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DIVE INTO SACRAMENTO & ITS SURROUNDING AREAS

JULY 17 – 31, 2019

#296

HONEST ART

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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


2708 J Street SACRAMENTO 916.441.4693 HARLOWS.COM * ALL Thursday

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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


P R ES EN TS

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WITH HOST

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FRIDAY, AUG 2 2019 6:00pm-7:30pm ND

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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

Wed. Aug 28 Shonen Knife

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Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band

F O R M O R E I N F O V I S I T G O L D F I E L DT R A D I N G P O S T. CO M

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


296 2019

DIVE IN

Submerge: an independently owned entertainment/lifestyle publication available for free biweekly throughout the greater Sacramento area.

MAKE THE STATE FAIR GREAT AGAIN

JULY 17 – 31

COFOUNDER/ EDITOR IN CHIEF/ ART DIRECTOR

Melissa Welliver melissa@ submergemag.com COFOUNDER/ ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Jonathan Carabba jonathan@ submergemag.com SENIOR EDITOR

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DIVE IN

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THE STREAM

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THE OPTIMISTIC PESSIMIST

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MELISSA WELLIVER melissa@submergemag.com It’s July and that means hot days with warm nights, my birthday but even better... the California State Fair! Now, I know I’ve shared my love for the State Fair before in my column, but after attending on opening day last week, I’m really bummed out. There was no one there. On opening day. On a Friday night with gorgeous weather. And while that was kind of nice—I mean, there were no lines at the wine garden, for food, or even for the Ferris wheel—it mostly left me feeling a little dead inside. More and more people are moving to Sacramento, so why does the attendance seem less and less every year? I love that the State Fair spans two full weeks and three weekends. That gives my husband and I the time to go at least a few times, even with our crazy deadlines. I don’t want to see it change, but I think they are in major need of an overhaul if it’s going to keep people interested! It’s a bit expensive to go, so maybe make some compromises here and there? How about free parking on opening day or on Mondays? Or how about just straight up cheaper parking overall? $15 is ridiculous. Also, what the hell is up with rebranding it as a “Food Festival” this year? A few things on their list: Hot Cheeto Chicken Burrito, Pizza Funnel Cake, Deep Fried Banana Hot Dog. Are you kidding me? I like to indulge with a few not-so-healthy items at the fair every year, like my brick of fries drenched in nacho cheese, gelato churro sandwiches and deep fried Oreos. Keyword there was a few. To me, it seems like they completely missed the mark trying to capitalize on the ever-so-popular “Farmto-Fork” slogan. How about giving attendees more healthy options? Roll with the Farmto-Fork slogan, but line up some noteworthy local chefs and sell tickets (maybe even just one of the weekends) and have special, onetime-only dinners. Take a page out of the Tower Bridge Dinner, Farm-to-Fork Festival or how about looking into things like the Music Tastes Good Festival in Long Beach on ways to improve? Is it just me, or does the music at the State Fair just seem to be getting worse and worse? This year there are way too many tribute bands. This is the CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR, why are we not getting some of the best bands that live in California?! Seems simple to me, if you book good bands, there will be people who will pay for the good seats and fair organizers will recoup costs. And if you can’t figure that out, my dear folks who run the fair, perhaps you need to team up with some of the best promoters in the area to help (with an option for them to also make money) and maybe, just maybe, one day we could have a semi-decent concert lineup. The vendors seem to be getting worse and worse, as well. Who wants to be a vendor if no one is there? What if there was a makers mart one weekend? Craft fairs have become extremely trendy over the past few years! I have plenty more ideas, but before I run out of room, I’d like to say that I still love the State Fair. No matter how janky it is. I love seeing the animals. I love talking to the 4H kids. I love the art from professionals and students; and I love the weird county booths. I love watching people from all walks of life having fun and taking it all in. And while I love it for what it is, I can’t help but feel like it needs to evolve to grab peoples’ attention with some substantial changes, in order to sustain itself and to properly represent a CALIFORNIA State Fair. Read. Learn. Do rad things! Melissa Welliver

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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

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THE STREAM

SACRAMENTO, SAY HELLO TO SUNNY SIDE THEATRE COMPANY

Send regional news tips to info@submergemag.com

Photo by Ernie Lucio

Sacramento theatergoers will be happy to hear there’s a new kid on the block. Sunny Side Theatre Company is set to debut with its firstever show, fittingly titled City of Trees, which will open on Aug. 2 at the Geery WM J Theater (2130 L St., Sacramento) and run for three consecutive weekends (nine performances in total). City of Trees is written and co-directed by Johanna C. Pugh, who also portrays one of the roles in the play. Pugh, as it turns out, is the president of Sunny Side Theatre Company, “a non-profit company dedicated to representing mental health and multi cultural experiences through the creation of performing projects in Sacramento,” according to press materials sent to Submerge. “Sunny Side Theatre Company was born out of a desire to see theater done in a different way,” Pugh writes in an email interview. “I know artists of color in Sacramento and beyond have experienced a similar feeling I have—that there is

not always a space for them in performing arts. I decided to create a kind of theater company that fosters accurate everyday portrayals of mental health and features artists and characters that actually look and sound like the people here. “The actors I have cast all have varying backgrounds and experiences. They do have a very important trait in common, though: compassion,” Pugh continues. “I wanted to create a safe, open and genuine space for artists and audiences that are as diverse as this city is.” Pugh writes that she has been discouraged by “productions that use mental health and trauma as dramatic storytelling tools instead of for true representation reasons.” City of Trees tells the story of a small group of childhood friends who reconnect as adults, coming together in order to save a Midtown diner. However, old wounds begin to surface, and “each must learn how to face their roots in order to move forward,” according to a

ACCORDING TO BAZOOKA AccordingToBazooka.com

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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

description posted to the City of Trees event page on Facebook. In addition to this being Sunny Side’s inaugural production, City of Trees is also Pugh’s first-ever produced full-length play. It is not, however, her first foray into long-form playwriting. She tells Submerge that her first full-length, Anything Green, was a far cry from the more naturalistic feel of City of Trees. She describes the former as a “fantasy-based murder mystery I was recruited to write,” which was slated to be produced by Cosumnes River College. The funding for that production, however, fell through. Though it never saw the light of day, writing Anything Green served as a valuable learning experience for Pugh. “It did give me the sense that writing a play that could be enjoyed by and really reach audiences was something I could really accomplish and do,” she says. “City of Trees showcases my preferred genre of writing, which is contemporary realism. Not to go with a cliché here, but for anyone who knows me personally, this play is very much ‘me.’” Pugh acknowledges that she “wears a lot of hats” as producer, writer co-director (alongside Janiece Pride) and performer in her debut production. She says she didn’t intend to have so much involvement in City of Trees, but her multiple roles seem to have been born out of necessity. “We have had a couple of changes in the staff and cast since the announcement of the show,” Pugh admits. Despite the many responsibilities, Pugh describes the experience as “rewarding” and “a labor of love.” In City of Trees, she portrays Dia Grey, the daughter of the owner of the diner around which the play revolves. Dia is a child abuse survivor, suffering from post-traumatic stress. Pugh says Dia is the first character she has ever played that shares her ethnicity (black and Filipino) and is biographical “to a point,” as are the other characters in the play. Drawing from her own experience, Pugh mines universal themes.

“They are all at a crossroads in their lives, either with strained familial relationships, mental health recovery, or in trying to figure out their identity as post-grad first-generation Americans,” she says. Though City of Trees doesn’t shy away from heavy topics, Pugh asserts that the play is “a comedy as much as it is a drama.” Hey, who doesn’t need a laugh or two to get through the tough times? As someone who also struggles with mental health issues, I found it refreshing to read Pugh’s take on a difficult topic. “I think it would do the community and world a lot of good if mental health issues could be discussed in a way that is as acceptable as physical health issues are,” she writes. “People should know they are not alone in what they go through, and that finding the resources to help them heal and sharing how they really feel out loud could be really cathartic.” It’s corny, but it’s true. You’re really not alone. Healing is great; enjoying the shared experience of theater can certainly facilitate that. For more info about show dates and tickets, check out Facebook.com/sunnysidetheatre.

Johanna C. Pugh, president of Sunny Side Theatre Company Photo by Ernie Lucio

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THE OPTIMISTIC PESSIMIST AMERICA ACCORDING TO TRUMP BOCEPHUS CHIGGER bocephus@submergemag.com You are not going to believe what I came across recently. Like any good news man, I have people going through the White House’s garbage looking for scandals, crimes, blackmail attempts and boudoir photos of Putin on horseback. Until recently, my crack squad of investigators hadn’t turned up bupkis, but now they’ve finally hit pay dirt! It appears the President of the United States of America has ghostwritten a middle school report about an important time in the history of the United States for his 13 year-old son, Barron. If you saw Trump’s performance at the big Fourth of July party he threw for himself in D.C., then you already know how bad this report is going to be, but for those of you who missed it, our president told the world that there our soldiers took over airports during the Revolutionary War with the British and that our Army still uses the same tanks today that we had in WWII. His attempts to blame these errors on a teleprompter were unsuccessful, and it was clear that the president has a very strange concept of our nation’s history. You don’t have to take my word for it, though; read the school report and decide for yourself:

America the Most Greatest, Bigly. A report by Donald Barron Trump. America is the greatest country the world has ever seen. It always has been and it always will be, even though it’s not as great as it used to be, which is why I am my dad is working to make America great again (MAGA!!!). Got it, cucks and libtards? The reason why America is so much greater than everyone else is because we are better at business and making huge deals. It hasn’t always been that way, but I have my dad is doing some great things that have fixed this country after all of our historical mistakes. Why don’t you teach that to your students my classmates? They should be learning that I am my dad is a very stable genius and probably the greatest negotiator on the planet. Have you even been to Mar-A-Lago? It was a dump when I bought my dad bought it for pennies and turned it into the crown jewel of the entire nation. You know they call it the Winter White House now, right? No other country can touch us when it comes to guns, money, business, freedom or even hamburgers. McDonald’s Quarter Pounder with Cheese is like America on a bun, which is why I eat my dad eats two or more of them almost every day. It’s a great thing to do and a great service to our young people who are just getting started out in the job market at places like McDonald’s and Burger King and are making incredible money. These kids are learning how to pull themselves up by their bootstraps like I did my dad did. I would tell them not to work at Taco Bell though; that food is Mexican and we just can’t trust them anymore. We have to keep MS13 out of our burritos! I’m sure some of them are good people, but they just aren’t real Americans. Real Americans wouldn’t commit crimes or smuggle drugs and real Americans wouldn’t join violent street gangs like MS13 or Antifa to become hooligans, drug dealers and killers. Real Americans work hard, do good at sports, drive expensive cars, fly in private planes and helicopters, get all the young, hot broads they want and start successful businesses with small multi-million dollar loans that are SubmergeMag.com

totally legit and not from a family member or friend of the Russian President (No Collusion!!!). It’s those successful businesses like mine my dad’s that have made this country great. When Alexander Hamilton invented the telephone 3,000 years ago, do you think he knew what that would mean for America? Did he know that Jesus would use his phone to talk to God or that someday Buzz Aldrin would use it to call NASA from a little planet known as the Moon? Do you think Alexander Hamilton foresaw us installing the tubes into his phone lines that turned his invention into the very internets themselves? What an incredible idea, right? I could have made a lot of money with an idea like that! Anyway, you asked my son me to tell you about an important time in U.S. history that changed the country, and I’m going to do that now. First of all, the question is silly. It’s a silly question because the answer is so simple. Obviously, the election of Trump my dad as President of the United States is the best and most important time in U.S. history. After the election, I put my dad put together a team of very bright (some might say genius) men and a few gals that pleased me him to fix every mess that the presidents before me him like Obama made. These people have done seriously big things in their lives. We’ve He’s got a guy working in the Department of Defense that once lead a battalion for the Confederate States of America during the Civil War. Talk about history! I have My dad has him working on getting the Space Force up and running. He is a real go-getter and I think my dad thinks he’s going to be a huge, huge success. Bigly. On top of creating the Space Force, I have my dad has already fixed healthcare, voting and the tax code. My His administration solved our immigration problems and restored freedom to our businesses by getting rid of pointless environmental laws that keep all of us from making more money. Have you even looked at the market lately? It’s going bananas for Trump my dad. America is GREAT once again thanks to Trump my dad and it doesn’t get more important than that! You are welcome, America!

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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

9


A family, bicycle, and dog-friendly cider company Open

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The great rock band The Presidents of the United States of America once sang, “Movin’ to the country, gonna eat a lot of peaches.” Boy would they have sure loved the Marysville Peach Festival! The 20th annual event celebrating all things peaches is happening Friday, July 19 and Saturday, July 20 in historic downtown Marysville on D Street between First and Seventh streets. This free, family friendly event will offer dozens of peachy foods, including staples like cobbler, pie, ice cream and milkshakes, but also some off-thewall foods and drinks, too, including peach salsa, peach taffy, deep fried peaches and even barbecued peach burgers! Approximately 30,000 people from the entire region are expected to attend, with one major perk being that there are no parking fees. There will also be live entertainment and a ton of vendors. The event runs from 4–10 p.m. on Friday and from 10 a.m.–10 p.m. on Saturday. Check out Marysvillepeachfest.com to learn more.

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16th Annual Midnight Mass Brings The Goddamn Gallows and Other Killer Bands to Yolo County Fairgrounds • July 27 Come for the cars, stay for the tunes! Once held in a parking lot behind a body shop, the annual Midnight Mass custom car show and entertainment extravaganza, now in its 16th year, continues to grow at a pedal-to-the-metal pace. This year’s event is going down at Yolo County Fairgrounds in Woodland on Saturday, July 27, and is expected to draw more than 700 badass custom cars and over 5,000 attendees! In addition to all of the one-of-a-kind hot rods on display all day, there will also be a pin-up contest, food, beer, up to 50 vendors selling all types of different goods and, of course, a great lineup of live bands. Set to headline the music stage is The Goddamn Gallows, who are originally from Detroit and have been called “punk rock mixed with metal and bluegrass, with a touch of Satan.” In other words, they’re spot-on perfect for this event and a band that is not to be missed when they come to your town. Also performing at Midnight Mass will be Outlaw Inlaws from Arizona, Motor City Riot from Redding, Northern California’s Hillbilly Royale and Sacramento locals The Cantaliers. Tickets are just $15 at the gates, which open at noon. The event runs all the way through midnight and is open to all ages (kids 10 and under get in free, along with active duty military). Check out Facebook.com/ poorboysmidnightmass for more information.

Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


TOUCH

Learn How to Pickle Vegetables at This Hands-On Class July 28

Maxwell McMaster Tahiti Pehrson

Devin Troy Strother

SEE

Public Land Celebrates One Year Anniversary with Group Art Exhibit, Climate Therapy • Now Through Aug. 13 If you haven’t stopped by the retail space and gallery known as Public Land in the Curtis Park neighborhood of Sacramento yet, you really owe it to yourself to do so. They’ve got a well-curated selection of unusual cacti, succulents, tropical house plants and plenty of stylish pots to house ‘em in. To celebrate their one year anniversary, Public Land owners Austin McManus and Mel Eligon hand selected a group of 19 diverse artists from our region and beyond for a group exhibit in the store’s gallery space, called Climate Therapy, that keeps in line with their vision of facilitating a space that “celebrates and also encourages positive engagement with the natural world.” The exhibit includes pieces from artists like Nevada City-based Tahiti Pehrson, who creates intricate geometric sculptures; as well as Maxwell McMaster, originally from Sacramento but currently living and working in Los Angeles, who creates colorful Cali-inspired pieces that are abstract and minimal and ohso-joyous to look at; plus Devin Troy Strother, who also lives and works in Los Angeles, known for his intricate alternative narratives in a variety of mediums including mixed-media, sculpture, neon and installation. Public Land is located at 2598 21st St. They’re open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m.–6 p.m. and on Sundays from 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Hit up Publiclandstore.com or find them on Instagram (@publiclandstore) for more.

Ever wanted to learn the ins and outs of pickling your own veggies? Here’s your chance! Join local instructor Leanna Halldorf—who has won multiple firstplace awards at the California State Fair for her pickled okra, green beans and asparagus—at the Sierra 2 Center’s Garden Room on Sunday, July 28 for a DIY Pickles class. In this one hour, hands-on class, you’ll go over how to prep your materials, prepare your ingredients and how to properly pressurize your pickles so they will last you through the winter. You’ll even learn a quick pickle or fridge pickle recipe. They provide the pickling cans, spices and liquid; you need to bring a half-pound of whatever vegetable you would like to pickle. You’ll want to make sure it’s extra fresh, so it’s suggested to hit up the Sunday morning farmers market from 8 a.m. to noon at Eighth and W streets under the freeway in downtown Sac! Be sure to register for the class ahead of time (space is limited!) for $25 at Sierra2.org. The class starts at 2 p.m.

Movies Off the Wall: Lady Bird Screened open air in the Museum’s outdoor courtyard THURSDAY AUGUST 1 • FILM STARTS AT SUNDOWN

Tickets at crockerart.org @crockerart

SubmergeMag.com

Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

11


KICK OUT THE JAMS

ROSEVILLE QUARTET VISTA KICKS’ HEARTFELT EVOCATIONS OF GOLDEN ERA ROCK EARN BILLING ALONGSIDE DYLAN, YOUNG AND THE STONES WORDS ANDREW C. RUSSELL

A

sk any young band only a few years into their career to brainstorm the end-all fantasy scenario of classic rock gods with whom to share the stage, and the Stones would likely top the list of contenders. It’s a fantasy made real for Vista Kicks, four childhood friends from Roseville who set out for Los Angeles four years ago to make the big dream happen. Having already opened for The Kooks last year on a U.K. tour, and concluding this year’s jaunt across the pond sharing a bill in Hyde Park with Bob Dylan and Neil Young, they’ll have their biggest gig yet stateside in August opening for The Rolling Stones’ No Filter Tour in Santa Clara. This sudden wave of fortune, as it might seem, was in fact years in the making. Sam Plecker (guitar), Nolan Le Vine (Drums), Trevor Sutton (Bass) and Derek Thomas (vocals) have known each other since preschool days. By the time middle school rolled around, they were playing music together; though already well-steeped in their classic rock obsessions, they initially began performing 1960s soul along the lines of Sam Cooke and Otis Redding, along with crooner material from Sinatra standards to Bublé hits. They took gigs as offered and never shied away from an opportunity to practice or gain familiarity with a new style, ingesting a massive chunk of the 20th Century pop canon in the process. Between 2013 and 2015, they first got off the ground as polished indie rock outfit Babe, and began making waves online, especially among the high-school set, with songs like “Make it Real” and “Circles.” Not too long after they moved into a cramped one-bedroom apartment in Hollywood, on the precipice of their dreams, the four realized that if the journey was to be inspiring, they’d have to do it on their own terms. So, they let down their hair, let the old-school influences show and became Vista Kicks, a non sequitur that nonetheless manages to evoke their long-run view and the mellow, kickback music parties they’ve been known to throw at their L.A. studio. As a new entity, Vista Kicks rapidly evolved into the prolific, genre-hopping band they are today. First came the surf-inflected EP Chasing Waves in 2016. On the cover of their full-length debut, 2017’s Bootyshaker’s Ball, the four put off a Badfinger-meets-Rubber Soul vibe in more ways than their appearance, pointing toward their magpie pop sensibility and rougher-edged rock proclivities that tend to gel excellently. On last year’s 18-track-deep Twenty Something Nightmare, Vista Kicks really spread their wings, lightly brushing their ballads and harder jams with everything from soul to country/western and tinges of psychedelia. For a band with the chops to pull it off, they revel in demolishing generic borders and taking on new styles. If they can be pinned to any one thing, it’s a time, not a style—a period from roughly 1968 to 1977 when rock performance, presence, instrumental virtuosity and songwriting was in full blossom. It’s a set of talents that’s gone far on putting them on stages with some of the greats of this time—classic, though still strongly contemporary in their youthful energy and in-the-moment concerns. Below, we catch up with the four ahead of their upcoming appearance at Concerts in the Park (taking place before the big Stones gig). Come see them while you can still get up close!

How does it feel to be sharing the stage with your heroes? Sam Plecker: It’s funny—when we started playing music together, it was always like, “We really gotta get this thing going, because one day, we could actually play with the people we’ve listened to our whole lives.” Now that that’s happening, it’s unbelievable—it is. We’re not that many years into this, and it’s already sort of happening for us, and it’s just insane. We’re very humbled by it. How did you all go from being friends as toddlers to making music together? SP: Derek and I met when he was best friends with my older brother. I was probably still like 4, or something. And I used to go with my mom to pick up my brother from school, and Derek lived across the street from the elementary school. After a few of our dads bought a few of us drum sets, we just got hooked on music. We couldn’t stop listening. Trevor Sutton: I started playing bass around fifth grade. Derek got me into music around that time. Nobody in my family plays music whatsoever, so it was a very big curveball for them. But they were very supportive in getting me into it. I just started locking myself in my room and practicing bass and guitar, and oddly enough, banjo. Then, that’s what kind of led me into band class in middle school, where I met the rest. At some point after band class, we all realized that we knew each other. It took until late high school to kind of put all the pieces together, and say “Hey, let’s make a band.” Derek Thomas: In high school we started doing Sinatra covers, Sam Cooke and Otis Redding stuff, and that was great, but high school ended, we went to college and when we split up, Sam went to Chico, Nolan went to Sac State, I went to [American River College] and Trevor went to Sierra. We didn’t play for awhile. Nolan and I kept doing the crooning stuff, but then Sam would come back in the summer, and we didn’t want to do the covers anymore. It was getting exhausting, because it was really just background music at these places. We felt that we’d done all that we could there. So we sat down and wrote some songs; the first one we wrote, during our first summer break from college was “Make it Real,” and then the pieces of the band came together around it. What makes the 1960s/1970s rock era, the time of Young, Dylan and the Stones, resonate so powerfully in the present day? DT: I’d say what makes us look up to some of the music giants like The Beatles and Bob Dylan, The Stones, Neil Young and all the rest that we’re obsessed with, is the fact that they’re making music from an honest place, and the reason they were so huge was because they were very honest music makers. They were making honest art. I think that, though there are plenty of musicians today who do that, in some sense the industry has become a much more business-oriented thing, where there’s a lot of people in it that aren’t making art. I don’t want to say that new music sucks, but I think the reason we really like 20th Century rock, soul, blues, jazz musicians, is because of their integrity in music creation first and foremost. The title track “Twenty Something Nightmare” off of your last album seems like a final moment of doubt before turning the corner to success. What does the song mean to you? DT: The song is about a lot of things, most of it was written out in one night, and then I kept plugging away at it for the next two months. Sam and I talk about this a lot—we talk about how Bootyshaker’s Ball, as our first record, is

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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

Photo by Willow Rae

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


COMING TO GRASS VALLEY THURSDAY , AUGUST 1

Opening: Earles of Newtown N ORTH STAR HOUSE 12075 AUBURN ROAD tix range from $30 - $45

FRIDAY , AUGUST 23

TYLER RICH

Concerts in the Park, 2017 / Photo by Melissa Welliver “We’re broke and we’ve got nothing but ‘fuck it’, let’s just have as much fun as we can.” And the other side of that coin is “Twenty Something Nightmare”—it’s kind of like the come-down, the moment of doubt where it’s like, “Oh shit, can we actually do this?” SP: Naturally, when you’re going up like that, there’s always a comedown. To me that song feels like a conscious effort to come out of that, to triumph over the doubt and insecurity. It was written at a time when our innocence as a band was gone, and we understood that we’re climbing a hill, doing the impossible, and that there are far many more ways to fuck this up than we can actually do it right. But it’s also about acceptance, doing it anyway, persevering to do what you want to do and taking life by the horns, through all of the doubt and mischief that there may be. Part of changing to Vista Kicks was to better represent who you are. Is there any outside pressure to change your music from album to album? SP: It all changes organically, I’d say. I think what’s great is that we’re still an independent band. There’s no label pressure for certain music to be made or not be made, which is nice. But I’d say the pressure is still there to write nonstop, because now with all the exposure we’re gonna inevitably have with The Rolling Stones, opening up for other shows like that. We’re actually gonna have a shot, so we do feel more pressure, but in a good way. There’s more encouragement to make better music because more people will be looking. I think it’s putting a stride in all of our steps. You’re not shy when it comes to mixing genres. Are there any others you feel like you’d like to feature more in your work? SP: Maybe some Hank Williams [laughs]. DT: Yeah, we have an infatuation with country and western. I’d say the next record is gonna be even more diverse, a bit broader. That, and everybody’s seasoning into a better songwriter and performer, including Nolan and Trevor, so it’ll be likely that you’ll hear them sing a tune on the new record. We’re all a bunch of songwriters.

SubmergeMag.com

How would you describe the optimal musical education as a band? SP: I think for the people who want to start bands, when you have a band where everyone is 100 percent in, they’ll skip work for a show. When they have that dedication, there’s a lot more that you can do that even a more talented band could not. When you have the commitment level and the trust there, the work ethic—once you get rid of the fear of “What if it’s not gonna work?”—then you can really start on making something happen. But that fear has to go away before anything else happens. The best thing you can do is find people that you trust, that you like, and work together, grow together. Just because somebody’s the best at something, doesn’t make them the best for the band DT: There are multiple paths to success with music, so you have to go with what resonates with you. Whatever you want to do, do it entirely. We wanted to make a band and we wanted to play our own songs, so we dropped out of normal life and lived in a car. Then all four of us lived in a one-bedroom apartment, and we had records for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and we studied, became better songwriters and hit the practice room for 12 hours, and that’s what you’ve gotta do if you wanna be a band that makes records of their own songs. You have to be able to make the sacrifice if you want to do it. You have to listen to yourself and push through any doubts.

Vista Kicks will share the stage with this other band you may have heard of (The Rolling Stones) on Aug. 18 at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, California. Before that, though, you can see them live for free here in Sacramento at Concerts in the Park (Cesar Chavez Plaza) on July 26. Also performing will be ONOFF, For the Kids and A Summer Alive. DJ Nocturnal will grace the DJ stage at The Mill at Broadway. To get tickets for the Vista Kicks’ gig with the Stones, go to Vistakicks.com.

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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

13


MAIDEN VOYAGE

GENRE-BENDING ROCK OUTFIT THE MINDFUL DROP DEBUT ALBUM WORDS GRANT MINER PHOTO TYLER WATLEY

Y

ou can always tell when an artist has studied jazz, even if their current output is as far away from the genre as can be. Seminal punks Bad Brains’ tracks, for instance, are usually prime examples of that classic, hardcore sound. Every so often, though, they’ll end the tracks with a space-y jazz resolution (see: “Sailin’ On”), or just straight up go for a six-and-a-half-minute jazzed-up dub jam (“I Luv I Jah”). The Mindful, a Sacramento experimental-rock outfit headed by guitarist and vocalist Brett Vaughn, drummer Alan Gamboa and bassist Dom Salazar-Turner, is similar. Vaughn, who composes for the band, studied guitar performance and jazz big-band arranging at the prestigious Berklee College of Music. This expertise shows in his band’s music, which combines a broad blend of different genres with longform experimental composition and improvisational breaks. Until late last year, the only way to hear the band’s stuff was to attend a live show. They’ve been gigging around the Northern California area since 2016 but haven’t put out any recordings aside from one single, “Mercury Hours,” which was released on their Bandcamp page in 2018. Don’t be disappointed, though. As with most of their songs, the track is a long one—in this instance, it’s an impeccably produced 13-minute math-rock odyssey with multiple tone/ rhythm changes and a six-minute solo section at the tail end of the track. Now, after a successful Kickstarter campaign, The Mindful is releasing their debut album, Full Blown Gallery, which will feature some of Vaughn's older compositions from his college days. Accordingly, the record includes a wide range of genres, from the country-western “Cowboys and Indica,” to the funk and soul-inspired “Starting Something.” The result is an eclectic mix of music that is both strange (I mean, whoever heard of an eight-and-a-half-minute experimental country song), and, in cases like the jazzy, ambient groove of “Sea of Stars,” highly listenable. Read below for our interview with Vaughn and Salazar-Turner, as they talk shop about their new album and the releases to come.

14

So how did you wind up back in Sacramento after graduating from Berklee? Brett Vaughn: I walked in 2014, and the whole time I was in Boston, I never planned on staying there. I wasn’t getting the kinds of bands or gig opportunities I wanted, so I came back home just for a summer to chill out, relax and take a break. Here, I just started getting more gigs—they were cover bands, but the pay was good. It was a good learning opportunity in terms of the business, but artistically, I was dying. So pretty soon, I left and started The Mindful. When you were first putting the band together, were you looking for people who were jazz theory guys? BV: Well, when I came back [from Berklee], I had just been studying jazz super hard in this academic world, so I wanted to make sure that the people I was playing with had those skills, and that we could all speak on that same level. There’s been three iterations of the band; the first one, which was with some guys from cover bands I was playing with, then the next one with our current drummer [Gamboa] in it, and then we got Dom into the fold a little over a year ago. Dom, you also studied jazz as well? Dom Salazar-Turner: Yes, I studied composition in college, but played with the jazz band there at [American River College] and took theory and improv classes. I took that knowledge and applied that to rock when I started playing stuff like Grateful Dead music, and that’s kinda how I met Brett.

Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

In playing experimental rock music, do you find your jazz background to be very helpful? DST: Oh absolutely. I remember years ago, I was asked by my dad and brother, “What is jazz?” And I didn’t have an answer then, but now I can safely say that jazz is simply having a conversation with your instrument, with music. Just like we’re having a conversation now, you have to understand not only the syntax of how the different sounds are put together but how it’s going to come across—jazz teaches you those skills. That’s what we try to apply to rock. You say the “point” of the mindful is “to provide a springboard for personal reflection.” How does the way you tackle making music reflect that? BV: Well, from a lyrical standpoint, I liked lyrics that are specific but vague in a way to where you can listen to it and you’re in a certain mood and it means one thing to you and then the next day you’re in a different mood and it means something else. Also, we have a lot of improvisation in our music. We have a lot of exploration and when you’re experiencing that from the audience's standpoint, you’re thinking a lot and you’re reacting a lot. And so that creates, I think, a selfreflective experience. DST: That’s exactly it; there’s the foundation of the music, but then we launch into these improvisational sections where it’s a different experience every time. So that’s exactly like we’re [the audience and band] being sprung into this different thing.

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


How did Full Blown Gallery come about as a debut album? It includes a lot of older material. BV: I’m planning on releasing all of our music chronologically. I write music in phases, and these songs belong to the “first phase.” Four out of five of the songs were written back in 2013. There is a lot more kind of classic styles and there’s more of a folk and Americana influence than really anything that I’ve written since. I even considered abandoning some of that stuff, but I felt like this material was owed some representation. If you’ve moved past these styles, how have you evolved since then? BV: That older stuff on Full Blown Gallery, it was more of a funky sound—and I still dig funky stuff, but I feel like there’s a lot of it out there. What you’ll find on the next album, for example, is that it’s darker. It’s gonna be weirder, more colorful and instrumental. Any idea of when that’s going to come out? BV: Well, the songs are already done. We may play that album at the release show, too. So, as soon as humanly possible [laughs]. I’m hoping for the last chunk of 2020.

SubmergeMag.com

What are your favorite songs off the new album? BV: I think I’m maybe most impressed with “Sea of Stars,” the third track. I liked the vocal harmonies that are in there, and the recording, the tones and the mood that we captured was probably like the closest to the way I hear it in my mind. DST: I like to improvise—just noodle on my instrument. Because of that, it’s “Slumpelstiltskin,” because we recorded that one live. There was some overdubbing, but really just a little over what we kept. So that one really keeps the live, improvisational spirit of our shows alive. What can we expect from you in the future? BV: You can expect our sound to go from this really broad, eclectic thing and consolidate and become more focused. We’re going to get rid of some of the extraneous stuff, and it’s going to be more focused and more intense. I’ve been getting into some stuff I used to listen to back when I was young—Randy Rhoades-era Ozzy stuff, and even death metal, like Morbid Angel and Death. I can really see the potential of that heavy sound, but filtered through our style and our jazz sensibilities.

You can catch The Mindful and snag their new album at their release show at Momo Sacramento (2708 J St.) Saturday, July 27. The show will be recorded, so you could be featured in the filming of the evening’s performance for a future release as well! This is an all-ages event, with advance tickets setting you back $10, and $12 day of show. Doors open at 6 p.m., show at 7. Get your tickets at Momosacramento.com.

Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

15


WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

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Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

TOO SHORT

17


HOT FUN IN THE SUMMERTIME

JEFF MAYRY’S ABSTRACT WORLD COMES TO LIFE AT JAYJAY WORDS LOVELLE HARRIS

Whenever I Breathe Out | Mixed media | Size variable | 2016

Laid Down in the Garden Crying | Oil on canvas | 48"x 48" | 2019

Shadow Self Tiger | Oil on canvas | 48"x 48" | 2019

Took Off Her Riding Boots | 72" x 96" | 2014

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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

Apple | Oil on canvas | 66" x 96" | 2015 Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


T

he mystique of the artistic process is a trope that has permeated just about every discipline that comprises the visual art world. We’re all eager to know “what” that piece means or “why” that artist used those specific brushstrokes to create that particular form. But the mere act of creative expression—producing something from nothing—is significant. To glean insight on the creative process, talk to any artist and you’ll get a different response on what that even means. Some say it’s about discipline, others lean into collaboration, and then there are those brave souls who operate within the plane of the subconscious mind where plans go straight out the window, yet beauty still emerges. For Sacramento artist Jeff Mayry, the progression of the pieces he creates, much like the exploration of the patterns of the human psyche, is dominated by the absence of a conscious process. Rather than relying on a premeditated road map, Mayry employs repetition, collection and chance to pilot him. This spontaneity results in artwork that conveys emotion rather than logic. “My aesthetic kind of changes,” Mayry explains. “It fluctuates in between abstract and figurative, but I don’t have a set process or anything. I start my paintings with what I call an inner logic, which is kind of like an internal logic, but something that only makes sense to me.” This is perhaps why Mayry’s work—currently on view at JayJay Gallery during its three-person exhibition, titled Hot Fun—is the perfect addition to the show given its theme. As the gallery’s curator and a participant in the show, Mayry was careful to select artists whose work fully embraced the intent to move the viewer through different states of pleasure by employing color and narrative elements as driving forces. Kristin Hough, a Los Angelesbased painter, and David Mohr of Oakland round out the exhibition’s triumvirate. “We were trying to pick artists that expressed, either abstractly or figuratively, moments of pleasure through color,” Mayry explains as he walks through the pieces in advance of the show. “So, this is David Mohr, we picked him because of his palette—it expresses pleasure, but also when he talks about his paintings, he talks about them as impermanent, like they’re moments in flux.” During a recent tour of the gallery space as Mayry was hanging the show, the juxtaposition of texture, energy and flow that pours from his work culminates in a flurry of geometric and organic forms that coalesce to create artistic offerings bursting with energy and movement. In Mayry’s work, texture and the energy elicited in each brushstroke produce a sort of playfulness, but not in a childlike manner. “My process isn’t like one where I sit down [and paint]; it’s more of a physical process,” he says. “And then, [with] paint, I guess over time I became just more interested in the physicality of it. You can load up a brush with a ton of different colors or using tools like chunks of wood to scrape down or like different ways of applying paint, so then the texture obviously happens, but it also provides an outlet for different things to happen with the colors, too.” For those interested in how this process, or lack thereof, manifests itself in the canvases he creates, Mayry explains that his work is the result of what he says many would view as a nonsensical and repetitive act that ultimately leads to substance and content. And while the work he produces is unplanned, it’s not accidental, but rather a true expression of his subconscious. One of the pieces in the show, Shadow Self Tiger, fully encapsulates this notion. The canvas SubmergeMag.com

bursts to life through a combination of techniques that build movement and perspective. The tiger’s stripes form through rivers of thick layers of paint that are evocative of the canyons and valleys you might find in the artists’ hometown in the foothills of Northern California. “Compositionally, it’s set up that there’s a tiger on top of its shadow, but in reverse on the bottom, so it kind of creates this sort of hypnotic composition,” Mayry says of the piece. “I gravitate toward using tons of colors, almost in an obsessive way to where I’m using too many, so it’s almost like reconciling with the image with the amount of colors that I want to use.” The reflective theme of Shadow Self Tiger continues with the backdrop on which the tiger and its echo lay—the canvas teems with shapes that are reminiscent of the all-seeing eye, or eye of the tiger, that lures the viewer into its snare. For Mayry, who earned a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in studio art and a master’s degree in art history from California State University, Sacramento—he cites his education as an experience that had a tremendous impact on his artistic style and process—color is king. “I don’t use color straight from the tubes, so everything’s mixed—I mix one color then I can endlessly change with the others, and I just keep going,” he explains. “To that extent, I kind of have ADD about it—I just keep going until I have to reel myself in at some point because it does have to actually make sense to someone other than me.” Mayry does not shy away from allowing contradictions to emerge within his work—the energy that emerges in his visual prose is born out of a construct that combines drawing, painting and sculpture. For the artist who admittedly toggles between the realms of the figurative and the abstract, there are moments where pure form emerges within the expanse of what initially appears to be uncontrolled chaos to the naked eye. “The process is extremely up and down with how I feel about it—I might feel like it’s good one day, then I change it [the next day],” he admits. “I’m constantly going back and forth, so it’s more like getting to a place where I’m comfortable with it.” Mayry admits that while he is driven to express himself through the mode of color and texture—he says that he is drawn toward colors that are pure and true—he asserts that it’s the very nature of color to convey the beauty that operates in the visual world as well as the emotional. To Mayry, color has the power to communicate what it truly means to be alive. For an artist who is constantly exploring and pushing his artistic limits, Mayry says he learned to reject the notion of perfection and to simply allow what is inside of him to pour out onto the canvas—much like the thick, viscous rivers of color that lend form to the abstractions within his work. With an almost frenetic sense of urgency, Mayry continues to explore the nuances of his creative spirit animal. “Looking back, art has really been it for me,” he beams. “Interests come and go, but the act of making things has been my constant, and I will never leave it.” Even in abstraction, elements of the style and character of the artist’s deep inner self emerges and communicates his place and Check out Hot Fun, featuring intent in the world. Jeff Mayry’s vibrant, abstract Deeper yet is art, at JayJay Gallery (5524 the unconscious B Elvas Ave.). The show runs through Aug. 10. Admission mind—and oh, is free and you can visit what a beautiful Jayjayart.com for more info. mind Mayry has.

Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

19


MIND BLOWING NERD BURGERS

KEITH BREEDLOVE’S FAMOUS CULINERDY FOOD TRUCK TRANSFORMS INTO BRICK AND MORTAR WORDS ROBERT BERRY • PHOTOS DILLON FLOWERS

I

n less than 24 hours, I’ve eaten what may be the best hamburger and best pancakes I’ve ever had. I’m out of shape and should be on a diet, but when your editor asks you to write a review of a restaurant, and you forget about your deadline until the day it’s due, you have got to make some sacrifices. If you’re gonna cheat on your diet, you might as well cheat hard. So when I had the chance to gorge on the delights of the recently opened restaurant by Sacramento’s celebrity Chef Keith Breedlove, how could I say no? Culinerdy, the long-famous food truck that you’ve seen at

20

events throughout Sacramento for years, has opened a brick and mortar location, Culinerdy Kitchen at 524 12th St. It’s nothing short of wonderful. I strolled in about 10 minutes before their official 5 p.m. dinner service time and was greeted and sat at a table with no grief whatsoever from the servers. Located on the street of a main light rail line and not too much else of note, it’s a bit off the beaten path from the busier parts of the grid, but it’s a great spot that deserves to grow into a go-to breakfast, brunch and dinner spot. The pending alcohol permit on the front door suggests the evenings there will get even

best nerd rush I got, however, was seeing that the font on part of their dinner menu was clearly from the logo of the 1962 first issue of Marvel Comics’ Fantastic Four. Such daring to use the typeface of “The World’s Greatest Comic Magazine” to represent your

food. It was a bold risk that turned out to be well deserved. The dinner menu uses a Build-A-Bear type approach with your meal. You choose a base meal of a burger, mac and cheese, brussels sprouts or fries (any of which is available as a side, as well) and you

choose between 15 different options to dress it up. From popular styles like Cubano and a variation of banh mi called “Banh Jovi,” there are more exotic choices like “Thai peanut and bacon,” which features bacon, peanut butter, sriracha and comeback sauce (which is an amazing combo of garlic, mayo and brown sugar), or “Californication,” which is a tongue-dazzling combination of chile verde, chorizo corn, cheese sauce, fried eggs and pork rinds! I chose the burger with a side of brussels sprouts option and was not disappointed. The “Apple Bottom” burger is a work of art. Under the patty is a layer of bourbonpoached apples with bleu cheese that’s also been soaked in bourbon. The grilled onions,

more amazing as time goes on. “Nerdy Cuisine” may seem hard to understand, but don’t let that hang you up. The menu is full of some amazing breakfast, lunch and dinner options that are simply just reasonably priced, damn good comfort food with creative and gourmet ingredients that taste amazing. That’s not to say there isn’t a wonderful geeky flair throughout the place. The table I sat at was a remarkable collage of science fiction artwork, and I was given my dinner check inside of a Hardy Boys novel (The Tower Treasure, which is really one of Franklin W. Dixon’s most thrilling of the Hardy’s adventures). The

Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


comeback sauce and “nerdy slaw” add up to a fantastic taste explosion the likes of which I haven’t been as excited about since I had a strawberry and bleu cheese burger 15 years ago. The beef patty was thick and flavorful. Usually, these loaded burgers are impossible to eat with your bare hands, but after cutting a few pieces off, I went for it, and it was totally fine. The bun didn’t get bogged down with moisture, and the toppings stayed inside as I gulped it down. The kitchen definitely built this with precision. The apples, cheese, onions and beef blended together in a harmonious choir of greasy bliss in my mouth. It was as if God himself was singing to me with each bite and I didn’t want it to end. Make no mistake, this is hamburger perfection. My wife had a similar reaction with the “Earth and Brie” burger I brought her home (on a tasty gluten-free bun), which featured mushroom sauce and brie as the primary ingredients. She said, “Oh, God, this is good” three different times without prompting. That it held up so well after sitting on the table for about 20 minutes before she ate it bodes well for folks who want to order through Door Dash or Grub Hub, both of which Culinerdy Kitchen proudly uses for delivery. The brussels sprouts, which appear to be fried SubmergeMag.com

like french fries, are equally dazzling and surprisingly not very greasy. I couldn’t eat them all in one sitting, which is saying a lot, so sharing them might be a good option. If you’re not a fan of brussels sprouts, consider trying them here, anyway. I’m certain you’ve never had them like this before. I was also impressed with the plant-based burger options, which feature five different styles like one made of corn beans and mango, a broccoli artichoke burger, one made from mushrooms and faro, and a couple of cauliflower selections that look delightfully flavorful. Once I got my dinner check (in the aforementioned Hardy Boys book), it was accompanied by an adorable small white plate with a 6-inch high tower of what appeared to be freshly made delicious blue cotton candy! It was a gorgeous, sticky-sweet way to end the meal. The next morning, I showed up at 8 a.m. for breakfast, still in a daze over that amazing burger. This is where the pancakes shine. The server was attentive, quick with the coffee and charming to talk to. You can choose three classic pancakes made from the classic buttermilk or vegan, gluten-free or hoecakes (which are probably your mom’s favorite, if she likes corn, that is), so there’s nobody in your party who should feel left out unless they

hate good things. This is when it’s hard to decide, with nearly 30 varieties to choose from that are separated into categories of nuts and chocolate,” “fruits” and the adventurous “Not Typical,” which has inspired choices like ancho corn, mac and cheese, and mushroom and onion. I wasn’t baked enough to try the latter section, so I went with a butter pecan option that did not disappoint. The cakes were perfectly browned, and the smell of the fresh pecans chopped within the flaky batter hit my nose as soon as the plate hit the table. I put just a bit of butter and syrup on it, as they were so naturally sweet and wonderful anyway. I could barely finish half of them. For $10, it was a helluva meal. Fortunately, you can mix and match and choose more than one variety if you can’t make up your mind. Culinerdy Kitchen deserves to thrive and succeed. The ambiance, staff and food are excellent, and if you park on E Street around the corner, it’s pretty accessible, as there are plenty of non-metered twohour spaces to choose from.

Culinerdy Kitchen is located at 524 12th St., Sacramento. Their hours are Monday–Friday, 8 a.m.–9 p.m. You can find their menu at their website Culinerdykitchen.com

Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

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MUSIC, COMEDY & MISC. CALENDAR

JULY 17–31

SUBMERGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR

7.17 WEDNESDAY

Bar 101 Open Mic, 7:30 p.m. The Boardwalk Night Verses, Dead American, Auras, Yunger, Without Hope, 6:30 p.m. Cal Expo California State Fair: The Marshall Tucker Band, 8 p.m. The Club Car The Double Shots, 7:30 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Open Mic Night, 7:30 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Open Mic Jam, 9 p.m. Harlow’s Hot Flash Heat Wave, Tino Drima, Mediocre Cafe, 6 p.m. Holy Diver Local $5 Showcase feat. Bmall.Flair, CT Fashoski, TBA X BNB, Zack The Villain, W!SK!, 6:30 p.m. Kupros Craft House Ross Hammond, 5 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Live Blues Jam Session, 8 p.m. Momo Sacramento Bourbon & Blues: Wendy DeWitt & Kirk Harwood, Steve Freund, 6:30 p.m. Nicholson’s MusiCafe Acoustic Open Mic, 7 p.m. Old Ironsides Open Mic, 9 p.m. The Press Club Outlaw Country w/ Jereme Morgan, 9 p.m. Shine Speak Out! Sacramento, 8 p.m. Sophia’s Thai Kitchen Open Mic, 8 p.m. Streets Pub and Grub Karaoke, 9 p.m. Torch Club Kally O’ Mally, 5:30 p.m.; Jon Bartel, Matt Woods, 9 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Reggae Wednesdays w/ Hazey Autumn, 6 p.m.

Blue Lamp Velnias, Slege, Wandern, 8 p.m. Cal Expo California State Fair: Petty and the Heartshakers (Tom Petty Tribute), 8 p.m. The Club Car Songwriters Showcase, 8 p.m. Crest Theatre The Rocket Man Show (Elton John Tribute), 6 p.m. El Dorado Hills Town Center: Steven Young Amphitheater Live On The Boulevard w/ Coffey Anderson, 7 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Jerry Martini and Frank Sorci, 7 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Karaoke Night & DJ Matty B, 9:30 p.m. Fox & Goose Justis & McLane, 8 p.m. Harlow’s Terrance Simien & The Zydeco Experience, 6 p.m. Harris Center All American Concert, 7 p.m. Harveys Lake Tahoe Miranda Lambert, Randy Houser, 7:30 p.m. Holy Diver Bizzy Bone, Lil Bizzy, Bloodline Harmony, Radio Club, Ultra Violet, Chris Kash, Aye Tee, James Duer, 7 p.m. Kupros Craft House Alyssa Matson, 7 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m. Momo Sacramento Vansire, Boyo, Münechild, 6 p.m. Old Ironsides Open Acoustic Jam, 8 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Chris Scoville, 9:30 p.m. The Press Club Sneeze Attack, Taleen Kali, Mallard, Trinidad Silva, 8 p.m. Shady Lady Harley White Jr. Orchestra, 9 p.m. Shine Jazz Jam, 8 p.m. Sofia Tsakopoulos Center for the Arts @ B Street Theatre Le Vent du Nord, 7 p.m. Sophia’s Thai Kitchen Aan, Glass Bat, 7 p.m. Suite Nine Bar and Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m. Torch Club Mind X, 5:30 p.m.; Back Alley Buzzards, 9 p.m.

7.18 7.19 THURSDAY

Ace of Spades Pouya, Ramirez, Boobie Lootaveli, 7 p.m. Armadillo Music Hellgrimm, 7 p.m.

7.19

FRIDAY

Ace of Spades One Ok Rock, Weathers, 6:30 p.m.

CONCERTS IN THE PARK: SHAED Destiny Rogers, Centersight, NYTVZN, Zephyr Cesar Chavez Plaza 5 p.m.

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Armadillo Music Tanglers, 7 p.m. Bar 101 Banjo Bones, 9:30 p.m. Berryessa Brewing Co. Shakedown String Band, 5 p.m. Blue Lamp MDC, Verbal Abuse, Round Eye, Bootlegs, 8 p.m. Boeger Winery The Golden Cadillacs, 6 p.m. Capitol Garage Capitol Friday’s Reggae Night w/ DJ Veyn, 10 p.m. Cal Expo California State Fair: Sean Kingston, 8 p.m. Cesar Chavez Plaza Concerts in the Park: SHAED, Destiny Rogers, Centersight, NYTVZN, Zephyr, 5 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Vagabond Brothers Band, 9 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Plaid City, 9:30 p.m. Fox & Goose Richard March, Tim Crumb, 9 p.m. Golden Bear DJ CrookOne and Guests, 10 p.m. Goldfield Coffey Anderson, 7:30 p.m. Harlow’s The Winehouse Experience (Amy Winehouse Tribute), Christin Leonna, The Jungle, 8 p.m. Holy Diver Stick To Your Guns, Counterparts, Terror, Year of the Knife, 6 p.m. Kupros Craft House Ross Hammond, 5 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge William Mylar’s Hippie Hour, 5:30 p.m.; Tommy and Marion’s Kitchen, 9 p.m. Momo Sacramento Dead Horses, 6 p.m.; DJ JB, 10 p.m. Nicholson’s MusiCafe Open Mic Night, 7 p.m. Old Ironsides East-West North-Ish, Westerly, Sugar Beast, 8:30 p.m. On the Y Malcom Bliss, KDN, Anarchy Lace, TarVaN, 8 p.m. Opera House Saloon Teazer, 9 p.m. Palms Playhouse Barrio Manouche, 8 p.m. The Park Ultra Lounge DJ Eddie Edul, 9:30 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. Placerville Public House The Steven Graves Band, 8 p.m. Powerhouse Pub WonderBread 5, 10 p.m. The Press Club DJ Rue, 9 p.m. Red Hawk Casino Rock Monsterz, 9:30 p.m. SacYard Community Tap House Intuitive Compass, 6:30 p.m.

Shady Lady Joe Mazzafero, 9 p.m. Sophia’s Thai Kitchen Latin Night: 7th Anniversary Party, 9:30 p.m. Suite Nine Bar and Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m. Swabbies on the River 3rd Friday Reggae w/ Mykal Rose, 6 p.m. Torch Club Jereme Greene, 5:30 p.m.; Kara Grainger, 9 p.m. Tower Brewing Toree Mcgee & David Karacozoff, 7 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co . The Bartabs, 6 p.m.

7.20 SATURDAY

Ace of Spades Andre Nickatina, Mahtie Bush, DJ Nocturnal, Ledreagle, 7 p.m. Armadillo Music Colourshop, 1 p.m. Bar 101 The Stormcasters, 9:30 p.m. Berryessa Brewing Co. Boca Do Rio, 3 p.m. Blue Lamp Xzani (Album Release), 9 p.m. Cal Expo California State Fair: Joe Nichols, 8 p.m. Crawdads On The River Remix, 7 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Code Blue Band, 9 p.m. The Fig Tree Open Mic, 7 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Mach 5, 9:30 p.m. Fox & Goose Honeypower, Alex Walker, John Conley, 9 p.m. Goldfield Nate Smith, 8 p.m. Harlow’s Ward Davis, Clint Park, 8 p.m. Holy Diver Black Pistol Fire, Thunderpussy, 6 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m. Momo Sacramento Dikembe, Pool Kids, Soft Nerve, 6 p.m. Nicholson’s MusiCafe Ukulele SingAlong, 11:30 a.m.; Free Ukulele Class, 1 p.m.; Jason Bennett, 6 p.m. Old Ironsides Lipstick w/ DJs Roger Carpio & Shaun Slaughter, 9 p.m. Opera House Saloon Kenny Frye Band, 9:30 p.m. Palms Playhouse Peter Case, 7:30 p.m. The Park Ultra Lounge DJ Eddie Edul, 9:30 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. Placerville Public House Amanda Gray, 8 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Alex Vincent Band, 10 p.m. The Press Club DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9 p.m. Red Hawk Casino The Spazmatics, 10 p.m. Revival at the Sawyer Encore w/ Guest DJs, 9:30 p.m.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

>>

7.20

XZANI (ALBUM RELEASE) Blue Lamp 9 p.m. Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

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The Shack 50 Watt Heavy, 5:30 p.m. Shady Lady Reggie Graham, 9 p.m. Shine Free Candy, Short Trip, Sofo, 8 p.m. Sophia’s Thai Kitchen The Charities, 9:30 p.m. Suite Nine Bar and Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m. Swabbies on the River Hot For Teacher (Van Halen Tribute), 1 p.m.; The New Crowns, 3 p.m.; Long Time (Boston Tribute), 6 p.m. Torch Club Loose Engines, 5:30 p.m.; Peter Petty & His Double P Revue, 9 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. The New Crowns, Manual the Band, 6 p.m.

7.21

7.25

SARAH SHOOK & THE DISARMERS JonEmery Goldfield 7:30 p.m.

SUNDAY

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SPOTLIGHTS

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SLOUGH FEG

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CATTLE MUTILATION: THE MUSICAL!

WITH XORCIST

AUG 3 HORSENECK, VAMPYRE, NMTA 8 PM

WEDNESDAY

DROP DEAD RED JULY 30 VELVICKS, ABANDON THEORY 8 PM THURSDAY

DJS CHAT NOIR & DIRE

PERFECT STRANGERS SHOWCASE WITH E-MONEY GL PATE, VAN B, BRUTHA SMITH + MORE

9 PM

9 PM

8 PM

AUG 4

FRIDAY

JULY 27

CLUB SÉANCE

(RECORD RELEASE PARTY)

JULY 26 ROCDAMIC SHOWCASE SATURDAY

FRIDAY

AUG 2

8 PM

AUG 7

SANHEDRIN

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8 PM

IMPERIAL TRIUMPHANT, TIMES OF DESPERATION

THURSDAY

BLUE OAKS

8 PM

ROA BROTHERS BAND

FRIDAY

SPANKY’S ELECTROSWING SOIRÉE

AUG 8 PEYOTE UGLY, JOSIAH GATHING, AUG 9 9 PM

THURSDAY

AUG 15

DANCING, LIVE MUSIC, BOOZE, LIVE MUSIC, PLUS DJ KING LI

THE BELLWETHER SYNDICATE

8 PM

AUTUMN, CAROLINE BLIND, DJ CHAT NOIR

SUNDAY

LUCIFER

AUG 18 8 PM

HAUNT, OLDER SUN

Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

Berryessa Brewing Co. The Twilight Drifters, 3 p.m. Blue Lamp Joseph Huber, Zach Kincaid, 8 p.m. Blue Note Brewing Co. Sunday Sessions Live w/ Roadhouse 5, 3 p.m. The Boardwalk BillyBio (of Biohazard), Aggressive Dogs, Cutthroat, 6:30 p.m. Cal Expo California State Fair: Mariachi Vargas, 8 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Gene Barnett, 12 p.m. Elkhorn Country Saloon Four Fit Band, 2 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Acoustic Sundaze w/ Amanda Gray, 3 p.m. Goldfield The Aquadolls, 7:30 p.m. Harlow’s Dressy Bessy, Potty Mouth, Colleen Green, 6 p.m. Holy Diver Smrtdeath, LiL Lotus, Guccihighwaters, 6 p.m. LowBrau Throwback Jams w/ DJ Epik & Special Guests, 9:30 p.m. Midtown BarFly Factor IX w/ DJ Bryan Hawk, DJ CarnieRobber and Guests, 9 p.m. Momo Sacramento It Looks Sad., Derek Ted, The Bahama Investigation Team, 6 p.m. On the Y Schwach, Knocked Down, Attack of the Hooligans, 8 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Coco Montoya, 3 p.m. The Press Club Sunday Night Soul Party w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9 p.m. Red Hawk Casino Flat Busted, 1 p.m. Red Museum Sacramento Audio Waffle: Entitlements, Overdose the Kataonic, Infinexhuma, Collapsist, Flame Thrower Ignitor, Of This Earth, 12 p.m. Shady Lady Alex Jenkins, 9 p.m. Suite Nine Bar and Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m. Sutter Creek Provisions Darin Sexton & HWY 49 Band, 3 p.m. Swabbies on the River Amador Sons, 1 p.m.; Buck Ford, 3 p.m. Torch Club Blues Jam, 4 p.m.; Front the Band, 8 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Cider for a Cause: Loaves & Fishes Fundraiser w/ Live Music & Food, 1 p.m.

7.22 MONDAY

Armadillo Music Schwach, Sick Burn, 7 p.m. Blue Lamp Perfect Strangers Showcase feat. EMoney, GL Pate, Van B, Brutha Smith, Renegade and More, 8 p.m. Cal Expo California State Fair: The Boys of Summer (Eagles Tribute), 8 p.m. Fox & Goose Open Mic Night, 7:30 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m.

LowBrau Motown on Monday’s w/ DJ Epik, 9 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Nebraska Mondays, 7:30 p.m. Old Ironsides Heath Williamson & Friends, 5:30 p.m. Shady Lady Roselit Bone, 9 p.m. Tower Brewing Open Mic Night, 6:30 p.m.

Streets Pub and Grub Karaoke, 9 p.m. Torch Club JT Lawrence, 5:30 p.m.; Madisons, 9 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Reggae Wednesdays w/ The Higher Logic Project, DJ Murti, 6 p.m.

.25 7 7.23 THURSDAY

TUESDAY

Ace of Spades Panteon Rococo, La Noche Oskura, 7 p.m. Cal Expo California State Fair: 38 Special, 8 p.m. Harlow’s The Appleseed Cast, Young Jesus, 7 p.m. Holy Diver Spose, Bensbeendead, 7 p.m. Kupros Craft House Kyle Rowland, 5 p.m.; Open Mic, 7 p.m. Momo Sacramento FEA, Bruiser Queen, Las Pulgas, 7 p.m. Old Ironsides Karaoke, 9 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Live Band Karaoke, 8 p.m. Sofia Tsakopoulos Center for the Arts @ B Street Theatre Mandy Harvey, 8:30 p.m. Torch Club Scott McConaha, 5:30 p.m.; Blueberry Open Jazz Jam w/ The Ice Age Jazztet, 8 p.m.

7.24 WEDNESDAY

Bar 101 Open Mic, 7:30 p.m. Cal Expo California State Fair: We Are Messengers, 8 p.m. The Club Car The Double Shots, 7:30 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Open Mic Night, 7:30 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Open Mic Jam, 9 p.m. Goldfield Wood & Wire, 7 p.m. Kupros Craft House Ross Hammond, 5 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Live Blues Jam Session, 8 p.m. Momo Sacramento Bourbon & Blues: Studebaker John & The Hawks, 5:30 p.m. MontBleu Resort Casino Hinder, 8 p.m. Nicholson’s MusiCafe Acoustic Open Mic, 7 p.m. Old Ironsides Open Mic, 9 p.m. The Press Club Emo Night, 8 p.m. Shady Lady Mathew Major, 9 p.m. Shine Sacramento Songwriter Circle Showcase w/ Stereo RV, So Much Light, Seth Kaminsky, Heather Evans, Marco Robledo, 7 p.m. Sophia’s Thai Kitchen Open Mic, 8 p.m.

Blue Lamp The Atom Age, Nobody’s Baby, 8 p.m. Cal Expo California State Fair: California Surf Inc. (Beach Boys Tribute), 8 p.m. The Club Car Songwriters Showcase, 8 p.m. Crocker Art Museum Wayne Wallace Latin Jazz Quartet, 6:30 p.m. El Dorado Hills Town Center: Steven Young Amphitheater Live On The Boulevard w/ Beatles & Stones Experience, 7 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Tim Dierkes, 7 p.m.; DJ Uncle Hank, 9 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Karaoke Night & DJ Matty B, 9:30 p.m. Fox & Goose Jigo, 8 p.m. Golden 1 Center Hella Summer feat. YG, Tyga, Kid Ink, DJ Mustard, Saweetie, Bryce Vine, Gashi, A.CHAL, 6 p.m. Goldfield Sarah Shook & the Disarmers, JonEmery, 7:30 p.m. Harlow’s Madi Sipes & the Painted Blue, RIVVRS, Animals in the Attic, Cugino, 7 p.m. Holy Diver Local $5 Showcase feat. Mourning Mountains, City Mural, The Viles, Mid October, The Almanac, 6:30 p.m. Kupros Craft House Joseph Kojima Gray, 7 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m. Old Ironsides The Weekend: A Prequel w/ DJ Streams, 8 p.m. Palms Playhouse Jason Eady, 7:30 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Michael Beck, 9:30 p.m. The Press Club The Enlows (Album Release), The O’Mulligans, Grimetime, Sumdood, 8 p.m. Shine Jazz Jam, 8 p.m. Suite Nine Bar and Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m. Torch Club Mind X, 5:30 p.m.; City of Trees Brass Band, 9 p.m.

7.26 FRIDAY

Ace of Spades Crown the Empire, Attila, Veil of Maya, Gideon, Hawk, 5 p.m.

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


Bar 101 Dylan Crawford, 9:30 p.m. Blue Lamp RocDaMic Showcase feat. Lil Tan (Mixtape Release) and More, 8 p.m. The Boardwalk Shades of Pink Floyd (Pink Floyd Tribute), 7 p.m. Boeger Winery Patrick Walsh, 6 p.m. Cafe Colonial CBGB Tribute Show, 8 p.m. Cal Expo California State Fair: Tony! Toni! Toné!, 8 p.m. Capitol Garage Capitol Friday’s Reggae Night w/ DJ Veyn, 10 p.m. Cesar Chavez Plaza Concerts in the Park: Vista Kicks, ONOFF, For the Kids, A Summer Alive, DJ Nocturnal, 5 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Undercover 209, 9 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Four Barrel, 9:30 p.m. Fox & Goose Sugarbeast, Penwin, Dean Haakenson, 9 p.m. Golden Bear DJ CrookOne and Guests, 10 p.m. Goldfield Read Southall Band, Brotherly Mud, 7:30 p.m. Harlow’s School of Rock AllStars, 6 p.m. Harris Center The SteelDrivers, 8 p.m. Holy Diver Ideateam, What Rough Beast, The Big Poppies, Butterworth, 6:30 p.m. Kupros Craft House Ross Hammond, 5 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge William Mylar’s Hippie Hour, 5:30 p.m.; Badd Self, 9 p.m. Nicholson’s MusiCafe Open Mic Night, 7 p.m. Old Ironsides Nova Sutro, Never For Naught, Waves of Distortion, John Rodriguez, 8 p.m. Opera House Saloon The Simms, 9 p.m. Palms Playhouse Chris Smither, 7:30 p.m. The Park Ultra Lounge DJ Shift, DJ Eddie Edul, 9:30 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. Placerville Public House Alex Vincent, 8 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Neon Playboys, 10 p.m. The Press Club DJ Rue, 9 p.m. Red Hawk Casino Clean Slate, 9:30 p.m. SacYard Community Tap House Burning Daylight People, 6:30 p.m. Shady Lady Sour Diesel, 9 p.m. Suite Nine Bar and Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m. Swabbies on the River Nathan Owens’ Pop, Rock and Soul: The Magic of the Motown Era, 6 p.m. Thunder Valley Casino Resort Big & Rich, Gone West, Colbie Caillat, Rachel Steele, Cowboy Troy, DJ Sinister, 6:30 p.m. Torch Club Jimmy Pailer, 5:30 p.m.; Big Sticky Mess, Boca Do Rio, 9 p.m. Toyota Amphitheatre Rascal Flatts, Morgan Evans, Jordan Davis, 7:30 p.m. The Village @ Sacramento Gateway Bobby Zoppi and The Corduroys, 6 p.m.

Cal Expo California State Fair: Journey Revisited, 8 p.m. CLARA Auditorium Sacto Unplugged: Brotherly Mud, The Loose Threads, 8:30 p.m. The Colony MDL, World Peace, Sick Burn, Fuming, Good Shit, DuranxDuran, 7 p.m. Crawdads On The River Locked N Loaded, 3 p.m. Elkhorn Country Saloon Jim Hunter & Simpson Creek Band, 6 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Sock Monkey, 9 p.m. The Fig Tree Open Mic, 7 p.m. Fox & Goose Ify Yellow, Ayotunde Ikuku, Velvetwavez, Kaliforniacation, 9 p.m. Goldfield Shane Smith & the Saints, 7:30 p.m. Harlow’s Cam’ron, JT Blaze, Diamond Dez, Doe the Unknown, 8 p.m. Holy Diver Among the First, Failure By Proxy, NMTA, LionCourt, Preacher, 6:30 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m. Momo Sacramento The Mindful (Album Release), 6:30 p.m. Nicholson’s MusiCafe Ukulele SingAlong, 11:30 a.m.; Free Ukulele Class, 1 p.m.; RealLife, 6 p.m. Old Ironsides Cities You Wish You Were From, Mastoids, Duke Evers, 9 p.m. Opera House Saloon Ariel Jean Band, 9 p.m. The Park Ultra Lounge DJ Peeti-V, 9:30 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. Placerville Public House Frankie and the Defenders, 8 p.m. Powerhouse Pub 8 Track Massacre, 10 p.m. The Press Club DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9 p.m. Raley Field Steel Breeze, 10 p.m. Revival at the Sawyer Encore w/ Guest DJs, 9 p.m. The Shack The Schwamigos, 5:30 p.m. Shady Lady Bap Notes, 9 p.m. The Side Door Julie Meyers & Stan Read, 7 p.m. Suite Nine Bar and Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m. Swabbies on the River Superbad, 1 p.m.; Backstage Pass, 3 p.m.; Night Moves & Creedence Classic Revival, 6:30 p.m. Thunder Valley Casino Resort Styx, Night Ranger, 7 p.m. Torch Club Dey Trippers, 5:30 p.m.; ZuhG, Mookatite, 9 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Knock Knock, Arts & Leisure, The Comedians, Coast Office, 6 p.m. VFW (Fair Oaks) Potbelly, Pisscat, Jesus & the Dinosaurs, Banger, Dead Is Better, 8 p.m. Yolo County Fairgrounds Midnight Mass: The Goddamn Gallows, Outlaw Inlaws, Motor City Riot, Hillbilly Royale, The Cantaliers and More, 12 p.m.

Midtown BarFly Factor IX w/ DJ Bryan Hawk, DJ CarnieRobber and Guests, 9 p.m. Pine Cove Karaoke, 9 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Shana Morrison, 3 p.m. The Press Club Sunday Night Soul Party w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9 p.m. Red Hawk Casino Cash Prophets, 1 p.m. Shady Lady Peter Petty, 9 p.m. Sofia Tsakopoulos Center for the Arts @ B Street Theatre Guitar Masters: Andy McKee, Mike Dawes, Trevor Gordon Hall, Calum Graham, 7 p.m. Suite Nine Bar and Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m. Swabbies on the River Pato Banton, 12:30 p.m.; Garratt Wilkin & The Parrotheads, 3 p.m. Torch Club Blues Jam, 4 p.m.; Front the Band, 8 p.m. Tower Brewing Bluegrass Jam w/ Blue Mountain Quartet, 1 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Grateful Sunday Hosted by Todd Gardner, 6 p.m. William Curtis Park Music in the Park: Dr. Rock & The Stuff, 6 p.m.

7.29 MONDAY

Fox & Goose Open Mic Night, 7:30 p.m. Holy Diver Bobaflex, Artifas, Breaking Solace, No Sympathy, Heroes To Ashes, 6:30 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Karaoke, 9 p.m. LowBrau Motown on Monday’s w/ DJ Epik, 9 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Nebraska Mondays, 7:30 p.m. Old Ironsides Heath Williamson & Friends, 5:30 p.m. Tower Brewing Open Mic Night, 6:30 p.m.

7.30 TUESDAY

Blue Lamp Drop Dead Red, Velvicks, 8 p.m. Holy Diver Grizfolk, Laura Jean Anderson, me&you, 7 p.m. Kupros Craft House Scott McConaha, 5 p.m.; Open Mic, 7 p.m. Old Ironsides Karaoke, 9 p.m. Powerhouse Pub Live Band Karaoke, 8 p.m. Torch Club Matt Rainey and the Dippin’ Sauce, 5:30 p.m.; Dylan Crawford, 8 p.m.

7.31 7.28 7.27 WEDNESDAY

SUNDAY

SATURDAY

Ace of Spades Jana Kramer, Elana Jane, 7 p.m. Armadillo Music Hannah Judson, 7 p.m. Bar 101 Garage Openers, 9:30 p.m. Berryessa Brewing Co. Matt Rainey, 3 p.m. Blue Lamp Fever! 5 Year Disco Cancer Benefit feat. Swingkidd, Andy Cruz, Todd Hurley, Sugar D, 9 p.m. The Boardwalk Control, Divine Blend, Arminius, 7 p.m. Cafe Colonial Rinona Wyder, The Rebel Holocrons, Sitting & Waiting, Freature, 7:30 p.m.

SubmergeMag.com

Ace of Spades Girls Rock Sacramento Presents Teen Camp Showcase w/ Sad Girlz Club, Ruby Jaye, 11 a.m. Armadillo Music Hannah Cooper, 2 p.m. Blue Note Brewing Co. Sunday Sessions Live w/ Ghost Town Rebellion, 3 p.m. Cal Expo California State Fair: Martina McBride, 8 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Austin Payne, 12 p.m. Folsom Hotel Saloon Acoustic Sundaze w/ Taylor Chicks, 3 p.m. Harlow’s The Beths, Girl Friday, Aerial View, 7 p.m. LowBrau Throwback Jams w/ DJ Epik & Special Guests, 9:30 p.m.

Bar 101 Open Mic, 7:30 p.m. The Boardwalk Seconds Ago, Endings, 7 p.m. The Club Car The Double Shots, 7:30 p.m. El Dorado Saloon Open Mic Night, 7:30 p.m. Kupros Craft House Ross Hammond, 5 p.m. Louie’s Cocktail Lounge Live Blues Jam Session, 8 p.m. Momo Sacramento Bourbon & Blues: Lisa Phenix Band, 5:30 p.m. Nicholson’s MusiCafe Acoustic Open Mic, 7 p.m. Old Ironsides Open Mic, 9 p.m. Sophia’s Thai Kitchen Open Mic, 8 p.m.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

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>> Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

25


Streets Pub and Grub Karaoke, 9 p.m. Torch Club Josh Hoyer & Soul Colossal, 9 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Reggae Wednesdays w/ The Lambsbread, Strange Matter, 6 p.m.

Comedy Folsom Hotel Saloon Standup Saloon Hosted by Jason Anderson, Mondays, 8 p.m. Laughs Unlimited Say It Loud Comedy Show w/ Michael Calvin Jr., Jerry Law, Tatiana, Marcus Parker, Javon Whitlock, July 18, 8 p.m. JR DeGuzman feat. G King, Hosted by Ian Levy, July 19 - 21, Fri. & Sat., 8 & 10:30 p.m.; Sun., 7 p.m. High Brow Humor w/ DJ Sandhu, Anna Valenzuela, Liz Stone and More, July 24, 8 p.m.

Swizz Comedy Presents: Lance Woods, Marcus Mangham, Hosted by Chris Smith, July 25, 8 p.m. Erik Knowles feat. James Schrader, Hosted by Ta’Vi, July 26 - 28, Fri. & Sat., 8 & 10:30 p.m.; Sun., 7 p.m. The Young OG Comedy Show w/ Lewis Belt & Teddy Ray, July 31, 8:30 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Open Mic Comedy w/ Hosts Jaime Fernandez and Michael Cella, Tuesdays, 8 p.m. Nicholson’s MusiCafe Open Mic Comedy Night, Mondays, 7 p.m. On the Y Open Mic Comedy w/ Guest Hosts, Thursdays, 8:30 p.m. Punch Line Sacramento Comedy Showcase, July 17, 8 p.m. Andrew Santino feat. Ali Macofsky, Hosted by Clay Newman, July 18 20, Thurs., 8 p.m.; Fri. & Sat., 7:30 & 9:45 p.m.

Sactown Comedy Jam w/ Guest Oliver Graves, July 21, 7:30 p.m. Earthquake, July 25 - 27, Thurs., 8 p.m.; Fri. & Sat., 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Invisible Disabilities Comedy Show w/ Nina G, Emma Haney, Amber Whitford and More, July 28, 7:30 p.m. Zack Fox, July 31, 8 p.m. Sacramento Comedy Spot Open Mic, Sunday’s and Mondays, 8 p.m. Improv Taste Test and Harold Night, Wednesdays, 7 - 10 p.m. Cage Match and Improv Jam, Thursdays, 8 - 10 p.m. Anti-Cooperation League, Saturdays, 9 p.m. STAB! Comedy Theater Comedy Open Mic, Thursdays, 9 p.m. STAB! Podcast Panel Show, Fridays, 10 p.m. Late Week Leftovers Open Mic, Sundays, 8 p.m. Tommy T’s Stay Silly Comedy w/ O.J. Young, Imin Love, Elisia Gonzales, Aja Mae, Chris Smith and More, July 18, 7:30 p.m. Kountry Wayne, July 19 - 20, Fri., 7:30 & 10:15 p.m.; Sat., 7 & 9:45 p.m. Javon Whitlock & Michael Calvin Jr, July 21, 6 p.m. Billy Sorrells, July 26 - 27, Fri., 7:30 & 10:15 p.m.; Sat., 7 & 9:45 p.m.

Misc.

JULY 18-20 ANDREW SANTINO Ali Macofsky, Clay Newman Punch Line

1409 Del Paso Blvd. Uptown Market on the Boulevard, Saturdays, 12 - 5 p.m. 8th and W Streets Certified Farmers Market, Sundays, 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. 20th Street (Between J and L) Midtown Farmers Market, Saturdays, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

2710 R St. Light.wav 2019 - Tech Art Showcase, July 19 - 20, 7 p.m. B Street Theatre at The Sofia Tsakopoulos Center for the Arts Mainstage Series: The Last Match, July 23 - Sept. 1 Barrio Cafe Barrio Maker’s Mart, July 27, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Blue Cue Trivia Night, Wednesdays, 9 p.m. The Boxing Donkey Trivia Night, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. California State Capitol: West Steps Sacramento National Dance Day, July 27, 8:30 - 11:30 a.m. Capitol Garage Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, Wednesdays, 8:30 p.m. Dinner and a Drag Show, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. Cesar Chavez Plaza SacTown Michelada Bash, July 27, 1 p.m. Colonial Theatre The Love Horror Short Film Festival, July 20, 6 p.m. Country Club Plaza Certified Farmers Market, Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Crest Theatre 2019 Sacramento Japanese Film Festival, July 19 - 21 Crocker Art Museum Arte Extraordinario: Recent Acquisitions, Through Aug. 18 Big Ideas: Richard Jackson’s Alleged Paintings, Through Aug. 25 Crooked Lane Brewing Co. Trivia Night, Wednesdays, 6 p.m. Elk Grove Regional Park Strauss Festival of Elk Grove, July 25 - 28, 8:15 p.m. Florin Road & 65th Street Certified Farmers Market, Thursdays, 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Fox & Goose Pub Quiz, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Gardenland Park Screen on the Green: Into the Spiderverse, July 27, 8 p.m.

7.18

CREATIVITY+ PLAY W/ GRACE LOESCHER AND NICK BRUNNER Warehouse Artist Lofts 5:30 p.m.

Glenn Hall Park Screen on the Green: Into the Spiderverse, July 26, 8 p.m. Harlow’s The Darling Clementines Variety Show Presents: Chacha’s Pajama Party B-Day Bash, July 26, 9:30 p.m. Highwater The Trivia Factory, Mondays, 7 p.m. Historic Old Folsom Farmers Market, Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Kupros Craft House Triviology, Sundays, 7:30 p.m. Lincoln Village Community Park Party in the Park, July 19, 5:30 p.m. Luna’s Cafe Poetry Unplugged, Thursdays, 8 p.m. McClatchy Park Oak Park Farmers Market, Saturdays, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Midtown BarFly Salsa Lessons, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.

Streets Pub and Grub Pub Trivia, Sundays, 8 p.m. Strikes Unlimited (Rocklin) Let’s Get Quzzical: Trivia Game Show Experience, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Sunrise Light Rail Station Certified Farmers Market, Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. The Sutter District Sacratomato Week, July 22 - 28 Tower Brewing Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Two Rivers Cider Co. Cribbage Night, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Trivia Night, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Village Park Movies in the Park: Hotel Transylvania 3, July 19, 7 p.m. Warehouse Artist Lofts Creativity+ Play w/ Grace Loescher and Nick Brunner, July 18, 5:30 p.m. Yolo Brewing Co. Trivia Night, Tuesdays, 6 p.m.

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LITTLE &BOUTIQUE RELICS GALLERIA LITTLE Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

1111 24th St. #103

Midtown Sacramento 95816

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Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


LIVE<< REWIND

Max and Scott Carpenter

ONE LAST HOOT! Kai Kln

OWLFEST VIII

Blue Mountain Event Center, Wilseyville June 28–30 WORDS & PHOTOS PAUL PIAZZA

It’s not easy running your own music festival. There can be a multitude of challenges, including planning, logistics and scheduling, along with finding the most suitable venue for the event. When you factor in that it will be a weekend campout that involves families with children, things bump up another challenge level. Owlfest started out as a fun idea to involve local musicians, their friends, and families but eventually became too much work for even the most dedicated. Thus, as the eighth annual Owlfest approached, it was pegged to be the final one. The festival, which was started by longtime local musical collaborators and friends Scott Carpenter and Nathan Kingham of the band MAU, began as a labor of love, but running an annual festival eventually became too much work. “The goal of the festival was for it to be a fan fest when we started it,” said Carpenter recently. “But over time, it had become an ‘owlbatross.’ I have loved doing this, but every year afterward I will be wiped out for a month.” If this year’s festival was the last one, it sure went out with a hoot. The musicians were on point, the festival location and weather were beautiful and there was an amazing spirit of friendship and camaraderie. In all, 450 people attended, which was the festival’s largest turnout in its history. That’s pretty solid for a homegrown family music gathering. SubmergeMag.com

The first Owlfest was held on private property in Gardnerville, Nevada, and the next six were at Toney’s Mountain Golf in Nevada City, California. For its final year, a new location was required due to renovations being done at Toney’s. The latest venue was Blue Mountain Event Cente in Wilseyville, California, which is about 90 minutes outside of Sacramento, just off the road heading toward Kirkwood. The spacious campground, nestled in a small valley, has a rustic ranch look and a stream that winds around its perimeter. Add a funky barn with room for a stage on each side, a near perfect weather forecast and a staff who were very helpful, and the optics were just about perfect. “Blue Mountain was so much more than I thought it would be,” said Carpenter. Afterward, most of the campers agreed. Many were seen enjoying a dip in the stream during the day’s heat or huddling around the huge campfires that the venue host maintained during the late evening chill. While all of this was great, it’s music that was the main reason for this gathering. Owlfest VIII had a solid lineup. Sacramento legends Kai Kln, whose members played in a variety of other bands at the festival, were the main attraction on Saturday night. The band, who rarely perform together these days, reunited for the event and delivered a blistering midnight set that had the entire campground rocking late into the night and buzzing well into

the next day. This set was a couple scorching hours of music that people will remember for years to come. On Friday the closer was Trikome, whose set featured a marriage proposal. The weekend lineup also had The Bongo Furys, Watt Ave. Soul Giants and many others, including splinter bands of the Kai Kln family such as Dutch, Gene Smith Lives and drummer Neil Franklin’s set with Ross Hammond. Kai Kln’s Sherman Loper is also the guitarist for MAU, who played a pair of great sets. It was not uncommon to see musicians from the different groups popping up onstage with each other throughout the weekend. Another set that stood out during the weekend was young Max Carpenter, Scott’s son, who is a 17-year-old guitar prodigy. The youngster is in a Mark Knopfler phase, and he showed up decked

The Vintage Find

out in the guitarist’s look, complete with a western-stylized shirt and headband. But what knocked everyone out was Max’s welldeveloped skills, which didn’t utilize a pick and involved a plucking technique that heavily utilized thumb, index and middle fingers. “This year was the culmination of everything he has absorbed over the past seven years of Owlfest, meeting all of these musicians and scratching their brains and trying to see what he could glean from their knowledge,” said Max’s proud father, who was his son’s drummer during the set. Naturally, as the festival was nearing its close on Sunday, people were secretly hoping that it really wasn’t the last one. Hannah Jane Kile brought everyone together for a big singalong before things closed out and emotions ran high as everyone knew this was the final set.

“Everything this weekend was everything it was supposed to be,” said Carpenter. “When we started out, I was just flying by the seat of my pants. I now have a better idea of how I’d want to run a festival if I ever did it all over again, but there will definitely not be another Owlfest.” While the hooting has been put to rest, and there is nothing concrete planned for the future, Carpenter hinted that he may undertake a new festival in a couple of years. In the meantime, the music won’t stop. One is almost certain to continue to find almost all of these musicians of all ages making music all over town, whether at formal gigs, casual midweek jams or noodling in the garage or on the porch. And you might catch others daydreaming about that killer midnight set by Kai Kln and hoping that they’ll reunite once more.

Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

27


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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


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SUN SEPTEMBER 1 • 7PM

FLIGHT MONGOOSE

FRI SEPTEMBER 6 • 7PM

AUG 1: CATHEDRAL HILLS AUG 17: THE FADED SHOW AUG 2O: ROD WAVE SEPT 7: MELVINS/ REDD KROSS SEPT 1O: WARBRINGER/ ENFORCER SEPT 11: MORGXN SEPT 12: GRIM REAPER SEPT 13: HAIL THE SUN SEPT 16: MILLENCOLIN SEPT 18: (HED) P.E. SEPT 27: DESPISED ICON SEPT 28: JACK RUSSELL’S GREAT WHITE OCT 3: CHARLY BLISS OCT 9: ASHE

OCT 12: IMMOLATION OCT 15: WHITE REAPER OCT 2O: D.R.I. OCT 21: ALIEN WEAPONRY OCT 24: AT THE GATES OCT 25: MICHALE GRAVES OCT 29: KERO KERO BONITO NOV 12: HELMET NOV 16: STRUNG OUT / THE CASUALTIES NOV 18: ICON FOR HIRE NOV 23: NILE DEC 9: DEFEATER DEC 2O: SHORTIE / LONG DRIVE HOME FEB 14: ROSS THE BOSS APR 22: POWERGLOVE

Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

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THE SHALLOW END Welcome to the upside down. Just kidding. It’s just me. Mollie. I’m taking over this week, just like Stranger Things took over my Fourth of July. Did you guys have a great Fourth? I hope so. I used to get really into going to house parties/BBQs in Midtown, watching block party fireworks and drinking sangria while wearing the tackiest red, white and blue outfit I could scavenge from Walmart. But these days, I’d say I’m feeling a particular malaise toward the good ‘ol USA. I feel like Americans come with an asterisk now. I’m sure I’m not the only one. I just started watching a limited series on HBO called Years and Years, which is a British show depicting the anxieties and joys of a family over the span of 15 years, starting in 2019. I was immediately drawn into the Black Mirror sensibilities of this show (in fact, I spotted a few choice actors

“WELCOME TO HAWKINS: LET’S MAKE MONSTERS SCARY AGAIN”

who starred in their own digitally upsetting Black Mirror episodes) —and then I quickly realized the villain of the show was not (solely) the future of a digital society, but rather, a tyrannical/moronic/sexist leader we all know so well. Especially for his Twitter feed. The United States strikes fear in the hearts of the British family when they send a missile over the ocean. I haven’t watched the next episode, but I’m guessing nothing good comes from that. Now, I don’t know about you, but watching a show where the reality and probability of disaster is a very likely scenario when your country is run by a raving lunatic is scarier than anything Stephen King could muster. (On a side note, you should follow Stephen King on Twitter; he is really good at political ribbing.) We’re all just having to sit around and brace for impact. And hope that the rest of the world

T FRIDAY,

JULY 19 -

SUNDAY

JULY 21

FRIDAY,

JULY 26

SUNDAY,

JULY 28

FRIDAY,

AUG 16 +

SATURDAY,

AUG 17

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INS HAWK E I L L MO JAMES BARONE jb@submergemag.com

knows that most of us can’t stand That Guy. Remember when horror was ghosts, poltergeists and demons on a mission to steal your soul? Yeah, me too. Those were the days. So it hit me like a wall of bricks the other day when I was trying to figure out why everyone is obsessed with Stranger Things. Aside from the fact that it is the epitome of ‘80s nostalgia, has a cast of characters that you wish you were when you were that age and an uncanny ability to make you want to buy Eggos—the bad guy in the show isn’t human. But it’s still less scary than reality. Isn’t it sad that true horror is plausible real life now? So, while we all wait to get obliterated because our country is being run by a giant baby man with tiny fists, let’s talk about Stranger Things. (No spoilers, I promise.) First of all, I am totally biased. My last

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SACRAMENTO JAPANESE FILM FESTIVAL FOR MORE INFORMATION SACJAPANESEFILMFESTIVAL.NET

PRETTY IN PINK

STARRING MOLLY RINGWALD, ANDREW MCCARTHY & JON CRYER

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name is the name of the town (Hawkins) — so you bet your Steve-and-Nancy-loving ass that I have purchased every T-shirt, coffee mug, sticker and random tchotchke depicting the name “Hawkins, Indiana.” I’m making up for all those personalized magnets and keychains I never got as a kid—because almost no one spells “Molly” with an “ie.” Yeah, I’m bitter, and I bet there are a few Ashlies, Brittanies and Tonies out there who feel me on this one. But Hawkins, Indiana, is a place I’d like to visit, given the chance. They have a cool mall. A lot of scientific breakthroughs. The people seem nice enough. Donald Trump doesn’t exist in any meaningful way. I’ll take a Demogorgon over that guy. Anybody with me?

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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

Dive Into Sacramento & Its Surrounding Areas


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Issue 296 • July 17 – July 31, 2019

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DIVE INTO SACRAMENTO & ITS SURROUNDING AREAS

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Profile for Submerge Magazine

Submerge Magazine: Issue 296 (July 17 - 31, 2019)  

Issue 296 of Submerge features interviews with Vista Kicks, who headline Concerts in the Park's closing event on July 26, and will also open...

Submerge Magazine: Issue 296 (July 17 - 31, 2019)  

Issue 296 of Submerge features interviews with Vista Kicks, who headline Concerts in the Park's closing event on July 26, and will also open...

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