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index a day in pictures It happened overnight South Africa Africa WorlD Business LIFE, ETC Sport

friday – 9 september 2011


A DAY IN PICTURES

friDAY – 9 september 2011


a day in pictures

afghanistan

A picture of slain Afghan national hero Ahmad Shah Massoud is set along the road in Punisher province September 7, 2011. At the entrance to Afghanistan's magnificent Punisher Valley, an 84-year supporter of resistance hero Ahmad Shah Massoud said his village was fully armed to fight a resurgent Taliban to the end. Picture taken September 7, 2011. REUTERS/Mohammad Ismail

friDAY – 9 september 2011


a day in pictures

libya

Anti-Gaddafi fighters from the Warfallah tribe pray at Wadi Dinar, 15 km (9 miles) from the town of Bani Walid, currently held by pro-Gaddafi forces, in southeast Tripoli September 8, 2011. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

friDAY – 9 september 2011


a day in pictures

belarus

Belarussian hockey players from Dinamo Minsk attend a commemorative event at the Minsk-Arena sports complex in Minsk September 8, 2011. A passenger plane carrying Russian ice hockey team Lokomotiv Yaroslavl to a season-opening match crashed after takeoff from a provincial airport on Wednesday, killing 43 people and plunging the Russian and international sports world into grief. The match would have taken place at the sports complex in the Belarus capital on Thursday. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

friDAY – 9 september 2011


a day in pictures

spain/israel

A Spanish street performer is seen during a performance near Damascus Gate in Jerusalem's Old City, September 8, 2011, as part of the "Festiclown Palestinia" clown festival. According to the organisers, the festival includes street, circus and clown theatre shows, performed by local and international artists and runs until September 15 in East Jerusalem and the West Bank. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun

friDAY – 9 september 2011


IT HAPPENED OVERNIGHT

friDAY – 9 september 2011


it happened overnight

briefs

John Edwards (Reuters)

Politics USA President Barack Obama announced his $450 billion jobs plan to a joint session of Congress, which will offer tax cuts to small businesses which hire, and invest in infrastructure projects. Obama said the expense of this will be offset by cuts which he will only announce next week, and implored Congress to pass the plan as soon as possible. $175 billion will go towards tax relief for employers, $25 billion on 35,000 school upgrades and $35 billion to halt nearly 300,000 teachers being retrenched. Republican reactions were mixed with house speaker John Boehner

admitting the president’s ideas merited consideration, but others calling it more of the same. Luckily Obama wrapped up before the opening match of the NFL season, preventing his immediate impeachment. Authorities are chasing up intelligence which alleges that three people have entered the USA and are planning a terrorist attack by car in a major east coast city on the 10-year anniversary of 9/11. None of the reports we covered could confirm this threat or provide anything more than unnamed law enforcement sources, but a White House spokesman did say the warning has passed beneath the eyes of the president, who was in touch with the counterterrorism unit.

John Edwards (remember that chap who cheated on his cancerous wife and then fiddled with his campaign finances?) will have his trial moved to January after his legal team successfully delayed again, claiming that they need more time to examine the 400,000 pages of government investigation paperwork. Illinois governor Pat Quinn is set to lay off 1,900 state workers and close seven facilities to slash over $300 million off the state budget. This, ironically, comes the same day as President Barack Obama, also from Illinois, announced his plans to tackle the unemployment crisis in the US. Mitt Romney and Rick Perry weren’t finished at yesterday’s

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it happened overnight

briefs

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan (Reuters)

Republican presidential candidate debate and continued into Thursday, with Romney’s team sending out a release calling Perry a career politician, reckless and wrong regarding his Ponzi scheme analogy towards social security. Perry responded with his own release, wittingly (sarcasm, folks) entitled “Mitt Romney’s Social Insecurity” and saying his current views differed from what he claimed before. Pressure on the US’s defence budget may reduce its army to below the planned 520,000 troops recommended by the Pentagon, and could affect its ability to fight two wars

simultaneously (which is the in-army capability the US would like to have). General Ray Odiemo, the army’s new chief of staff, said the forces could not be reduced too quickly, and that senior officers and sergeants must be maintained to preserve flexibility. Turkey Israel really has brought out a firm stance or two from Turkey, one its moderate allies. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has already cut military ties and chucked out the Israeli ambassador, and has now authorised Turkish warships to escort aid to Gaza. Israel and Turkey are also due

a fight over gas resources in Cyprus. Afghanistan Nato has admitted to killing a BBC journalist during an attack in southern Afghanistan in July, after mistaking him for a suicide bomber. Nato representatives apologised to the family of the slain Ahmed Omed Khpulwak and, in a summary of the incident, explained that a soldier expected him to detonate a suicide vest, so he shot him with an M4. According to the report the soldier “complied with the laws of armed conflict and rules of engagement and acted reasonably under the circumstances.”

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it happened overnight

Russia David Cameron will meet with Russian Prime Minister Vladmir Putin in Moscow next week which will be the first in-person contact between the British and Russian governments since an acrimonious exchange between Putin and Tony Blair in 2007 (related primarily to the murder of journalist Alexander Litvinenko). In fact, the last time anyone spoke even on the telephone was when Putin rang Gordon Brown who ascended to the British Prime Minister’s job on Blair’s departure. Cuba The Cuban government has published photos of Fidel Castro to quash concerns about his health. While the photos show a healthy man, Castro’s age is rather prevalent in them, so hopefully this won’t cause a spike in questions about how old he is. Incidentally, the exleader is 85. South Sudan Opposition politicians in South Sudan warned against the new country’s dependency on oil trade (which makes up about 95% of its income), blaming it for inflation rises, food availability instability and a failure to develop other industries. The party wants

briefs

Porsche and Volkswagen merger delayed (Reuters)

oil revenues invested in agriculture and tourism. Venezuela The USA has sanctioned four Venezuelan officials, all of whom are close to president Hugo Chavez, for aiding the Colombian drugs trade. The Venezuelan government, never really a fan of the US, has called it an act of aggression and abusive. In fact, one of the four accused said on Twitter, “If they hope to frighten me with their gringo list, now more than ever I kneel down for Chavez and the revolution.” According to the BBC, Venezuela has arrested drug peddlers in recent years.

half of whom log on every day, as well as an 82% increase in the number of users since the beginning of 2011. According to the microblogging service, an average of 230 million tweets are published a day which is more than double that of January 2011. The company is also due to increase its advertising as a revenue stream.

Business

Porsche and Volkswagen have admitted that a planned merger will not be completed in 2011, but will definitely happen. The delay is due to legal action against Porsche in Germany and the USA for market manipulation. Volkswagen also admitted that its board would look for ways of merging with Porsche outside of the current agreement of stock options.

Twitter now claims to have 100 million active users a month,

Ousted Yahoo CEO, Carol Bartz dropped the F-bomb in

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it happened overnight

briefs

her first interview, claiming she was “fucked over” and said by sacking her, the board was “trying to show that they're not the doofuses that they are.” She shouldn’t be too bleak: she’s been given a $10 million severance payout.

in straight sets, Caroline Wozniacki did the same with Andrea Petkovic and unseeded Angelique Kerber beat 26th seed Flavia Penetta. Australia’s Sam Stosur knocked out Vera Zvonereva in a steady 6-3, 6-3 win.

1 Tendai Mtawarira. Replacements – 16 Bismarck du Plessis, 17 Gurthro Steenkamp, 18 CJ van der Linde, 19 Johan Muller, 20 Willem Alberts, 21 Francois Hougaard, 22 Butch James

The United Kingdom and China are to set up an offshore trading hub for the yuan, China’s currency, in London (which is the largest foreign exchange trading centre in the world). This would be the second place for deposits in the yuan after Hong Kong. The agreement was made after a meeting with British chancellor George Osborne and Chinese vice premier Wang Qishan; the pair also agreed to increase trade between the countries to $100 billion by 2015.

In the men’s US Open draw the all-Serbian clash between Novak Djokovic and Janko Tipsarevic ended in the fourth set when both players were treated for injury, but Tipsarevic was unable to continue. Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray progressed with straight sets wins against Gilles Muller and Donald Young respectively, while big servers John Isner and Andy Roddick moved on at the expense of Gilles Simon and David Ferrer. Roger Federer takes on Jo-Wilfriend Tsonga, the man who knocked him out of Wimbledon, in the evening session.

Life

Sport USA Tennis: The US Open was again delayed due to rain which means the women’s final has been pushed to Sunday, and the men’s to Monday. And that’s if the weather is compliant. In the fixtures which were played yesterday, Serena Williams beat Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova

New Zealand Rugby: The South African team to play Wales in both countries’ opening fixture on Saturday is: 15 Frans Steyn, 14 JP Pietersen, 13 Jaque Fourie, 12 Jean de Villers, 11 Bryan Habana, 10 Morné Steyn, 9 Fourie du Preez, 8 Pierre Spies, 7 Schalk Burger, 6 Heinrich Brüssow, 5 Victor Matfield, 4 Danie Rossouw, 3 Jannie du Plessis, 2 John Smit,

Mexico Troops in Mexico have made a breakthrough in their dealings with the drug cartels, smashing their encrypted communication radio system. A navy spokesman said the gangs could no longer communicate effectively which will naturally affect its tactical operations. The army also arrested 80 people related to the Zetas cartel which included four policemen. USA As if the north east of America isn’t wet enough, Tropical Storm Lee has caused some of the worst flooding in years, with 100,000 people told to evacuate the Susquehanna Valley in Pennsylvania and New York state. Rivers are threatening to flood from Maryland all the way up to Massachusetts and numerous highways are closed. Nine deaths have been attributed to Lee so far.

thursdAY - 8 september 2011


Done

done well, for

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you.


it happened overnight

US

Obama’s challenge to congress: ‘work for people who elected us’ - or else Despite being panned by some quick-off-the-mark Republicans as “the worst pre-game show ever”, the American football season started just after his speech - Barack Obama told a joint session of the US Congress to pass his new plan to create jobs or he’d take his case across the country directly to the voters. He reminded them, by the way, about an election in 14 months. By J BROOKS SPECTOR. Republican speaker of the house John Boehner and house majority leader Eric Cantor made some conciliatory noises over the possibility of supporting elements of Obama’s proposals. However, the candidates for the party’s nomination to run against Obama next year gave a thumbs-down. At least initially, the Republicans seem unclear on a unified response to a speech that was both policy and campaign stump – score one for the Democrats on this. The key elements of Obama’s plan were a

commitment for spending on those “shovelready” infrastructure projects like bridges and school renovations, support for teacher salaries, an extension for unemployment benefits, a (temporary) reduction in the payroll tax that funds Social Security, tax incentives and tax breaks that support adding workers to businesses, ensuring the marginal tax rates on the rich are at least as high as those on Photo: President Obama addresses a joint session of the US Congress, September 8, 2011. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


it happened overnight

US

While Obama issued no figure for the cost, White House aides had briefed the media and key politicians in advance that the cost of the overall proposal would be around $450 billion – about half the stimulus package of the first half of the Obama administration. .

people who earn much less (echoing Warren Buffet’s recent public astonishment that his tax rate is lower than his secretary’s) and a review of government regulations to cut out rules that impede employment. He also gave his commitment to pay for the whole thing paid by cuts in government spending over the next decade via the special committee that came out of the debt ceiling agreement. Throughout his unusually blunt speech, Obama repeated his call for Congress to “pass this bill”, a measure he dubbed The American Jobs Act, which his administration will submit to Congress in detail next week. For each element of his proposed plan he called attention to the fact that in the past several years, both Republicans and Democrats had, at various times, supported all of these proposals. “The question is whether, in the face of an ongoing national crisis, we can stop the political circus and actually do something to help the economy.” While Obama issued no figure for the cost, White House aides had briefed the media and key politicians in advance that the cost of the overall proposal would be around $450 billion – about half the stimulus package of the first half of the Obama administration. Republicans have consistently called this stimulus package

wasteful and ineffective - even as the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office offered an evaluation that it did have a real, discernible and positive effect on the economy, helping ameliorate the recession. In a way the impact of the speech was somewhat blunted by a near-simultaneous announcement of a heightened risk of a stillunconfirmed yet credible threat of some sort of terror attack that presumably would be timed to coincide with commemorations of the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on New York and the Pentagon. Only moments after the speech, television networks were alternating their interviews with the “talking heads” analysts dissecting Obama’s speech with some fairly breathless comments over the security threat. The night before Obama’s speech, eight Republican candidates had jousted at the Ronald Reagan Library. The resulting debate made it increasingly clear that there are only two likely challengers for the Republican nomination – Texas governor Rick Perry and former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney. In the most recent polling, Perry forged ahead in support from likely Republican voters. However, some of his comments during the debate such as his charge that Social Security

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


it happened overnight

(the government’s old age pension system) has just been a Ponzi scheme on people seem almost preternaturally designed to stun and scare the independent voters who are the key to a general election victory. Romney, on the other hand, seemed to pander to the Tea Party movement in an effort to seize the imagination of more rightist voters. Given these demonstrations, incredulous blogosphere comments on the debate included things like: Wait a minute - here are eight people who say they hate the US government but want to be in charge of it; as well as, here is a gaggle of wouldbe candidates that cries out for a PGA-style cut. Much of Wednesday’s debate was around whether Romney or Perry had the better job-creation record. Perry charged former Massachusetts Democratic governor Mike Dukakis (the Democratic candidate for president in 1988 and a virtual byword for charismatically challenged leadership) had had a better jobs creation record than Romney as a pro-business, pro-growth governor. And that only elicited a retort from Romney that George W Bush’s record on jobs was better than Perry’s. Besides provoking some astonishment at Perry’s seeming endorsement of Dukakis’ economic policies – probably the nicest thing any Republican has ever said about Dukakis – the exchange made it clear that this coming general election will be fought over new jobs and economic growth. New York Times reporter wrote that if there was any doubt about what Romney thought was the most significant moment of Wednesday night’s debate, an email from his campaign made it totally clear. The subject heading of the email read: “RICK PERRY: RECKLESS, WRONG

US

ON SOCIAL SECURITY”. Romney aides add that Perry’s writing about the failure of the federal retirement programme, and his refusal to back away from them equalled a fatal flaw in his candidacy. Nonetheless, veteran Washington observer, John Judis, described the enormity of Mitt Romney’s current challenge in the campaign as: “Romney is the Nelson Rockefeller of today’s Republican party.… He might have won the presidency in 1960 or 1968, but he could never win the Republican nomination for president. “Romney was raised in Michigan, not Utah; he learned economics at Harvard Business School; he made his mark as a businessman and governor in liberal Massachusetts. He has tried to recreate himself as a conservative Republican, but it simply has not worked. He could be the candidate by default against someone like Michele Bachmann, because most of the Republican electorate does understand that she is unelectable, but someone like Perry takes all the air out of his candidacy.” Meanwhile, with unemployment still above 9%, it seems both logical and inevitable for job creation to be the measuring stick for presidential political success. Barack Obama’s support has continued to slide, although general trust and support for Congress is now zeroing in on single digits, giving the president at least the chance to find a toehold to make good on his threat to carry his message over the heads of Congress. Depending on how Congress, voters and economic indicators respond to Obama’s proposals, he may just be able to find this speech and its challenges will help him gain ground - and some oxygen for his chances next year.

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


SOUTH AFRICA

friDAY – 9 september 2011


south africa

briefs

Jimmy Manyi (Mail & Guardian)

SAPOA adds voice to criticisms of land reform green paper The South African Property Owners Association has say that while it supports land reform, it wants it to take place with a win-win scenario. The association says that the recently released green paper on land reform not only falls short of that, it may be unconstitutional. Key among the problems with the green paper is its setting up a land claims commission, which the association says infringes on the jurisdiction of the courts. Others, including the South African Institute of Race

Relations, the Democratic Alliance and the Freedom Front Plus have also criticised the green paper since its release.

Manyi: Minister travel information a security issue Government spokesperson Jimmy Manyi told a postCabinet briefing that ministers could not answer questions about their state-sponsored travel and accommodation because it was a “security issue�. Manyi contended that it would be irresponsible for ministers to disclose the information because it would

help criminals plan attacks on ministers based on the historic pattern of their travel and hotel information. He suggested rather that these questions should be directed through the presidency for the sake of security.

Charges against Thembelihle residents drepped Police have withdrawn charges against 14 people arrested during protests in Thembelihle, south of Johannesburg. The 14 were arrested for public violence after crowds barricaded

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south africa

briefs

said that Cosatu would fight alongside Swaziland’s people because it wanted them to have freedom and a democratic multi-party system.

ANCYL cancels march for economic freedom

Themb'elihle (iMaverick)

Klipspruit Valley Road with burning tyres earlier this week, but were released and charges were withdrawn on Thursday because police said there was not enough evidence. At the trial of the 14, five more Themb'elihle residents were arrested for gathering illegally after refusing to disperse.

Community service for vets to become a reality To qualify as a veterinarian in South African, you will soon have to complete compulsory community service. That’s the new requirement in the draft Veterinary and Para-veterinary Amendment Bill, which was

approved by Parliament on Wednesday. The amendment bill is supposed to help address the shortage of vets in rural areas and brings the vet qualification in line with that for a medical doctor.

Cosatu: Swaziland loan a mistake Cosatu, having sent representatives to this week’s anti-government protests in Swaziland, criticised the South African government’s R2.4 billion bailout to its landlocked neighbour. Zwelinzima Vavi, Cosatu general secretary, told a Food and Allied Workers Union congress on Thursday that the loan was a mistake. He also

The ANC Youth League has been treading cautiously since the ANC decided to exert its power. Before the crackdown, the league had called on youth to march to the Johannesburg Stock Exchange for economic freedom. The march was supposed to form part of their 65th birthday celebrations. However, youth league spokesperson Magdelene Moonsamy said the march would not be taking place and, instead, they would focus on their political programme. The march for economic freedom has been replaced by a memorial lecture, a cakecutting ceremony and a rally in Alexandra.

Jacaranda DJ loses job over racial slur Supersport presenter and Jacaranda FM DJ Darren Scott apologised for using a racial

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south africa

briefs

New Chief Justice Mogoeng Mogoeng (Oupa Nkosi for M&G)

slur against a colleague at a team building event. He told Radio 702 on Thursday that he was drunk and had been provoked by unpaid loans. Scott said he apologised to the colleague concerned and the apology was accepted. He also said he resigned from Jacaranda FM as a result of this and other issues. Supersport said that Scott, who presents rugby on the channel, has been granted an indefinite leave of absence.

McBride gets two years for drunk driving Robert McBride, former metro police chief for Ekhuruleni, received a two-year sentence on Thursday for drunk driving. He also received a five-year

suspended sentence for defeating the ends of justice. McBride crashed a state-owned car after a Christmas party and claimed that his colleague was driving. The judge also suspended McBride’s licence for 18 months.

CEO and president had been turned away from the summit, released a statement on Thursday where it said it was looking forward to working with the Black Business Council.

Black business quits Busa

Mogoeng confirmed as chief justice

Following a two-day black business summit in Johannesburg, the black business organisations that had remained part of Business Unity South Africa following the departure of the Black Management Forum, also quit. The organisations resolved at the summit to form a Black Business Council to be headed by businessman Patrice Motsepe. Busa, whose

President Jacob Zuma was relaxed on Thursday afternoon when he confirmed judge Mogoeng Mogoeng as the new chief justice of the Constitutional Court. Zuma – who had earlier this week promised to “apply his mind” to submissions made by opposition parties and civil rights groups – heralded Mogoeng’s appointment as a victory for transparency and democracy.

fridAY - 9 september 2011


south africa

johannesburg

Johannesburg, the worst commute in the world Not to be unkind to people living in Fourways, but we raised a cynical eyebrow when it was announced that Johannesburg has one of the worst commutes in the world. It all makes sense when you realise that the parameters being measured are the happiness of the people commuting. By SIPHO HLONGWANE. People in Johannesburg spend at least 36 minutes in traffic, ranking alongside Nairobi, Mexico City, Beijing, Bangalore and Moscow as the worst commuter cities in the world. This was according to a commuter pain survey by IBM, which ranks the emotional and economic toll of commuting, and gives a pain ranking. An astonishing 52% of respondents to the survey said that traffic increased their stress levels significantly. “Commuting doesn’t occur in a vacuum,” said Gavin Pieterse, governmental programmes executive for IBM sub-Saharan Africa. “What’s significant from drivers in cities around the world, and Joburg specifically, is that they are Photo: REUTERS

voicing that they are much more unsettled and anxious compared with 2010, that there is significant room for improvement in making our transport systems smarter”. Some of the stress triggers include poor road design in Joburg which leads to gridlocks and slow traffic, as well as – you guessed it – taxi drivers. The overriding conclusion is that Johannesburg desperately needs a good public transport system. According to the survey, Montreal, London and Chicago were the least worst cities to commute in.

Read more: 1. ‘Joburg commute is worst in BusinessDay 2. Joburg commute is one of the worst: study in TimesLive

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


south africa

cosatu / swaziland

Cosatu continues pressure on Swazi government The two Cosatu leaders deported from Swaziland on Wednesday will address a press conference on Friday to explain what went down. The trade union will also hold a protest outside the Swazi Embassy in Pretoria as it continues to support calls for democracy in the mountain kingdom. By THERESA MALLINSON. On Wednesday, two Cosatu leaders, deputy president Zwingiswe Losi and deputy international secretary Zanele Matebula were detained by police in Swaziland, and subsequently deported. Losi and Matebula were part of Cosatu's 45-strong delegation that the trade union federation had sent to Swaziland to show solidarity during the Global Week of Action prodemocracy protests. On Thursday Cosatu Mpumalanga stated that it: “condemns in the strongest possible term the unprovoked harassment, torture and brutality unleashed against the peaceful, unarmed protesters by the Mswati armed forces...We are extremely worried about the safety and whereabouts of most of our leaders since we have lost contact with the organisers inside Swaziland”. Speaking to iMaverick on Thursday evening, Cosatu Mpumalanga provincial secretary Photo: REUTERS

Fidel Mlombo said that they had since re-established contact with those Cosatu members still in Swaziland. “Most of them are safe,” he said. “They have moved from the town of Siteki to Manzini to continue with the demonstrations tomorrow.” Losi and Matebula will both speak at a press conference in Johannesburg on Friday morning to let the public know about their experiences in Swaziland. Cosatu will also hold a protest outside the Swazi Embassy in Pretoria on Friday morning, as well as other demonstrations around the country. Meanwhile, at a Food and Allied Workers' Union congress in Johannesburg on Thursday, Cosatu general secretary Zwelinzima Vavi declared categorically that the South African government's R2.4 billion bailout of Swaziland had been a mistake. “We are saying it was a mistake... that's our tax money you are giving to them,” Sapa reported him as saying. FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


south africa

Themb'elihle

Glimmers of hope for peace and solidarity in Themb'elihle We've been putting Themb'elihle under the microscope all week, in the belief that the service-delivery protests here are a good indication of things to come elsewhere. If that is true, then the early beginnings of the start of the planning of a bridge across the social divide we saw there on Thursday bodes well. Except for the government. By PHILLIP DE WET. It could have come earlier, and in a more dramatic fashion. A candle-lit vigil on Tuesday night, maybe, or bringing protesters water on a boiling Wednesday. But on Thursday afternoon, the mostly Indian residents of Lenasia finally started making noises of solidarity and sympathy for the demands of their mostly black neighbours in Themb'elihle. And though they may have been motivated by fear, their gesture may just mark an important turning point. A small group of Lenasians, many who live just metres away from the road where protesters had been teargassed the night before, gathered for a street meeting of their own to discuss their response to the unrest. While Themb'elihlers had been gathering for such

consultations regularly, Lenasia had instead fed on a steady diet of hair-raising rumours. There were widely circulated e-mails about Lenasia houses having been burned down, or plans for such; instant messages saying that major malls had been looted or would be targeted; even calls for residents to take up arms to defend themselves from what we'll call a crazed black horde, although the actual language used was a lot more inflammatory and derogatory. Standing together in the bright afternoon sun, with cars going past on the previously disputed road and township representatives in attendance, the mood was very different. Photo: Phillip de Wet for iMaverick.

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


south africa

Palestine, and the likeness of the campaign for rights in the township and the wouldbe country, came up. The living conditions of shack-dwellers were discussed. One of the organisers, Sada Pillay, pointed out how ridiculous it would be for people from Lenasia to join in the battles between protesters and police, something that had seemed far from impossible the previous night. "If you shoot at these people, you'll be shooting at the people who look after your children, who mow your lawn," he later told us, pointing across the road. "These are our people too." While the meeting did not include a representative sample of those who live in Lenasia – it will take some time before we can accurately judge the mood of the community as a whole – those who attended easily reached consensus on the agreement they seek to reach with those who live in Themb'elihle. They want assurances about their safety, and the safety of their property. In return they will intervene with police to ensure community leaders aren't targeted for arrest, so future joint meetings can be held, lobby for the release of at least some of those arrested on public violence and related charges, and campaign for either temporary electrical connections in Themb'elihle or an acceptable, nearby site for relocation. For the politically-minded Themb'elihlers, that's a good deal. The target for their anger has steadfastly been government, local and provincial, rather than their richer neighbours. Lenasia was simply caught in the crossfire, through fear, the stoning of a handful of cars (half of which had black drivers) and electricity outages. Those we polled now accept that burning down electrical distribution points

Themb'elihle

made a powerful statement while causing only temporary inconvenience. Some are even willing to accept it if Themb'elihlers should again choose to blockade the main arterial that separates the communities – as long as it is done peacefully. While an alliance would be good for both sides, it won't necessarily hold. There is still a great deal of mutual suspicion. There are inveterate racists on both sides. There are those in Themb'elihle who are suspicious of the motives of those in Lenasia. There are those in Lenasia who would rather not have poor people staying on their doorstep. Both sides have their rogue elements. One major incident of mistreatment of a black worker by an Indian boss, or one serious crime in Lenasia blamed on a shack dweller, could easily see attitudes harden again. If a long-term partnership develops, combining sheer numbers in the street with economic power, it spells trouble for their mutual enemies. Both communities are now actively bypassing their elected representatives, who they believe have utterly failed them. Both are angry at the provincial and national governments for, respectively, doing little and doing nothing. Both are highly critical of the police who responded to the protest, Themb'elihle for perceived heavy-handedness, Lenasia because the hand is seen as having not been heavy enough. That is true of many disparate communities who live in close proximity to one another. If Themb'elihle and Lenasia manage to make a difference by standing together, others may follow their lead. Perhaps even before the rubber bullet and tear gas comes out again.

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


south africa

crime

Crimes, damned crimes and their statistics As usual in the past few years, the annual crime statistics for last year proved to be a mixed bag of successes and setbacks, but on the whole police minister Nathi Mthethwa believes victory is in sight. CARIEN DU PLESSIS reports. The annual release of crime statistics is always a media circus, although police minister Nathi Mthethwa on Thursday seemed to have brought half of his force with him too. The Jacaranda room in the Sheraton Hotel in Pretoria was packed as Mthethwa told the nation that “the tide against crime is turning and that police, joined by society, are gaining an upper hand against vicious criminals”.

The rape stats, however, were a bit of a disappointment. Again. Mthethwa started his statement with the decreases – and this is for the 2010/11 financial year (it always seems odd to measure crime in financial years, but that’s how we do it). Contact crimes – murder, attempted murder, Photo: Sipho Hlongwane for iMaverick.

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south africa

crime

Murder, one of the easiest crimes to keep track of because there’s always a body to show, is down by 16.5%, but at 15,940 cases it’s still nothing to celebrate (it’s still more than 43 murders a day, but Mthethwa reminded us that the 1994/5 murder rate was a staggering 27,000,

sexual offences, assault (grievous bodily harm), common assault, aggravated robbery and common robbery have decreased by 6.9% and is down in all provinces except North West and Western Cape. “Trio crimes” – house robberies, business robberies and vehicle hijacking – are down by 10.7%. Murder, one of the easiest crimes to keep track of because there’s always a body to show, is down by 16.5%, but at 15,940 cases it’s still nothing to celebrate (it’s still more than 43 murders a day, but Mthethwa reminded us that the 1994/5 murder rate was a staggering 27,000, so it could be worse). Attempted murder is down by 12.2%, which could have been a bad thing if the murder rate was up, but in the event Mthethwa is “pleased” with the figure. Sexual offences are down by 3.1%, but the minister admitted “we cannot seriously say we are winning the war against rape”. After a few weeks of lobby groups lobbying about the less-than-progressive rape judgments made by Chief Justice nominee Mogoeng Mogoeng in the past few weeks,

and after some hype around last month’s Slutwalk march in Cape Town, this had our attention. Reported rape cases (this crime is usually under-reported, due to the emotions and other factors around it) increased from 55,097 to 56,272, and while this isn’t really a crime that can be policed by increasing law enforcer visibility, Mthethwa believes that the re-introduction of the Family Violence, Child Protection and Sexual Offences units in the past year would help police “address” these crimes better. Assault with the intent to do grievous bodily harm decreased by 4.5%, aggravated robberies are down by 12%, house robberies are down by 10.1% (this is an important crime when it comes to perceptions – and insurance companies are also happy), house burglaries by 4.8% (this is attributed to special festive season campaigns), car hijackings are down by 23.6% while truck hijackings are down by 29.2%. Robberies at small businesses, spaza shops, supermarkets, taverns, schools and general dealers have increased by 0.9%. It’s a difficult

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south africa

“We see the car is parked. If you steal it, we come and arrest you. We don’t just collect cars and allow you to steal the rest. We get the car, we get you.” area to manage, Mthethwa said, unlike for the big businesses, which have more money to pay for security. Cash-in-transit heists – always very violent and disruptive – have decreased by 18.7%, but ATM blasts seem to be the new trend in “bank robberies” (and possibly the new cash heists too): the former is up by 61.5%, most of them in Gauteng, while bank robberies are down by 58.1%. Stock theft is down by 8.2%, something which the police have been paying special attention to, but drug-related crimes (10.2%), drunken driving (4.5%) and commercial crime (2.8%) are all up. The good news is that the increase in crime statistics here often indicate better policing. Police deaths have decreased from 110 the year before, to 94 in the last financial year –

crime

good news in a sombre kind of way. Mthethwa told us repeat offences seem to be on the increase, but officials conceded that they do not keep scientific stats on these. Of course, police chief General Bheki Cele was there as well, in a bad leather jacket with police insignia on, and his police hat. After his illness, he looked a bit thinner than usual and, although the mischievous smile was there, the glint in the eye was gone. Cele, who is in trouble after the Public Protector found multimillion-rand irregularities in the leasing of buildings to the police, was at pains to point out that the decrease in statistics was not due to a miracle, but to hard work. “It was not the descent of the holy ghost in the hearts of the criminals. Some people have worked for it.” Prayer could have been part of it, but it was the hard work of the foot soldiers, he continued. There was a bit of his stand-up comedy routine, when he reminded us that the “big guys” doing cash heists “do not do it with feather dusters, but with high-calibre weapons”. So you won’t respond with mere “broom sticks”, but hi-tech equipment that matches theirs or is better is needed. He said crime prevention is also due to greater police visibility, as well as the pursuance of criminals. “We see the car is parked. If you steal it, we come and arrest you. We don’t just collect cars and allow you to steal the rest. We get the car, we get you. “It is not as if there was thunder somewhere and people turned around. People have worked under (their) leadership,” he added. With rumours that he might be deployed as a diplomat to Japan, Cele must kind of want to prove that he’s irreplaceable.

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


south africa

chief justice

Faithful Mogoeng survives the irreverent tsunami to become SA's supreme judge After almost four days of thinking, President Jacob Zuma made up his mind about the appointment of Chief Justice Mogoeng Thomas Reets Mogoeng. It seems much judicial reform awaits our new judge at the top, CARIEN DU PLESSIS reports. As journalists prepared to enter the Presidential Guest House in Pretoria for a special briefing, where on Thursday morning premiers and ministers gathered to talk infrastructure, North West Premier Thandi Modise exited. “Write nice things about my judge,� she whispered with a smile as she walked past. If hacks had been in the dark about the purpose of the meeting until then, her remark had made it clear.

President Jacob Zuma shortly thereafter announced the appointment of Chief Justice Mogoeng Mogoeng, who is from the North West and who went through a gruelling interview process over the weekend after being nominated by Zuma some weeks back. A relieved and radiant-looking Justice Mogoeng, whose wife and three children Photo: Mogoeng Mogoeng (Mail & Guardian)

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south africa

chief justice

Zuma took a sideswipe at his and Justice Mogoeng’s critics: “The judiciary should not be part of mudslinging and other public spats that happen from time to time in society”. accompanied him, again hinted that the recent public examination of his judgments, beliefs and character had been difficult. “From the depth of my heart I thank God for seeing my family and I through a tsunami of a special kind that I had to confront in the past few weeks,” he said in a prepared speech. The reference to the natural weather phenomenon reminded of Cosatu general secretary Zwelinzima Vavi’s description of Zuma a few years back as an “unstoppable tsunami” who would make it against all the odds and wipe out his critics politically. Perhaps Justice Mogoeng wanted to show some kind of solidarity with Zuma’s past suffering. Perhaps not. He thanked Zuma for “the trust and confidence you put in me on behalf of the nation by appointing me Chief Justice. I undertake not to betray his trust”. Mogoeng then renewed his judicial vow by saying he’d be faithful to the Republic of South Africa, he would uphold the Constitution and the human rights entrenched in it, and administer justice to all people without prejudice. “I do so confident that God will help me accomplish this special assignment.” Zuma, on his part, sympathised with Justice Mogoeng for the total onslaught against him, saying he had “high regard” for the “dignified

manner in which he responded to the spirited public commentary on his candidature”, and only answered it in the “correct” forum, the Judicial Service Commission. Zuma took a sideswipe at his and Justice Mogoeng’s critics: “The judiciary should not be part of mudslinging and other public spats that happen from time to time in society”. Zuma, having never given reasons for having preferred Justice Mogoeng above some other strong candidates (he is not required to do so by the Constitution), revealed a bit of the thinking behind his latest appointment. He said Justice Mogoeng assumed office in a time of judicial reform, when the Constitution Seventeenth Amendment Bill and the Superior Courts Bill, which had been the subject of debate for the past 14 years and which would, amongst others, provide for judges to do their own administration, were close to reaching finality. The reform was one of the priorities that met Justice Mogoeng as he assumed office on Thursday, Zuma said. Zuma also emphasised that he respected the separation of powers and the independence of the judiciary in an attempt to put to rest the fears of those who say Justice Mogoeng would be Zuma’s lap dog.

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south africa

Cosatu on Thursday said it accepted Justice Mogoeng’s appointment even though it had registered its reservations about him as Chief Justice before. Although he said it with a straight face, Zuma might have meant to be just a bit ironic when he thanked Deputy Chief Justice Dikgang Moseneke, who was also at the briefing and who sat next to retired Chief Justice Sandile Ngcobo. Zuma made much of Justice Moseneke’s opening up the participation process, inviting interested organisations to make submissions and to attend the interview – one of the “most robust” ever undertaken by a candidate for Chief Justice. “It may even have scared many candidates for public office, who feel this may be the next route to follow,” Zuma said, perhaps just slightly relieved that presidents don’t have to be grilled in the same way. Justice Moseneke, who was also a possible candidate for Chief Justice, was one of Justice Mogoeng’s harsher examiners. Zuma was also at pains to point out that the correct process was followed and that the interview of Justice Mogoeng was “transparent and thorough”. This came after critics have threatened to take the matter to court to have the process reviewed.

chief justice

DA leader Helen Zille, who is said to have eagerly posed for pictures with Zuma at Thursday morning’s infrastructure meeting, later in the day said her party was “deeply concerned” that Zuma did not “engage in appropriate consultation” and did not take into consideration the concerns raised. “We are currently considering the implications of what we consider to be a defective process,” she said. Zille had wanted to meet Zuma earlier this week to voice her concerns, but the meeting was cancelled by Zuma, who said he did not need a further meeting with Zille because the information she released to the media on the matter was enough. Cosatu on Thursday said it accepted Justice Mogoeng’s appointment even though it had registered its reservations about him as Chief Justice before. The IFP’s Chief Whip Koos van der Merwe said he would consider introducing a Private Members’ Bill into Parliament to change the way the Chief Justice is appointed. Justice Mogoeng does not need to be sworn in again, because he was sworn in when he first became a judge in 1997, but it is expected that he and Justice Ngcobo would go to a joint sitting of the National Assembly and the National Council of Provinces in Parliament for an introduction (not required by the Constitution). As Mercury editor Angela Quintal wryly remarked in a private tweet, hopefully this introduction won’t happen on the same day that Parliament votes on the Protection of Information Bill – Justice Mogoeng’s first possible big challenge.

friDAY - 9 september 2011


grootes assessment

chief justice

A double dose of advice for Mogoeng Mogoeng On Thursday, President Jacob Zuma anointed, sorry, appointed Judge Mogoeng Mogoeng as Chief Justice. It’s been a slightly bumpy ride, but Mogoeng got there in the end. However that little journey is nothing compared to the turbulence that lies ahead. As always, we think a little advice will go a long way. And who better than to dispense than the perennially shy and retiring STEPHEN GROOTES. Chief Justice. Got a nice ring to it, doesn’t it? It’s grand, imposing, it sort of towers above all the other titles. It’s not like the simple one word “President” which is supposed to sound powerful and often just ends up signifying impotence. It speaks of high office, of being somehow not just first among equals, but actually better than others. Enjoy it. Make a weekend of it. Spend

it with your family. Because coming soon is a rather large perfect storm. The first cold front is going to be your deputy. Deputy Chief Justice Dikgang Moseneke is a big man. He’s huge. Respected, very highly thought of, the man who many would have Photo: JSC's public interview with Mogoen Mogoeng.

FRIDAY - 9 september 2011


grootes assessment

chief justice

… And there’s nothing like huge power in this country to give you a huge headache...

in your job, with your title. You spoke of your respect for him “as an elder brother…but not as a friend” during your Judicial Service Commission interview. Well, we know that it was tough, but one generally doesn’t tell an elder brother “you don’t have to be sarcastic”. So you need to find a way to make amends. Moseneke is a fair, thoughtful man, he’ll certainly, from what we know of him, accept any private apology you may tender to go with your public one. At the same time, you need to find a way to publicly signal that you two have made your peace. Bear in mind, you win his respect, you’ll win the respect of people who respect him. But it’s tricky. As judges, you’re supposed to not really speak in public that much. So you will have to think hard. Perhaps you could quote him approvingly in your next speech. Hmmm, maybe not, some people (nasty hacks like myself no doubt) will think you’re just being sarky. Perhaps you need to make some kind of joint speech somewhere. If you were just B-grade celebrities, we’d just arrange for a picture to be taken of the two of you at some upmarket bistro. We can’t do that here, but you get the drift. So, a judicial signal of some type is in order. I’ll tell you one thing, you deal well with the typhoon that could be about to arrive and you

won’t have to worry about gaining his respect, cos you’ll already have it. It’s not the position of Chief Justice in the Constitutional Court that will really give you power. It’s the position of Chair of the Judicial Service Commission that is really going to do it. And there’s nothing like huge power in this country to give you a huge headache. The Hlophe Hurricane is gearing up again. You know the drill, it’s long, it’s complicated and it matters. And it affects many of your fellow Con Court judges directly. So saddle up. First, say publicly, that you are determined to do the right thing in this case. Then, get as much transparency in the process as you can. You insist that the media is allowed into any hearing that happens and you’ll make loads of new friends. We’re fickle like that. So use that against us. Get us in. Let us watch the process. Make some important points, and you’ll have us all nodding our heads in unison at your brilliance. And bear in mind that, while Hlophe may look scary, he’s not. Because he has no real political backing, if he ever did, in fact. But check your back. Justice Minister Jeff Radebe is the person to check with by the way. He’ll tell you. You crack that, you’ll be a hero. But there’s another pesky group you’ll have to deal with as well. It’s the horrible neo-liberal

FRIDAY - 9 september 2011


grootes assessment

... You’re more than welcome to dissent if you agree with another judge on the issue. But if you remain in a minority of one, well, that just won’t look good…. rainbow flag-waving crowd. The ones who dragged up all those judgments about rape, and who pontificated endlessly about your lack of dissenting judgment in Le Roux vs Steyn. You are going to have to do this quite loudly, almost injudiciously. Firstly, I get that you love the Bible. So do many many other people. You should no longer quote it in judgments. I know. That’s unfair. But that’s just the way it goes sometimes. Secondly, make a speech, in which you talk about why it’s important to protect the rights of everyone. You don’t actually have to go further than you have done already in your interview and in your address on Thursday. But instead of making it sound like a slightly defensive statement, make it a positive, pro-active one.

chief justice

So speak out against “corrective rapes” and the murders that sometimes accompany them. It’s not hard. You’re a judge, murder is wrong. And it’s not at all odd to speak out against it. But we’ll take notes and make it plain that you’re actually leading on the issue. Sir, Chief Justice, there is another sad task you have to perform. Just as you have to publicly signal that you and your deputy are on the same page, so you have to signal that you and the person who appointed you are not that close. Again, I know, it sucks. But you have to do it. It’s not that tricky, actually, you say you’ve only met three or four times anyway. The only way you can really do this is through your judgments. Ja, you don’t want to mess too much with that. But just know, in the back of your mind, that if you rule in government’s favour more than three times in a row, people will talk. You can’t stop them. And no one likes to look as if they’re “somebody’s man”. You want to be independent, you must look as if you are at the same time. And the entire country will be following your every word one day when the Protection of Information law case somes your way. Oh, and one final thing. Enough with the minority dissents, okay? The Con Court needs to look unified. You’re more than welcome to dissent if you agree with another judge on the issue. But if you remain in a minority of one, well, that just won’t look good. And Chief Justice, you’ve got ten long years ahead of you. So if things go wrong, you’ve got time to make it right. Obviously, a strong start will help. But you will have plenty of time to recover if you misstep. Good luck!

FRIDAY - 9 september 2011


south africa

population

Population estimates and the war against HIV/Aids The latest mid-year population estimate from StatsSA points to a bright light at the end of the HIV/Aids tunnel for the country. PAUL BERKOWITZ takes a closer look at the numbers and their implications. Numbers are funny things. Ask 10 different South Africans how many people live here, and you’ll receive 10 different answers. One of them might resemble the official mid-year population estimate which puts the figure at 50.6 million people, give or take. Someone better tell Eskom that its estimate of 49 million is so late-2008. On the

other end of the range of estimates is economist Mike Schussler, who claims we may have as many as 60 million people in South Africa. South Africa’s demographic narrative is a highly contested one. The story of South Photo: REUTERS

friDAY - 9 september 2011


south africa

South Africa’s demographic narrative is a highly contested one. The story of South Africa’s HIV problem as told by the TAC is vastly different to the one told by Rian Malan. For every Zimbabwean that the Department of Home Affairs claims is living in the country, someone at a braai somewhere will claim that there are two Zimbabweans. Or four.

Africa’s HIV problem as told by the Treatment Action Campaign is vastly different to the one told by Rian Malan. For every Zimbabwean the department of home affairs claims is living in the country, someone at a braai somewhere will claim that there are two Zimbabweans. Or four. Until the results of this year’s upcoming census are audited and finalised, we’ll have to keep relying on the official population projections. The trends identified by the official numbers make for some interesting reading. Firstly, the prevalence of HIV (percentage of total population which is HIV-positive) has increased from 9.4% in 2001 to 10.6% in 2011. In sheer numbers, HIV-positive people have

population

increased from 4.2 million to 5.4 million. Almost one in nine South Africans is HIV-positive, but this rises to one in six of people aged 15 to 49 years (16.6%) and almost one in five of all women between 15 and 49 years (19.4%). That’s the bad news. The good news is that the incidence of HIV (percentage of HIV-negative people who become infected in any one year) peaked in 2006 at 2.1% and has fallen to 1.4% in 2011. This is the lowest rate of incidence in more than a decade. The slowdown in the rate of new cases recorded is largely due to interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission, because the prevalence rate among women of childbearing age continues to climb. The assumptions underpinning the peaking and subsequent decline in the HIV incidence rate (driven mainly by the increased rollout of ARVs) also feed through into the modelling of life expectancy at birth and the crude death rate. Life expectancy is a highly politicised number. It’s one of the three primary statistics used to calculate the official UN Human Development Index for a country. South Africa’s HDI had fallen for much of the late 1990s and early 2000s. The latest data claim that life expectancy reached a low of 51.8 years in 2005 and has since risen, reaching 57.1 years in 2011 – its best level in a decade. Similarly, the crude death rate is recorded as having peaked at 14.4 deaths/1,000 people in 2005, subsequently declining to 11.7. Once again this is the best level in a decade. These figures, if true, represent a major victory for the department of health. They point to a causal link between its actions on the HIV epidemic and the positive demographic outcomes.

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south africa

Of course, these numbers produced by the official model are highly contested. They bear little resemblance to the figures given by the UN. The model itself is underpinned by the 2001 Census, where a very large undercount of the population dealt a severe blow to the credibility of any derived data. The model is, however, updated and monitored by the Actuarial Society of South Africa. You’re safer trusting their numbers than all the amateur News24 and TimesLIVE demographers put together, with their back-of-the-braai-pack calculations about how life expectancy will fall to 35 years under another decade of ANC rule.

These figures, if true, represent a major victory for the Department of Health. They point to a causal link between its actions on the HIV epidemic (increased rollout of ARVs, expanded education program) and the positive demographic outcomes described in the latest release.

population

We have extended the quantity of life available to HIV/Aids sufferers over the last six years. We now need to work much harder to improve the quality of that life.

Even if the model is accurate (and we might only be able to compare it to the Census 2011 numbers in two years’ time) we’ve only won one battle in the war. The rate of new infections may have peaked, but the ranks of the HIVpositive still swell by about 120,000 people a year – the share of the public health pie going to ARV provision isn’t likely to shrink significantly over the medium-term. The broader social costs of HIV are also still with us, including the issues of child-headed households and the ongoing deaths of the economically productive cohorts of society As a country, we need to absorb the future implications of these trends quickly so that those areas of government responsible for public health and social development can adapt their programmes to deal with remaining challenges. We have extended the quantity of life available to HIV/Aids sufferers over the last six years. We now need to work much harder to improve the quality of that life.

Read more: 1. 2011 Mid-Year Population Estimates, StatsSA

friDAY - 9 september 2011


AFRICA

friDAY – 9 september 2011


africa

briefs

Al-Qaeda expands influence in sub-Saharan Africa The recent bombing of the UN building in Abuja has sparked fears that al-Qaeda’s influence south of the Sahara may be growing. Boko Haram – the Nigerian Islamist sect that has claimed responsibility for the bombings – is thought to have links to al-Qaeda’s north African wing. One of the suspects sought for the Lagos bombings is a Boko Haram member with strong ties to al-Qaeda. And according to experts, increasing numbers of Nigerians are training in the desert with al-Qaeda.

Nigeria deports immigrants as counterterrorism measure The Nigerian government has, following the Lagos bombings, arrested and will be deporting an unspecified number of Africans from other countries. The arrests, according to Senegalese authorities cited by African Review, are an apparent attempt to fight terrorism by rounding up illegal aliens. The Nigerian ThisDay newspaper had reported that Boko Haram was using nonNigerians in its attacks.

Boko Haram (Reuters)

Zanu-PF youths intimidate residents of Harare township Growing tension between Zanu-PF and MDC supporters in Zimbabwe has resulted in sporadic clashes. On Wednesday in Highveld, a Harare township, police fired teargas to disperse Zanu-PF youths who attacked local traders. Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangarai and the MDC are due to hold a rally in Highveld on Saturday and the attacks are thought to have been orchestrated to intimidate the townships’ populace.

Archbishop of Cantebury seeks Zimbabwe visit Still on Zimbabwe, the Archbishop of Cantebury, Dr Rowan Williams, has asked for a meeting with Robert Mugabe

following reports of violence and intimidation between rival factions of Anglicans in the country. Williams is expected to visit Zimbabwe in October, marking the highest level visit to the country by a British representative in over a decade. The Archbishop’s visit is intended to show solidarity with Anglicans in the country, who have been divided by political divisions.

DRC bans political protest ahead of polls The Democratic Republic of Congo, which goes to the polls on 28 November, has imposed a five-day ban on political protests after violent protests this week when at least one person was killed. Kinshasa governor Andre Yango imposed the ban, which the ruling party has agreed to abide by if the

fridAY - 9 september 2011


africa

briefs

pressure to create a more inclusive government.

$2.6 million drug bust in Tanzania

Salva Kir, President of South Sudan (Reuters)

opposition does too. However, an official from the opposition criticised the ban.

One thousand inmates freed in DRC prison break DRC officials said that armed men attacked a prison in the east of the country and freed 1,000 inmates. The attack is thought to have been orchestrated to free a militia leader, Gedeon Matunga, who had been sentenced to death in 2009 for his involvement in the long-running conflict in the region. Police had recaptured 152 of the prisoners.

Kenya seeking early IMF disbursement Kenya is seeking an early disbursement of funds from the International Monetary Fund under a previously agreed-upon $509 million loan

facility. Authorities said the loan was to ease pressure on the Kenyan shilling which has declined by over 15% against the US dollar this year. Kenya’s north is also affected by the drought and high food prices, with inflation in the country soaring to 17% in August. The loan is to be used to alleviate that pressure, authorities say. The shilling strengthened slightly on this news.

South Sudan’s president reinstates advisor South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir, has done an about turn on his decision to fire his advisor on gender and human rights, Rebecca Garang. Kirr on Thurday reinstated Garang, the widow of a liberation struggle hero, after having fired her and her four colleagues on Wednesday. The president of the newly formed nation has been under

Police in Tanzania have seized 97 kilograms of heroin worth $2.6 million and arrested five suspects, Africa Review reported. The head of the country’s antinarcotic operation heralded the bust as a victory in the struggle against drugs, especially as recently the UN identified Tanzania as one of the preferred routes for international drug traffickers. An Iranian and four Tanzanians were arrested.

Somalia’s PM calls for more international troops Following the expulsion of al-Shabaab militants from the capital in recent months, Somalia’s Prime Minister Abdiweli Mohamed Ali said greater international support is needed if the government is to extend its control beyond Mogadishu. The 9,000 African Union troops in Mogadishu were recently boosted by reinforcements of 3,000. More are needed to drive militants out of the south of the country, Ali said.

fridAY - 9 september 2011


africa

kenya

Kenyan courts block SA mining company Courts in Kenya have blocked a South African mining company from prospecting what has been called a protected area after a local community successfully complained about the mine’s practices. By SIPHO HLONGWANE The Digo people of Kenya have successfully blocked Cortec Mining, a South African company, from prospecting Mrima Hill near Mombasa. The Daily Nation, which broke the story, said, “The Kaya Mrima Self-Help Group convinced the High Court in Mombasa that Cortec Mining, which claims to have invested Sh13.5 billion (R1.016 billion) in the Kwale mining project, was granted the prospecting mining licence in contravention of the Forests and Mining Acts.” Mrima Hill is considered rich in niobium, a ductile transition metal which is vital for the production of steel and nickel and iron-based super-alloys used in gas turbines and jet engine compartments. The lawyers representing the community successfully argued that the area where the prospecting was to take place was a forest and Photo: Mombasa by Marcel Oosterwijk.

nature reserve, and that excavation had destroyed the shrine and that the community’s cultural beliefs had been belittled. They also argued that their rights to a clean and healthy environment had been curtailed because a proper health and safety assessment had not been carried out. The Digo community said that their case had come after they had tried to get the Commissioner of Mines and Geology to suspend Cortec’s mining licence, and had failed. They have also sued the Commissioner of Mines and Geology, the Culture and National Heritage minister and the Environment and Natural Resources minister.

Read more: 1. Court suspends firm’s mineral mining project in the Daily Nation

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


africa

egypt

Has Egypt’s revolution lost its soul? Activist appeals for a million-man march in Tahrir Square on Friday are ostensibly to protest the erratic decisions of the military junta now ruling Egypt. But in truth, the march will be a test of the popularity and influence of the activists themselves, and whether the “Soul of the Revolution” is still relevant in Egypt’s new dispensation. By SIMON ALLISON. The Revolutionary Youth Coalition is a loose umbrella body of Egyptian activist groups, representatives of the young revolutionaries who were, as they described themselves, the “soul of the Revolution”. These are the people that organised the first mass protests, that put themselves in the frontlines, that camped out in Tahrir Square. Popular support coalesced in their wake. But they’re finding themselves increasingly irrelevant in the post-Mubarak era, sinking in the political quicksand as the real battle is fought between the interim military government, seasoned political campaigners and Islamist groups. They’ve made little to no preparation for elections and their demands for more dramatic change are met with silence. In a bid to revive their flagging support, the Revolutionary Youth Coalition is evoking the spirit of the revolution with another million-man march scheduled for Friday in Tahrir Square, Photo: REUTERS

with the goal of “correcting the path” of the military government. Their key demands include an end to military trials of civilians, a date for new elections, a new electoral law and minimum and maximum public sector wage laws. Estimates of expected turnout vary wildly. Although Egypt’s influential football fan groups have announced their participation, the popular Muslim Brotherhood is boycotting the march. If the activists get their million men (and women) in Tahrir, expect the military administration to take notice and, perhaps, action on some of their demands. But a poorly attended march will fatally undermine the influence of the young revolutionaries, who are finding that merely overthrowing a government is quicker and easier than effecting real change.

Read more: 1. Court suspends firm’s mineral mining project in the Daily Nation FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


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africa

sahel

Focus shifts to Sahel as Libyan endgame plays out Media attention might still be focussed on the hunt for Gaddafi, but in the corridors of power he’s yesterday’s man. Countries are already jostling for position in North Africa’s new geopolitical landscape, which is unusually sandy and filled with terrorists, smugglers and dangerous levels of heavy weaponry. By SIMON ALLISON In Arabic, the word “Sahel” means coast, or shore. It’s an ironic, perhaps wishful title for the long strip of land which marks the southern end of the Sahara desert, stretching all across Africa from the Red Sea in the east to the Atlantic in the west, where water is hard to find and survival is only for the fittest. It’s a harsh, forbidding environment that every year

gets harsher as the Sahara creeps further and further south. But desertification isn’t the region’s only problem. A major conference called by Algeria this week discussed the Sahel’s two greatest man-made threats, and what to do about them. Photo: REUTERS

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


africa

sahel

The repercussion of the Libyan crisis on the Sahel region have become palpable, particularly with the arrival of large amounts of weapons and fourwheel drive vehicles and the return of armed individuals involved in the Libyan crisis,” said Niger’s foreign minister Mohamed Bazoum.

Billed as an anti-terrorism forum, foreign ministers gathered in Algiers to discuss the growing threat of al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), the al-Qaeda-linked group behind a string of attacks in Sahel countries. But with Gaddafi’s fall, delegates had something else to talk about. “The repercussion of the Libyan crisis on the Sahel region have become palpable, particularly with the arrival of large amounts of weapons and four-wheel drive vehicles and the return of armed individuals involved in the Libyan crisis,” said Niger’s foreign minister Mohamed Bazoum. Tuesday’s large, high-profile convoy of vehicles into Niger was reportedly one of a few that have made their escape there from Libya. While knowledge of who and what exactly was on the convoys is still unconfirmed, it’s thought that they contained hundreds of pro-Gaddafi soldiers, many of them ethnic Tuaregs, and enough weapons and money for a small army. The Sahellian countries – specifically Algeria, Chad, Mali, Mauritania and Niger – are understandably worried: they’ve got enough

issues to deal with without a sudden influx of armed and dangerous men with nowhere else to go. There’s AQIM, which recently asserted its strength with a vicious attack on a military academy in Algiers, and is rumoured to be expanding its influence by linking with Nigeria’s Islamist group Boko Haram. There’s the prevalence of smugglers, also heavily armed, who see their wilful defiance of borders as a symbol of autonomy and control. Then there’s the institutional corruption which mars the bureacracies of almost all the Sahel countries, which themselves are exceptionally weak and unable to exert much influence on the vast desert area. Their powerlessness is exemplified by Niger’s inability to prevent proGaddafi convoys or even Gaddafi himself from entering the country: “We have no means to close the border...It is too big and we have very, very small means for that.” The Sahel is certainly big, but, according to Professor Cedric Jourde of the University of Ottowa, a specialist in Sahel politics, this doesn’t mean it’s some kind of desolate no

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


africa

The challenge for governments will be to better monitor and police these “nodes”. Algeria, in particular, is pushing for greater control of its border area and surrounds, which it sees as a major source of instability within the country.

man’s land: “Though the desert is vast, the actual areas used by humans are much more limited. All human activity—whether it is tourism, nomadism, trafficking, or terrorism— relies on the region’s key land routes and converges at water points and fuel stops. That local communities, armed Islamists, smugglers, and other groups involved in illegal activities sometimes interact at these nodes, then, is no surprise.” The challenge for governments will be to better monitor and police these “nodes”. Algeria, in particular, is pushing for greater control of its border area and surrounds, which it sees as a major source of instability within the

sahel

country. With the country’s hosting of the antiterrorism forum and their bullish talk about confronting al-Qaeda in the region, they look to be positioning themselves as the last North African bastion against terrorism; a stance that might just be popular in Washington DC. But they can’t do it on their own, and a serious effort to address the problems posed by AQIM, smuggling and the influx of Libyan fighters into the Sahel region can only be addressed by all the Sahel countries working together. There is already an institution in place to manage just this kind of regional cooperation. Cen-Sad, the Community of Sahel-Saharan states, was established to facilitate cross-border integration on regional issues. But it’s woefully unsuited to handle the post-Gaddafi world, seeing as it was inspired and established by him, and continues to recognise him as the legitimate leader of Libya. So the Sahel states are going to have to figure out how to solve their problems without the help of their regional body. It’s not going to be easy, given the region’s historic lawlessness, porous boundaries, widespread poverty and lack of respect for authority; but for the region’s governments, its a battle that must be won, or they’ll risk losing that authority completely.

Read more: 1. Algeria, neighbours searching solutions to Libya war fallout, al-Qaeda in the Washington Post 2. Sifting through the layers of insecurity in the Sahel from the Africa Center for Strategic Studies

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


WORLD

friDAY – 9 september 2011


world

briefs

Joe Biden and Barak Obama (Reuters)

LIBYA An audio recording reportedly by Gaddafi surfaced on Thursday, urging his loyalists to keep fighting. As with so much about the Libyan situation, its authenticity is uncertain. In it, Gaddafi said: "we will not leave our ancestral land", by way of dismissing rumours that he had fled into Niger. He also predicted that "Nato will be defeated because its financial resources are not sufficient to continue bombing Libya". Sorry, Muammar, but we reckon they could probably scrape together the necessary bucks.

USA Obama gives his long-awaited jobs speech on Thursday night

to the joint session of Congress. They're expecting announcements on an extension of pay-roll cuts, an extension of unemployment benefits, new infrastructure spending and aid for state and local governments. CBS estimated that the total package could amount to $400 billion. We eagerly await the Republicans' response.

GREECE Seems like the whole of Europe is on strike at the moment. Greeks have joined their Spanish and Italian counterparts in a new round of anti-austerity protests. Bad news for anyone in Greece needing a root canal or a lift anywhere: taxi drivers and dentists are on strike this time round. Rubbish collectors and

primary school teachers are scheduled for the next strikes. The taxi drivers' specific beef is the government's refusal to open up their profession to more competition.

USA Wendy Sherman, Obama's pick for a top State Department post, confirmed to senators on Wednesday that the US would veto Palestine's bid for statehood at the UN this month. She repeated the US's favoured line that they are committed to urging the parties into negotiations again, even though the parties in question have indicated they have no interest in this idea. On Thursday Palestine officially launched its bid for recognition with the first of a series of planned rallies.

friday - 9 september 2011


world

briefs

and paid tribute to them and the troops dispatched to the area. Noda knows that how he is seen to manage the earthquake reconstruction effort will largely determine his popularity, after the botched job performed by his predecessor Naoto Kan.

CHINA Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda. (Reuters)

LIBYA Gaddafi isn't the only thing missing from Libya at the moment. Investigators have been unable to turn up any trace of heat-seeking missiles that they know were sold to Gaddafi. The weapons can be used by terrorists to shoot down civilian airliners. They assume they have been stolen by rebels, criminals or smugglers. But the major fear is that they may have fallen into the hands of al-Qaeda's North African branch. There's a thought to make you sleep easy.

CHINA A militant Islamic group has claimed responsibility for recent attacks in China's Xinji-

ang region, which left over 30 people dead. A video released by the “Turkistan Islamic Party� claims that the attacks were revenge against the Beijing government. Around half the residents of the region at Turkic-speaking Muslims who complain that the migration of Chinese workers from the east has cost them jobs. Two hundred people died in the last flare-up of ethnic violence two years ago.

China has renewed Google's internet content provider license, allowing the search company to operate for another year. This will also give the site the opportunity to expand some of its services for Chinese users. Google China currently only provides entertainment and product search functions after a fight between the two entities last year, when Google accused the Chinese government of being behind a cyber attack on the company. Weird how that can sour a friendship.

JAPAN

USA

Japan's new Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda has paid his first visit to the site of the Fukushima nuclear disaster. Noda visited the J-Village sports facility, which has been turned into a camp for emergency workers,

A White House scientist will serve 13 years in jail for selling top-secret military intelligence to an FBI agent posing as an Israeli spy. The court heard on Wednesday how Stewart Nozette received around

friday - 9 september 2011


world

briefs

Brother Leader (Reuters)

$225,000 monthly for answering questions posed to him by a state-owned Israeli company. Nozette is one of the highestranking American scientists to ever be charged with spying on a foreign power. Wait, didn't we tell you earlier this week that the US had been caught spying on the Israeli embassy? For such close allies, they're remarkably suspicious.

USA New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg will not have many friends left in the Muslim community after saying on Wednesday that the NYPD's habit of subjecting predominantly Muslim neighbourhoods to greater surveillance was the same thing as screen-

ing children for measles. Say what? Bloomberg's point (we think) was that he sent cops into areas he knew to have high crime rates, just as the measles rate is higher among young people. That still doesn't make a lot of sense, Michael.

GERMANY Two men have been arrested in Berlin on suspicion of planning a terrorist attack. A 24-year-old German and a 28-year-old Gazan were detained after police tracked their purchases of materials which could be used to make bombs. Speculation was rife that they intended some attack linked to either the 9/11 anniversary or the visit of the Pope later in the month, but

the police denied that there was any evidence for either.

UK An inquiry into abuses committed by the British army in Iraq has found evidence of an "appalling episode of serious gratuitous violence". The case they are referring to there is the death of Iraqi hotel worker Baha Mousa, who died from 93 injuries inflicted on him by UK soldiers after he had been taken in for questioning in 2003. The inquiry found that senior commanders were "ignorant" of a ban on the use of five interrogation techniques, including sleep deprivation. David Cameron called the findings "shocking and appalling".

friday - 9 september 2011


world

abortion debate

UK votes on abortion law The UK pro-abortion lobby won the day on Wednesday, when the British parliament shot down a bill which proposed to strip abortion counselling from the abortion process. But the "spirit" of the proposal is being retained in a consultation which will necessitate a further MP vote. By REBECCA DAVIS. Abortion has been legal in the UK since 1967, making it one of the European pro-choice pioneers. But a Conservative MP called Nadine Dorries aims to significantly amend the process in a way which would give strength to prolife groups. Dorries' amendment seeks to stop non-state affiliated abortion providers like Marie Stopes clinics from offering counselling to women seeking abortion. The purported motivation for this is to provide greater opportunities for independent counsellors. What concerns reproductive rights activists, however, is that many of these independent counsellors are influenced by pro-life groups. Dorries insists she is “pro-life”, but the subtext of her proposal is that she feels groups like Marie Stopes encourage undecided women to pursue an abortion because they have a financial Photo: REUTERS

motivation to do so in terms of their funding. "If an organisation is paid that much for abortions, where is the incentive to reduce them?" she asked The Guardian. Dorries won support for her bill from some influential corners, including Iain Duncan Smith, the work and pensions secretary, and Liam Fox, the defence secretary. In the end the bill was outvoted by 368 to 118, but the UK health minister, Anne Milton, gave a boost to Dorries' case by announcing that the "spirit" of her plans would be embodied in a consultation on the issue. MPs will be presented with the findings of this consultation and vote on it again before the next general election. Dorries told the BBC: “We lost the battle but we have won the war”.

Read more: 1. Dorries abortion amendment defeated in House of Commons, in The Guardian

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


world

new york

Muslim racial profiling is like treating measles – NYC mayor New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg has defended the New York City Police Department against allegations of racial profiling. The Associated Press conducted an investigation which showed that the NYPD specifically targeted and spied on Muslim communities. By SIPHO HLONGWANE The NYC mayor has taken a turn to the dark side, and he seems quite okay with it. He defended an Associated Press revelation that in the years following September 11, undercover cops had spied on more than 250 mosques and Islamic groupings within the Big Apple. “The AP last month unearthed information on a mysterious ‘Demographics Unit’ inside the NYPD that, under the guidance of a CIA operative, installed clandestine cops in Muslim-majority neighborhoods to infiltrate the community and identify factors that could signal an eventual terror attack,” the Washington Post said. Bloomberg’s response to AP was: As the world gets more dangerous, people are willing to have infringements on their personal freedoms that they would not before. “If there is a community Photo: REUTERS

where the crime rate is very high, to not put more cops in that community is ridiculous,” the mayor said. “If you want to look for cases of measles, you’ll find a lot more of them among young people. That’s not targeting young people to go see whether they have measles or not.” Several Muslim civil rights groups and a New York congresswoman have urged the Department of Justice to investigate the department for racial profiling, according to the Washington Post. Hindsight has shown that the activities of Muslim terrorists never really took off from within the US, a fact Bloomberg might take into consideration when defending the NYPD’s odious practice.

Read more: 1. Bloomberg defends secret surveillance of Muslims in RT.com FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


world

iceland

Where have all the good glaciers gone? The Petermann Glacier is in Iceland. Or at least, it was two years ago. A Welsh scientist has taken photos which have shown an incredible amount of the glacier has melted away. Cause for alarm? Not until the Al Gores of this world get their hands on the photos. By SIPHO HLONGWANE. The Petermann Glacier is a large glacier in the north-west of Greenland, accounting for about 6% of the Greenland ice sheet. It is 300 kilometres long and measures up to 1 kilometre in height at some places. And it is melting at an incredible rate. Dr Alun Hubbard of the Glaciology Centre at the Aberystwyth University took photos of the glacier last month and compared them to photos taken by other scientists at exactly the same spot two years ago. Over that period, at that spot, the glacier has almost completely melted away. Hubbard said, “Although I knew what to expect in terms of ice loss from satellite imagery, I was still completely unprepared for the gobsmacking scale of the break-up, which rendered me speechless”. Photo: The Skaftafellsjokull glacier, Iceland (Reuters)

Scientists had been expecting a big break in the glacier since 2009. “With support from the US National Science Foundation and the Natural Environment Research Council in the UK, Dr Hubbard travelled by helicopter to the glacier to gather data from time lapse cameras and GPS sensors set up in July and August 2009, with the help of Greenpeace,” BBC said. “The GPS sensors were set in anticipation of a large break-up of ice that eventually occurred by on 3 August, 2010.” The break formed a 220 square kilometre ice island. The Petermann Glacier is far from shipping lanes, in case you’re concerned about that.

Read more: 1. ‘Gob-smacking’ scale of Petermann Glacier breakup in BBC News 2. Dramatic shrinking of Greenland glacier in Sydney Morning Herald

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


world

us 2012

Perry on top after Republican TV debate The Republican presidential battle kicked off in earnest on Wednesday night with a televised candidates' debate held, fittingly, in Ronald Reagan's library. Most commentators agreed that this round was won by Texan Rick Perry. By REBECCA DAVIS. This was Perry's first major showing since entering the presidential race last month and he came out all guns blazing. He took advantage of the platform to carry out some character assassination of President Obama - at one stage calling him an "abject liar" - but saved most of his ammunition for his Republican competitors. Jobs are likely to be the issue over which the next election is won or lost, and Perry lost no time in criticising opponent Mitt Romney's record on jobs growth. "Michael Dukakis created jobs three times faster than you did, Mitt," Perry said. Romney rebutted by repeating his claim that he is the man for the job because of his private sector experience rather than being simply a "career politician". Utah governor Jon Huntsman argued forcefully that his own jobs record Photo: REUTERS

was better than either Perry's or Romney's, but this was a two-man match. Michele Bachmann was given almost no opportunity to speak, with one of her campaign aides saying afterwards that the network “was trying to make it a Romney-Perry show”. Perry was grilled about his climate change scepticism, and responded with: "The science is not settled about this - Galileo got out-voted for a spell." Jon Huntsman took the extraordinary step of defending his claim that science is useful, which explains why he doesn’t have a hope in hell of getting voted in. It was a sign of the mood of the GOP’s voting base that the biggest cheers of the night were reserved for mention of the 234 executions Perry has signed off in Texas.

Read more: 1. Rick Perry's white-hot debate debut, on Salon

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


world

us 2012

View from Middle America: Iowa may be losing that loving feeling, Mr President The central place of Iowa in US national politics was cemented in the 1988 presidential elections, when Iowans, reeling from the farm crisis and the decimation of the local economy, voted Democrat for the first time. After two elections that saw extremely close calls in the state, in 2008 Iowa voted Obama by a landslide. Is the love affair now over? By KEVIN BLOOM. In December 1846, fourteen years after the Sauk and Meskwaki had been pushed out of the Mississippi valley and three years past the removal of these selfsame tribes from the Iowa River valley, Iowa became the 29th state in the Union. From that date until 1969, reflecting a Republican tradition typical of the American heartland, the state elected only three Democrats to the United States Senate. Since inception the people of Iowa had been

farmers, the introduction of the railroads in the 1850s transforming it into a major agricultural producer, and it was to a large extent the farm crisis of the 1980s that first caused Iowans to question their political affiliations. The 1988 presidential elections at the end of Ronald Reagan’s final term of office saw the state vote 55.1% Democrat for the first time Photo: President Obama in Iowa. (Reuters)

friDAY - 9 september 2011


world

us 2012

ever. What was on voters’ minds, presumably, was the mass depopulation that had occurred during the last few years due to the closure of farms, not to mention the high increase in the rates of farmer suicides, alcoholism, divorce, and child abuse. Iowans may have been right to blame the Republicans – the tailspin began in 1980, when record production collided with the loss of export markets due to the White House-imposed Soviet grain embargo, causing commodity prices and land values to plummet (by 1982, net farm income adjusted for inflation was lower than during the Great Depression). Iowa’s reputation as a major swing state in presidential elections has since been cemented. The state voted heavily Democrat in 1992, at 43.35% versus 37.33%, and even more heavily Democrat in 1996, at 50.31% versus 39.92%, but 2000 and 2004 saw differences at the polls of less than a percentage point, with the Republicans taking it after Bush Jr.’s first term at 49.92% versus 49.28%. In 2008, landing a key victory for the Obama campaign, Iowans swung Democrat again by a wide margin – 54.04% versus 44.74%. No wonder the president comes here as often as he can. Last March he was in Iowa

City, delivering a speech on health-care at the university, and afterwards – as the people who work in that fine store never tire of telling you – he visited the Prairie Lights bookshop, to buy books for his daughters. The event was covered in detail in all the local papers, of course, but The Washington Post saw fit to report on it too. “‘Well, this used to be my favorite place,’ Obama told the owner of Prairie Lights,” observed the Post. “He had mentioned the shop in his speech, noting that it has been offering health-insurance benefits to full-time employees for the last 20 years, only to see premiums shoot up 35 percent last year, making it harder to afford the same coverage.” By August this year, during a two-day tour of the state that was effectively a pre-campaign move against Republican candidates Rick Perry and Michele Bachmann, Obama’s hopes of health-care reform were lying in tatters. His speeches now were about partisan gridlock in congress, and the message was clear – it was the Tea Partyers’ fault that the US’s creditrating had been downgraded, sending markets plummeting and the financial world into fear. To be fair, Obama had been in Iowa in June talking about job creation, but the

… His speeches now were about partisan gridlock in congress, and the message was clear – it was the Tea Partyers’ fault that the US’s credit-rating had been downgraded, sending markets plummeting and the financial world into fear… friDAY - 9 september 2011


world

us 2012

... If Obama loses Iowa he may well lose his presidency, which will make any hope of a targeted jobs plan for African-Americans a distant memory....

blame-game theme appears to sum up what progressive Iowans now think of the incumbent – he’s become an ineffective evader. During a discussion on the subject after a reading at the abovementioned Prairie Lights, a prominent local attorney told me of his disappointment. “Clinton wouldn’t have stood for this,” he said. “He would have used the force of his personality to get congress on his side. Obama is too damned polite.” And as if to prove he really can’t win, in Washington DC on Thursday 8 September, just hours before he addressed a joint sitting of congress on his jobs plan, the president was getting it in the neck for being too interested in Iowa. The source of the attack was the Democrat congresswoman Maxine Waters, who demanded that the US’s first African-American president show he cares as much about unemployed blacks as he does about Iowa’s swing voters. As Waters told the online news site Politico: “There are roughly three million AfricanAmericans out of work today, a number nearly equal to the entire population of Iowa. I would suggest that if the entire population of Iowa, a

key state on the electoral map and a place that served as a stop on the president’s jobs bus tour were unemployed, they would be mentioned in the president’s speech and be the beneficiary of targeted public policy. So, one question to be answered this evening is, are the unemployed in the African-American community, including almost 45 percent of its youth, as important as the people of Iowa?” What Waters surely does know but isn’t saying is this – the answer to her last question is “yes”. If Obama loses Iowa he may well lose his presidency, which will make any hope of a targeted jobs plan for African-Americans a distant memory. What will a loss in Iowa mean for the rest of the world? With Rick Perry in the White House, the answer here is almost too ghastly to contemplate.

Read more: 1. “Maxine Waters to Obama on unemployment: Iowans or blacks?” in Politico 2. “Obama picks up books for his girls at Iowa City's Prairie Lights,” in the Washington Post

friDAY - 9 september 2011


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BUSINESS

friDAY – 9 september 2011


business

briefs

SAB Miller (Reuters)

South Africa The JSE All Share Index had another positive day ending up 1.3% to close at 30,918. RMB Holdings rose 3.8% with parent company First Rand Holdings also gaining 3.5% on the back of a trading update that it expects earnings per share to raise by over 100%. Other financial stocks also gained on the back of the update. Bell Equipment, the machinery company, fell 4.8% as industrials and resources took a knock in trading. Combined Motor Holdings, the automotive dealer fell 4.6%. Standard Bank deputy CEO, Sim Tshabalala expressed

concerns that Basel 3 liquidity standards would be “overly onerous”, retarding the ability of banks to lend while increasing the cost of borrowing. South African Airways made a net profit of R782m in the 2011 financial year, the national carrier announced on Thursday. This represents a 77% increase from last year's net profit of R442m. SAB Miller’s hostile takeover attempt of Foster’s looks set to proceed as the brewer’s appeal to the Australian regulator of misleading claims by Foster’s was rejected. SAB Miller doubted statements made about Foster’s profit forecasts at its annual results. The ruling was however favourable for

SAB as it meant the Australian brewer had to clarify it’s net debt position. A bid document is expected next week for a cash offer of AUD $4.90 per share. Emerging Markets THE MSCI Index climbed 0.2% as Brazil’s Bovespa Index gained 1.5%. The Brazilian central bank said it might cut interest rates further, while Turkey’s index rose 1% after Citigroup recommended a buy on the nation’s equities.

UK The FTSE 100 ended slightly up 0.4% to close at 5,340. Commodities trader, Glencore

friday - 9 september 2011


business

briefs

adopted by 17 nations in the region, weakened against most major currencies after the ECB decided to keep interest rates on hold at 1.5%. HTC smartphones (Reuters)

International gained 7.6%, recouping the previous day’s losses with Tullow Oil following the oil price rise, up 4.8%. Financial Services provider Admiral fell 2.3% as financial shares fell on Bank of England announcements.

ESPN and the NFL have reached an agreement that will keep Monday Night Football on American televisions until at least 2021. The deal is worth $1.9 billion per year or $15.2 billion over the period.

The Bank of England commented that it would not engage in further stimulus activities, while the European Central Bank expressed concerns that continent-wide economic threats had intensified.

Europe

US Gold futures gained in New York trading as the jobless claims showed and unexpected increase. UBS, the Swiss investment bank, expects gold to average $2,075 next year in a research report released yesterday.

Greek credit default swaps on the nation’s sovereign debt surged to record levels, signalling a 91% chance it will fail to honour its debt commitments. Data showed the economy shrank 7.3% prompting the German Finance Minister to describe the situation as being on “knife’s edge”. The euro fell the most in a month, versus the dollar, as the ECB president said “downside risks to the regions economy have intensified”. The euro,

Lufthansa is toying with entering the 21st century as it considers expanding the number of routes it currently offers one-way tickets on. Not to rush in too quickly, the Germans want to establish which routes and “under which conditions” the move would make sense.

Asia HTC, the region’s second largest smartphone manufacturer, is using nine patents purchased from Google last week to up its lawsuit claims against Apple Inc. as the two exchange patent infringement accusations. Apple is suing HTC and other manufacturers running the Android operating system, claiming it copies the iPhone. Google has been criticised for sitting on the sidelines while it’s manufacturing partners are being sued.

friday - 9 september 2011


business

google

Google acquires restaurant rating site Zagat Google have announced the acquisition of restaurant rating site Zagat. It is like they looked at the dealbuying site frenzy and chose to do the exact opposite. By SIPHO HLONGWANE Google bought Zagat, a popular restaurant rating site, for an undisclosed amount. “Moving forward, Zagat will be a cornerstone of our local offering—delighting people with their impressive array of reviews, ratings and insights, while enabling people everywhere to find extraordinary (and ordinary) experiences around the corner and around the world,” wrote Marissa Mayer, Google’s vice president for Local, Maps and Location Services on Google’s official blog. Zagat was founded more than 30 years ago as a way to collate diner experiences into one platform, and then provide a single rating. It is driven by diner experience. Zagat’s surveys could be one of the world’s earliest examples of user-generated content. Google’s decision is in marked contrast to the Photo: REUTERS

new fad in tech, the group-buying site. Started by Groupon, the craze has seen the deal-buying site spawn hundreds of thousands of copycats throughout the world. The business model always looked like benefiting the company peddling the deals rather than the merchants whose establishments were looking to attract customers. Even Facebook, which had got onto the group-buying bandwagon, admitted that it wasn’t such a good idea, and shut their deals site down. Unlike Groupon, Zagat doesn’t really focus on the bottom-line-shaking cuts to prices. Good customer service, ambience and dining is what gets you a high Zagat rating.

Read more: 1. Google buys Zagat, crushes OpenTable in Wall Street Journal 2. Officially just got Zagat rated in Google Blog

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


business

beer market

Beer o’clock in Congo as Heineken invests millions Four hundred million euros is a lot of money for anyone to invest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, especially when there’s no gold or diamonds involved. But Heineken think they have an even more valuable product: beer. We’re inclined to agree. By SIMON ALLISON Heineken, the world’s third largest brewing company, has just announced a massive 400 million euro (R4 billion) investment in its breweries in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The investment, which is one of the largest in the country that isn’t linked in some way to the extraction of precious natural resources, is a huge boost to the beleagured Congolese economy, which has been in the drink for quite some time. Heineken is confident in the scope for expansion. “Even if they fight a war in parts of Congo, the economy keeps going,” said Hans van Mameren, boss of Heineken’s Congolese subsidiary which brews Primus, the country’s most popular beer. “Everyone can see if you put a minimum of infrastructure in this country, it immediately opens up markets, it's all about access.” The DRC’s consumption of Primus and its competitors is small beer in comparison to other countries. Whereas the DRC consumes an average of three litres of beer per person per year, Photo: REUTERS

in neighbouring Congo Brazzaville it’s 30 litres, and in South Africa it’s 60 – although perhaps that’s not something to aspire to. Heineken believes that demand is huge in the country, and the only factor hindering a massive increase in consumption is distribution. The DRC is a huge country with few roads, so transport is expensive and sometimes impossible. But the government has a few massive infrastructure projects in the pipeline, and Heineken is betting that these will open up the market. It’s a brave time for Heineken to announce its planned investment, just before the DRC’s national elections in November and amid increasing political unrest. But Van Mameren is confident politicians are too clever to mess with the country’s beer supply: "We're producing the cheapest luxury in this country; if there was a situation where there was no beer, the population would be very surprised to say the least,” he said.

Read more: 1. Heineken to invest 400 million euros in Congo over five years on Reuters Africa

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


business

facebook

Judge rules in favour of five employees fired for whining on Facebook In the brave new world of Facebook and Twitter, South African companies are scrambling to put together social media policies for staff. They may want to look at the US judgment which has just ordered the reinstatement of five employees fired for dissing their workplace on Facebook. By REBECCA DAVIS. It’s a landmark decision for the often murky waters of Facebook use and the law: a national labour relations board judge in the US has ruled that a New York NGO must re-hire five workers given the boot for criticising their working conditions on Facebook. In October 2010, the five employees of Hispanics United of Buffalo participated in a Facebook discussion about the nature of their job, including complaining about their workload. Within days they had been fired. This week a judge ruled that the five should be reinstated immediately. His justification was that the employees were protected because what happened on Facebook constituted a private conversation among co-workers. It’s the first ruling of its kind, so it may set a valuable precedent. Photo: REUTERS

South African organisations have wised up to the power of social media and are increasingly introducing fairly draconian use policies, sometimes banning the mention of the employer at all. Individuals’ personal profiles on networking sites are now often taken as representing the organisation, even if there is no explicit link between the two. It was a sign of the times in June of this year when the Mail & Guardian fired an intern for an anti-Semitic rant on Facebook. Of course, hatespeech is a different kettle of fish to criticising your job, and so is defamation. Offline defamation laws apply equally to Facebook - as a Durban man found out in 2009 after using Facebook to describe his boss as a "serial masturbator".

Read more: 1. Judge Orders Re-Hiring of Workers Fired for Facebook Complaints, on Inc

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


LIFE, ETC

friDAY – 9 september 2011


life, etc

briefs

CANADA Celine Dion had an unwelcome visitor on Monday night when a man broke into her Montreal home, helped himself to pastries from the kitchen and prepared for a nice hot bath. When police arrived, he reportedly said: "Hey guys, what are you doing here?" Celine Dion was unharmed because she wasn't at home at the time, currently holidaying with her hubby in Florida. So don't worry, her art will go on.

AUSTRIA Archaeologists in Austria have found a large school which seems to have been a training ground for Roman gladiators about 1,700 years ago. The compound contained 40 small cells for the fighters, most of whom were criminals, prisoners-ofwar or slaves. The area also housed a training area and a large bathing area. Outside the compound walls, there also appears to be a cemetery for those killed during training. Tough gig, gladiatoring.

ITALY Madonna has become the latest victim of the old in-

Celine Dion (Reuters)

sulting-aside-picked-up-bymicrophone syndrome. At the Venice Film Festival this week, an adoring fan presented her with a bunch of flowers. Madonna smilingly received them, but then promptly shoved them under the table while saying to the man next to her "I absolutely loathe hydrangeas". The comment was broadcast to the room at large due to the fact that her press conference mic was still on. You've been warned: don't give Madge hydrangeas.

SWEDEN We've all been there: you have a bit too much to drink, and you get stuck in an apple tree. That's what happened to an elk in Sweden this week, who chomped his way through

enough fermented apples to get him pretty sozzled. Greedily reaching for more apples (it's never "just one apple for the road", is it?) he managed to get his antlers tangled in the tree and had to be rescued by a special team. He is now in elk rehab.

UK If you're going to get a tattoo, forget the Chinese symbols and make it something functional. That's the thinking of 81-yearold UK grandmother Joy Tomkins. Tomkins is pro-euthanasia, and decided to make sure that nobody would submit her to a lingering death like that suffered by her husband Malcolm. Accordingly, she has had the words "Do not resuscitate" inked on her chest and, just in

friday - 9 september 2011


life, etc

briefs

IRELAND

Reese Witherspoon (Reuters)

case, "P.T.O." (with an arrow) tattooed on her back. Let's hope doctors don't assume it's a rap lyric.

USA Jury selection has begun in the Michael Jackson manslaughter trial in Los Angeles. Attorneys on Thursday began selecting the 12 people who will decide whether Jackson's doctor, Conrad Murray, killed him by administering a drug overdose. It's said that they will go through 480 potential jurors before selecting the final 12. This has “reality show” written all over it. Come on, Simon Cowell.

USA Actress Reese Witherspoon was hit by a car while jogging

in Santa Monica on Thursday morning. The driver was some crazed old bat (84 years old) who failed to stop for the Legally Blonde actress, who was taken to hospital but released shortly afterwards. That gives us a chance to make the following joke: "Did you hear that actress Reese Whatsername was hit?" "Witherspoon?" "No, with a car."

NEW ZEALAND Bad news for people who love rugby and vuvuzelas: they have been banned from the Rugby World Cup. They are on the forbidden list together with whistles (noisy), umbrellas (impede vision), roller blades (irritating), gang insignia (dangerous), furniture (um…) and auto parts (no idea. No idea at all).

There's just no delicate way to put this: Sinead O'Connor is trawling the internet for sex. In a post on her website, the Irish singer says she is "so desperate for sex" that she might do something desperate. O'Connor is quite flexible about her must-haves for her potential sexual partners, although she does stipulate that they "must not be named Brian or Nigel". Women are also allowed to apply. You must absolutely not apply, however, if you are not a fan of anal sex. Apparently, nothing compares.

UK Inadvertent victim of the day: the editor of the UK's Gay Times, who happens to be called – cough – Darren Scott. As a result, he has been on the receiving end of a torrent of Twitter abuse from South Africans bent on expressing their outrage with South Africa's racist DJ Darren Scott all Thursday. "I am not the Darren Scott that is trending on Twitter. There is more than one in the world", he told South African tweeters, adding: "The only K word I fling about ends in Minogue". He sounds much nicer than our one.

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life, etc

galliano

Galliano and Scott: separated at birth? On Wedensday, British designer John Galliano was found guilty by a Paris court of making racist statements in a bar. Et tu, Darren Scott? By REBECCA DAVIS. Galliano was fined the equivalent of around R60 000 for going on two racist and anti-Semitic rants in October 2010 and February 2011. In the February incident, Galliano directed 30 anti-Semitic insults at a fellow customer in 45 minutes, before moving on to racially attack her South Asian companion. Galliano's case was lodged by several French anti-racism groups, as well as the people he insulted. During the hearing the state prosecutor told the judges his behaviour was an example of "everyday anti-Semitism and racism" which was "pitiful and dreadful". “Pitiful and dreadful” is a pretty good description of how Darren Scott must be feeling today after Beeld broke the news yesterday about his use of the “k-word” to a colleague – like Galliano, in a bar. Scott has since resigned from his radio gig and taken an indefinite leave of absence from Photo: John Galliano arrives to Paris court. (Reuters)

Supersport. Scott yesterday released a statement to Beeld saying they had been factually inaccurate in their reporting of the incident and that "once those facts are known it emerges that Scott had been generous and patient to a fault". Scott describes in detail his financial history with the object of his racial slur, seemingly as a tacit justification for his insult. The statement concluded by noting that Scott "regrets" the incident and has "conveyed his apologies". In person on 702 yesterday morning Scott was more effusive in expressing his shame and regret. But then again, so was Galliano, who said, "I know that I must face up to my own failures and that I must work hard to gain people's understanding and compassion."

Read more: 1. JJohn Galliano found guilty of racist and anti-Semitic abuse, in The Guardian 2. Darren Scott’s side of the story, on IOL

FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


life, etc

bmw

Laser headlights for future BMWs We know about light emitting diode (LED) lights being used in the headlights of cars, but have a gurn at this: future BMWs will have power-saving lasers in their headlights. By SIPHO HLONGWANE Future BMWs will use lasers instead of LEDs in headlights. The new technology will save power and fuel for the cars, the company said. What won’t happen is BMWs driving about with burning red lights in the front, setting fire to other road users. Instead, the laser beam will be converted by a fluorescent phosphor material inside the headlamp into a bright, white light. The resultant light won’t pose a risk to anybody. “The tiny size of the lasers open up a lot of possibilities,” CNet said. “Instead of a large, round piece of glass, a laser headlight could shine through the cross pieces of the car's grille, and so remain hidden when not in use. The traPhoto: REUTERS

ditional dual-headlight configuration would also no longer be necessary, as a row of laser diodes could peek out from the front edge of the hood. As laser light is a coherent beam, it can be precisely shaped, and also changed at will. Instead of a separate high-beam lamp, lasers can be computer controlled to form a low-beam or highbeam pattern. The first car to have the laser headlight technology will be the upcoming i8, a plug-in hybrid sports coupé.

Read more: 1. BMW to fit cars with lasers in CNet 2. BMW to introduce laser headlights in GizMag

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SPORT

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briefs

South Africa The Sharks have made three changes and a positional switch for Saturday's Currie Cup clash against the Pumas in Durban. Conrad Hoffmann replaces the injured Charl McLeod at scrum-half in the only change amongst the backs. Up front, Alistair Hargreaves replaces Jan Andre Marais at lock, while Wiehan Herbst comes in for Eugene van Staden at tighthead prop and in the back row, captain Keegan Daniel swaps places with Jean Deysel The Blue Bulls have made two changes to their side for Saturday's Currie Cup clash against the Cheetahs in Bloemfontein. Coach Pine Pienaar has made one positional change, with Zane Kirchner moving from centre to his more accustomed position at full-back. Francois Venter has been promoted to the starting line-up at inside centre for Jurgen Visser, who drops to the bench. The MTN8 final has been sold out ahead of the eagerlyawaited contest featuring Orlando Pirates and Kaizer Chiefs at Soccer City on Saturday. Premier Soccer League CEO Zola

Andy Robinson (Reuters)

Majavu revealed his delight at the news after fans purchased the last of the tickets on Thursday afternoon.

New Zealand Ireland prop Cian Healy has been ruled out of his side's Rugby World Cup opener against the USA in New Plymouth on Sunday. The Leinster front-rower suffered an eye injury against England in their final warm-up clash two weeks ago and was always in doubt. Scotland coach Andy Robinson has named his side to open their Rugby World Cup account against Romania in Invercargill on Saturday. Glasgow

lock Alastair Kellock will lead the team that includes eight players with previous Rugby World Cup experience. Veteran full-back Chris Paterson will be playing in his fourth RWC tournament - unprecedented for a Scot. Fiji have named former soldier Leone Nakarawa in their team to face Namibia in Saturday's match at Rotorua International Stadium. The 23-yearold lock was at the centre of a visa row targeting the country's military government. Nakarawa was forced to resign his army commission to even play at the World Cup after New Zealand refused to relax a ban on visits from anyone connected with Suva's military government.

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briefs

after rain caused havoc for the second day running. Following Tuesday's wash-out, organisers were desperate to get play underway on Wednesday. Both the Australian Open and Wimbledon already have the capacity to play matches when it is raining with roofs on their biggest courts, while the French Open has already confirmed plans to have a roof over Court Philippe Chatrier by 2016. Roberto Mancini (Reuters)

The vuvuzelas which provided the droning soundtrack to last year's soccer World Cup in South Africa are unlikely to make a big noise at the Rugby version in New Zealand. The ubiquitous plastic trumpets are among several items banned from World Cup venues. Also included on an eclectic list are whistles, umbrellas, roller blades, gang insignia, furniture and - remarkably - auto parts. Leave your carburettor at home.

UK QPR boss Neil Warnock has refused to rule out a bid for David Beckham. New Rangers owner Tony Fernandes revealed his interest in signing the former Manchester United and England star on Twitter this week. And Warnock was quoted in the Daily Telegraph as saying: "About three weeks

ago I would not have dreamed to sign Joey Barton so I will never write anything off.� Manchester City boss Roberto Mancini admits Owen Hargreaves' signing was largely influenced by UEFA's financial fair play regulations. Mancini coveted Roma's Daniele de Rossi and Real Madrid's Fernando Gago, but opted for out-of-contract Hargreaves as he couldn't spend heavily. Mancini told The Independent: "Gago is a player we liked a lot. We couldn't spend any more money also for the question of financial fair play.� What a confidence booster.

US Novak Djokovic has urged the US Open organisers to considering putting a roof over Arthur Ashe stadium

Europe F1 Bruno Senna feels he will be more self-assured at this weekend's Italian GP after blowing the cobwebs away at Spa a fortnight ago. After starring during the Belgian GP qualifying which saw him start P7, the Brazilian was involved in first-lap accident and eventually had to settle for 13th place. Golf Ian Poulter has confirmed he will return to Hong Kong GC to defend his UBS Hong Kong Open title from 1 - 4 December. Poulter, who shot a stunning second-round 60 last year to win the title, will be joined by rising Italian star Matteo Manassero, and both are excited about the prospect.

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rwc

The time has come: crouch, touch, pause … Engage! If Test match rugby was played in press conference rooms and quotes were the equivalent of fivepointers, Wales would have already won the opening encounter against the Springboks. STYLI CHARALAMBOUS previews Sunday’s big match. In the politically correct world of modern day media relations, it’s not often that opposing teams take the opportunity to talk up their own chances. The usual mantra is one of fighting for the underdog status and hoping to lure the 15 players on the other side of the pitch into complacency. But not Warren Gatland and his team of Cymru lads. The Welsh management stopped just short of bad mouthing the Boks and in particular

their style of play. Gatland, a former Waikato and New Zealand “B” team hooker, has not been afraid to mince his words ahead of this mouth-watering Pool D encounter. Showing little respect for the current World Champions, Gatland said the Boks “played no rugby” and that the Welsh knew just what to expect from the World Champions. Photo: South Africa Springboks captain John Smit (front C) trains with the team at a practice session in Wellington September 6, 2011. REUTERS

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rwc

Photo: Wales' training session in Wellington, ahead of their Rugby World Cup opening match against South Africa on Sunday, September 6, 2011. (Reuters)

By effectively calling the Boks predictable and exponents of boring rugby, Gatland can only be hoping to get the player’s backs up before the game that will result in overzealous and foolish behaviour on the pitch. The Springboks have lost many Tests due to dangerous and illegal practices that resulted in sin-binned players. Just think back to last year’s ill-fated Tri-Nations campaign, where the Boks earned three yellow cards in as many matches, and how the disadvantage of playing with a man short for 10 minutes effectively ended any hope of victory. Gatland’s strategy is as transparent as it is underhanded, going on to call Wayne Barnes, the referee officiating Sunday’s Test match, “the best in the world”. Not too many of his countrymen would agree, after Barnes failed to pick up the blatant forward pass at the last World Cup that ended New Zealand’s tournament.

No doubt, Gatland had Bakkies Botha in mind, who more often than not has been the recipient of those pesky yellow cards. And in a twist of fate, the big man from Pretoria has been ruled out through injury, to be replaced by teammate Danie Roussouw, himself no stranger to the sin-bin. Mind games aside, the Boks will be preparing for a tough test from their northern hemisphere rivals. In their RWC warm-up campaign Wales exchanged victories with England and then went on to disarm Argentina with relative ease in a 28-13 victory at the Millennium Stadium. The Welsh have proven to be tough opponents to put away for the Boks, running the South Africans close the last three times the two sides met, coming within one score of the Boks each time. The Boks will know their strength lies in the set-pieces of the scrum and the line-out,

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where the experienced and formidable pack of forwards will look to lay the platform and secure possession. With Bakkies Botha out of the mix, Victor Matfield will lead the lineout efforts with the incredibly good Heinrich Brüssow the go-to man for turnover possession. The expected wet conditions will also nudge the Boks into playing a tight game with much territorial kicking. Fourie du Preez will need to up his own kicking game since the last outing against the All Blacks, where he only succeeded in handing over possession. Another off day like that on Sunday could see the exciting Welsh backline attacking the Boks defensive line at will, and the Bok management considering the option of Francois Hougaard at scrumhalf. Where the Boks will be looking to their forwards to set-up the win, the Welsh will be wanting to spread the ball as wide, and as quickly as possible to get their potent backline into the game. George North, Jamie Roberts and veteran Shane Williams have all caused problems for the Bok defence in the past, whether it be in the red jerseys of Wales or the British Lions. North and Roberts are big men able to break over the gain line at pace, while the unpredictable Williams, even at the ripe old age of 34 can still dance his way to the try-line. It is likely to be a nervous start to the match as both teams’ excitement over the start of the tournament results in early nerves for the players. South Africa, with the more experienced team and likely to field many of the players that started the World Cup final in 2007, should be in a better position to deal with the big occasion. On paper, the Boks look 10-14 points better than Wales, but as we all know, no Test match is ever played on paper.

rwc

Previous results 2010: South Africa won 29 -26 in Cardiff 2010: South Africa won 34 -31 in Cardiff 2008: South Africa won 20 -15 in Cardiff Prediction: Expect a close game, with Welsh finishing strongly as they usually do against the Boks, but only after the game has been lost. Boks by 12 points.

The teams South Africa: 15 Frans Steyn, 14 JP Pietersen, 13 Jaque Fourie, 12 Jean de Villers, 11 Bryan Habana, 10 Morné Steyn, 9 Fourie du Preez, 8 Pierre Spies, 7 Schalk Burger, 6 Heinrich Brüssow, 5 Victor Matfield, 4 Danie Rossouw, 3 Jannie du Plessis, 2 John Smit, 1 Tendai Mtawarira. Wales: 15 James Hook, 14 George North, 13 Jonathan Davies, 12 Jamie Roberts, 11 Shane Williams, 10 Rhys Priestland, 9 Mike Phillips; 8 Toby Faletau, 7 Sam Warburton (c), 6 Dan Lydiate, 5 Alun Wyn Jones, 4 Luke Charteris, 3 Adam Jones, 2 Huw Bennett, 1 Paul James

Date: Sunday, September 11 Kick-off: 20.30 (10.30 CAT) Venue: Westpac Stadium, Wellington Weather: Chance of rain, with strong winds. Day time high: 15°C; Evening low: 9°C Referee: Wayne Barnes (England)  Assistant referees: George Clancy (Ireland)), Vinny Munro (New Zealand)  Television match official: Matt Goddard (Australia)

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RWC

RWC 2011: Preview New Zealand vs Tonga The question is not who will win Friday's 2011 Rugby World Cup opener in Auckland, but rather in what state New Zealand will be left after 80 minutes. By ROSS HASTIE. It's the moment we've all been waiting for. The World Cup finally kicks off and the All Blacks get a chance to make amends for the disappointment of four years ago. While the hosts are under massive pressure to keep the Webb Ellis Cup in New Zealand for four years (not just six weeks), they won't be having sleepless nights about Friday's result. Tonga will not win - of that there is no doubt. The Islanders have never beaten the All

Blacks. In fact, they have not even come within 80 points of the Kiwis in the last decade. But the team in red will not go down lightly, and it's their reputation for thundering big hits that will have All Blacks coach Graham Henry worried. Indeed the Tongans have promised to bring their standard physical approach to what is sure Photo: REUTERS

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sport

RWC

Photo: Tonga (Reuters)

to be a bruising encounter. The Ikale Tahi have a habit of picking up cards (they've seen red and yellow more than any other team in World Cup history) and will still be ruing the final game of this year's Pacific Nations Cup where they lost the title in the last minute to Japan, due largely to the fact that they were down a man for an hour. As a result, don't be surprised if Dan Carter and Richie McCaw don't play to the final whistle. Henry will want to make sure of the result before pulling out the ol' shepherd's crook and getting his stars out of harm's way. Speaking of stars, Ma'a Nonu will wear number 13 as Sonny Bill Williams is given a chance at inside centre. It's incredibly tough to leave a player as classy as Conrad Smith out, but we fancy the Nonu-SBW combination will wreak havoc. Picture it: an off-load out the back of Williams's hand into the path of a charging 110kg Nonu... ouch.

Of course, it would be wrong to assume Tonga will be thrashed by a cricket score. They beat Fiji 32-20 in their last warm-up game and have bolstered that winning team with a couple of European-based players. The visitors are also sure to have plenty of support after they arrived at Auckland Airport to an awaiting crowd of at least 4,000 - more than any other side. Interestingly, Tonga will kick-off the World Cup's haka showdowns. They will start their traditional pre-match war dance before the hosts, who will then have the choice to try to out-shout their rivals or wait until they have finished. After two consecutive losses, a big win is just what the doctor ordered for the All Blacks as they begin their quest to appease an expectant nation. There should be tries aplenty. We can't wait.

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sport Players to watch For New Zealand: He's set to be one of the stars of the World Cup... as long as he can make his team's first XV, Sonny Bill Williams has been given a rare opportunity to start and show us all what he is capable of. He floats like a butterfly, off-loads like a magician and hits like a lumberjack. If SBW is given enough space, we're likely to be treated to a real spectacle. But will it be enough to earn a place in the team to face France in two weeks? For Tonga: Tongan-born but New Zealandeducated Soane Tonga'uiha is a star of the English Premiership where the Northampton Saints charger is a try-scoring phenomenon, ending the last two seasons as the league's top-scoring prop. In what is set to be a highscoring game, the 126kg man-mountain is bound to get a chance to show off his impressive turn of speed. Head-to-head: Competition for places in the All Blacks back-row is red hot at the moment and Jerome Kaino will be out to cement his berth while Adam Thomson is sidelined with an elbow injury. He'll be up against Tonga captain Finau Maka, who could be a little rusty since he’s now plying his trade in France's third division. But the former Toulouse back-rower's reputation for big hits and barnstorming runs is well earned so his tussle with Kaino is sure to be exciting to watch.

Previous results 2003: New Zealand won 91 -7 in Brisbane 2000: New Zealand won 102-0 in North Shore City 1999: New Zealand won 45 - 9 in Bristol Prediction: No mystery here. The crowd should get plenty in return for forking out for

RWC

the tickets to the opening game. New Zealand by 45 points

The teams New Zealand 15 Israel Dagg, 14 Richard Kahui, 13 Ma'a Nonu, 12 Sonny Bill Williams, 11 Isaia Toeava, 10 Daniel Carter, 9 Jimmy Cowan, 8 Victor Vito, 7 Richie McCaw (capt), 6 Jerome Kaino, 5 Ali Williams, 4 Brad Thorn, 3 Owen Franks, 2 Andrew Hore, 1 Tony Woodcock. Replacements: 16 Corey Flynn, 17 Ben Franks, 18 Anthony Boric, 19 Sam Whitelock, 20 Piri Weepu, 21 Colin Slade, 22 Cory Jane. Tonga 15 Vunga Lilo, 14 Viliame Iongi, 13 Suka Hufanga, 12 Andrew Ma'ilei, 11 Siale Piutau, 10 Kurt Morath, 9 Taniela Moa, 8 Viliami Ma'afu, 7 Finau Maka (c), 6 Sione Kalamafoni, 5 Joe Tu'ineau, 4 Paino Hehea, 3 Taufa'ao Filise, 2 Aleki Lutui, 1 Soane Tonga'uiha. Replacements: 16 Ephraim Taukafa, 17 Alisona Taumalolo, 18 Kisi Pulu, 19 Sione Timani, 20 Samiu Vahafolau, 21 Samisoni Fisilau, 22 Alipate Fatafehi.

Date: Friday, 9 September Kick-off: 06.30 SAST (08.30 GMT) Venue: Eden Park Stadium, Auckland Weather: Dry. Day time high: 18°C; Evening low: 7°C Referee: George Clancy (Ireland) Assistant referees: Craig Joubert (South Africa), Stuart Terheege (England) Television match official: Giulio De Santis (Italy)

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Formula one

Preview: Italian Grand Prix The historic 5.8 kilometre Monza circuit, just north of Milan, plays host to this weekend’s Italian Grand Prix. It has only six corners, which means the drivers spend most of their time on full throttle. Success will depend on straight-line speed, stability under braking and making best use of the two DRS zones. OSIAME MOLEFE previews the 13th round of the Formula One world championship. With this year’s dominance by Red Bull Racing and judging from the noise from the paddock, Mark Webber seems to be the only driver interested in racing. He writes in his BBC column that a Red Bull victory at Monza would mean more to the team than the points on offer; it would deal a psychological blow to Ferrari and McLaren. The Australian though has been outclassed most of this year by his team-mate Sebastian Vettel, and a victory for Vettel at Monza would deal the same psychological blow to all, including Webber. Despite the fighting words, question marks still hang over Webber’s gridleading credentials. A Monza victory won’t be easy for Red Bull. The team has never won at the circuit. The toughest competition will come from hometeam Ferrari who have always been competitive here. The Tifosi wouldn’t have it any other way. Fernando Alonso has asked for perfect support from the team and Filipe Massa has blamed the Photo: REUTERS

team’s lacklustre performance of late on cold temperatures, which should not be a problem with the forecast predicting high 20s. Monza is also tyre supplier Pirelli’s home grand prix. Following last weekend’s drama with blistering tyres, Pirelli has given the team new camber settings, which they say should prevent overheating on the straights and provide grip in high-speed corners. Lewis Hamilton meanwhile has denied that his lifestyle – which sees him hobnobbing with celebrities and doing the TV talk show circuit – distracts him from the racing. In his defence, he has seemed all-in behind the wheel – excessively so at times. But McLaren have said they won’t ask him to change his driving style, so expect him to be as aggressive as ever at Monza. Prediction: He’s had some bad luck and races where he simply didn’t show up, but watch Felipe Massa. He probably won’t win. Vettel will do that. But expect Massa to duke it out with his team-mate Alonso for the second step on the podium. FRIDAY - 9 SEPTEMBER 2011


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iMaverick 09 Septemebr 2011