his career and creativity, which for him is one and the same. “I started skateboarding when I was 5 and now I’m 50 and I’m really happy for where skateboarding is,” he explains. “I don’t care about contests or Olympics or any of that shit. I just really like that kids are openminded and skating wildly amazingly. That’s such a cool moment, you know?” Uncompromising and singular, he says he “cannot bring [himself] to not make the thing that [he wants] to see.” “I will make an hour-long film and not give a fuck,” Campbell says. “However it falls, it falls.” In the past, skate media was elusive, and when you actually got your hands on some, you held onto it until the end of time. These days, however, skate videos are readily available. Videos of tricks thought to be impossible 20 years ago are a YouTube search away. Yet, somehow, it all feels so sanitized, corporate and clickbait-y. Ye Olde Destruction, Campbell’s newest film, is none of those things. Raw, energetic and lively, it could just as easily be playing in the MoMA as on a VHS player behind the counter of your local skate shop. It is an art film for skaters, and a skate film for artists. Imagine if Larry Clark and David Lynch took some shrooms and went skateboarding together. Now imagine that in black and white. Ye Olde Destruction will be premiering in Sacramento on Feb. 6 at Midtown BarFly. The soundtrack will be scored live by Tommy Guerrero, Matt Rodriguez, Lee Bob Watson and Josh Lippi. Be there. And bring your board.

Eli Williams | Kernside, California | Photo by Anthony Acosta

Al Partanen | Photo by French Fred

Photo by Jai Tanju

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Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

Thomas Campbell getting inside trunk shot | Photo by Jai Tanju

John Worthington | Delano Pool | Photo by Thomas Campbell

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


How’d you initially get started within skateboarding? Was there any particular incident that drew you to it or was it just kind of a natural thing? When I was a kid in the ‘70s, it was just kind of a boom, and where I lived there were hills, and my street was a really good one. Everyone would come to skate on my street. There was a quarter pipe back at the top of the hill, and at the bottom of the hill there was a drainage ditch. What was it like making A Love Supreme [Supreme’s first skate video, released in 1995]? And how’d you initially link up with Supreme? Back then, every hypebeast wasn’t lining up for their T-shirts, they were just a skate shop. I was skating with those guys and shooting pictures of the guys that rode for Supreme, and I was friends with the guys who worked at the shop. I grew up in California, and I always liked all types of music from punk rock and jazz and indie rock. But when I moved to New York, I dove way deeper into jazz. I love that Coltrane record, A Love Supreme, and I just had an idea and ran it by those guys and they were into it. The day I started filming A Love Supreme was the first day that I ever used the 16mm cameras. So, that was the beginning of my journey that I’m still on today … What inspired you to shoot in 16mm? I just feel like it’s a super visceral medium; it’s not lo-fi, it’s not super hi-fi. You have this nice area where you can get a lot of emotions from the film grain and the way the film dances. And I feel like it captures an emotional range really well. And it’s been my dancing partner. It does a lot for mood and ambience, and film innately adds a lot of dimension. It’s probably coming to an end because the problem is you can still get film, but the people that fix the cameras are dying and/or retiring and there’s no one to fix them. It’s kind of going toward obsolescence. Like one of my main cameras, I can’t get fixed. I have this film and then I have a surf film coming up that are predominantly [16mm]. Ye Olde Destruction is probably 90 percent. There’s, like, the drone footage and a few minor things that weren’t on film. The mix of skaters you had was really diverse. You’ve got old schoolers like Ray [Barbee] and you’ve got people like Ishod [Wair] who are much more modern, technical skaters. Did having such a mix of different skaters affect the making of the film? A lot of how I see the skateboarding is just like whatever’s there, just go skate it, you know? And that’s how I’ve always looked at it. And I think, like, the divisiveness in the ‘90s when there was tech skaters, gnar bowl skaters and vert skaters. SubmergeMag.com

SHOWS AT SAC STATE SPONSORED BY UNIQUE PROGRAMS

FOR MORE INFO: WWW.SACSTATEUNIQUE.COM OR CALL: (916)278–6997 NOONER

HUMBLE WOLF WED • FEB 5 • 12:00P • UNIVERSITY UNION REDWOOD ROOM FREE: indie rock concert

MOVIE

HARRIET THUR • FEB 6 • 7:30P • UNIVERSITY UNION BALLROOM FREE: special film screening, biography on Harriet Tubman

LECTURE

Omar Salazar | Kernside, California | Photo by Anthony Acosta

And now you see people like Evan Smith that approach skating like they don’t give a shit. They’re just, “I’m gonna wall ride, 180 out off this thing, then I’m gonna switch crooked grind this handrail.” That really inspired me to want to document it more. I always liked the idea of just getting unique people together and seeing what can happen from people being together. It really had a lot of people who personally wanted to be there. You know, skating DIY in general is not super gnarly. What you see in a magazine is really less than 1 percent of how people normally skateboard. Most people just aren’t very good at skateboarding and are not hitting super gnarly stuff because people don’t have that skill level. Is it cool to see guys at the highest level pushing things into stratospheric areas? Of course it is, but it’s not what the mass of people are doing. And I think that laughing and having fun with your friends and doing stupid shit is what skateboarding is about. You also made a photo book that accompanies Ye Olde Destruction. Did making the book come naturally in the making of the film or were there additional challenges you had to face? I just always wanted to make a book with it because I knew in the making of the film, I was getting all my friends, like Brian Gaberman and Jai Tanju and French Fred and Arto Saari and different people to come on the trips and they’re all insane photographers. I just knew we were gonna end up with just an incredible body of images. I liked that format, too, so people can have something physical to connect them with the project and I think it turned out really cool. How do you think social media has changed the face of skate photography and filming? It’s changed the face of everything. I think kids are communicating on a much

shorter wavelength. I’m 50. I have a much different idea of what I want to do with my time than the kids now. And I think the length of my film really speaks to that. Like, I know a skater that went, “Uh, I can’t really watch things that go over four minutes.” I could go into, “I think that that’s fucked,” but it’s their life, and they’re impacted by the way things are going. And I look at the analytics on my films online and people have such short attention spans. I’ll make little clips that are three to seven minutes and people generally don’t watch over a minute of them; things are just simply changing and that’s all there is to it. And I hope the best for everyone, but I’ve just got to do the things I got to do. It’s funny you say that; having the artist’s vision where you don’t compromise for anything. Going off of art, how did you initially start painting? Oh, I mean, I think just being an artist is gained from being in skateboarding. You know, like getting Thrasher and seeing Neil Blender and Todd Swank’s work, and just being, like, “All those guys are having fun. I wanna have fun. Let’s try it.” I think skateboarders have a lot going for them just because of the nature of skateboarding. You fall and then you fall and then you fall. Then maybe you make something and then you fall again. And failing is normal. If failing is normal, then that’s cool, because life is hugely about not succeeding. So you’re just psyched on the process, and you know how to persevere when you’re a skateboarder. I honestly give everything in my life to skateboarding. You know, what happens if I fucking play tennis? So yeah, my art really came from that and my approach to everything came from my inspiration from being in that culture. There’s not that many things that are that physically visceral that ground you in that way. You have actual trauma, you know? You have no one to

blame; it’s you not nose-grinding properly. It’s you figuring out the weight distribution and how your tricks are going to be performed. You’re like, “OK, I’m going to be up there. I need to put my weight on the back foot and have the pressure more on the toe side. And then the front foot kinda does this.” But it’s problem solving and it has consequences. And then it’s tied into so many creative outlets like music and art and graphics; there’s just so much dimension. What’s inspired you lately? I think what’s probably inspiring and de-inspiring me the most is our current situation on this planet, where … our world views [are] nationalistic. We’re living on a planet, a round sphere, and we’re fucking this planet up. All these imaginary lines that are drawn all over the Earth by corporations that call themselves companies, we have to get beyond that and look at this Earth as the cellular process that it is. And people are so worried about being Americans and not being humans on the Earth or any country for that matter. We need to get beyond it. The movie’s not overtly political, but it has a dystopian feeling to it and that fear and tension is expressed within it. Our current political scenario with this fucking Cheeto in office and all this shit, it’s definitely inspiring me and motivating my creative process and my want to communicate and express about what’s going on. I have a 3-year-old daughter, and I’m just thinking about her future and I’m scared. We need to talk about it. It’s important.

BOOTS RILEY THUR • FEB 13 • 7:30P • UNIVERSITY UNION BALLROOM FREE: rapper, community organizer, and writer/director of the film Sorry to Bother You NOONER

NOONER

DELE OG WED • FEB 12 • 12:00P • UNIVERSITY UNION REDWOOD ROOM FREE: a collection of stories celebrating the growth of basketball on the African continent, followed by Q&A with film director Taylor Sharp

WED • FEB 19 • 12:00P • UNIVERSITY UNION REDWOOD ROOM FREE: Afro soul concert

COMEDY

NOONER

BLACK GREEK COMEDY SHOWCASE HOSTED BY E. CLARK (KAPPA ALPHA PSI)

SACRAMENTO TAIKO DAN THUR • FEB 20 • 7:30P • UNIVERSITY UNION BALLROOM FREE: feat. stand up by LeLe Mason (Delta Sigma Theta), Steph Sanders (Kappa Alpha Psi), Kanisha Buss (Zeta Phi Beta), Kente Scott (Alpha Phi Alpha), and music by DJ Quelly Quell

WED • MAR 4 • 12:00P • UNIVERSITY UNION REDWOOD ROOM FREE: traditional Japanese drumming

Catch the Sacramento premiere of Ye Olde Destruction, with live score provided by Tommy Guerrero, Matt Rodriguez, Josh Lippi and Lee Bob Watson, at Midtown BarFly (1119 21st St., Sacramento) on Thursday, Feb. 6 at 8 p.m. DJ Juan Love (AKA John Cardiel) will also provide tunes for the event. For more info, go to Facebook.com/tommyguerreromusic.

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

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MUSIC, COMEDY & MISC. CALENDAR

JAN. 29 – FEB. 12

SUBMERGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR

1.29 WEDNESDAY

Cafe Colonial Wu Tang Wednesdays, 4 p.m. The Club Car The Double Shots, 7:30 p.m. Harlow’s The Lil’ Smokies, 7 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Live Blues Jam Session, 8 p.m. The Pour Choice Daniel Roholt & JT Lawrence, 6:30 p.m. Powerhouse Pub ALT 94.7 Music Discovery Series feat. Michigander, Verno, DJ Zephyr, 7 p.m. The Press Club Jonah Matranga, Show Me Golden, Minor Fiasco, 8 p.m. The Starlet Room Blues & Bourbon: Dana Moret, 5:30 p.m. Torch Club JonEmery & The Unconventionals, 9 p.m. Sacramento State: University Union Redwood Room Nooner w/ Team Money Gang, 12 p.m.

1.30 THURSDAY

Ace of Spades Xavier Omar, Parisalexa, 7 p.m. The Club Car Songwriters Showcase, 8 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Gene Barnett, 7 p.m. Fox & Goose Steve McLane, 8 p.m. Harlow’s The Fred Eaglesmith Show, 7 p.m. Kupros Robert Kuhlmann, 7 p.m. Mondavi Center: Ann E. Pitzer Center Quince Ensemble, 7 p.m. Old Ironsides The Weekend: A Prequel with DJ Luckey, 9 p.m. The Pour Choice Deidra Hall, 6:30 p.m. The Press Club Dandelion Massacre, John Underwood & Friends, Greg Rekus, 8 p.m. Shine Jazz Jam, 8 p.m. Torch Club Mind X, 5:30 p.m.; City of Trees Brass Band, Lantz Lazwell & The Vibe Tribe, 9 p.m. Sacramento State: University Union Ballroom Silent Disco w/ DJs Hopkins.fun, Mos, Kak & More, 7:30 p.m.

1.31 FRIDAY

Ace of Spades In Uterus (Nirvana Tribute), Alice in the Garden (Soundgarden/Alice in Chains Tribute), Corduroy (Pearl Jam Tribute), 7 p.m. Armadillo Music Sensei Joshu, 2K, 8 p.m. Big Sexy Brewing Co. Andrew Castro, 6 p.m. The Boardwalk It’s Not A Phase: An Emo, Pop Punk, & Post Hardcore Party Feat.Jordan Blake, Sadghost, Apollo’s Key, 6:30 p.m. Cafe Colonial Wastewalker, Bavmorda, GreyBush, Exile’s Erosion, 6:30 p.m. Capitol Garage Capitol Friday’s Reggae Night w/ DJ Veyn, 10 p.m. The Club Car Private Criminals, 8 p.m. Crest Theatre Howard Jones, Rachael Sage, 6:30 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Mere Mortals, 9 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Playback the Hits, 9:30 p.m. Fox & Goose Scotty McConaha, Jereme Greene, 9 p.m. Golden Bear DJ CrookOne and Guests, 10 p.m. Harlow’s Drake Bell, Zach Van Dyck, 6 p.m. Harris Center The Nell & Jim Band, 8 p.m. Holy Diver Boulevard, Blckbrd, Bad Company Only, Teddy C, LV, Tribe, Chonnie Gold, 6:30 p.m. Kupros Ross Hammond, 5 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge William Mylar’s Hippie Hour, 5:30 p.m. Mondavi Center: Jackson Hall Joey Alexander Trio, 8 p.m. Mondavi Center: Vanderhoef Studio Theatre Spektral Quartet, 8 p.m. Old Ironsides Dive Bar Bombers, Higher Mansions, Would-Be Train Robbers, 9 p.m. On the Y Embryonic Devourment, Cursed, Sever All, Short Fuse, 8 p.m. Opera House Saloon Chill, 9:30 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. PJ’s Roadhouse Revolver (Rage Against The Machine Tribute), Stellar (Incubus Tribute), Third Eye Spiral (TOOL Tribute), 9 p.m. Placerville Public House Patrick Walsh, 8 p.m. The Pour Choice Jasmine Bailey, 6:30 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Grooveline, 10 p.m.

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The Press Club DJ Rue, 9 p.m. The Starlet Room Dogleg, Glass Beach, 6 p.m. Thunder Valley Casino Resort The Green, Ka’ikena Scanlan, 7:30 p.m. Tilted Mash Brewing Burning Daylight People, 6 p.m. Torch Club Jimmy Pailer & Co., 5:30 p.m.; Joy & Madness, 9 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Farrow and the Peach Leaves, 6 p.m.

2.01 SATURDAY

Ace of Spades Queensryche, John 5, Eve To Adam, Trigger Effect, 6 p.m. Auburn State Theatre Keith Greeninger & Dayan Kai, 7:30 p.m. Berryessa Brewing Co. Jessica Malone Duo, 3 p.m. Cafe Colonial Spark8 Artist Showcase, 7 p.m. The Club Car Jax Hammer, 8 p.m. The Colony Anxious Arms (Video Shoot), Fake It, Mourning Mountains, Paper Airplanes, 6:30 p.m. Crest Theatre Foreverland (Michael Jackson Tribute), 6:30 p.m. Davis Odd Fellows Hall The Sam Chase and the Untraditional, Jessica Malone, 7 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Remix, 9 p.m. Fox & Goose Empty Wagon, Lovelorn, 9 p.m. Harlow’s The Purple Ones (Prince Tribute), 9 p.m. Holy Diver Hunny, Verno, 7 p.m. Laughs Unlimited X Cons, 3:30 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge The Fryed Brothers Band, 9 p.m. Memorial Auditorium 1812 Overturer: Sacramento Philharmonic & Opera, 8 p.m. Mondavi Center: Jackson Hall UC Davis Symphony Orchestra, 7 p.m. Mondavi Center: Vanderhoef Studio Theatre Spektral Quartet, 9:30 p.m. Old Ironsides Lipstick w/ DJs Shaun Slaughter & Roger Carpio, 9 p.m. On the Y Hellway Patrol, Banger, Sky Pig and More, 8 p.m. Opera House Saloon Angel From Montgomery (Bonnie Raitt Tribute), 8 p.m. Placerville Public House Joe Lev and Friends, 8 p.m. The Pour Choice Abandon Theory, 6:30 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Spazmatics, 10 p.m. The Press Club DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9 p.m. SacYard Community Tap House Home B4 Dark, 6 p.m. p.m.

Shine Instagon’s 27th Anniversary Show w/ Grex & Nam The Giver, 8 p.m. The Side Door Eric Anderson & Scarlet Rivera, 7 p.m. The Silver Orange Sanity Aisle, Under Ego, Brain Death, 6 p.m. Torch Club The Dey Trippers, 5:30 p.m.; John Clifton Blues Band, 9 p.m.

2.02 SUNDAY

Berryessa Brewing Co. Scott Guberman, 2 p.m. The Boardwalk The Classic Crime, Assuming We Survive, Keith Anthony Gray, Western Spies & the Kosmonaut, Zendegi, 6:30 p.m. Cafe Colonial 10th Annual Super Bowl Party w/ Kill the Precedent, Gentleman Jimmy, 3 p.m. The Colony Valkyrie Missile, McCadden Place, Wasteful, Danger Escape, Fonty, 7:30 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Roni Yadao, 3 p.m. Harlow’s Radical Face, Axel Flóvent, 6 p.m. Midtown BarFly Factor IX w/ DJ Hawk, DJ CarnieRobber and Guests, 9 p.m. Palms Playhouse Contra Dance w/ Sacramento Country Dance Society, 1 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. The Press Club Sunday Night Soul Party w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9 p.m. The Russ Room at Solomon’s Record Club Brunch w/ DJ Roderick, 11 a.m. Torch Club Blues Jam, 4 p.m.; Front the Band, 8 p.m.

2.03 MONDAY

Ace of Spades American Authors, Magic Giant, 6:30 p.m. Harris Center: A Cappella Live! feat. Committed, The Filharmonic, Blake Lewis, Women of the World, 7:30 p.m. LowBrau Motown on Monday’s w/ DJ Epik, 9 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Nebraska Mondays, 7:30 p.m. Old Ironsides Heath Williamson & Friends, 5:30 p.m. The Russ Room at Solomon’s Cool Kidz ‘80s Dance Party w/ DJ Roderick, 8 p.m.

2.05 WEDNESDAY

Ace of Spades Lil Tjay, 7 p.m. The Club Car The Double Shots, 7:30 p.m. Harlow’s Grateful Shred, 7 p.m. Holy Diver Mustard Plug, The Toasters, Flip The Switch, Ants in My Eyes Johnson, 6:30 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Live Blues Jam Session, 8 p.m. The Pour Choice Seth Grauer & Friends, 6:30 p.m. Shine Open Mic, 7:30 p.m. The Starlet Room Blues & Bourbon: Albert Castiglia, 5:30 p.m. Torch Club O’Mally Sisters, 5:30 p.m.; Wild Wild Wets, The No. 44, PETS, My Dallas Teens, 8:30 p.m. Sacramento State: University Union Redwood Room Nooner w/ Humble Wolf, 12 p.m.

2.06 THURSDAY

Ace of Spades The Marcus King Band, Dee White, 7 p.m. The Boardwalk Paranoid Void, The Seafloor Cinema, Enter: Villan, Predisposed, Grayed Blue, 6 p.m. Cafe Colonial Marty Taters Open Mic, 7:30 p.m. The Club Car Songwriters Showcase, 8 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Patrick Walsh, 7 p.m.; DJ Uncle Hank w/ Karoake, 9 p.m. Fox & Goose Irish Jam Session w/ Stepping Stone, 8 p.m. Goldfield Black Uhuru, Etana, Empress Niko and the Lion’s Paw, 7:30 p.m. Harris Center A.J. Croce, 7:30 p.m. Kupros Joseph Kojima Gray, 7 p.m. The Pour Choice Ben Wysong, 6:30 p.m. The Press Club Scraper, Jesus & the Dinosaurs, Trinidad Silva, 8 p.m. Shine Jazz Jam, 8 p.m. Torch Club Mind X, 5:30 p.m.; Drunken Kung Fu, 9 p.m.

.07 2 2.04 FRIDAY

TUESDAY

Ace of Spades Jauz, Drezo, 6:30 p.m. Harris Center A Cappella Live! feat. Committed, The Filharmonic, Blake Lewis, Women of the World, 7:30 p.m. Kupros Leo Bootes, 5 p.m. The Pour Choice Matt Brennan, 6:30 p.m.

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Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

The Starlet Room Homeboy Sandman, Quelle Chris, 7 p.m. Torch Club Scott McConaha, 5:30 p.m.; Joe Lev & Friends, 8 p.m.

Ace of Spades Chris Lane, Blanco Brown, Ernest, 7 p.m. (Sold Out) B Street at The Sofia Joe Craven & the Sometimers, 6 p.m. Big Sexy Brewing Co. JT Lawrence (of Pine Street Ramblers), 6 p.m. The Boardwalk 96 Bitter Beings, The Native Howl, Dads Under Where, Blacksheep, The Outside, 6 p.m. Capitol Garage Capitol Friday’s Reggae Night w/ DJ Veyn, 10 p.m. El Dorado Saloon FooTube, 9 p.m. Fox & Goose Surfer Joe, The Me Gustas, 9 p.m. Golden Bear DJ CrookOne and Guests, 10 p.m. Harlow’s Midnight Players, 9 p.m. Holy Diver Kingdom of Giants, Lucrecia, Petroglyphs, HellHeart, In Chaos, 6:30 p.m. Kupros Ross Hammond, 5 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge William Mylar’s Hippie Hour, 5:30 p.m.

On the Y Judhead, Skyline Red, 8 p.m. Opera House Saloon Mere Mortals, Sock Monkeys, 9:30 p.m. Palms Playhouse Stevie Redstone, 7:30 p.m. PJ’s Roadhouse Paranoid Void, Mookatite, Hypha, Wandern, 7 p.m. The Pour Choice Brad Hoshaw, 6:30 p.m. The Press Club DJ Rue, 9 p.m. Shine Shelby Murray, Brian Hanover, Evan Bailey, 8 p.m. The Side Door The Vintage Find, 7 p.m. Spotlight Ballroom Swing Dance to Big Band: The Crescent Katz, 8 p.m. The Starlet Room Niviane, Failure by Proxy, Cloudship, Damaged Things, 8 p.m. Torch Club Jimmy Pailer & Co., 5:30 p.m.; Tropicali Flames, 9 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Shotgun Slim, 6 p.m.

2.08 SATURDAY

Ace of Spades Ultimate ‘80s Party Featuring Tiffany, 8 p.m. Berryessa Brewing Co. The Muddy Waders, 2 p.m. The Boardwalk Zackthevillain, Lonely Valentine, Grimyboi, King Theta, Skeletxrn, Jp, Dead Homie, Wiski, Baku, 7 p.m. Cafe Colonial Your Friends, Joan and the Rivers, Vinnie Guidera & the Dead Birds, Pink Frank, 8 p.m. Crest Theatre Steelin’ Dan (Steely Dan Tribute), 6:30 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon 8 Track Massacre, 9:30 p.m. Fox & Goose Character. & The Method Actors, Mr. P Chill, Madame Z, J.Smo, Mike Colossal, 9 p.m. Goldfield Tarrus Riley, Dean Fraser and Blak Soil Band, 7 p.m. Harlow’s Shannon McCabe’s Mardi Gras Masked Ball: The Double X Brass Band, Clemon Charles, DJ Bryan Hawk, DJ Norman Stradley, and More, 6 p.m. Holy Diver Blacktop Mojo, Roswell, Among the First, Soulwood, 7 p.m. Laughs Unlimited Groove Deluxe Band, 3:30 p.m. Old Ironsides The Moans, Doc Rotten, Lamonta, 8 p.m. Opera House Saloon When Doves Cry (Prince Tribute), 9:30 p.m. Phono Select American Maw, Sissyfit, Knee Deep, 6 p.m. Placerville Public House Old Mule, 8 p.m. The Pour Choice Misner & Smith, 6:30 p.m. The Press Club DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9 p.m. The Russ Room at Solomon’s Disco Brunch w/ DJ Shaun Slaughter, 11 .m. The Side Door The Gold Souls, 7 p.m. Torch Club Empty Wagon, 5:30 p.m.; Katie Henry, 9 p.m.

2.09 SUNDAY

Ace of Spades Phora, 7 p.m. Auburn State Theatre Iris DeMent, 7:30 p.m. (Sold Out) Berryessa Brewing Co. Sourdough Slim & Robert Armstrong, 2 p.m. Crest Theatre Alan Parsons, 6:30 p.m. Crocker Art Museum Classical Concert: Carlos & Brennen feat. Robin Fisher, 3 p.m.

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


Folsom Hotel Saloon Austin Payne, 3 p.m. Golden 1 Center TobyMac, Tauren Wells, We are Messengers, Ryan Stevenson, Aaron Cole, Cochren & Co., 6 p.m. Golden Bear Julian Never, Yawzea, Dye, 9 p.m. Goldfield Logan Mize, Willie Jones, 7:30 p.m. Holy Diver Crobot, Aeges, Like Machines, Malcontent, Cold Shoulder, 6:30 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Sugar Shack, 5 p.m. LowBrau Glitter Wizard, 5 p.m. Midtown BarFly Factor IX w/ DJ Hawk, DJ CarnieRobber and Guests, 9 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. Placerville Public House Lonely Avenue, The Countermen, Foot Clan, 6:30 p.m. The Press Club Sunday Night Soul Party w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9 p.m. SacYard Community Tap House Zack Sapunor, 6 p.m. Torch Club Blues Jam: Don Bassey Tribute, 4 p.m.; Front the Band, 8 p.m.

2.10 MONDAY

Goldfield World / Inferno Friendship Society, The Bridge City Sinners, Dandelion Massacre, 7:30 p.m. Harlow’s Pinegrove, Lake, 6 p.m. Holy Diver Grayscale, Hot Mulligan, WSTR, Lurk, 6 p.m. LowBrau Motown on Monday’s w/ DJ Epik, 9 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Nebraska Mondays, 7:30 p.m. Old Ironsides Heath Williamson & Friends, 5:30 p.m.

2.11 TUESDAY

B Street at The Sofia Avery*Sunshine Trio, 7:30 p.m. Goldfield Melvins, Hepa. Titus, Cunts, 7:30 p.m. Holy Diver Caspian, The Velvet Teen, 7 p.m. Kupros Kyle Rowland, 5 p.m. The Pour Choice Matt Brennan, 6:30 p.m. Torch Club William Mylar Hippie Hour, 5:30 p.m.; Sactown Playboys, 8 p.m.

2.12 WEDNESDAY

The Club Car The Double Shots, 7:30 p.m. Crest Theatre Steel Pulse, 6:30 p.m. Goldfield Horrorpops, 7:30 p.m. Harris Center Al Di Meola, 7:30 p.m. Holy Diver Bodysnatcher, Great American Ghost, Born a New, Distinguisher, The Willow, 6:30 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Live Blues Jam Session, 8 p.m. The Starlet Room Blues & Bourbon: Matt Rainey & the Dippin’ Sauce, 5:30 p.m. Torch Club Ballin’ That Jack, 5:30 p.m.; Shoofly Complex, 9 p.m.

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Comedy Cafe Colonial One Night Stand... UP! feat. Amy Estes, Becky Lynn, Shahera Hyatt, Diana Hong, Feb. 9, 6 p.m. Crest Theatre Smosh: Try Not To Laugh Live, Feb. 5, 8 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Standup Saloon Hosted by Jason Anderson, Mondays, 8 p.m. JB’s Lounge & Grill Wild’N Out Wednesday Night Open Mic Comedy, Wednesdays, 9 p.m. Laughs Unlimited K-von, Jan. 29, 8 p.m. There Goes the Neighborhood w/ Evan Montelongo, Jason Cheny, Diego Curiel & Bob Fernandez, Jan. 30, 8 p.m. Sean Larkins, Jason Cheny, Chris Smith, Jan. 31 - Feb. 1, Fri. & Sat, 8 & 10:30 p.m. Pro-Am Comedy Night Showcase Hosted by Ellis Rodriguez, Feb. 4, 8 p.m. Clean & Funny Stand-Up w/ Robert Vogel, Robert G. Lee, Carlos Rodriguez, Roman Spinale, Feb. 5, 8 p.m. Butch Escobar, Robert Omoto, Bryant Hicks, Feb. 7 - 9, Fri. & Sat, 8 & 10:30 p.m.; Sun., 7 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Open Mic Comedy w/ Hosts Jaime Fernandez and Michael Cella, Tuesdays, 8 p.m. Memorial Auditorium Bert Kreischer: The Berty Boy World Tour, Feb. 7, 7 p.m. On the Y Open Mic Comedy w/ Guest Hosts, Thursdays, 8:30 p.m. Punch Line Akaash Singh, Jan. 29, 8 p.m. Jordan Carlos, John Ross, Michael Cella, Jan. 30 - Feb. 1, Thurs., 8 p.m.; Fri. & Sat, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Comedy Allstars w/ Becky Lynn, Carlos Rodriguez, Alfonso Portela, Feb. 5, 8 p.m. Steve Trevino, Feb. 6 - 8, Thurs., 8 p.m.; Fri. & Sat, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Lance Woods, Feb. 9, 7:30 p.m. There Goes the Neighborhood Comedy Tour, Feb. 12, 8 p.m. Sacramento Comedy Spot Open Mic, Sundays and Mondays, 8 p.m. Improv Taste Test & Harold Night, Wednesdays, 7 - 10 p.m. Thursday Scramble & Improv Jam, Thursdays, 8 - 10 p.m. Anti-Cooperation League, Saturdays, 9 p.m. SacYard Community Tap House Sacyardigans Comedy Night, Feb. 12, 8 p.m. The Starlet Room Comedy Burger w/ Ngaio Bealum, Wendy Lewis, Feb. 9, 6:30 p.m. STAB! Comedy Theater Comedy Open Mic, Thursdays, 9 p.m. STAB! Podcast Panel Show, Fridays, 10 p.m. Late Week Leftovers Open Mic, Sundays, 8 p.m.

Misc. 1409 Del Paso Blvd. Uptown Market on the Boulevard, Saturdays, 12 - 5 p.m. 8th and W Streets Certified Farmers Market, Sundays, 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. 20th Street (Between J and L) Midtown Farmers Market, Saturdays, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. 21st & X Streets Sacramento Antique Faire, Feb. 9, 6:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. B Street at The Sofia Popcorn Falls by James Hindman, Through Feb. 23 Blue Cue Trivia Night, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

The Boxing Donkey Trivia Night, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Capitol Garage Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, Wednesdays, 8:30 p.m. Dinner and a Drag Show, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. CLARA Studios for the Performing Arts: Cunningham-Binda Stage Sacramento Ballet: Beer and Ballet 2020, Jan. 31 - Feb. 16 Country Club Plaza Certified Farmers Market, Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Crocker Art Museum Silent Film Series: The Kid, Feb. 6, 6:30 p.m. Granville Redmond: The Eloquent Palette, Through May 17 Cool Clay: Recent Acquisitions of Contemporary Ceramics, Through July 19, 2020 Crooked Lane Brewing Co. Trivia Night, Wednesdays, 6 p.m. Dreaming Dog Brewery Trivia Night Benefitting Save Them All Horse Rescue, Feb. 1, 6 p.m. Florin Road & 65th Street Certified Farmers Market, Thursdays, 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Fox & Goose Pub Quiz, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Harris Center An American In Paris, Jan. 30 Feb. 1 Ballet Folclórico Nacional de México de Silvia Lozano, Feb. 3 - 4 Lenaea High School 64th Annual Theatre Festival, Feb. 7 - 9 Highwater The Trivia Factory, Mondays, 7 p.m. Historic Old Folsom Farmers Market, Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Kupros Craft House Triviology, Sundays, 7:30 p.m. Laughs Unlimited The Love Jones “Best Love Poem” Competition, Feb. 6, 8 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Hollywood Knockouts Female Oil and Hot Cream Wrestling Revue, Jan. 31, 8 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Poetry Unplugged, Thursdays, 8 p.m. Sac Unified Poetry Slam, Jan. 17, 8 p.m. Midtown BarFly Salsa Lessons, Wednesdays, 8 p.m. Sacramento Premier of Ye Old Destruction Skateboard Film by Thomas Campbell w/ Live Score by Tommy Guerrero, Matt Rodriguez, Josh Lippi, & Lee Bob Watson, Plus Sets by DJ Juan Love, Feb. 6, 8 p.m. North Highlands Recreation Center Re-Think Women’s Conference w/ Speaker Joan Hehir, Feb. 1, 12 - 3 p.m. Oblivion Comics & Coffee Drink & Draw, Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sacramento State: University Union Free Film Screening: Harriet, Feb. 6, 7:30 p.m. Free Film Screening: Hoops Africa: Ubuntu Matters, Feb. 12, 12 p.m. Sam and Bonnie Pannell Meadowview Community Center Sweet Potato Festival, Feb. 8, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Shine Thee Word Thing Hosted by Lob Instagon feat. Laura Martin, Feb. 12, 7:30 p.m. Strikes Unlimited (Rocklin) Let’s Get Quzzical: Trivia Game Show Experience, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Sunrise Light Rail Station Certified Farmers Market, Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Tower Brewing Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Cribbage Night, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Trivia Night, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Various Museums In Sacramento Free Museum Day 2020, Feb. 1, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Yolo Brewing Co. Trivia Night, Tuesdays, 6 p.m.

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Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

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1517 21 st Street Sacramento

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Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

MON FEBRUARY 24 • 7PM

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SO MUCH Issue 310 LIGHT, • January 29 – February 12, 2020 CATBAMBOO AND ROMAN PILOT

25


THE SHALLOW END Have you been keeping up with the Senate Impeachment Trial? I’m not asking so I can judge you. It’s cool if you have; it’s equally cool if you haven’t. I’ve been listening to bits and pieces of it on NPR as I drive around, and caught Adam Schiff’s closing arguments on YouTube. Honestly, it’s a lot of stuff we know already—a lot of stuff that’s been kicked around the media like a political football and even admitted to by members of the executive branch. It’s one of the downsides of living in such an information-rich age. I listened one evening as Mr. Schiff laid out the timeline of the events that precipitated the impeachment of the 45th U.S. President and marveled at the compelling and damning narrative. I wondered, as others have, what it would have been like if we hadn’t been given this info in dribs and drabs, as we had with the Mueller Report, and if all of this was just dumped on us en-masse. Would the majority of the country who approve of impeachment and removal be even wider? I guess it’s ridiculous to speculate. Even though we can be reasonably sure how this political drama will play out—since the Republicans in charge have basically already told us how it will, and there’s no reason to

26

WHO WANTS CANDY?

believe that they’re lying to us or, you know, have souls—it’s certainly interesting to tune in to see the inner workings of our government. It’s still our government after all. We can complain all we want about who we have representing us in Washington, but remember, we’re the ones who sent them there. That is, if you vote. And if you don’t, well, OK … now I’m judging you. What’s most interesting about this whole impeachment trial, to me anyway, is that we’re seeing how our senators react—on both sides of the aisle—when they actually have to work. As per the rules of the trial, they’re not allowed to talk, drink coffee or use cell phones. I’d imagine the first one would have to be the toughest for them. Hemming and hawing is kinda their schtick. For the most part, I guess they’ve been toeing the company line. They’ve been quiet—that’s for sure. As Mr. Schiff hammered away at President Trump, you heard nary a yip out of presidential lap dog Lindsay Graham. If anything good has come out of this impeachment so far, I guess it’s that we’ve received respite from his inane word salad for a brief while. It’s about as close as we can come to bliss in these trying times.

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

JAMES BARONE jb@submergemag.com They’ve even been paying attention, for the most part, even though I’m not sure that’s something that’s deserving of praise. Mr. Schiff gave the senators a shout out as he began his closing arguments one night for being so attentive and respectful. It’s like when the kindergarteners don’t eat the paste. Hey, at least it’s something. Maybe they’ll all go home with attentiveness trophies. It’s cool. The taxpayers will pick up the tab. According to an article on Latimes.com, some of the senators are even taking notes. The article mentioned democrats Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin, Kirsten Gillibrand of New York and even a republican, Tennesee’s Lamar Alexander, have been jotting away like good girls and boys. Who knows, they may even ask pivotal and thoughtful questions when the time comes and get a gold star or something next to their names. Who doesn’t love stickers? On the other side of the coin, some senators have taken the long hours to catch up on their beauty sleep, according to the same article. Idaho republican Jim Risch caught some Zs on Tuesday and, lo and behold, so did Bernie Sanders on Wednesday (not to make excuses, but he’s, like, a billion).

My favorite story to come out of this so far, and why this whole thing feels like elementary school, is that there’s a Candy Desk on the Senate floor. It even has its own entry on Wikipedia. “In 1965, California’s George Murphy joined the Senate, and kept candy in his desk to offer his colleagues, and for himself, though eating is not allowed on the Senate floor,” the entry reads. “When he left the Senate after a sixyear term, other Republican senators maintained the custom. The nascent tradition did not become publicly known until the mid-1980s, when Washington Senator Slade Gorton disclosed it in announcing that he would be sitting at the candy desk.” The current holder of this prestigious honor is Senator Patrick Toomey, a republican from Pennsylvania who has been an outspoken opponent of LGBTQ issues. Not so sweet, I guess, but I do like the fact that there’s a hidden cache of candy on the Senate floor, and for some reason it makes sense that a republican is in charge of it. You can’t just hand out candy willy-nilly after all, even if congress has all that amazing healthcare.

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


SubmergeMag.com

Issue 310 • January 29 – February 12, 2020

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DIVE INTO SACRAMENTO & ITS SURROUNDING AREAS

JANUARY 29 – FEBRUARY 12, 2020

#310

MUSIC + ART + LIFESTYLE

THOMAS CAMPBELL THE NATURE OF SKATEBOARDING

THE SEAFLOOR CINEMA BOOTS RILEY EVERY NIGHT IS EMO NIGHT ONE BIG EXPRESSION

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Profile for Submerge Magazine

Submerge Magazine: Issue 310 (January 29 - February 12, 2020)  

Issue 310 features exclusive interviews with filmmaker, director, writer, actor and artist John Waters, who will bring his This Filthy World...

Submerge Magazine: Issue 310 (January 29 - February 12, 2020)  

Issue 310 features exclusive interviews with filmmaker, director, writer, actor and artist John Waters, who will bring his This Filthy World...

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