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‘Alive’ ISSUE No.9


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All issues are contributor-based and loosely revolve around different themes. Contributions in any shape or form are always welcome. For more information: stylocontributions@gmail.com facebook.com/stylozine instagram.com/stylomagazine stylomagazine.tumblr.com

Photo by Andie Phillips

STYLO is an online magazine based in Perth, Australia.

EDITED BY ANDIE PHILLIPS COVER ART BY ALEX SEDANO

No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission. Issue Nine |


Foreword

Well, what a shitstorm 2016 has been so far. Not only is there now a deep Prince-shaped void in our hearts, but we’ve also seen the return of Pauline Hanson, had to endure the mindless ramblings of Donald Trump, and will soon bear witness to the UK exiting the EU. I don’t have any idea what is in store for the final months of this year, but hopefully we don’t get any more nasty shocks to add to further conviction that this world is indeed going crazy. I apologise for the bleak preamble and I have certainly tried my best to find the silver lining to give this piece an optimistic spin, but for the moment I feel frustrated and growingly disheartened.

WORWOWORDS BY ANDIE PHILLIPS

IN THIS ISSUE: PLAYLIST p.4-5 REVIEW p.10-15 39 | Alive

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CONTRIBUTORS p.6-7

ILLUSTRATION p.16-17

MORE PHOTOGRAPHY p.40-53

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DRAWING p.8-9

PHOTOGRAPHY p.18-35

ILLUSTRATION p.54-55

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ARTICLE p.36-

PROSE p.56-57

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However, with the theme of this issue being ‘ALIVE’, I suppose these feelings of exasperation are fitting. I’m almost certain there are thousands of people alive on Earth right now sharing my exact sentiments. We are living in a world of growing discontent and division amongst all social groups: left and right, young and old, east and west. This is an important time to be alive, for great change is ahead of us and moving rapidly - but we must not let that overwhelm us. Instead, practise getting offline, educating yourself, being aware of the times, engaging in meaningful conversation with those around you, and being open to learning from others. I’m telling you this because if we start making individual changes right now, maybe we could postpone entering an era where we are all just existing rather than living.


Playlist 4

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KATE BUSH

Watching You Without Me

ROXY MUSIC

RENEE

THE CURE

DAVID BOWIE

Lay Me Down

Lullaby

Fashion

You Gotta Say Yes To Another Excess

BLANCMANGE

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YELLO

True To Life

Living On The Ceiling

JOY DIVISION

Isolation

NEW ORDER

Fine Time

DEPECHE MODE

Photographic

LISTEN ON STYLOMAGAZINE.TUMBLR.COM/PLAYLIST PLAYLIST AND PHOTO BY ANDIE PHILLIPS | Alive


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Contributors

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SARAH BROOKE is a Fine Arts student, adding another notch to her belt after having completed her degree in Architecture. MATILDA CHANEY is an avid reader and art enthusiast and wouldn’t say no to a gin and tonic. GABRIELLE CLARK studies Communications and Media and volunteers for local Perth radio station RTRfm and WAM during her spare time. JEREMY HAM is a Melbourne-born, self-taught artist whose drawings and paintings emulate the abstract, emotional and symbolic world within. ANDIE PHILLIPS is a media student who wants to learn German, try pottery and start riding her bike more.

ALEX SEDANO is a fashion and lifestyle photographer based in New York who likes good fast food, blondes and 80s American films. FRANCES SILBERSTEIN studies Architecture and has a soft spot for French, illustration and art history. DECLAN WATKINS-SAXON has recently returned from Europe, where he almost became a walking kebab. Photo by Andie Phillips

A huge thank you to all contributors for their submissions. If you would like to feature in the next issue, visit: stylomagazine.tumblr.com/contribute | Alive

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OSCAR POIESZ lives in Rotterdam and has an impressive record collection and well-seasoned taste for jazz.


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ART AND WORDS BY SARAH BROOKE

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Old Blood has Slim’s rhythm trippin’ with old-school motown riffs Issue Nine |


Art by Sarah Brooke

Recorded in October last year to an intimate crowd of 60 at the epic Perth based Rada Studios, the band agree there was a lot of work that went into pulling off the live documented set. In an interview with RTRFM’s Caitlin Nienbar the band told listeners that despite nerves, they managed to pull off the recording. Dropping in July with thanks to resident Rada engineers Dan Carroll and Matt Gio who both made sure the live recording ran smooth as well as Carroll mixing on the night. >> | Alive

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Playing a much anticipated show at Jack Rabbit Slims in Northbridge over the weekend, punters were in for a treat with old-school bluesrockers Old Blood performing new sounds off their latest album Live at Rada Studios. Although this wasn’t all punters had to look forward to, with a stand-out local line-up featuring the much loved singer-songwriter Jacob Diamond as well as West Australian Music (WAM) award winning World artist Grace Barbe bringing her infectious Afro-Kreol sounds.


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Since their beginnings in 2011 this bluesy five piece have continued to wow Perth music lovers with their raw vocals, impressive instrumental and plasmic old-school blues. Transcending listeners young and old with their swampy blues rhythm and uncut deep vocals, their original sound can’t be beaten. Jack Rabbit Slims provided some entertainment of their own with sick projector graphics which was a total eye feast, featuring a series of hand drawn objects such as hands and abstract lines. Instead these graphics were met by some freakishly impressive Mr. Messy-esque squiggles which were perhaps inspired by author and illustrator Roger Hargreaves. Acoustic local legend Jacob Diamond not only won the hearts of last years Big Splash band competition judges, but he put on a wicked set from 9:30 and warmed up crowds with his original tunes and charismatic stage presence. I have no doubt the Cat-Ladiesto-be batting their lashes at feline-themed-shirt-wearing Diamond. Kicking things off strong with the track ‘People Pangea’ it wasn’t long before the next song ‘Docks’ was blended in. Next up were a couple of tracks off Diamond’s 2015 album Chum with ‘Singapore Sling’ bringing a slightly more upbeat vibe to for crowds before ‘Someday My Prince Will Come’.

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Diamond was joined on stage with lead guitarist Jake Chaloner, Will Langdale on bass, wicked keys from Matt Schmalkuche and Ethan Darnell on drums.

Art by Tilly Chaney

The band flew through their set in style with other tracks including ‘Blue Begets Blue’ and ‘Mary and Augustine’ all before finishing up with a favourite track ‘Fishwife’.

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At around 10:30 crowds packed in tight for local world artist Grace Barbe who got audiences moving with her lucid hip movements and eclectic sounds. The talented Grace Barbe rocked not only vocals but guitar and bass, whilst Jamie Searle slapped the Bass, while Joelle Barbe’s epic percussion impressed crowds most. Playing tracks off their much loved album Welele! the trio got crowds moving with many favourites including ‘Fatigue’ and ‘Afro-Sega’ as well as the album’s title track. The band ended their set with wicked cover of ‘All Night Long’ in a native language which was a total crowd pleaser. >>

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G N I D N E C S N A R “T ENERS T S I L G N YOU D N A D OL


R I E H T H T I Y P -W M SWA

Before long it was time for the main act with Perth’s favourite swamp-town rockers Old Blood kicking off their much awaited set at 11:30 to an ecstatic crowd.

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With the full-throated voice of Tony Papa-Adams himself, epic percussion by Tyler Ray Michie, exquisite bass work from Shaun Liddell Jennings, plus guitar work from Edo Ekic and Jules Peet, this gig was a must-see. Kicking off their set with the track ‘Lay Down’ off their latest LP recorded live at Rada Studios last year, the debut album features tracks that had been in the works for the past 18 months. Their Live at Rada album even features an extended 11 minute long cover which was originally performed by Billy Gibbons, Dusty Hill and Frank Beard called ‘Blue Jean Blues’. Although this wasn’t played on the night, perhaps due to its length. Their next track going by the working title of ‘Leaving’ was a true crowd pleaser whilst ‘Nature (In Me)’ wowed audiences next.

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S E U BL M H T RHY

Next up was another track off their recent album mixed by Daniel Carroll and mastered by William Bowden called ‘Grand Plan’ followed by the equally enticing track ‘Medicine Man’. Finishing off strong with Eddie Harris’ cover of ‘Compared to What’, the track was the perfect tune to end to an incredible performance. Old Blood’s extended set went until late, giving audiences an eclectic taste of old-school blues and motown riffs. Their set seemed more instrumental than usual which was a slight disappointment for PapaAdam’s fans, although there was no shortage of talent from the other musicians.

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Old Blood’s set was a whirlwind of swampy Louisiana blues that rocked Jack Rabbit Slims’ punters right into the night. WORDS BY GABRIELLE CLARK


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Dead or Alive?

Pencil on paper, 2012. Are we alive from the inside out? Or do we hide skeletons of the past within ourselves? ART AND WORDS BY JEREMY HAM facebook.com/theartofjemham www.jemham.com Issue Nine |


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Losing Touch PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDIE PHILLIPS

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ANDIE PHILLIPS, 2016


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Pirates: the alive villains

“Piracy, like murder, is one of the earliest of recorded human activities,� states Philip Gosse in his book The History of Piracy. Indeed, when one examines the history of the sea, pirate activity is as old as history itself. Many pirates reached somewhat of a mythical status, being regarded as people who lived perhaps an illegal life, but nevertheless a life lived to the fullest. They were adventurous and dangerous. Today, pirates still speak to the imagination, the movie franchise The Pirates of the Caribbean proves as much. According to a 2005 poll in The Guardian, most children wanted to grow up and be Jack Sparrow. But beyond the stereotypical pirate, perhaps there is a thing or two we could learn from the way pirates lived their lives.

Art by Sarah Brooke

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THE GOLDEN AGE OF PIRACY During the 17th century, piracy activities increased tremendously. This period, which is also dubbed the Golden Age of Piracy, saw the emergence of many mythical pirates. Names like Blackbeard, Black Sam, Black Caesar and Calico Jack gave extra weight to their dangerous arrivals and struck fear into many merchants, mostly in the West Indies.

Secondly, the increased trade within the Caribbean by traders of mostly English, French, Spanish and Dutch origin made sure there was bounty aplenty. The activities of the European powers also made for some heavy fighting in the West Indies for supremacy over the already many plantations. Being secluded from Europe and receiving little military support, local governors relied increasingly on the help of pirates for security. The buccaneers who operated outside of state control suddenly were used for the protection of the valuable colonies. Take for example the story of Sir Henry Morgan. As a pirate-king he | Alive

SOCIAL STRUCTURES The social structures of the pirates are fascinating. Pirates came from many different backgrounds, races and nationalities. This included runaway slaves or European radicals who had run from persecution in their homeland. While in earlier days pirates were used as a hired marine for local governors in the Caribbean, this changed in the early 18th century. The example of Sir Henry Morgan shows that pirates were often used for the goals of governments, however, many pirates were fed up with this system. >>

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The Golden Age of Piracy – during which about 2400 men were active as pirates - came to fruition due to several reasons. The West Indies especially served as a haven for pirates due to their many uninhabited natural harbours. Too few vessels to capture pirates ships and too many islands to hide into made sure the pirates had an obvious advantage over the forces that wished to destroy them.

plundered many Spanish forts and ships alike. When he ravaged Panama City – against the will of the English government – he was arrested and send to prison. However, his time there was short-lived. Instead, Henry Morgan got a knighthood for his service for the English crown. This shows how European governments used the pirates whenever they saw fit. Sir Henry Morgan shows the grey area many pirates faced between pirating for you own glory, or fighting as a marine for a nation. Although they operated outside the law, they could still be very useful in the power struggle for the valuable colonies in the Caribbean. Also, this meant that while pirates could become very rich of their bounty, it still meant they served the interest of the upper classes. This would not always be the case.


While this is certainly not the case for all pirates, between 1718 and 1720 certain pirates did establish a more anarchic view towards law and liberty. As Markus Rediker put it: … common men of the deep gained control of the enterprise of piracy and used it for their own purposes, independent of the economic projects from the upper classes of the day. By 1720, the main purpose was no longer booty. It was, rather, the perpetuation of a ‘life of liberty’.

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Although historical evidence is at best lacking, it is clear that in this period a new form of pirate emerged. One who was not loyal to a nationality, race or king, but rather loyal to the purpose of freedom. This was not in the least bit due to the favorable circumstances on a pirate ship in comparison with ships from merchants or the royal navy. Where on board on a merchantman the ships would be ruled as little kingdoms of the captain, this was not the case as a member of a pirate crew and it had many other advantages. It offered “better rations, more rum, less work, the prospect for a share in real wealth and, perhaps most importantly, greater freedom and autonomy”. Indeed, it has been argued that one became a pirate precisely for the reason of greater freedom and autonomy. Even on the ships the captains had a modest amount of power compared to the captains of the Royal Navy. The ‘pirate code’ made sure that the power of the captain was limited and that the ship was put before the captain. Each ship had its own code, but generally speaking, it made sure that crewmembers had a say in the ships’ affairs and that ‘honorable’ behavior must be observed.

S E T A R I P “ D A H AN Y S EA E G A T N A ADV

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WHAT CAN WE LEARN? While there was certainly violence amongst the pirates, it did form a close-knit community. It was able to largely abolish class difference, have greater social mobility and was often radically democratic. It rejected the authority of the state and the leaders it elected without the public having a say in the matter.

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In battling the power structures of the day, they formed new structures that allowed them to be freer. In doing so, they had the ability to have more opportunities available to them that would have been impossible otherwise. This allowed them to operate outside of the shackles of the government they so eagerly left. They had the ability to roam the many islands of the Caribbean, being much more free then other sailormen around the world. Isn’t that the most alive feeling in the world? WORDS BY OSCAR POEISZ

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R E V O THE ES C R O F T A TH

As such, pirate culture was in many ways revolutionary. They rejected and challenged the state power and formed a new social structure. Whilst it has only been possible to scratch the surface of the complex world of the pirates and many tales of pirates are indeed fascinating, it is clear that even today we have much to learn from them. They made it clear that class difference can be easily abolished, at least in relatively close communities. Not only did they challenge power structures, but they also lived a more autonomous and free life. Perhaps, even, they were the most “alive” men (and women occasionally) in history.


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Cones & Cigars in Bushwick Travelling to N.Y, Miami or L.A, I find perfect scenery to shoot my subjects. I try to create a fake story, based in other time reality. Sometimes beautiful, sometimes insolent. This series was shot in Bushwick, Brooklyn (N.Y) where I was living during summer 2015.

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Can someone point me in the direction of paradise please?

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Thoughts on Paradise: Paradise is really really great. She’s a place where we can relax and forget all terrible things in the world. She’s green and blue, red orange purple pink and green and all the other colours of the rainbow. Paradise is friendly, she is calm. Paradise is mindful and generous. Paradise smells like salt, she smells like daffodils. Feels like cool water’s edge, like grass and fresh sheets. The only thing is that she doesn’t exist.

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WORDS AND IMAGE BY FRANCES SILBERSTEIN | Alive

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COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE COCONUTS IN PARADISE


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Slippage (12” Mix) WORDS BY DECLAN SAXON-WATKINS

In the upstairs gallery a film played starring the mythological ex, His beloved habits: two books a week, a pack a day, His denouement: several STD’s, other lovers. In the carpark below brightly dressed couples smoke, hold hands, and bask in their big/small world. -

On the last night you were sick so I walked the streets looking for a drugstore. Everything was closed so I couldn’t find quells. I awoke you from limbo-sleep and made you a drink water mixed with powdered ginger. It was cold, as we didn’t have a kettle.

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As the sun came up we danced to France Joli’s “Gonna Get Over You”. With wry, playful smiles we decided to leave the club, and buy some balloons.


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Contributions are now open

B-Movie: Lust and Sound in West Berlin 1979-1989 (2015)

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Since its beginnings in 2013, STYLO has put out nine different issues, each growing larger in size with contributors from all over the world, and always with diversity of content.

ISSUE TEN of STYLO magazine will be a SPECIAL EDITION to mark this achievement, And we need contributors!

The theme for issue ten is ‘growth’. Contributors are encouraged to interpret the theme in whichever way they like. If you want to get involved, please visit: stylomagazine.tumblr.com/contribute or email: stylocontributions@gmail.com | Alive

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with new and exciting surprises.


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ISSUE #9: ALIVE  

Edited by Andie Phillips. Contributors: Sarah Brooke, Matilda Chaney, Gabrielle Clark, Jeremy Ham, Andie Phillips, Oscar Poiesz, Alex Sedano...

ISSUE #9: ALIVE  

Edited by Andie Phillips. Contributors: Sarah Brooke, Matilda Chaney, Gabrielle Clark, Jeremy Ham, Andie Phillips, Oscar Poiesz, Alex Sedano...

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