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Index

index a day in pictures It happened overnight South Africa Africa WorlD Business LIFE, ETC Sport

thursday – 8 september 2011


A DAY IN PICTURES

thursDAY – 8 september


a day in pictures

libya

Muammar Gaddafi relaxes with his granddaughter in his tent at the Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli in this still image taken from an exclusive amateur video from 2005 obtained by Reuters on September 7, 2011. REUTERS/Reuters TV

thursDAY – 8 september 2011


a day in pictures

Brazil

Spectators look at contestants competing in the National Ballooning Championship, held to commemorate Brazil's independence day, in Brasilia September 7, 2011. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

thursDAY – 8 september 2011


a day in pictures

germany

German Chancellor Angela Merkel (foreground C) listens to a budget debate in the Bundestag, the German lower house of parliament in Berlin, September 7, 2011. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

thursDAY – 8 september 2011


a day in pictures

new york

Court workers riding blower machines remove water from the playing surface of Arthur Ashe Stadium after rain delayed competition in the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York, September 7, 2011. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

thursDAY – 8 september 2011


IT HAPPENED OVERNIGHT

thursDAY – 8 september


it happened overnight

briefs

GOP debate (Reuters)

Politics USA We’re finally starting to get things going as the third Republican presidential debate – the first one to feature Rick Perry – took place on Wednesday night and featured a terse exchange between Perry and Mitt Romney. Romney has been running around lately telling everyone he can how he has worked in the private sector and understands how to create jobs. During the debate Perry said that Romney wasn’t able to translate that into his public administration. “As a matter of fact, we created more jobs in the last three months in Texas than he created in four years

in Massachusetts.” Romney responded that Massachusetts didn’t have the resources Texas did and he was proud of the state’s 4.7% unemployment rate under his administration (read: it’s not my fault!). The US justice department has charged 91 people, including doctors, with fraud within America’s federal health programme, Medicare. The charges relate to prescribing unnecessary medicine and treatment, and charging for treatment, which was never provided. These dodgy dealings totalled around $295 million. The federal government has moved ahead with plans to boost solar energy, providing funding to the tune of $344

million to install 160,000 solar panels on military housing in 34 states. The military has a current goal of achieving a quarter of its power from solar by 2025. This decision will double the amount of government solar panelling in the country. President Barack Obama and Texas governor Rick Perry have been on the phone about federal aid for Texas, which is being demolished by wildfires after a very dry summer. Obama has guaranteed the USA’s second-biggest state that aid in fighting the blaze will be forthcoming quickly, and funds to rebuild it will be made available too. It is nice to know that outside congress, a Democrat and a Republican can actually get something done.

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it happened overnight

briefs

Laurent Kabila (Reuters)

Niger The brand new Libyan authorities have urged neighbouring Niger to prevent ex-Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi from living there and escaping the prospective justice over which the transitional national council is drooling. Niger has confirmed that Gaddafi has not entered the country. The TNC also claims its forces are within 65km of where Brother Leader is expected to be. UK Britain confirmed its commitment to liberalism when it held a parliamentary debate on abortion yesterday

– as if this issue hasn’t been covered by enough hot air and column inches – and voted against altering its policy by 368 to 118. Although the debate was specifically regarding abortion counselling and not pro-choice vs pro-life, Britain has been pro-choice for more than 50 years. Dianne Abbot, the shadow health minister explained to Time how, in a country that is 40% Catholic, abortion is a relatively lax issue, “[It is due to] the absence of a Fox News pumping out social propaganda 24 hours a day and British common sense.” The Scottish National Party leader, Alex Salmond, will

unveil his policy proposals today, but is expected to leave out plans for a referendum on Scottish independence until later into his term. Most likely to be in the headlines after he announces his plans are the unification of the police force and minimum alcohol pricing. DRC The son of one of the world’s most famous lunatic dictators, Mobutu Sese Seko, has filed his candidacy to participate in the presidential elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo on 28 November. Nzanga Mobutu has run for the presidency before in 2006. He is unlikely to displace

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it happened overnight

briefs

current President Joseph Kabila who also happens to be the son of a former president, Laurent Kabila. If politics are genetic, we’re quite sorry there isn’t a son of Patrice Lumumba contesting these polls. A raid by armed men on a prison in the southeast DRC killed two people and freed nearly 1,000 inmates. AP reports the two victims were a police officer and a man visiting an inmate. One of the escapees, Gedeon Kyungu Mutanga, is a militia leader who had been sentenced to death. South Africa The Umkhonto we Sizwe Military Veterans Association is unimpressed with the ANC Youth League, claiming the party’s juniors only joined because it was fashionable. The MKMVA KZN secretary said the current veterans joined the party because of actual liberation, and that disciplinary procedures (well, he said expulsion) should be brought against anyone who burnt an ANC flag. Moldova One of Europe’s iciest conflicts could be approaching some sort of impasse as Moldova’s prime minister is due to meet

Google in China (Reuters)

with the Russian-speaking breakaway Transdniestria in a process that is far preferable to war, we would think. Aside from creating trust between the sides, issues such as reconnecting telephone and rail lines between the parties, and what to do about Europe. The current PM is pro-Europe in a heavily opinionated nation, and despite its poverty, its economy is growing at just under 8% a year. Greece The opposition party in Greece is leaping ahead in polls, currently 5% ahead of incumbent George Papandreou, while the country comes to grips with its finances. It’s quite convenient as an opposition party when the economy tanks.

Israel Social unrest due to high cost of living has finally led to arrests as weeks of peaceful protest have come to naught and violence inevitably broke out. Police arrested 40 demonstrators as the middle classes in Tel Aviv went a-marching. It’s nice to know that the middle-classes in other countries can get up off their arses and complain about something (ahem, Gauteng tolls, ahem).

Business China has renewed Google’s licence to operate in the country. Although the Chinese government and the search engine giant don’t see eye-toeye when it comes to which

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it happened overnight

briefs

results should be displayed, Google does want a piece of the world’s biggest Internet market and peddles its advertising trade through the country, in spite of its search engine redirecting to Google Hong Kong. Forbes reports that Michael Arrington is no longer the editor of TechCrunch, nor an employee of AOL after duffing a few steps in a conflict-of-interest saga – he thought he could straddle editorial independence and investments. When he was told he couldn’t he demanded that AOL sell TechCrunch back to its original investors or give it editorial independence. They didn’t do either; they sacked him. Stocks and the euro rallied on the news that Germany’s efforts to help out the cash crisis in Europe can go ahead after a court ruling contesting the country’s current policies was turfed. Gold fell, nut oil was up 4% and investors returned to stocks: the Dow and S&P 500 were up over 2.5% and the Nasdaq over 3%. The federal reserve, America’s central bank, has expressed concern at sluggish growth in the US economy. Great news considering its chairman,

Ben Bernanke (Reuters)

Ben Bernanke, decided to do nothing last month. Yahoo co-founder and influential board member, Jerry Yang, has denied the CEO-less (as of yesterday) company is up for sale. Yesterday the Wall Street Journal cited an anonymous source, which said the company would be sold if the right price could be found. Kenya’s agriculture sector is set for a recovery as weather experts predict near-normal rains during the upcoming rainy season. Kenya is currently suffering drought which has affected food security, boosted inflation (which reached 16% last month) and affected the east African nation’s electricity

output (a portion of Kenya’s power is hydroelectric).

SPORT USA Tennis: The US Open was delayed for a second day due to rain with only 16 minutes of play possible. Rafael Nadal is 0-3 down against Gilles Muller in the first set while Andy Roddick is a break up against David Ferrer. The players all had a good bitch about the slippery playing surface when they came off, saying officials should not have insisted they play. Any more delays should see the tournament moving into Monday. None of the scheduled women’s quarter finals took place.

thursdAY - 8 september 2011


it happened overnight

briefs

Conrad Mrray (Reuters)

UK Football: Paul Ince, acting like an old man, has had a go at the current crop of players representing England saying that they no longer feel like it is a privilege to play for their country as the Premier League and Champions League are more important. Then he complained that players make up excuses to get out of international fixtures. Then he also kakked out England fans for not making a positive enough environment (Us Sharks fans know how booing our own team at Kings Park improves their performance). New Zealand Rugby: Referees boss Paddy O’Brien claims that the 20 World Cup coaches are all with him in his quest to be harsher

on offsides and infringements which slow down the ball. I can actually hear Div crushing tranquilisers and stirring them into Schalk Burger’s tea.

Life Hungary The Hungarian government is using a scantily-clad woman to boost the amount of people filling out its census form online. Hopefully its results will show that around 50% of the people in Hungary are women. India An earthquake struck the Indian capital city of New

Delhi just before midnight. The shake measured 4.2 on the Richter scale and although many people felt it, there were no reports of damage or injuries although some spots did lose power. USA The trial of Michael Jackson’s doctor is back on track after his application to sequester the jury was refused. Jury selection will begin on Thursday. Conrad Murray is accused of giving Jackson the pills that ultimately killed him. He is also barred from mentioning other doctors in Jackson’s employ during the trial, ruining his defence of blaming the dermatologist. Indeed, Jackson had someone looking after his skin. Whoda thunk it?

thursdAY - 8 september 2011


SOUTH AFRICA

thursDAY – 8 september


south africa

briefs

Murder suspects shot and killed in police raid One officer was killed and two others were injured when police and the Hawks raided a house in Chatsworth, Durban on Wednesday in pursuit of two men suspected of killing ANC regional secretary Sbu Sibiya. The two suspects were also killed in the raid. Sapa reported that KwaZulu Natal’s community safety MEC Willies Mchunu said the police were acting on a tip-off.

Idasa: ANC blurring line between party and state Idasa’s head of political monitoring Judith February warned that lines between party and state have been blurred by the participation of the ANC’s Progressive Business Forum in a country-to-country trade expo in China. February said that South Africa’s lack of regulation over private political party funding was what allowed such trips to happen. Currently, only funding from public sources is regulated.

ANC's top six. (Reuters)

DA: Open toilets task team shows willingness to go beyond politics

Cosatu demands end to civil servants doing business with government

The Democratic Alliance welcomed human settlements minister Tokyo Sexwale’s announcement of a task team to investigate the country’s open toilet debacle. A DA spokesman Butch Steyn said in a statement the move represents a willingness to go beyond politics in the interests of those subjected to substandard sanitation. The task team, headed up by Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, will have three months to assess the extent of the problem and identify irregularities and malpractice.

Cosatu in Gauteng said in a statement that civil servants should be banned from doing business with the state. The federation, reacting to a report from the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, expressed concern that even though it is widely known that civil servants do business with the state, nothing has been done about it. The Scopa report had given Gauteng premier Nomvula Mokonyane a month to act against civil servants who had undeclared interests in companies that won tenders from the state.

Thursday - 08 september 2011


south africa

Busa kicked out of black business summit Nomaxabiso Majokweni, CEO of Business Unity South Africa, and the organisation’s president, Futhi Mtoba, were not allowed to attend Tuesday’s black business summit. The pair were turned away as Busa would be discussed at the summit and the organisers, the Confederation of Black Business Organisations, felt it inappropriate for the two representatives to be there. Majokweni had last week expressed hope that the summit could be used to heal what she called an ideological rift between Busa and black business organisations.

Nzimande: Liberal agenda behind attacks on government SACP secretary general Blade Nzimande has accused the “liberal agenda” of being behind the criticisms of the ANC-led government. He said in an SACP online newsletter that the criticism of President Jacob Zuma’s nomination of Mogoeng Mogoeng was the most concerted of the liberal offensive. The SACP’s stance compares starkly with that of tripartite alliance partner Cosatu, which had joined in the criticism of the Mogoeng nomination. Meanwhile, the president’s spokesman Mac Maharaj

briefs

said Zuma is applying his mind to the widely criticised nomination.

CDE: Turning schooling system around is South Africa’s biggest challenge The Centre for Development and Education released a report on Wednesday that called for a reform of the South African education system. It said that individual projects would not do the trick and cited international education system reforms in Brazil, Ghana, India and the United States as examples from which South Africa could learn. CDE’s executive director Ann Bernstein said that a new, incentive and performance-based approach is needed for the teaching profession if the country is to turn the schooling system around.

Whistleblower in John Block case contacts public protector Afriforum’s newly established investigative team has approached public protector Thuli Madonsela on behalf of a Northern Cape whistleblower who is in hiding. The whistleblower has apparently gone into hiding after exposing the corruption in the province that eventually led to the charges made against Northern Cape MEC John Block. Madonsela

had, during her roadshow in the Northern Cape, ask for help locating the whistleblower so that she could release her final report into the investigation.

Eskom workers to go strike The National Union of Mineworkers said that 16,000 Eskom workers would go on strike due to deadlocked wage negotiations. The union rejected Eskom’s offer of a 7% increase, which the power company will be implementing for its September payroll. NUM is demanding an increase of 13%, but will need to approach the CCMA before it goes on strike.

Labour brokers to be phased out Labour minister Mildred Oliphant told the Food and Allied Workers Union that following the Human Rights Watch report on the abuse of farm workers in the Western Cape’s winelands, her department would prioritise dealing with labour brokers in a way that protects workers and eliminates abuses. She said, however, that labour brokers could not be banned overnight as demanded by trade unions. Instead, the Labour Relations Act would be amended to allow the phasing out of labour brokers.

Thursday - 08 september 2011


south africa

Themb'elihle

Themb'elihle: a breakdown of ingredients for a service-delivery riot The residents of Themb'elihle, now in their fourth day of protests, have one simple demand: electricity. Beneath that, though, lies a complex mix of politics and agendas, criminality and xenophobia. By PHILLIP DE WET. Many pieces of the Themb'elihle puzzle are still missing, and many facts will probably remain in dispute for a long time. And some of those are important. Did police fire the live rounds that injured at least two residents when they made a push into the township late on Tuesday night, or did those shots come from residents, as the police claim? Would a more decisive response to initial violence on Monday– either by police or politicians – have made a difference? On Wednesday, though, other important facts were finally confirmed, giving us much greater insight into a protest that seems unlikely

to be the last of its kind. Somebody was using live rounds, which ups the ante significantly. There has probably (we can't confirm this beyond doubt) already been an exchange of gunfire between black residents of the township and the mostly Indian residents living nearby, during a battle for an electrical distribution box. That went no further though. Some shops inside Themb'elihle have been looted, but only those owned by Somalis and Pakistanis. This despite the fact that the Photo: Residents gather late on Wednesday afternoon to discuss their next move. The consensus: the protest continues, indefinitely. (Phillip de Wet)

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south africa

township escaped the widespread xenophobic attacks of 2008. The local councillor's house in the township was not burnt down, as had been rumoured, but now has two uniformed security guards on duty in front of it. Though it took only a day-and-a-half to replace a sabotaged electricity distribution box in Lenasia, in the township just metres away street lighting remains out because the same had not happened there. Patterns have started emerging. Criminals within the township have taken advantage of the relative chaos. These are mostly young men, who tend to emerge at night or after trouble has already started. Young women, on the other hand, are constantly at the coal face, and tend to be mightily militant. A few residents from other, nearby informal settlements have come to show support. Local police are more likely to over-react (and inflame) than the imported variety. And, of course, apocalyptic rumours swirl and mutate as time passes by. Themb'elihle has also confirmed – hearteningly, for future longer-running service-delivery protests – that basic South African values don't change under prolonged strain. Many of the protesters are happy to deal in property damage and inconvenience to others, but get uncomfortable with intimidation and draw the line at intentional physical harm. Racism flares up and the rhetoric can get fierce, but everyone still pretty much gets along afterwards. The primary concern is for comrades in arms, in this case those arrested during the course of the protests.

Themb'elihle

Patterns have started emerging. Criminals within the township have taken advantage of the relative chaos. These are mostly young men, who tend to emerge at night or after trouble has already started. Politically the bag is more mixed. Outsiders who tried to enter the fray to campaign or push a cause were gently, but firmly rebuffed, perhaps all the faster because this is a relatively small community. While local leaders kept a grip on the reins, it was a loose one; their approach was one of polling for consensus rather than manufacturing it, and it seems pretty sure that anything else would have failed. That leaves nobody to call a halt until the community, on average, simply runs out of anger to vent. All of this has combined in the case of Themb'elihle, to make for a long and tense standoff, with residents unlikely to gain anything of consequence, trust in the government and its ability to deliver eroded, and two communities' faith in the police badly damaged. None of which need have happened had the people of Themb'elihle not considered themselves voiceless. iM

THursday - 08 September 2011


south africa

wikileaks

The evidence to nail Zuma was there: US Embassy Cable The evidence to successfully prosecute ANC President Jacob Zuma was always there, according to a US Embassy cable leaked by WikiLeaks. By SIPHO HLONGWANE “US Department of Justice Intermittent Legal Adviser (ILA) believes that the Supreme Court of Appeal's 7 November verdict upholding Schabir Shaik's conviction is legally sound, provides little to nothing for Shaik to credibly challenge, and further bolsters the State's case against former Deputy President Jacob Zuma,” said the cable, which originated from the US Embassy in Pretoria. The cable was written based on reports of a US adviser to the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) on the corruption case against Zuma. “ILA believes that the State has enough evidence from the Shaik trial to convict Zuma; evidence gathered from Zuma's house and attorney is ‘icing on the cake.’  If the State loses the search warrant appeals, they simply will try to focus on proving (again) that Shaik made 238 payments to

Zuma, totalling 1.2 million rand,” the cable says. The case was nonetheless tossed out of the courts by Judge Chris Nicholson on 12 September 2008, who said that Zuma’s constitutional rights had been breached by the prosecutors for not allowing him to make representations before charging him. Nicholson also cited political influence in the case as a reason for dropping the charges. The Supreme Court of Appeal upheld an appeal by the NPA against Nicholson's ruling and the criminal charges against Zuma were then reinstated. In April 2009, then acting National Director of Public Prosecutions Mokotedi Mpshe decided to drop charges against Zuma after mysterious recordings of phone conversations surfaced, which Mpshe said amounted to “abuse of process” by the state. THursday - 08 september 2011


south africa

wikileaks

ANCYL has been buddies with Motlanthe for a long time – WikiLeaks If a US Embassy cable leaked by WikiLeaks is anything to go by, the ANC Youth League’s love for Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe is no new thing. They’ve been buddies since Motlanthe’s days as a “caretaker president”. By SIPHO HLONGWANE. The cable, which apparently originated from the US Embassy in Pretoria, details a meeting between ANC Youth League spokesperson Floyd Shivambu, ANCYL national executive committee member Magdalene Moonsamy and a US diplomat only identified as “Poloff”. The original cable was obtained by EyeWitness News. The meeting took place at the time when reports of Motlanthe’s infidelity were surfacing in the media. Poloffs reported that the two ANCYL representatives were fully committed to defending Motlanthe. Shivambu replied, “We are defending Motlanthe. I am getting tired of writing that, 'We stand behind Motlanthe as the President’.” Shivambu denied that anyone in the ANCYL Photo: REUTERS

or Zuma’s supporters in the ANC NEC had leaked the story about Motlanthe to the media. In recent weeks, as tensions between the ANCYL and Zuma spike, the League has once more come out very strongly in favour of Motlanthe. “Shivambu said that Motlanthe has always been a ‘caretaker leader’ and that he would stand down as national leader after the election,” the cable reads. It later transpired that the stories of Motlanthe’s infidelity were not true. The cable concludes by noting that Shivambu and Moonsamy downplayed the threat posed by the newly-formed Congress of the People, and said that the list controversy that the ANC was battling with at the time was not a sign of a Zuma vs Motlanthe tussle. The US Embassy in Pretoria has previously said that it would not comment on the veracity or content of a document leaked onto a public website.

Thursday - 08 september 2011


SECTION

HEADING

Backyarders vs De Lille: a tussle over the shape of participatory democracy Government has a paternalistic approach to dealing with the poor. That’s according to some of the organisations behind the backyarders movement. They also say that the government speaks to the poor as though they are invalids and does not engage them in decision-making that affects them. OSIAME MOLEFE scratches the surface in the first of a series of articles on the country’s so-called poor and marginalised.

Cape Town mayor Patricia de Lille on Tuesday announced the city’s plans to provide basic services such as sanitation, power and water to over 450,000 households who are on housing waiting-list backlog. She made the announcement at an information session with associations representing “backyarders” – the many hundreds of thousands of residents of informal settlements who themselves may or may not be on waiting lists to receive housing. De Lille hoped the session would mark a change in the historically acrimonious interaction between the city and provincial administration one side and the backyarders on the other. The event, however, was not without controversy. Originally scheduled to take place at Oliver Tambo Hall in Khayelitsha, the session was moved at the last minute to the Cape Town city centre. De Lille’s spokesman Solly Malatsi says that the meeting was moved due to fears that Abahlali baseMjondolo – one of the backyarder associations – would disrupt the meeting. Abahali, if you’d recall, was named in a Wikileaks cable where US Embassy staff compared the ANC government’s crackdown

on the organisation’s members to that of the apartheid government on the ANC members. Malatsi says that Abahlali had asked De Lille for a meeting shortly after she became mayor this year. De Lille, however, said she would first like to meet with the organisation’s leadership before meeting with the organisation’s members. But Abahlali, according to Malatsi, declined saying that De Lille was refusing “to meet with poor people on their own terms”. Abahlali then boycotted the information session and announced that it would mobilise residents to protest outside the venue. According to Malatsi, a lot of work had been put into setting up the meeting with over 50 backyarder organisations. He says that the mayor’s office was not prepared to let it all go to waste because one organisation was holding them to ransom. So the meeting was moved on the day and, according to Malatsi, transport was provided to the new venue. Mzonke Poni, Abahlali’s Western Cape chairman disagrees with Malatsi’s account. He says De Lille did agree to meet with Abahlali’s leadership, but only with three members. As an umbrella organisation with a leadership

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south africa

De Lille says last year, the administration provided 7,000 housing opportunities – nowhere near providing for the estimated 15,000 households that move to Cape Town and seek housing every year, let alone the many more already waiting. of over 30 representing as many community organisations, Abahlali found De Lille’s conditions for a meeting unacceptable and counter to the principles of a participatory democracy, Poni says. The information session too was limited to three people from each organisation, which is why Abahlali boycotted and protested, Poni adds. “When politicians hold rallies for backyarders during election campaigns, they do not limit the number who can attend, but when it comes to discussing real issues that effect communities most, suddenly the number is limited,” Poni says. The information session was convened to announce that basic services would be provided to those who have managed to build their own housing structures and to gather information on their service needs. But given the last minute change, and how Abahlali and the Anti-Eviction Campaign, another backyarders umbrella

cape town

organisation, say they were not notified of this change nor was there transport provided, it’s clear that De Lille’s message did not reach all concerned. Neither did it represent a new step in the administration’s dealing with the backyarders, as hoped. The city says it is providing basic services because some of the backyarders have been on housing lists since the 1990s and will probably have to wait quite a while longer before they receive their houses. De Lille says this is a reality they must accept. The city last year received R700 million from National Treasury and, along with its own contribution of R500 million, provided housing and basic services. De Lille says last year, the administration provided 7,000 housing opportunities – nowhere near providing for the estimated 15,000 households that move to Cape Town and seek housing every year, let alone the many more already waiting. Mncedisi Twalo, chairman of the antieviction campaign, says government needs to change the way it engages with the poor. He says the poor are best positioned to say what they need and have been trying to change the dynamic of the conversation, but this has fallen on deaf ears. As long as government persists with a paternalistic approach to dealing with the poor, Twalo says, the protests such as the ones in Themb’elihle will continue.

Read more: 1. Is the ANC as democratic as it claims, a Wikileaks cable on AllAfrica.com 2. What we're doing to assist backyarders - Patricia de Lille on PoliticsWeb 3. Mayor De Lille Unwilling to Meet Backyarders on our own Terms – Abahlali baseMjondolo

thursday - 08 September 2011


south africa

western cape

Western Cape crackdown on child maintenance defaulters The Western Cape department of justice is the latest government arm to use “name and shame” tactics to get results – in this case on child maintenance defaulters. But is naming and shaming actually legitimate? By REBECCA DAVIS. Western Cape is getting serious about child maintenance defaulters. The department of justice held a press conference this week to name some of those parents who owe a total of R10 million in outstanding child maintenance. They listed 50 of the worst defaulters, whose names have now been published in a number of national newspapers. In South Africa, name-and-shame techniques have previously been used largely to target drunk drivers. The Cape Argus runs a campaign with LeadSA which sees them publish the names of recently convicted drunk drivers every six weeks, and it's believed this has been successful in helping discourage the behaviour. Elsewhere in the world the concept of naming and shaming attracts more controversy, however. In late 2009 the Rat Book was launched Photo: REUTERS

as the UK's biggest name and shame website. It listed the details of over 14,000 criminal convictions, divided into categories like paedophilia, rape and murder. But in July 2010 the site was forced to shut after criticism over the fact that they named people prior to convictions and also released the details of people found not guilty. Of course, the question of whether it’s right or wrong often comes down to what kind of information you're disclosing. The practice of “outing” prominent gay people who would prefer the anonymity of the closet is a form of naming and shaming which can cause serious harm, for instance. It’s more difficult to make the case that parents defaulting on child support have a right to their privacy.

Read more: 1. Dads and moms owing R10m are named, shamed in The New Age

thursday - 08 september 2011


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grootes assessment

equality act

Julius Malema, A freedom of speech revolutionary? Next week Julius Malema’s hate speech trial will climax when Judge Colin Lamont hands down his ruling on whether he should be allowed to sing “Dubula Ibhunu”. Over the past weekend National Prosecuting Authority head Menzi Simelane said it was time to put legislation in place to stop people being racist. But in the middle of all of this is the Equality Act . And the parts of it that are currently used to stop hate speech may in fact, be unconstitutional. Really. By STEPHEN GROOTES. Any act of racism is repugnant. So is any act of homophobia. So is any act of sexism. South Africa, and many other countries, don’t punish them specifically. We have measures in place to make sure people are protected though. If you are assaulted, you lay a charge of assault. It doesn’t and shouldn’t matter what the reason for that assault is. If someone slurs your character, you go to court. It’s expensive, time consuming and probably less than satisfying, but it is still an option.

SA law generally punishes the act, and not the motivation. Speaking in the Sunday Times, Simelane seemed to think this was not enough. Some of his utterances, that the courts are “filled with racists”, were probably unwise. We doubt he has the numbers to back up that claim. At the same time, when in Kimberley or Ventersdorp a farm worker is “punished” by his employer by being dragged behind a Photo: Peter Carvell. (Reuters)

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grootes assessment

So if Simelane is able to have a law banning racism passed in the way he appears to want, Zapiro’s days could be numbered. Hilux Double-cab, racism is surely one of the motivations. But that act is punished. Or it certainly should be. Then you have newspaper columinists like Jon Qwelane, who was hauled before the Human Rights Commission for saying “gay marriage is not okay” and equating homosexual sex with having intercourse with dogs. It’s repugnant alright, but whether he should be punished for it is another story. At present, the Equality Act’s main aim is to ventilate issues in society. The Equality Courts, sitting in the high courts and the magistrates’ courts are meant to host a debate on what is acceptable speech and what is not. Hence the desire by Lamont to hear about the history of “Dubula Ibhunu” (aka “Kill the Boer”) and its importance to the ANC. The point is that by holding a case that is not an inquiry, as is the case in criminal matters, the court essentially educates the nation about itself. So AfriForum gets to explain in public why this song is so

equality act

worrying, and Malema gets to explain why he should be allowed to sing it. But the problem comes with the sanction. Should the court say to Malema, you are not allowed to sing it, it will no doubt rely on Section 10 of the Act that says “no person may publish, propagate, advocate or communicate words based on one or more of the prohibited grounds, against any person, that could reasonably be construed to demonstrate a clear intention to be hurtful; be harmful or to incite harm; or to promote or propagate hatred”. That’s a pretty wide discretion. So, for example, if nasty capitalists like us stood up and said, “Anyone who supports the nationalisation of the mines is stupid” that could be considered harmful. And thus an illegal utterance. Even if we depersonalised it and said that “Anyone who supports the nationalisation of the mines is thinking stupidly” we could, no doubt, still be in trouble. And when you consider that the current chief justice nominee believes that the right to dignity is as important as the right to freedom of expression, (as quoted in the McBride judgment) our debate could be curtailed very quickly indeed. So if Simelane is able to have a law banning racism passed in the way he appears to want, Zapiro’s days could be numbered. You can imagine the line of thinking: He draws the President with a shower head. The President is black. He’s never drawn a white man with a showerhead. Therefore, the motivation is racial. Thus it’s hate speech. Thus it’s illegal. Thus he must stop doing it or be prevented from doing it by using force of Law.

THursday - 08 September 2011


grootes assessment

Never mind such arcane arguments like satire, the point of political speech, or even freedom. If it can be declared to be racial in motive, it will be. Let’s go a step further. Would a woman who leads a political party that opposes the ANC have a racial intent. Her party (sometimes) appears to be white. The ANC is black. Therefore…. However, should Malema lose on Monday (and I don’t expect him to, and it looks like, bizarrely, he may not even be able to be in the room at the time due to another pressing engagement) he will no doubt appeal. And that appeal will rest on the Bill of Rights. It states that everyone “has the right to freedom of expression”, but this is limited in that “it does not extend to: propaganda for war, incitement of imminent violence, or advocacy of hatred that is based on race, ethnicity, gender or religion and that constitutes incitement to cause harm”. Punctuation matters here. Because the Constitution doesn’t say “advocacy of hatred that is based on race, ethnicity, gender or religion” and stop there. It carries on to say “and that constitutes incitement to cause harm”. This would mean Qwelane’s comments, so long as he did not advocate physical violence, would be protected. Even if they are patently harmful. Notice also the difference between the Constitution’s “constitutes incitement to cause harm” and the Equality Act’s “demonstrates a clear intention to be hurtful, be harmful or to incite harm”. To my non-legally-trained mind, the Equality Act’s “be harmful” could perhaps be construed to mean harmful to a showerhead wearer’s dignity, while the Constitution’s “incitement to cause harm” would seem to

equality act

mean inciting physical violence. Malema would also rely on the provision Freedom of Expression clause that points to “freedom of artistic creativity” as that could cover his song. Perhaps. South African politics is a weird place. Sometimes the people who seem to be doing the most to curtail freedom of speech could actually end up doing a lot to protect it. Sometimes journalists who say hurtful things end up doing us all a favour. For me though, and this is a personal view, to punish what happens in someone’s head is problematic. A crime is a crime is a crime, no matter what the motivation. Sometimes the motive can perhaps be a mitigating circumstance, a father stealing bread to feed his starving child comes to mind. Sometimes it can be an aggravating factor, killing a defenceless old lady even though she’s your grandmother for her cash is perhaps so coldblooded it should be punished more harshly than the person who bottles his friend in a tavern one Friday night. But punishing someone more harshly for a belief they hold is something else. If a paedophile abuses a child, he must be punished. But he shouldn’t be punished more for believing that paedophilia is okay. The same has to apply for those who hold deeply repugnant views regarding race, homosexuality or religion. Simelane is wrong, Qwelane is wrong, but protected, that joker who posed with a dead-looking black child is a moron, but has to be protected too. It’s called freedom. Grootes is an EWN reporter

THursday - 08 September 2011


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AFRICA

thursDAY – 8 september


africa

briefs

Sudan facing large budget deficit Sudan estimates that it will need as much as $1.5 billion in foreign aid following the declaration of independence by its oil-rich south, according to the country’s minister of finance Ali Mahmoud. He told reporters at a meeting of Arab finance ministers on Wednesday that the country needed to cut spending by 25% and was looking for other ways to boost revenue, such as mining. The country is still under sanctions from the African Development Bank, the International Monetary Fund and other finance institutions.

Pirates free Danish family and crew Somali pirates on Wednesday freed seven Danes whose sailboat had been captured off the Horn of Africa coast in February. According to Reuters, one of the pirates said they had been paid a $3 million ransom for their release, however Danish officials declined to comment on the ransom. Instead, they said the family of five and their two crew members are expected back in Denmark shortly. Somali pirates, accord-

Youssou N'Dour (Reuters)

ing to popular estimate, have made in excess of $80 million in ransoms.

Nigerian Muslim leader: UN bombings detestable to Islam Mohammed Sa’ad Abubakar, Nigeria’s top Muslim spiritual leader, spoke out against the recent suicide bombing of the UN headquarters in the country. The attack, which killed 23, has been attributed to Boko Haram, a Nigerian Islamic sect with suspected links to al-Qaeda. Abubakar said the attacks were “detestable to Islam”. Two suspects are in custody and Nigerian authorities are seeking a

third, who is thought to be the ringleader.

Youssou N’Dour: Africans should do more for Horn of Africa Senegalese singer Youssou N’Dour has teamed up with Somalia’s K’naan to raise awareness and funds for victims of the Horn of Africa famine. N’Dour and K’naan will hold events across Africa as they say Africans are conspicuously absent from relief efforts in the drought-struck region. According to the Guardian’s latest data map on the crisis, $2 billion (of the $2.5 billion needed) has been raised so far.

thursday - 06 September 2011


africa

briefs

Red Cross launches Chad cholera appeal

pala Platinum, is in danger of losing its mining licence in Zimbabwe. Following the rejection of its original plan, the company was given 14 days to submit a revised plan to transfer 51% of its shares to black Zimbabweans to comply with the country’s new indigenisation law. Zimplats had said last week that discussions with government were ongoing following the expiry of the 14-day grace period. But according to The Herald, Zimbabwe’s indigenisation minister Saviour Kasukuwere on Wednesday warned that the company’s refusal to comply will force him to cancel its mining licence.

It is the start of the rainy season in Chad, raising fears that cholera – which has claimed 364 lives this year – could spread into a serious outbreak. According to a statement by the International Federation of the Red Cross, 12,713 cases have been reported this year, but this is now likely to more than double and may spread to neighbouring countries. The agency said it was launching a campaign to raise $3.5 million to assist 200,000 people.

Somaliland: Foreigners are trouble Somaliland, a self-declared (but unrecognised) sovereign state in Somalia, has decided to expel the 1,772 mainly Ethiopian and Pakistani refugees within its borders as they “are of no benefit [to Somaliland]”. According to Radio Garowe, Somaliland’s acting minister of interior said that the foreigners only bring trouble and will be expelled within 30 days. Somaliland has in the past expelled Somalis who had fled war in the south of the country.

President Zuma extends South African defence force deployments Thabang Makwetla, deputy

Colonel Gaddafi (Reuters)

minister of defence and military veterans, said that President Jacob Zuma has extended the defence force’s deployments in the Central African Republic and the Democratic Republic of Congo. South Africa’s defence force is helping the Central African Republic build its own defence force and is in the DRC to help the country reform its security sector following years-long civil war.

Zimplats in danger of losing Zimbabwe mining licence Zimplats, a subsidiary of South African mining company Im-

Algeria’s security minister warns that Gaddafi weapons could fall into al-Qaeda hands Countries around the continent’s Sahel region, south of the Sahara, have expressed concern that weapons and munitions have flooded into the area following the conflict in Libya. Speaking at a security conference for the region, Algeria’s security minister warned that the weapons, brought in the area by fleeing pro-Gaddafi fighters, could fall into the hands of al-Qaeda and turn the area into a warzone. He told delegates that the countries in the region should reinforce security and seek assistance from foreign nations.

thursday - 06 September 2011


africa

swaziland

Cosatu leader arrested in Swaziland As anti-government protesters in Swaziland embark on a global week of action, Cosatu's deputy president, Zingiswa Losi, has been arrested during the demonstrations. By THERESA MALLINSON. From 5 to 9 September, pro-democracy activists in Swaziland have embarked on a global week of action. The protesters are calling for political parties and trade unions to be unbanned, free and democratic elections, and a free media, among other demands. Cosatu sent a delegation to Mbabane, in support of its comrades across the border. The trade union federation has been a vociferous supporter of calls for democracy in Swaziland, in particular critising South Africa's recent R2.4 billion bailout of the impoverished nation. “Cosatu is proud, yet humbled and honoured to have been available when called upon to share the pains and sacrifices daily experienced by the struggling masses of Swaziland. The whole delegation of South Africans from Cosatu, its affiliates and civil-society organisations is about 45 people currently inside Swaziland for the actions,” read a statement released on Monday. Photo: REUTERS

At least one Cosatu member, none other than deputy president Zingiswa Losi, has been arrested in the demonstrations. Sibongile Mazibuko, head of the Swaziland National Association of Teachers, told AFP that Losi was one of three Cosatu representatives to be arrested. “When Cosatu representatives got up to speak, police gathered to remove them. The crowd tried to protect them. There were gunshots (of rubber bullets), teargas. I think they are being taken back to their country,” said Mazibuko. Losi was arrested in Siteki, as was former secretary-general of Swaziland's People's Democratic Movement, Siphasha Dlamini. Cosatu spokesperson Patrick Craven was unavailable for comment, but Pudemo's head of publicity, Zakhele Mabuza, told iMaverick: “I've not received any information on new developments on these people.” Mabuza indicated that there would be more information available on Thursday.

THursday - 08 september 2011


africa

malawi

Mutharika announces a whole new cabinet as opposition getS impatient President Bingu wa Mutharika finally got around to naming a new cabinet after running the country by himself for three weeks. But opposition to his rule continues to grow – and, as if to prove it, the president’s party was wholeheartedly rejected in a crucial by-election. By SIMON ALLISON.

Nearly three weeks after summarily dissolving Malawi’s cabinet in the face of mass protests against his increasingly authoritarian rule, President Bingu wa Mutharika finally announced a new one on Wednesday. This came after a civil society petition to the president on Monday, which told him that his office couldn’t competently handle all the functions of government alone. The new cabinet is made up largely of old faces, but Mutharika has reduced the number of ministers to 31 - still large by world standards, but nine ministers less than before. The bloated cabinet had been a key concern for anti-government protesters. In addition to the president, there are two other Mutharikas involved. His brother and anointed successor, Peter MuthariPhoto: REUTERS

ka, has been promoted to head the prestigious foreign ministry, while his wife Callista assumes the post of minister of safe motherhood; a laudable cause no doubt, but we doubt it deserves its own ministry. The announcement of the cabinet may also have been precipitated by the unexpected defeat of the ruling party candidate in a local byelection on Wednesday. The northern district of Rumphi elected a candidate from a minor opposition party in what was widely interpreted as a rejection of Mutharika’s rule, although the handling of the election was described as flawed by the ruling party and one of the major opposition parties.

Read more: 1. Malawi’s New Cabinet on Malawi Voice 2. Malawi’s ruling party floored in by-election on Africa Review

thursday - 08 september 2011


africa

uganda

Act II in Uganda vs the gays Nobody appears to be paying much attention to the fact that Uganda’s infamous anti-gay bill is on the table once more. According to activist group Behind The Mask, the chairman of Uganda’s legal and parliamentary affairs committee has announced that the Anti-Homosexuality Bill would be debated on Wednesday again. By REBECCA DAVIS. The cabinet debate happens a week after South Africa's ambassador to Uganda, columnist Jon Qwelane, successfully defended a claim that a homophobic column did not constitute hate speech. Qwelane may well be cheering the proposed Ugandan law from the sidelines, since the Ugandan government appears to concur with Qwelane’s sentiment that “gay is NOT okay”. The legislation proposes to imprison gays and execute those convicted of "aggravated homosexuality" offences. The bill was originally tabled in May, but the Ugandan cabinet initially voted to discard the legislation after coming under intense international pressure from donor countries. It also argued there was little point in spending time and money to pass the bill when Uganda's existing anti-homosexuality laws are very strict, with hoPhoto: President Museveni of Uganda. (Reuters)

mosexuality already punishable by a jail term. The new impetus behind its re-tabling now has now been provided by the anti-gay "Pass the Bill Now” campaign, spearheaded by the Uganda National Parents Network and the Uganda Coalition for Moral Values. This time they are proposing Uganda sever all international relationships that might impede the implementation of the law. In a statement to government, the campaign urged them to "Remember that it is the Ugandans who elected you and not donors or foreign governments," suggesting Uganda focus on strengthening ties with nations that "share common values". We can only hope, if nothing else, the threat of losing a lot of aid again discourages the Ugandan government from making the bill into law.

Read more: 1. Parent group supports Uganda Kill the Gays bill, on Care2.com

thursday - 08 september 2011


africa

egypt

Football and Egypt’s hooligan revolutionaries As they ripped up stadium seats and showered police with urine, it was hard to remember that the hooligan supporters of Egypt’s top football clubs were on the frontlines of the revolution. But after besting police in running street fights, it was easy to see to why they remain one of the transitional government’s biggest headaches. By SIMON ALLISON. The organised hooligan elements of Al Ahly, Egypt and Africa’s biggest and most successful football club, are enjoying the postMubarak era. Every weekend, the terraces in Cairo Stadium rock with chants that are only possible in the new Egypt. “Fuck the mother of Hosni Mubarak,” goes one. And to the

ranks of police stewards in the stadium: “Go fuck your minister, Habib al Adly,” a reference to the former interior minister and police boss, who is co-accused in Mubarak’s trial. As is custom, the police circle the field Photo: REUTERS

THURSDAY - 08 september 2011


africa

egypt

Mubarak’s security forces tolerated them, mindful of giving a frustrated population some outlet for expression, but were nervous of their growing popularity.

with their backs to the action, eyes firmly trained on the fans. Understanding that power has shifted, most match-days they stand there and take the abuse. But not on Tuesday night. Al Ahly were playing Kemi Aswan, and the action on the pitch was less entertaining than policeman-bashing. Seats were broken, firecrackers were lit, bottles were thrown. “The fans slapped the policemen on the back of their heads and threw plastic bottles at them containing urine,” said a government representative later. “The police are subjected to constant assaults everywhere and we are doing our best to exercise self-restraint. I don’t know why those fans are acting fiercely.” This time, the police lost their patience. As the match ended with a resounding victory for Al Ahly, the lights in the stadium went out and police advanced with sticks, chasing fans out of the stadium and along a nearby road. In the course of the clashes, more than 70 people were wounded – most of them policemen. The hardcore fans of Al Ahly, as well as those of their archenemies Zamalek, have never had a good relationship with the police, although they’ve never before been

able to challenge them to such a degree. In the stifled, oppressive political atmosphere of Mubarak’s Egypt, football gangs were one of the few areas where young men could channel their emotions, and violence has long been an integral part of Egypt’s football culture – usually, it’s been directed at the support of opposition teams. Mubarak’s security forces tolerated them, mindful of giving a frustrated population some outlet for expression, but were nervous of their growing popularity. “The more they tried to put pressure on us, the more we grew in cult status. The [interior] ministry and the media, they would call us a gang, as violent,” said Assad, a leader of the Al Ahly ultras, in an interview with CNN. “It wasn't just supporting a team; you were fighting a system and the country as a whole. We were fighting the police, fighting the government, fighting for our rights...this was something new, a little bit of a seed...” And as popular momentum gathered behind Egypt’s revolution earlier this year, Al Ahly and Zamalek ultras temporarily put aside their differences and came out openly against Mubarak. In the revolution’s fiercest battles against pro-Mubarak forces,

THURSDAY - 08 september 2011


africa

egypt

And as popular momentum gathered behind Egypt’s revolution earlier this year, Al Ahly and Zamalek ultras temporarily put aside their differences and came out openly against Mubarak.

be it against the police or the rent-a-militia recruited to quell the uprising, the ultras were on the frontlines, using their street-fighting know-how to help organise the fightback. “I don't want to say we were solely responsible for bringing down Mubarak,” Assad said. “Our role was to make people dream, letting them know if a cop hits you, you can hit them back. This was a police state. Our role started earlier than the revolution. During the revolution, there was the Muslim Brotherhood, the activists and the ultras. That's it.” Football hooligans are rarely on the right side of history, in other countries attracting a particularly right-wing reputation, as evidenced last week in Bulgaria where black

English players were subjected to racist abuse from certain sections of the home crowd during a Euro 2012 qualifier. But their influence in Egypt has been strong and largely positive, and in this strange interim period they are keeping pressure on the transitional government to deliver on the ideals of the revolution and not revert to a police state. In addition to police-baiting, Egyptian ultras are guarding the families of people who died in the revolution from any possible police vengeance. And they’ll be out in force this Friday in Tahrir Square, where another million-man march is planned to put pressure on the transitional government to implement reforms. But all this political action doesn’t mean that Egypt’s ultras have put their own differences behind them. The derby between Al Ahly and Zamalek remains one of the most volatile in world football, and amid Egypt’s chaos and instability, that’s one thing that won’t change any time soon.

Read more: 1. Sept 9th Friday of Anger set to intensify as Egypt’s football ultras vow to settle score with police in Egypt’s Al Ahram 2. Egypt’s revolutionary soccer ultras: how football fans toppled Mubarak on CNN 3. Egypt police attack fans after anti-Mubarak chants on Egypt’s Bikya Masr

THURSDAY - 08 september 2011


africa

niger/libya

The Tuareg people and the mystery of the Niger convoy Niger’s foreign minister insists that while several people, of varying importance, arrived in Niger in a heavily armed convoy on Tuesday, neither Gaddafi nor any of his sons were among the passengers. Asked whether Gaddafi was welcome in Niger, the minister said that decision was up to the president but added: "Gaddafi in Niger could cause some problems". Niger is certainly too close to Libya for any future government of Libya to feel free of the shackles of Gaddafi but in Niger itself, Gaddafi’s wheeling and dealing with the nomadic Tuareg people could prove especially challenging. By KHADIJA PATEL and SIMON ALLISON. On Tuesday, while Nato jets continued to pummel Sirte, the hometown of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, the nearby town of Bani Walid laid down their arms and agreed to hoist the flag of the National Transitional Council (NTC) well before the 10 September deadline.

Rebel soldiers celebrated the advance closer to Gaddafi’s hometown by shooting into the air but their celebrations proved premature. Tribal leaders in Bani Walid recanted later in Photo: REUTERS

thurSDAY - 8 SEPTEMBER 2011


africa

The much trumpedup convoy consisted of more than a dozen pickup trucks bristling with well-armed Libyan troops, according to eyewitnesses. Tuareg rebel leaders were reported to have led the convoy into the town of Agadez. the day. But away from the to-and-fro of the negotiations, the most salacious news of the Libyan war came from Niger. Early reports indicated that a convoy of between 200 and 250 vehicles was given an escort by the army of Niger across the Libyan border. Reuters soon fanned rampant speculation of who exactly was aboard the convoy by quoting a French military source who believed the convoy would be joined by Gaddafi en route to neighbouring Burkina Faso, which has of course offered Brother Leader asylum. The speculation was killed by the foreign minister of Niger who unequivocally denied that Gaddafi had fled Libya and was in Niger. "It is not true, it is not Gaddafi and I do not

niger/libya

think the convoy was of the size attributed to it," the minister told AFP. Reports from Chad late on Tuesday appeared to corroborate the minister. The size of the convoy does now appear to have been significantly exaggerated. Eye witnesses claim no more than 30 vehicles passed into the town Agadez on Monday night. Speculation however has grown that South Africa – diplomatic superheroes that we are – is brokering a deal that would see Libya move entirely into rebel hands in exchange for a safe passage for Gaddafi into Burkina Faso. In Libya, the rumour mill is a particularly lucrative industry. The much trumped-up convoy consisted of more than a dozen pickup trucks bristling with well-armed Libyan troops, according to eyewitnesses. Tuareg rebel leaders were reported to have led the convoy into the town of Agadez under the protection of the local army. Gaddafi remains popular in towns like Agadez, where the majority of the population is Tuareg. Gaddafi is remembered fondly for his for his assistance to the Tuareg during their fight for independence. The convoy into Niger raises questions about the Tuaregs and their political influence in Libya and the Sahel region. The Tuaregs are the nomads of the Sahara desert, and move largely unimpeded across the borders of Libya, Niger and Mali. They’re historically uncomfortable with governments and restrictions, and are a headache for whatever government is trying to exert its control over them. For example, the leadership of Western Sahara, the breakaway region of Morocco, is led by Tuaregs; and Tuaregs feature prominently in the ranks of alQaeda in the Islamic Maghreb. Gaddafi was one

thurSDAY - 8 SEPTEMBER 2011


africa

niger/libya

An Amnesty International investigation into rebel claims that Gaddafi had paid men from Central and Western Africa to fight for him, found no evidence to corroborate such allegations. Early on in the war, many of the foreigners that were paraded to journalists as foreign mercenaries were later found to have been quietly released.

of the few leaders who successfully co-opted the tribe into his regime, a feat achieved through the provision of political support and money. Tuareg fighters from other countries were welcomed in Libya, and Gaddafi funded Tuareg wars, even across borders: the two Tuareg leaders who apparently headed the convoy – Agbaly Alambo and Rhissa Agbouly – led an unsuccessful Gaddafi-funded rebellion in Niger before finding refuge in Libya. In this context, Tuareg support for Gaddafi makes sense. What is more puzzling is how and why they escaped – or were allowed to escape – into Niger. Apparently, the convoy originated from Bani Walid, the town which has been besieged by the rebels for the last week. But did it fight its way through the rebel lines, or was it allowed past? There’s plenty of speculation about a possible secret deal to let the convoy through, with Libya’s new leaders perhaps preferring to be rid of a potentially troublesome – and heavily armed – group of people. The heavily armed convoy also raises

pressing questions about Gaddafi’s reported use of mercenaries during this war. Allegations of “African” mercenaries in Gaddafi’s troops have circulated for as long as this war has raged, but there has so far been scant evidence that Gaddafi did indeed hire mercenaries to quell the armed insurrection against his rule. An Amnesty International investigation into rebel claims that Gaddafi had paid men from Central and Western Africa to fight for him, found no evidence to corroborate such allegations. Early on in the war, many of the foreigners that were paraded to journalists as foreign mercenaries were later found to have been quietly released. Many of the foreigners accused of being mercenaries are actually subSaharan migrant workers without the requisite visas permitting them to be in the country. Talk about African mercenaries has flamed mistrust of dark skinned people in Libya, lending an air of racism to the foundations of the new Libya. Dark skinned people face arbitrary arrest and persecution as rebels seek to win Libya over

thurSDAY - 8 SEPTEMBER 2011


africa

Tuaregs specifically from Niger and Mali have been singled as suspected mercenaries in Gaddafi’s army. Reports indicate that some 4,000 Tuaregs who had been unemployed after a peace deal ended their rebellion against the Niger and Mali governments in 2009 did indeed take up arms for Gaddafi.

from what they deem to be Gaddafi’s hired hands. So too, the Tuaregs in Libya have also been accused of being hired guns. Tuaregs specifically from Niger and Mali have been singled as suspected mercenaries in Gaddafi’s army. Reports indicate that some 4,000 Tuaregs who had been unemployed after a peace deal ended their rebellion against the Niger and Mali governments in 2009 did indeed take up arms for Gaddafi. In March, the BBC reported that Tuaregs were being paid $10,000 to join the Libyan government forces and a further $1,000 a day to fight. If indeed true, this would not be the first time Colonel Gaddafi has turned to the Tuareg for troops. In the 1970s he bolstered his Islamic Legion, a military force to

niger/libya

fight for a united state across North Africa, with the Tuareg. Many Tuaregs have already left Libya, returning to Niger and Mali, but their reputation for violence remains with Tuaregs who remain in Libya, severely exacerbating tensions between the local Tuaregs and rebels. The report on Tuesday of the convoy of vehicles crossing into Niger is markedly similar to a report late last month of a convoy of 60 vehicles that had driven over the Libyan border into Niger. French media also reported a separate incident of a convoy of 20 vehicles crossing into Mali. The Tuareg seem to be in an almighty hurry to leave Libya, taking with them anything that could fetch a price across the border. In the case of the convoy that had crossed the Niger border last month, Niger officials found the remnants of a destroyed helicopter piled on to the back of a pickup truck. But the convoy on Tuesday is reported to have been loaded with cash looted from the central bank but more significantly, senior members of the Gaddafi regime. As Americans implore Niger officials to arrest any of Gaddafi’s aides found in the country, the Tuareg might find that their passengers fetch a handsome price.

Read more: 1. Libyan army convoy in Niger may be Gaddafi deal in Reuters Africa 2. Reports Say Loyalists Are Fleeing From Libya to Niger in The New York Times 3. Poor, Destitute Niger: Gadhafi’s New Home? In International Business Times:

thurSDAY - 8 SEPTEMBER 2011


WORLD

thursDAY – 8 september


world

briefs

Bomb explodes in Delhi, India: 11 killed more than 70 injured. (Reuters)

India A briefcase bomb killed 11 people and injured at least 76 others in an explosion outside the Delhi high court on Wednesday morning. The briefcase packed with explosives detonated at a point when there were about 200 people queuing for entry to the court. A Bangladeshi terrorist group called Harkat-ul-Jehadi Islami has claimed responsibility, purportedly to demand the repeal of the death sentence for a man who attacked the Indian parliament in 2001. This is the second high court attack in four months. US It appears that US defence sec-

retary Leon Panetta is in no hurry to bring the boys home. Obama has pledged that all troops will be out of Iraq by the end of the year, but The New York Times has reported that Panetta supports a plan to keep 3,000 to 4,000 soldiers there after the deadline. Panetta would likely be supported in this proposal by senior commanders, who are said to be livid about the withdrawal because they say Iraq cannot yet ensure internal security. Republican presidential candidates are meeting for a debate in Ronald Reagan's library on Wednesday. It's expected to be largely a two-horse race between Mitt Romney and Rick Perry. In-fighting has already

developed between the two, with Romney calling Perry a "career politician" recently, and Perry saying Romney "failed to institute many of the reforms he now claims to support". Fingers crossed it gets even bitchier. The US has fallen to fifth place in the global competitive rankings due to its growing deficits. The rankings are drawn up by the World Economic Forum, and the news is yet another blow for Obama at a time when he can ill afford it. Switzerland came out on top for the third consecutive year, with Singapore second, Sweden third, and Finland fourth. The highestranked developing economy was China at an impressive

thursday - 08 september 2011


world

26th place. And South Africa gained four places to rank 50th out of 142. China The Chinese government has released a "White Paper" laying out its hopes and dreams for the future. The title says it all: "China's Peaceful Development". In it, the government waxes lyrical about its desire to be "rich, strong, democratic, civilised and harmonious". Enviable stuff. But, it says, it has no desire to dominate any other nations. It's been suggested the paper is a little at odds with reality, conflicting with China’s military expansion and neglecting any mention of the crackdown on government dissenters. Italy & Spain The Spanish and the Italians are taking to their respective streets to protest austerity proposals by their governments. Italy's largest trade union started a strike on Tuesday. Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi is currently seeking government backing for a package of cuts amounting to $64 billion. There are similar scenes in Spain, where protestors in Madrid are trying to halt constitutional reforms aimed at calming nerves about the country's ability to service its debt.

briefs

Uruguay President JosĂŠ Mujica has apologised for the sexual assault carried out by Uruguayan peacekeepers for the UN on a young Haitian man. "I share your sadness, which I feel as my own," Mujica said in a letter addressed to the "dear and heroic people of Haiti". He vowed that the "maximum penalty" would be applied to anyone found guilty. An additional fallout from the incident is that some Haitians are now asking for the UN mission to be shut down, which seems rash. Bahrain Hunger strikes are all the rage among activists these days, it seems. Shortly after Anna Hazare's successful public fast in Italy, more than 100 jailed Bahraini activists have gone on a hunger strike. They are demanding better rights for Shi'ites in the Sunni-run country. An international expert on hunger strikes is set to visit the detainees to evaluate their conditions. Libya Negotiators say the Gaddafiloyal town of Bani Walid is ready to surrender to the rebels. This feeling isn't totally unanimous - Gaddafi diehards shot at the tribal elders representing the town in talks with the rebels. Gaddafi's top brass were all hiding out in Bani

Walid, but have now all escaped, including Gaddafi's two sons. Once the rebels get the go-ahead, their forces, currently surrounding the town, will enter to take it. There might yet be one last bloody battle. Russia A Russian passenger jet has crashed near the city of Yarosalvl, northeast of Moscow. Current reports are that only two of the 45 passengers on board the plane survived. The jet was taking members of the Lokomtiv Yaroslavl ice hockey team to Minsk for their first match of the season. At the moment the crash is being blamed on the age of the plane: Soviet-era planes from the 1980s are still in service in Russia. Sri Lanka Amnesty International has called on the UN to set up an inquiry into war crimes during the final months of Sri Lanka's civil war in 2009. Between 10,000 and 20,000 civilians died during the last months, and AI claims it has evidence of the army shelling civilian areas. It also says the Tamil Tigers used human shields for protection. The Sri Lankan government is currently staging a TRC type inquiry, the Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission, but AI has already said its findings will not be credible.

thursday - 08 september 2011


world

phone-hacking scandal

Guardian journalist questioned by police over phone-hacking leaks In the latest bizarre development in the News Corp sideshow, a Guardian journalist has been quizzed by police investigating information leaks about their investigation of phone hacking. Or something like that. By REBECCA DAVIS. The Guardian's Amelia Hill was taken in for questioning by the police last week, but details of it only emerged on Wednesday. Police claim she published several stories for The Guardian about the police’s inquiry into the phone-hacking scandal which were based on leaks from a police officer assigned to the case. Guardian execs said the development was "a bleak day for journalism" and noted that "journalists would no doubt be concerned if the police sought to criminalise conversations between off-the-record sources and reporters". The reason why the Met is getting edgy about relationships between journalists and police officers is undoubtedly a result of the uncomfortably close relationships between police and the media exposed by the phone-hacking scandal. The police force has launched two internal inquiries to determine whether police officers should be prePhoto: REUTERS

vented from speaking freely to the media. Meanwhile, on Tuesday four former News of the World executives received a grilling from the same parliamentary committee that put the Murdochs under the spotlight in July. Former editor Colin Myler, former heads of legal affairs Tom Crone and Jon Chapman, and former head of resources Daniel Cloke were all in the hotseat. The most damaging revelation to emerge from the sitting were the testimonies of Myler and Crone that they had informed James Murdoch three years ago of an email proving that phone hacking was more widespread than merely the actions of one rogue reporter. This is in direct contradiction to Murdoch's own testimony to the committee, and virtually guarantees his return to sit in front of the group again. He won't be looking forward to that.

Read more: 1. Guardian journalist questioned over alleged phone-hacking leaks, in The Guardian

thursday - 08 september 2011


world

lord black

Black is back - in the slammer, that is Conrad Black, aka Lord Black of Crossharbour, aka Inmate #18330424, is back in federal prison in the US. Like News Corp’s Rupert Murdoch, he is a media baron who has fallen mightily from grace. Unlike Murdoch, he has done time. And he’s about to do more. By RICHARD POPLAK. This week, the minimum-security Federal Correctional Institute in Miami welcomes a new guest. He will look quite different from the largely black, largely under-educated prison population in Florida, where almost 70% are “men of colour”. None of Lord Black’s fellow inmates is a card-carrying noble, unless you count drug barons—narcotics offenses are far and away the leading cause of incarceration in the Sunshine State. And it’s safe to say that none of his new bunkmates will have assembled a 1,200-page tome on Richard Nixon almost entirely from memory, as the Black-meister has. No, Conrad Black is sui generis, and his remarkable biography takes a new twist this week as he prepares to serve out the second leg of a three-and-a-half-year sentence. In

July, Judge Amy St Eve, judicially unimpressed by Lord Black’s Brobdingnagian vocabulary, ordered Black to return to prison for charges of fraud and the obstruction of justice. Black had been free on $2 million bail for the past year, languishing in a luxury hotel in New York with his devoted wife, Barbara Amiel, sans passport and, therefore, unable to travel. He managed, in his time off, to get into a spat with the conservative Canadian government, which is tub-thumping a toughon-bad-guys platform despite the tumble in crime rates. Black, who is partly responsible for invigorating Canada’s conservative movement by founding the National Post, the country’s Photo: REUTERS

thursday - 08 september 2011


world

right-wing daily, and partly responsible for Prime Minister Stephen Harper, the man who makes the Tea Party look like a hippy love-in, couldn’t help but point out the absurdity of building new prisons in a country that doesn’t need them. Black is a small “c” conservative in an age where there is no longer a home for such a creature, and the government has duly ignored him, as the centre-left once did. Indeed, Black’s first stint in prison seems to have changed him. We won’t bandy about the term “humility” because that’s absurd given the man and the context, but it has certainly complicated his view of how an enlightened society should be governed, especially concerning crime and punishment. Black hasn’t exactly been contrite. He has pointed out that all but four of the 16 or so convictions with which he was charged have been shot down, which makes him only about 15% guilty. That he ripped off Hollinger’s shareholders is no longer in doubt and that he acted like a corporate swine at a trough he did not own is also no longer up for dispute. He still refuses even the tiniest of mea culpas and “has never ceased to assert his innocence”, according to his bio. That said, Black, always an astute mind, now has a perspective on the penal system in the US (and, by extension, the West), which he has frequently excoriated as “inane”, “malicious” and “stupid”. This month, he is publishing a memoir called “A Matter of Principle”, which covers his time at Hollinger International, his fall from grace, along with “the prosecutors who mounted a campaign to destroy him and the journalists who presumed he was guilt”. The über-villain, however, will no doubt be the US, a country in which Black seems to have

lord black

lost all faith. Flitting between the ivory tower and the gutter, Black may well be the man to put 21st century America into some kind of meaningful perspective. He has powerful friends and he has bunked with hardened cons in a Florida prison cell. (Twice.) Among his enemies Black can count the heads of state of at least three G8 nations, and lesser functionaries that number in the thousands. If he can’t get to the nut of the issue, then who can? It is, however, difficult to see how “without reserve” “A Matter of Principle” will be when Black refuses to be frank about his malfeasance at Hollinger. (His obstruction of justice was, famously, caught on camera when he and several associates moved incriminating paper out of his offices in the dead of night.) If he plans to turn the klieg lights on his enemies, should he not sit in the hot seat for a few moments himself? That’s media barons for you. Their frankness tends not to extend to their own activities. (See also: Murdoch, Rupert.) While Black unfurls his bedroll and toils in the prison factory, his book will rocket up the bestseller lists and find its way under Christmas trees. His sense of self will be secure and in seven or so months he’ll be free to plan the plundering of another raft of hapless shareholders. And in the Florida Correctional Institute, there is one thing with which he can console himself: He is not the most famous man ever to bunk there. That honour belongs to Manuel Noriega.

Read more: 1. Conrad Black returns to prison to finish sentence” in CTV 2. Black through the years at CBC 3. "Suckered by America" by Lord Black himself, in the LRC

thursday - 08 september 2011


BUSINESS

thursDAY – 8 september


business

briefs

Business South Africa The JSE had a great comeback day, gaining 3.4% of recent losses to close at 30,545. Sasol, the world’s largest motor fuel coal producer, gained 5.5% as brent crude oil had its biggest gain in three weeks. SAB Miller gained 2.7% as analysts changed the stock’s rating to “buy”. Anglogold Ashanti led the Top40 lower, losing 1.1% as the gold price dropped 3% in trading. Media company Avusa terminated the potential deal by suitors Capitau as the deadline for a firm offer by 7 September failed to materialise. Proposed tax changes were apparently the cause of failure to deliver a bid. UK The FTSE 100 posted its biggest gain since May, ending up 3.1% to close at 5,319. Barclays PLC and Lloyds Banking both climbed 6% while BHP Billiton climbed 4.8%. Randgold Resources led the laggards, down 2.3% following the gold price lower.

James Murdoch (Reuters)

House prices in the UK fell for the first time in four months, as negative sentiment set in the housing market. Prices dropped 1.2% from July, according to Lloyds Banking mortgage stats. James Murdoch, son of Rupert, faces further scrutiny in the phone hacking scandal after two senior executives challenged his statements to Parliament. The company’s lawyer and former editor claim Murdoch was made aware of phone hacking in 2008, contradicting statements he made to the parliamentary commission last month.

US President Obama is hoping to create opportunities for job growth by injecting $300 million into the economy. Tax cuts, infrastructure spending and direct aid to local governments would make up the bulk of the efforts. Facebook reportedly doubled its first half revenue to $1.6 billion as it continues to make inroads into the online advertising sector. Net income rose to $500 million for the period, countering perceptions that social media companies can’t make profits. The figures released by an unnamed company insider will boost interest

THursday - 08 september 2011


business

briefs

in the company’s expected 2012 IPO, estimated to be around $100 billion. In the time Steve Jobs presided over Apple, the share price grew by a multiple of 91, causing the share price to fall when his retirement as CEO was announced. Since then, the cost to insure against further losses in Apple stock value dropped to one-year lows as the market comes to accept the company will continue to prosper in his absence as CEO. After ousting CEO Carol Bartz, the share price of Yahoo! surged up to 8.4% in early NYSE trading as the market digested the news that management shakeup would help the company out of its slumber. The board is looking at a number of alternatives to unpack further value for shareholders, including a delisting to private equity partners. HP is set to introduce four touch screen desktop models, ahead of its planned sell-off of its PC division. HP is planning to move more aggressively into software where margins are higher. Europe Stocks in Europe rose the most in three weeks, as they rebounded from two year lows. Greek stocks gained as Germany’s high court rejected chal-

Victor Muller, SAAB Chairman (Reuters)

lenges on the legality of the bailouts made by the country to other euro zone members. Mercedes-Benz has ramped up the number of high-end luxury models and SUV’s is it plans to challenge BMW’s recently released record profits. BMW and VW have grown five times faster than Merc, mainly by increasing number of available models. Merc now sits third behind BMW and Audi in luxury car sales. SAAB, the Swedish automobile manufacturer, had its shares suspended in Amsterdam trad-

ing as it filed for court protection from creditors under bankruptcy legislation. The 60-year-old company is seeking to raise 150 million euros to see off creditors. The trading outlook for Ireland was given a kick in the family jewels as the IMF cut its GDP forecast for the Emerald Isle to 0.4% for 2011 and 1.5% for 2012. The country’s trade surplus widened to record levels in June as exports of dairy and medical products surged, but are expected to feel the effect of a tougher second-half of the year.

THursday - 08 september 2011


business

mining

NUM, AngloPlat reach wage deal. No pressure to other mining houses AngloPlatinum and the National Union of Mineworkers have reached a wage deal, and other platinum miners are in earnest talks with the unions to either end or avert strikes. By SIPHO HLONGWANE.

AngloPlatinum, the world’s largest producer of platinum, announced on Wednesday that it had reached a two-year wage deal with the National Union of Mineworkers and two other unions, and had avoided a strike. Reuters said that the deal was structured such that in the second year, the wage hike would be 8% plus 2% or 9% plus 2%, depending on the worker category, should the average consumer price index increase equal 8%. NUM had previously demanded a 12-15% wage increase, while AngloPlat offered 5%. All eyes are now on Impala Platinum, where NUM and other unions are still negotiating a wage deal. The average wage deal reached Photo: REUTERS

across the mining sector is between 7 and 10%, which not only places a watermark for ImPlats, but pressures it into accepting the unions’ offer should it fall within that range. NUM also reached a one-year wage deal with Rainbow Minerals’ Nkomati Mine and the Bokoni Platinum Mine, owned by AngloPlat and Anooraq Resources. The tone of the negotiations in the mining sector seems to be a lot better than that of negotiations between the South African Municipal Workers Union and the South African Local Government Assocation, where Samwu exploited a loophole to strike this year. The union also demanded an 18% wage hike.

Read more: 1. AngloPlat, unions sign wage deal in Fin24

thursday - 08 september 2011


business

telecoms

AT&T, Deutsche Telekom, US government scrap over T-Mobile AT&T wants to buy T-Mobile. Deutsche Bank wants to sell it. Straightforward, no? No. The buyer might have to pay the seller if the deal falls through. And it might, because the US government is suspicious of AT&T’s desire to merge. By SIPHO HLONGWANE Deutsche Bank has wanted to get out of the USA – due to tumbling sales – for some time now. It seemed like it would finally be able to when AT&T offered to purchase T-Mobile USA from the bank for a reported $39 billion. Then things got complicated. Tied up into these deals is something known as a “breakup fee” – a sum that the buyer has to pay the seller if the deal doesn’t work out. On 5 September, Reuters quoted a person “familiar with the matter” who said that AT&T may not be obliged to pay the $6 billion breakup fee under certain conditions. According to the source, the deal is only valid if the acquisition receives regulatory apPhoto: REUTERS

proval within a certain timeframe, and the agreement could become invalid if regulatory conditions for the sale push the value of T-Mobile below a certain level. AT&T could be manoeuvring to get out of the fee in anticipation of a lawsuit brought by the US government. The authorities are concerned that the merger – which would create the largest telecommunications company in the US – would result in uncompetitive behaviour in the industry. Deutsche Telekom said that Reuters were mistaken, and it was definitely entitled to a fee should the deal fall through.

Read more: 1. Deutsche Telekom: we are entitled to a break-up fee in CNet News 2. AT&T could escape fee in T-Mobile deal in Reuters

thursday - 08 september 2011


business

parastatals

Gigaba: Transnet and Eskom are fine as is Malusi Gigaba’s response to private investors asking to take over some state-owned enterprises was a firm “no”. The state is expanding, not narrowing, its public enterprise project. By SIPHO HLONGWANE “There is no anticipated privatisation of any of the entities or even a breakup of these entities,” said public enterprises minister Malusi Gigaba to Reuters in an interview. He was responding to repeated calls by private sector investors to privatise Transnet and Eskom. These investors said that they could help bring balance back to the balance sheet of these stateowned enterprises, and yes, do a better job of providing transport infrastructure and utilities to the country. Instead, Gigaba said, government would be cautious about involving private business in the sector. “On the continent private sector participation has been dismal… we have to be cautious in moving forward,” he said. His department will be developing a framework to allow private investors to have their input, but it probably won’t allow them the sort of free rein they would otherwise desire. Gigaba said to BusinessDay that the public Photo: REUTERS

enterprises ministry, the economic development ministry and the trade and industry ministry, as well as the eight main state-owned companies had held talks to implement a new competitive supplier development programme designed to boost South Africa’s industrial growth. The R624 billion capital expenditure budget set aside for these departments and SOEs would be “leveraged” for this programme. The government’s own under-investment in road, rail, port and power projects (you can almost hear the private investors fidgeting in the background) has been blamed for South Africa’s failure to have a thriving industrial sector. One idea that has emerged is requiring international manufacturers of supplies to make a certain portion of their goods locally. Transnet is planning to buy 100 locomotives from General Electric and, as a part of the deal, 90 of them have to be manufactured here.

Read more: 1. Gigaba: Transnet, Eskom won’t be sold in Fin24 2. Gigaba’s new plan to boost industry in BusinessDay

thursday - 08 september 2011


business

banking

The cool banker, Michael Jordaan First National Bank has emerged as the new face of cool business in South Africa. It’s an extraordinary feat, given that the industry is mostly defined by its conservatism. SIPHO HLONGWANE speaks to CEO Michael Jordaan about the bank’s gospel of innovation and other strategies for success. South Africa’s banking industry sat on the sidelines of the worst of the 2008 financial meltdown. They were spared the fates of their American and European counterparts, and if you ask why, the answer varies. The government spin is that our strict banking regulations saved the banks from harming themselves by imposing strict exchange controls.

But that’s not true, FNB chief executive officer Michael Jordaan says. “A popular conception, and it is a lie propagated by the banks themselves, is that exchange controls saved us,” he says. “And this was a lie we were happy to go with because it was something the man in the street could understand. “So all these foreign banks were investing

Thursday - 08 september 2011


business

“As CEO, I actually have very little to do… It’s completely overestimated what I do. I create an environment where people can come up with these ideas and do well.” in subprime mortgage funds through the exchange controls and South African banks didn’t. It’s a lie because if you wanted to, you could. There are mechanisms to get to CDOs [collateralised debt obligation]. So why didn’t we? And this goes for the whole industry and not just FNB by the way. “First of all, we are very well regulated. It’s not always nice to be ruled by an iron fist, but we are. The second reason is South African bank management is excellent. That’s why in the World Economic Forum I said we are the sixth-best in the world. The third one is that you’ll find that the banks that took the most risks are those in economies that didn’t grow,” Jordaan says. For banks to maintain the profit margins demanded by shareholders in those countries with poor economic growth, they began taking on more risk than they should have, Jordaan explains. The result of all this is it has put South

banking

Africa’s banks in the enviable position of holding more capital than their European and American counterparts . Jordaan is confident South African banks will have a higher capital ratio in 2019 than their Western counterparts – even higher than the requirements of Basel III , the global regulatory standard on bank capital adequacy and liquidity agreed by the members of the Basel Committee on Banking Standards The 43-year-old CEO has spent pretty much all his life in the banking industry, starting off at Deutsche Bank and then moving around in different leadership positions within the First Rand group before being appointed to the top of FNB in 2004. Since then, the organisation’s name has cropped up several times as the best bank in the South African and African industry. Jordaan says the key to that success has been attracting the right type of people to the organisation. He cites their innovation reward scheme, where employees receive a prize of R1 million if they successfully come up with and implement an innovative idea, as an example of the incentives FNB uses to attract the right kind of people to the organisation. “As CEO, I actually have very little to do,” he says. “It’s completely over-estimated what I do. I create an environment where people can come up with these ideas and do well. We’re blessed with people who can do that. The thing about being good with tech is that we can’t be a staid old bank. Very few people want to work for those. They like cool, hi-tech kind of companies to work for and so all I can do is create the environment and trust in the people to innovate.”

Thursday - 08 september 2011


business

banking

“Capitec is a respected competitor. It’s come into the market and innovated. When it first came in, we didn’t take it seriously enough and that was a mistake.”

FNB is also somewhat of a telecommunications company these days through FNB Connect. This Internet service company which operates within the First Rand cluster, was an internal employee innovation which FNB implemented and now offers to customers as part of its incentive package. The FNB CEO describes FNB Connect as an example of “wanting to do cool things for our customers”. The bank was also careful not to position FNB Connect as a competitor to other telecommunications companies. “How FNB Connect came about is that there was an opportunity in the market for us to apply for a licence,” Jordaan says. “You’ll remember the court case between Altech and the regulator. It really opened the opportunity for us to get a licence about the interpretation of the regulations. We can now negotiate with other ‘telcos’ as a peer, not as a customer. Then the techies said we had a whole network and we should give that to our customers. “The usage package for us is our customers use it exactly when we don’t use it. It’s a nice value-add for our customers. If you want to know a vision – in a few years time, there must be no rational reason not to bank with us,” he says.

A lot of FNB’s innovation that gets publicity is aimed at its top-end customers (with South Africa’s poor Internet penetration, it is the higher-ups in the ladder who are online). Jordaan says they haven’t abandoned the lower end of the pyramid, and are specifically competing with Capitec for lower-end customers. “Capitec is a respected competitor. It’s come into the market and innovated. When it first came in, we didn’t take it seriously enough and that was a mistake. Now we’re taking it very seriously and we are rolling out branches faster than it is. We think that our EasyPlan branches are better because they offer more. We’re also price-competitive with Capitec.” FNB’s African growth is based on three prongs: that of green-field ventures, accelerated green-field ventures and acquisitions. The thrust that would be used in the particular country depends on how easy it is to obtain a banking licence there, among other things. In countries like Botswana and Namibia (where FNB is a big employer and taxpayer), the company grows from the ground up, just like a start-up would. This strategy is FNB’s favourite, Jordaan says, as it means the bank can implement

Thursday - 08 september 2011


business

its systems and breathe its culture into the organisation right away. When that doesn’t work, they acquire a small bank within the company and then put it on an aggressive growth trajectory (the accelerated green-field venture), as they have done in Mozambique. In countries like Nigeria and Ghana, where there is either privatisation of banks or a narrowing of the banking industry, the company would probably opt for an outright acquisition. Jordaan is something of a big deal on Twitter , which he says is purely for fun. “What I really like about Twitter is that it’s short – and sometimes there is time for short bursts of conversation. Having started to do it, I can really see the benefit,” he says. He is not the company’s public face, however. That is “RB Jacobs”, a fake persona based on an old FNB ad joke. Executive salary has been in the news of late, with South Africa’s trade unions throwing a huge fit when it was reported that executives enjoyed a 23,3% pay hike last year. Jordaan says although South African companies are among some of the most socially responsible in the world, he is not opposed to a wealth tax. And a lot of rich business people are actively involved in social responsibility projects. “Some people choose to do these things and not make a big deal about it,” he says. “Personally I’d like to be in that category. I feel a deep social responsibility for this country. I want my kids to grow up here and I want this to be a successful country. You don’t only do that by working and drawing a salary, although that’s a very important part of it, but also by running a sustainable business and ploughing back into the country. It doesn’t

banking

We can now negotiate with other ‘telcos’ as a peer, not as a customer. Then the techies said we had a whole network and we should give that to our customers. necessarily all have to be in the public eye.” A salary cap for executives would have mixed results, Jordaan says. “You’d have a lot of skill leaving the corporate sector and doing something else. Some of them elsewhere in the world, but some would become entrepreneurs. You’d just have skill being applied elsewhere. You’d probably have corporations which aren’t being run as well, and you’d probably have some entrepreneurs that do very well. In the end I think you have to pay for skill. In big businesses that employ thousands of people mistakes are very costly. “If you make a mistake, it’s billions of rands in consequences and other people lose their jobs,” the FNB CEO says. “The real debate there is whether you are delivering value to you stakeholders, not just shareholders. It is actually about inequality and is a separate debate to how you reward people for value that they put into a company.”

Thursday - 08 september 2011


business

youtube

How Peter Carvell lost weight. Got a life. Found a career. Thanks to the internet. In 2006 Peter Carvell had just landed back in SA after spending a couple of years in the UK doing the study, work and experience life kinda thing. When he landed there was no cushy job waiting for him, and like most young people he had to start finding work for himself in a tough market. From there it went downhill all the way. Until he discovered YouTube. By MANDY DE WAAL. “I didn’t have a job and was living with my brother and over a year I had picked up 45kg to 50kg ,” says Carvell. “At school I was incredibly successful, I was sportsman of the year and 10 years on I was 27, didn’t have my own place and didn’t even have a job.” He reached a point where he decided he needed to turn his life around and thought the only way he’d be able to stay motivated was if he published his journey online. “I started losing weight on my own, and discovered YouTube, which at that stage was about a year old.”

Carvell had started his own personal journey about the same time YouTube started changing the world. Created by Chad Hurley, Steve Chen, and Jawed Karim, who used to work at PayPal, YouTube’s first video was a 19-seconder of Karim standing in front of some elephants at the San Diego Zoo. A couple of months later YouTube had its first viral sensation when Nike saw its potential and put a video of Ronaldinho doing a victory samba online. Photo: Peter Carvell. (Reuters)

THursday - 08 September 2011


business

The YouTube Partner Programme has now been expanded to Africa which means anyone with a mobile phone, free editing software that can be downloaded online and a big idea can start making money. People loved Ronaldinho’s dance, YouTube got funding and launched in December 2005. Soon afterwards it got more funding and then some crazy guy called Judson Laipply posted a video called “The Evolution of Dance”. That’s when people really started seeing how massive YouTube was. In October 2006 Google bought YouTube for $1.65 billion and today Laipply’s crazy dance video has been seen more than 180 million times. YouTube’s numbers are impressive. Thirteen-million hours of video were uploaded in 2010, while 48 hours of video are currently uploaded every minute. Each day more than 3 billion videos are viewed, but the most important number to people reading this article will be the 30,000 partners around the world who get millions from Google each year. Everyone knows about the chocolate rain guy or wondered why millions of people would watch an annoying orange, and hears

youtube

rumours of YouTube’s millionaires. But what are people making, really? “The YouTube Partner Programme enables people to make money on advertising which is shown through their content. These adverts are shown inside or next to the video and the partner has full control of how the adverts are shown,” says Sara Mormino, the YouTube Partner manager for Europe, the Middle East and Africa. “Over the past year we’ve had massive growth in the number of partners who are earning over $100,000 a year and in the EMEA region we have more than 100 partners who are earning six-figure revenues.” The YouTube Partner Programme has now been expanded to Africa which means anyone with a mobile phone, free editing software that can be downloaded online and a big idea can start making money. Local channel owners can make anywhere from R20,000 to R60,000 a month if they’re appealing enough to draw in good numbers. “Most of the online creators in our programme started with a small budget and freeware and used their imagination to produce excellent content,” says Mormino. But let’s get back to Carvell, the year 2006 and his drive to lose weight, get a life and develop rock-hard abs. “My first video was day one of my transformation, which was overwhelming because I didn’t know much about video and putting yourself out there… well you don’t know if you will embarrass yourself.” Carvell says the interface was easy enough, so he shot the footage, put it online, and went through his body transformation, learned a lot about himself and started attracting viewers.

THursday - 08 September 2011


business

youtube

“I get between $5,000 to $6,000 a month from YouTube during an average month, and product can bring in another $3,000 to $4,000 or more monthly.”

“The thought of embarrassing myself in front of the whole world put me under pressure, and putting the videos up gave me something to do with my life because I didn’t have a job. It was the perfect solution to make sure I pushed through and got that perfect sixpack,” says Carvell. Thanks to the experience Carvell was getting on YouTube he was able to start a production company, and this took off. Now a fit and lean man can focus on growing his business. “My YouTube channel went dormant for a couple of years because I’d achieved my goal and was busy with my company, but when a large contract came to an end, I thought I’d have another go at it.” This was the time of the World Cup, YouTube had just announced its partner programme, and Carvell achieved more than 2,6 million views with a simple video of himself doing ab exercises. “I started uploading videos, but now YouTube was very popular and thousands of people were uploading videos and I was only getting 500 to 1,000 views on each upload.” But because Carvell was trying to create a web site and an online business, he was undeterred. “I continued to upload, and the

more I did the more the interest picked up to a point where the videos were getting thousands of views and more. I did one video eight months ago on a 12-minute ab work out which got more than 2 million views,” says Carvell, who didn’t spend a cent on marketing or advertising. “Today the channel has almost 40,000 subscribers and I am making a viable living. Well, I think it is good money.” Carvell says the amount of money he earns depends on how much effort he puts in. He makes a share off advertising on his channel, together with sales of products like a “Six-Pack Diet” that he’s developed for his site. “I get between $5,000 to $6,000 a month from YouTube during an average month, and product can bring in another $3,000 to $4,000 or more monthly.” It is early days still for Carvell who, although doing well, with some smarts could continue to grow what is essentially a start-up into a really good business. The big problem for Carvell is focus; he has so many ideas that choosing the right things that build the momentum he already has is crucial. “I get hundreds of comments a month and can’t answer them all, but it gives me a great idea about what people want from me,

THursday - 08 September 2011


business

and this is what drives me forward. I have also started doing DVDs and have sold a few of these, but at this stage my focus is on building the base and the footprint, and taking things from there.” But what’s the silver bullet for perfect ads or weight loss? Sad news from Carvell is that there is none, and it is all about balance and doing things in moderation. “People are looking for that quick pill, the best work out, the best diet plan. Truth is that everything in moderation doesn’t make us fat. We get fat because we drink two litres of coke, eat at the wrong time of day or eat McDonalds every day. One burger won’t make you fat, but if you eat junk for six meals or so you will put on weight,” says Carvell. Good to hear common sense coming from a new player in an industry that too often exploits vulnerabilities for profits. And what’s the secret to making money online? “It doesn’t matter where you are, the minute you go online you’re on par with the rest of the world. Get started because it’s not that difficult. And don’t fall for tricks and people who want to sell you products, just get going. Shoot a video, stick it on YouTube and you never know you might just make money. Like fitness, it is all about getting going, getting information and striving for the results you are looking for.” Carvell advises people wanting to make money on YouTube to be unique, brand their channel, have a clear idea about what they want from a video before they even pick up the camera and to have fun. For his videos Carvell uses a normal HD camcorder,

youtube

But what’s the silver bullet for perfect ads or weight loss? Sad news from Carvell is that there is none, and it is all about balance and doing things in moderation

a few cheap lights and he started out using Moviemaker which is free, but now edits with Sony Vegas Pro. He reduces the size of the videos because SA isn’t bandwidth rich. “I use a normal Cell C 5Gb connection to upload. Not so ‘Woosh’ most of the time, but it works.” He also takes around half an hour a day to answer as many questions as he can. So you can lose weight, get a life and make money on the Internet. The biggest trick, it would seem, is getting started.

Read more: 1. Infographic: The History of Video Advertising on YouTube on The Atlantic 2. Natalie Tran: Down Under's Top YouTuber Considers Her Next Move on Forbes 3. Nollywood and the net: A love story in Mail & Guardian 4. Peter Carvell’s YouTube Channel 5. YouTube’s partner programme.

THursday - 08 September 2011


www.vwcommercial.co.za OGILVY CAPE TOWN 43221/AGRI © VWSA

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LIFE, ETC

thursDAY – 8 september


life, etc

CHINA What do you get a Chinese businessman who has everything? A foreign passport, apparently. A report by the Associated Press suggests that China's wealthiest citizens are desperate to get out of China. They are increasingly investing abroad in order to get a foreign passport – partly to expedite international business, but also to pave their way out. They want out because they want to protect their assets, they want to be able to Google stuff (well, they want to be able to speak freely), and many of them want a second child – verboten in China. USA Who doesn't love a lekker moon photo? Nasa has just released new images of the Apollo landing sites on the moon, and they are pretty cool. The pictures show the hardware left on the moon's surface by US astronauts in the 60s and 70s, including the Apollo 17 "moon buggy". (Haven't these astronauts ever heard of the hippie principle of “take nothing but pictures, leave nothing but footprints”?) The snaps were taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, which has been orbiting its away around earth since 2009.

briefs

Elizabeth Taylor (Reuters)

USA Fans of Elizabeth Taylor and extravagant jewellery will want to start saving up. Liz Taylor's jewellery collection goes on auction at Christie's in December. The pieces on offer include a 33-carat diamond ring and a 16th century pear-shaped pearl given to her by Richard Burton. You don't get to have seven husbands without amassing quite the jewellery box, and Taylor's is valued at $30 million. And boy did she love the stuff, writing in 2002 that: "I'm here to take care of them and to love them". Let's hope their next owner feels similarly. USA Do you know the name Tavi

Gevinson? Tavi is that slightly creepy teenage fashion blogger who launched when she was 13, and since then finds herself front row at all the Vogue shows, with Anna Wintour on speed-dial. Tavi is now 15, and while she's still a fashion celeb, she's decided to branch out, launching a much-anticipated (apparently) website called Rookie, a webzine for teenage girls. No doubt it will do splendidly – after all, no less an authority than Lady Gaga described Tavi as "the future of journalism". UK The UK Poet Laureate, Carol Ann Duffy, says that "txt speak" is going to spawn a new genera-

thursday - 08 september 2011


life, etc

briefs

ever heard. But wait, there's more – Asian Americans are saying the bill is discriminatory because shark fin soup is such a delicacy in Chinese cuisine. They say that if you can buy shark steaks, you should be able to buy shark fins. Seems fair to us. Charlize Theron (Reuters)

tion of poets. In one of those cringey attempts to make literature "relevant" and "personal" to sulky teenagers who don't give a toss, Duffy told high school pupils at the launch of a literary competition that: "The poem is a form of texting. It's the original text". As Shakespeare wrote, "Rose by eni otha name wd smel as swit LOL”. PHILIPPINES Oy vey. You must have seen the footage of this by now: fishermen in the Philippines have caught the world's largest crocodile ever captured. The croc weighed a ton (literally) and measured about 6.5m from snout to tail. It took 100 men to haul it to shore after it was caught in a steel trap. Although the villagers celebrated with a big feast, wildlife officials have warned them that there could be other giant crocs lurking. Nightmare stuff.

SA Onse Charlize is doing so nicely, hey? Benoni's favourite daughter has just released her second ad campaign for Dior's J'Adore scent. The video shows Charlize wearing black shades as she races past a crowd of paparazzi into the distance. Not Oscar-winning stuff, by the sounds of things, but she manages to look pretty good. And she already has an Oscar, so who cares. USA Spare a thought for shark finloving Californians, who are likely to be deprived of their favourite delicacy if a current bill gets passed. The proposed legislation – which looks likely to go through – will ban the sale, purchase or possession of the fins of what the Times in SA calls "ocean-going predators" – one of the more grasping synonyms for “shark” we've

USA It's official: the longest ears of any living dog in the world belong to Harbor, a black and tan Coonhound (shouldn't we be changing that name?) from Boulder, Colorado. Harbor's left ear measures 31cm and his right 34cm. Apparently Harbor often trips over his ears, which is a YouTube channel waiting to happen. You read it here first. UK Little Britain comedian David Walliams is swimming the Thames to raise money for Sports Relief. He is currently 38 miles through a 140-mile journey, during which he has to swim for eight hours a day. Walliams is no stranger to endurance swimming, having swum the Channel last year. A setback yesterday was his succumbing to “Thames Tummy”, which is what happens when you drink the river's water, a heady cocktail of sewerage and E.coli.

thursday - 08 september 2011


life, etc

netherlands

Reality TV's new low: Big Brother is deporting you As reality TV scrapes the barrel, the Netherlands broadcast a quiz show last week called “Weg van Nederlands”. Its unique selling point? The five contestants were all student refugees whose asylum applications have already been refused. By THERESA MALLINSON. The pun in the show's title, which can be translated as either “Away from the Netherlands” or “Crazy about the Netherlands”, cruelly plays on the contestants' predicament. They all face deportation, but have chosen to spend some of their remaining time in the Netherlands participating in a quiz show that tests them on such national trivia as how many bicycles were stolen in the country last year (524,000, if you care) and their ability to carve a map of the Netherlands from a block of cheese. “Of course, it's terrible, but it is also very smart,” Janneke Bruil, of the Foundation for Refugee Students, told Global Post. “When you watch this show it hits you right in your heart. You can't help but think that something is Photo: REUTERS

wrong. It's a game, but at the same time these people are going to be sent off on a plane and it's their life. You have to ask 'what is going on here?'” Yes, we do have to ask that question – not only of the Dutch government, which has recently tightened asylum policies, but of the show's producers. The winner of “Weg van Nederlands” received $5,680 – in a plastic suitcase. And the losers? They got bullet-proof vests, “decorated in the style of traditional Delft blue tiles”. As the contestants are returned to Armenia, Cameroon, Chechnya, Sri Lanka, and Syria over the next while, we're sure that touching reminder of their stay in the Netherlands will make all the difference to their situation.

Read more: 1. Reality TV: Who wants to be a refugee, in Global Post

thursday - 08 september 2011


life, etc

motoring

Mercedes-Benz CLS 63 AMG: A car of contradictions

The Mercedes-Benz CLS has always been a car of contradictions. Here’s a big four-door sedan that likes to pretend it’s a sleek coupé. It oozes fat-cat luxury, yet wants to be an athlete too. Mercedes says its new-generation CLS is much better than the first in every respect – and that should be true of the AMG muscle car version. DEON SCHOEMAN slips behind the wheel to find out. Interestingly, the AMG version of the all-new Mercedes-Benz CLS arrived in South Africa almost two months before the standard model, underscoring just how independently AMG operates these days. It means I haven’t seen the standard rendition of the new CLS yet – at least not in the metal. But despite its bodybuilder bulges, the AMG model shows off some promising styling improvements.

Most apparent is the more powerful, more aggressive front end. It echoes some of the SLS Gullwing’s boldly retro design cues, complete with a dish plate-sized three-pointed star. The car also gets a more muscular stance, thanks to sculpted wheel arches and scalloped sides. But the rear remains instantly recognisable Photo: REUTERS

thursday - 08 September 2011


life, etc

There’s enough switchgear to keep a fighter pilot happy, although the mix of conventional analogue dials and digital displays remains fairly intuitive. for all the wrong reasons – it still droops and sags like the behind of an octogenarian, emphasising the extended rear overhang and handicapping what has developed into a very handsome car in every other respect. As one would expect, the CLS63 AMG is much more aggressive than the standard version. It gets all the exterior embellishments you’d expect of a muscle car. There’s a deeper front spoiler with larger air intakes, while more pronounced fenders accommodate the huge 19-inch wheels. That controversial rear-end still looks awkward, and the slapped-on boot spoiler looks like an illadvised afterthought. Thankfully, a fearsome foursome of squaredoff exhaust tailpipes, and a rear diffuser, add a level of street cred and serve to remind innocent bystanders that this is a serious performance machine. But the real eye candy is at the front. The CLS63 AMG gets full-blown LED lights as standard. That includes the main and dipped

motoring

beams, as well as the daytime running lights. There are a total of 71 LED lamps and they create a swathe of light that’s daylight bright. The interior is pure AMG and almost exclusively black. The form-hugging AMG sports seats are trimmed in black hide, and can be electrically adjusted in every plane until the seat cushions are moulded around your every bulge and contour. The squared-bottomed, racing-style steering wheel has a thick, grippy rim with multifunction controls on the spokes and aluminium gear shift paddles behind. There’s enough switchgear to keep a fighter pilot happy, although the mix of conventional analogue dials and digital displays remains fairly intuitive. Given the sheer size of the CLS, the lavish interior space comes as no surprise. And from behind the helm, it feels like a big, regal machine, with the vastness of the bonnet stretching out ahead of you. At the rear, the individually sculpted seating positions add a touch of lavish indulgence. If it wasn’t for the dynamic promise of the AMG badge, I’d be tempted to opt for the comfort and space of the rear while being chauffeured to my destination. And unlike the first-generation CLS, there’s enough headroom, despite the sloping roofline. While the cabin oozes luxury and craftsmanship as only a large Mercedes-Benz can, it’s augmented here by a certain high-tech ambience. Nor is it just a cosmetic promise: this latest CLS 63 AMG literally bristles with advanced driver assistance systems. Among these are two new active systems – active blind-spot assist and active lane-keeping assist. The former will prevent drivers from

thursday - 08 September 2011


life, etc

motoring

thursday - 08 September 2011


life, etc

motoring

Best of all, fuel consumption drops by an incredible 32%, to just 9.9 litres/100km in the combined cycle. At least, that’s what Mercedes claims. turning into the path of a car in the driver’s blind spot. The other stops drivers from straying into another lane across a solid line. But for real petrol heads, the biggest attraction can be found under the bonnet. Confusingly, the plastic-shrouded mill is not a 6.3-litre unit as the car’s nomenclature might suggest. Instead, AMG’s engineers have opted for a 5.5-litre V8 fitted with twin turbochargers. Despite the smaller capacity, the forced induction extracts a massive 386kW of max power from the eight-potter, accompanied by a full 700Nm of torque. That’s 8kW and 70Nm more than the previous, normally aspirated 6.3-litre V8. Best of all, fuel consumption drops by an incredible 32%, to just 9.9 litres/100km in the combined cycle. At least, that’s what Mercedes claims. Frankly, I didn’t get even close to that. But then, I have a heavy right foot when it comes to performance cars which, by their very nature, demand to be driven with fair amount of gusto. I thought the 13.9 litres/100km I managed was pretty good, under the circumstances … The gearbox is AMG’s familiar Speedshift MCT unit, which is effectively an auto box without a torque converter. It uses a wet clutch for starts, and shifts gears as rapidly as a dual-

clutch design, while also offering a launch control function. Drive is to the rear wheels. Remember to open the windows before pushing the start button – even if it’s freezing outside. That V8 sounds just glorious, with enough of an edge to startle the neighbours and a deep growl that can rattle windows, even at idle. While you can drive the CLS 63 AMG in full auto mode, those paddle shifts cry out to be used for the cog swaps – and deliver a much more immediate, involving driving experience in the process. There are four driving modes to choose from: Comfort, Sport, Sport Plus and Manual. The adaptive damping can also be firmed up manually, or left to its own devices. We’ve come to expect edgy, unruly and even downright scary performance from cars wearing the AMG badge. And on some levels, the new CLS 63 AMG is no different. Even with stability control switched on, giving it welly will threaten to light up the tyres, and swagger the tail in a straight line. But there’s more to this car than brute force. It does a better job of harnessing that urge than, for instance, the old-school, downright brutal CL 65 AMG I drove not that long ago. Even compared to the previous CLS, there’s less bulk to absorb all that momentum and

thursday - 08 September 2011


life, etc

throw it back at you as unwanted inertia. Lavish use of aluminium has done much to keep weight down and reduce unsprung mass. Given its size, a kerb mass of 1,870kg is impressive, if hardly trim. Still, it allows a power to weight ratio of 206kW/ton – a figure which pretty much explains why a car measuring just 4mm short of 5m long and 1,88m wide feels like a quicksilver two-seater off the mark. The factory figures credit the CLS 63 AMG with a 4.4 second zero-to-100 time. And predictably, 250km/h is the maximum speed allowed before an electronic nanny digs in her heels. But for me, it’s the sheer tractability of the Merc that’s most impressive: floor the loud pedal in any gear and the kick in the small of your back is more missile than muscle car. The big Merc’s overtaking prowess is simply devastating, and when the engine’s growl crescendos into that almost tactile metallic whine, you know it’s time to hold on! Nor does it take much to unsettle the beast: hit a bump, a dip or a wet patch under full acceleration, and you’ll feel the steering come alive as those big tyres start scrabbling for grip. However, with its rear air suspension and adaptive damping, the CLS 63 AMG can also play the role of comfortable boulevard cruiser quite convincingly, as long as you remember to be easy on the gas. There’s even an eco-mode, which includes start/stop operation whenever the big Merc comes to a halt. An AMG muscle machine with a conscience? Bunny hugging will never be the same again! I started off this test describing the CLS as a car of contradictions – and perhaps that’s even more true of this AMG version. It’s a monster

motoring

The big Merc’s overtaking prowess is simply devastating, and when the engine’s growl crescendos into that almost tactile metallic whine, you know it’s time to hold on! in disguise, a balled fist in a thin velvet glove, a racing car finished in road car veneer. But unlike its predecessor, the new CLS 63 AMG isn’t nearly as compromised. It plays its multiple roles with great conviction, and becomes a desirable, exclusive - and above all – a high-performance all-rounder. I still think the rear end looks droopy. But that’s just my opinion!

VITAL STATISTICS

Mercedes-Benz CLS 63 AMG Engine

5,461 cc V8, 32 valves, twinturbocharged

Gearbox

Seven-speed Speedshift MCT Auto

Power

368kW @ 5,250rpm

Torque

700Nm @ 1,750rpm

0-100 km/h

4.4 sec

Top speed

250km/h (governed)

Fuel consumption

13.9 l/100km (tested)

CO2 emissions

231g/km

Retail price

R1,3 million (estimated)

thursday - 08 September 2011


SPORT

thursDAY – 8 september


sport

briefs

sports south africa Western Province coach Allister Coetzee has made four changes to his team for Saturday's Currie Cup clash against the Leopards at Newlands. The only injury-forced change comes at fly-half, where Ismaeel Dollie replaces Demetri Catrakilis who has been ruled out after sustaining a tear to his bicep in the 41-35 win over Griquas in Kimberley last week. Fans traveling to the FNB Stadium for Saturday's MTN8 final will be in for a treat after the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa and Stadium Management South Africa agreed to offer free rides to all those attending. Prasa has agreed to provide free transportation to all valid ticket holders for the R8million Wafa Wafa final between Orlando Pirates and Kaizer Chiefs, as well as the third Soweto derby of the season on 17 September. Both Jaco van Zyl and George Coetzee make their return to the Sunshine Tour this week following some outstanding performances on the European Tour. Both golfers have come home to compete in the 54-hole Telkom PGA Pro-Am at Centurion Country Club, which tees off on Wednesday.

Matthew Booth (Reuters)

Matthew Booth's future remains up in the air after Ajax Cape Town CEO George Comitis confirmed the board could not reach agreement over signing the former Bafana Bafana defender. Booth had been strongly tipped to join the Urban Warriors and even underwent a medical at the Cape Town Stadium last Friday New Zealand Springbok centre Jaque Fourie believes Wales will be a hard nut to crack in the defending champions' opening Rugby World Cup match. The two rugby proud nations kick-off their 2011 campaign at Wellington's Westpac Stadium on Sunday, in a game that will go a

long way in deciding who progresses to the quarter-finals. The Springboks have been defeated by the Dragons only once – back in 1999 in Cardiff – yet Wales have pushed South Africa close many times since that historic victory 12 years ago. New Zealand coach Graham Henry has given centre Sonny Bill Williams orders to stick to the game plan when he returns to the All Blacks fold. Williams has been sliding off the selectors' radar this year, so much so that he could not make the bench against Australia two weeks ago. He has been brought back for Friday's World Cup opener against

thursday - 06 september 2011


sport

briefs

Felipe Massa (Reuters)

Tonga in a surprising midfield reshuffle. Former Wallaby front-rower Michael Foley will join Fiji next week to assist the World Cup outsiders with their scrummaging problems. Foley, who is the Waratahs' new head coach, was appointed as Fiji's scrum consultant for the RWC in August. Fiji assistant coach Greg Mumm, another Australian, said Foley and Fiji captain Deacon Manu provide a wealth of knowledge and experience for the young forwards. UK Jade Dernbach and Craig Kieswetter have picked up England increment contracts after playing the necessary number of international matches this season. Both the Surrey fast

bowler and Somerset wicketkeeper-batsman have played in two Twenty20 internationals and seven one-day matches for England, earning them an increment contract via a points system

Europe Golf Lee Westwood will face some stiff competition as he goes in search of his second victory at the KLM Open this week. The Englishman headlines the field for the European Tour event alongside Rory McIlroy and Martin Kaymer, both of whom lie just below him in the world rankings and will be eager to upstage him at Hilversumsche Golf Club. Westwood has racked-up seven top ten finish-

es in his last nine events, and is hopeful of a repeat of the victory he achieved here way back in 1999. F1 Felipe Massa believes there will be plenty of overtaking at this year's Italian GP due to the track's high-speed nature and the double DRS. Monza is historically a good circuit for passing and the decision to have two separate drag reduction system zones is likely to boost overtaking further. The moveable rear wing technology can be deployed on the start/finish straight, with the detection point on the exit of the Parabolica. The second zone will be between the second Lesmo and the Ascari chicane, with the detection point between the Lesmos.

thursday - 06 september 2011


sport

rwc

Jaque Fourie wary of Welsh challenge Springbok centre Jaque Fourie believes Wales will be a hard nut to crack in the defending champions' opening Rugby World Cup match. By PlanetRugby.com The two rugby-proud nations kick-off their 2011 campaign at Wellington's Westpac Stadium on Sunday, in a game that will go a long way to deciding who progresses to the quarter-finals. The Springboks have been defeated by the Dragons only once – back in 1999 in Cardiff – yet Wales have pushed South Africa close many times since that historic victory 12 years ago. "They [Wales] have a new approach," Fourie said. "They have a new defence system as well and they are rushing up quite quickly [in defence] and putting teams under pressure. "They are also putting in a lot of hits in the rucks so we just need to stick to what's been working for us and do even better." Fourie, making his third appearance at the global spectacle, believes the stiff competition in Photo: REUTERS

Pool D could work in the Springboks' favour. "It is a very tough group and that will prepare us for the quarterfinals and going onwards," said the experienced Bok centre. The Boks have all sung the same chorus, insisting that Wales will be their only focus and that the other teams in their group will be studied closer to the actual matches. Fourie said it would remain that way throughout the competition. The Bok back-line failed to score a try in their last seven matches, but that was of little concern to the man ranked third among the top try-scorers in the side's history. Aside from training and media responsibilities, the Springboks had been given freedom to do whatever they wished – within set parameters – and Fourie felt the team was balanced in how they approached the build-up to their title defence. "It is a World Cup and a great occasion, so we need to take in as much as we can."

Thursday - 8 september 2011


sport

RWC

Henry surprises in All Blacks opener Israel Dagg has been named at full-back with Richard Kahui on the wing for New Zealand's opening World Cup clash against Tonga. By PlanetRugby.com Israel Dagg has been named at full-back with Richard Kahui on the wing for New Zealand's opening World Cup clash against Tonga. By PlanetRugby.com Coach Graham Henry has handed a number of fringe players an opportunity to prove their worth against a Tongan team which are sure to be up for the occasion. It is in the back-line that the biggest changes occur, with only Dan Carter and Ma'a Nonu retaining their places from the team that faced Australia in the Bledisloe Cup decider. Israel Dagg, Richard Kahui and Isaia Toeava form an all-new back three, with Kahui given an opportunity on the wing after turning out at centre against the Springboks during the Tri-Nations. In the midfield, Nonu moves one over to outside centre to accommodate the Sonny Bill Williams, while Jimmy Cowan replaces Piri Weepu at scrum-half. Photo: REUTERS

With Adam Thomson and Kieran Read ruled out through injury, Henry was left with few options in the loose forward department. As a result, skipper Richie McCaw and Jerome Kaino pack down on the flanks with Victor Vito at number eight. New Zealand: 15 Israel Dagg, 14 Richard Kahui, 13 Ma'a Nonu, 12 Sonny Bill Williams, 11 Isaia Toeava, 10 Daniel Carter, 9 Jimmy Cowan, 8 Victor Vito, 7 Richie McCaw (capt), 6 Jerome Kaino, 5 Ali Williams, 4 Brad Thorn, 3 Owen Franks, 2 Andrew Hore, 1 Tony Woodcock. Replacements: 16 Corey Flynn, 17 Ben Franks, 18 Anthony Boric, 19 Sam Whitelock, 20 Piri Weepu, 21 Colin Slade, 22 Cory Jane. Date: Friday, September 9 Kick-off: 20.30 (10.30 CAT) Venue: Eden Park Stadium, Auckland Referee: George Clancy (Ireland) Assistant referees: Craig Joubert (South Africa), Stuart Terheege (England)

thursday - 08 september 2011


sport

test cricket

Australia v Sri Lanka, second test preview If there was one act which fully declared Australia's new-found confidence, it was Michael Clarke confirming their XI two days prior to the start of the second Test in Pallekele. Tristan Holme previews the match.

They did a similar thing the day before the first Test when Cricket Australia tweeted their XI after the selection meeting. Naming a team days in advance is something more commonly associated with rugby unions, but whatever CA's reason for breaking away from the tradition of waiting until the toss, it is undoubtedly a bold statement. “This is our team,” it says. “Beat us if you can.” The challenge has certainly been thrown down for Sri Lanka, who have a proud home record but were beaten in conditions which were meant to give them a healthy advantage. Suddenly it is they who need to rebuild after a disappointing tour of England and a home defeat, followed on from the news that Sri Lanka Cricket is in huge debt and have sacked their board. A loss in the Hill Country could spell a fullblown crisis, particularly as it would leave them without a Test series win in five attempts. If a breath of fresh air is what they need,

then it could be supplied by Shaminda Eranga, who looks likely to make his debut, as Chanaka Welegedera battles a knee problem. Welegedera will undergo a fitness test on Thursday morning, but while his experience is handy in an otherwise fledgling bowling attack, the Australians apparently rate Eranga after he impressed in his first three one-day internationals last month. Another likely change is the inclusion of Ajantha Mendis in the place of Suraj Randiv, who had an unusually ineffective Test in extremely helpful conditions in Galle. Australia were surprised not to see Mendis in the Galle line-up. Although they appeared increasingly at ease against him during the one-day series, the task of picking him over after over is a challenge they are yet to endure. Either way, the changes to Sri Lanka's bowling attack reflect their continuing struggle to find reliable replacements for Muttiah Photo: REUTERS

thursday - 08 september 2011


sport

Muralitharan and Lasith Malinga. Rangana Herath has stepped up, and has taken 56 wickets in 14 Tests since the start of the 2009 home season, but he often lacks the support of a threatening second spinner. Of course Australia's only team news is a debut for Shaun Marsh with Ricky Ponting having flown home for the birth of his second child. Needless to say, Sri Lanka will be keen to exploit that, with Marsh occupying the key position of number three in the Australian order. Otherwise it's “same again” for Clarke's side, who will fancy their chances on a more conventional surface. Key Men: Sri Lanka: It was runs that Sri Lanka lacked in Galle, with their seemingly rock-solid middle order failing to stop the rot in the first innings. No one is as important to the batting lineup as Kumar Sangakkara, particularly with Tillakaratne Dilshan's maverick approach to opening, so the hosts desperately need him to return to his reliable self. Australia: With two rookies in the top three now, Shane Watson can almost claim “veteran” status. As someone who likes the ball coming onto the bat the harder Pallekele pitch should be to his liking, and Australia will need stability from him to aid Phil Hughes and Shaun Marsh at the top of the order. Last Five Head-To-Head Results: September 2011, First Test: Australia won by 125 runs in Galle November 2007, Second Test: Australia won by 96 runs in Hobart

test cricket

November 2007, First Test: Australia won by an innings and 40 runs in Brisbane July 2004, Second Test: Match drawn in Cairns July 2004, First Test: Australia won by 149 runs in Darwin Prediction: This is a tricky one to call. It will surely go into the fifth day, but with both batting units looking far from bullet-proof, a draw seems unlikely. It is to the bowlers that we must therefore look, in which case you have to fancy Australia to pip it. Probable Teams: Sri Lanka: Tillakaratne Dilshan (capt), Tharanga Paranavitana, Kumar Sangakkara, Mahela Jayawardene, Thilan Samaraweera, Prasanna Jayawardene (wk), Angelo Mathews, Suranga Lakmal, Rangana Herath, Ajantha Mendis, Shaminda Eranga. Australia: Shane Watson, Phillip Hughes, Shaun Marsh, Michael Clarke (capt), Michael Hussey, Usman Khawaja, Brad Haddin (wk), Mitchell Johnson, Ryan Harris, Trent Copeland, Nathan Lyon. Dates: 8 - 12 September Morning session: 10:00 - 12:00 (04:30 - 06:30 GMT) Afternoon session: 12:40- 14:40 (07:10- 09:10 GMT) Evening session: 15:00 - 17:00 (09:30 - 11:30 GMT) On-field umpires: Tony Hill and Richard Kettleborough Third umpire: Aleem Dar Match referee: Chris Broad.

thursday - 08 september 2011


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iMaverick 08 September 2011  

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