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A NEW USER EXPERIENCE IS HERE WITH EACH NEW ISSUE, WE TRY TO IMPROVE THE USER EXPEREINCE WITH THE MAGAZINE. VISIT WWW.STYLEZINEMAGAZINE.COM TODAY.

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STYLEZINE MAGAZINE


A LETTER FORM NIK BARNES

FROM THE EDITOR’s DESK

It is a common occurrence for someone to say they want to live forever. The human mind toils with this concept for most of their life. We know of course however that is impossible, or is it? To truly become immortal you must first break barriers and reinvent yourself in others through their vision and dreams. In our first issue of 2016 we feature Myles ‘Chairo’ Munroe Jr as the Man of the Year. The usually private young man was thrust into the spotlight, with the weight of the world on his shoulders and never once stumbled. Myles Munroe Jr has taken the responsibility on to not only continue a legacy but to also craft one of his own. He used the preparation from his parents to stand tall and be the man they always knew he was envisioned to be. In this issue we take a look at what makes ‘Chairo’ the dream. A special thank yo to all our sponsors, contributors and hard working staff at Stylezine Magazine. Join us as we continue to explore, experiment and inspire. The Dream lives on.

Nik Barnes Editor-In-Chief editor@stylezinemagazine.com www.twitter.com/stylezinemag

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WHAT’S INSIDE CLICK A THUMBNAIL TO GO DIRECTLY TO THE STORY.

ON THE COVER

IN THIS ISSUE Eat Here, Drink Here The Misadventures of Twitter Her and I Editorial Runway to Parris Artist Watch Feature Story: Man of The Year Robust to Success Ready Fa Di Road

STYLEZINE MAGAZINE © 2016. All rights reserved. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of the owners. For more information, please contact us. No part of STYLEZINE may be produced in any form by any means without prior written consent. For permissions requests, please call 242.525.9751. For reproduction on articles, please contact Nikolas Barnes at at editor@stylezinemagazine.com.

Myles Chairo Munroe Photographer: Scharad Lightbourne Assisted by: Gustavus Cox Styling: Scharad Lightbourne Custom Wardrobe: Gustavus Ausutsa

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CONTRIBUTORS Editor-In-Chief Nik Barnes Creative Director Scharad Lightbourne Staff Writers Parris Barnes Gail Lindsay Celeste Smith Crista Strachan Sherron Young Travis Edgecombe Khashan Poitier Jaychelle Hanna Amajahl Knowles Photographers Oliver Schneider Scharad Lightbourne K. Federick Photography Lehwego Remo The Carnival Doctor Whapaxx Photography Sales Team Jaquay Adderley The Poitier Group E Sounds Marketing The Barnes Group of Companies


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P A R I S

B A R N E S

With spring just around the corner you’re probably wondering what you can wear now and how you can update your wardrobe. Well the good thing is this season it’s a lot about expressing who you are, designers really embraced individuality. Spring is all about girl power! Designers are creating very feminine pieces we are after all hopeless romantics...right?

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TREND REPORT BARE SHOULDERS BOHEMIAN SUPER CHIC SEXY

PLEATS + PLEATS + PLEATS

My top 3 trends I’m absolutely loving right now are the lady-like pleats, cut off shirts, and the bohemian chic. This trend has been ruling the runway and I love it! It’s super feminine, but also very versatile. You can throw on a leather jacket or pair a pleated skirt with a simple white tee super chic but still very edgy.

Lastly the bare shoulder, this is super sexy and very feminine. You’ve seen celebs like Kendall Jenner rocking this trend. What I love about this look is you feel very feminine even if you’re some torn jeans. It’s the perfect addition to your wardrobe this season!

Bohemian Flare: This trend is putting a fresh spin on seventies romance for spring. I’m a fan of oversized tops and wide leg trousers. I love how this style looks so effortless and carefree. Try styling a loose fitted blouse with a pair of cut off denim bermuda shorts pair it with some chic sandals or if you’re feeling sexy put on your favorite pair of heels.

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b y

J a y c h e l l e

gender role is a set of societal norms dictating the types of behaviors that are generally considered acceptable, appropriate or desirable for a person based on their actual or perceived sex.

A

of accomplishment strokes our own ego, which then gives birth to the tired mantra “I don’t need a man”. Then, we take this attitude as subtle as it may be, into a relationship with a man who is again, driven by the instinctual desire to protect and provide.

The definition of “gender role” is fine. It’s all the uncertain implications that give me pause. Phrases like “considered acceptable [or] desirable”, and “perceived sex” are so open to interpretation, it’s no wonder that people are confused and relationship growth is stifled. We’re living in a world where memes showing Kanye West bending down to buckle Kim Kardashian’s shoe permeates the internet with the hashtag #relationshipgoals; with no one stopping to recognize that Kanye is an abominable twat and Kim’s just a buffoon. (It really felt good to say all of that).

I know the story of a woman who had a pretty horrible break up years ago and when the man she was seeing left, he took his vehicle with him, leaving the woman stranded. In her moment of being forced to learn how to get around on her own, she got her first vehicle. She was so determined to ensure that she was never again left stranded, when she got married, guess whose name the husband’s car was in? Her experience taught her the value of independence and there are times when we all, just like her, hoist this flag as a way of declaring to the men in our lives “I can do all of this without you”.

There was a time when the societal norm was men While we’re here adopting these societal norms of the went to work and women took care of the house and independent feminist woman in our relationships, we’re the children. Then there was WWI. also Christopher Columbus-ing up our relationships. I mean how could he discover a place that was already Though we may be on the brink of a third world war inhabited? Just like how is it that we women can take and though there appears to be a global shortage in the on the task of fulfilling the role we’ve selected the men workforce, these aren’t the main reasons why women in our lives to fulfill? are now spending more time in the field and less in the home. As women, we’ve learned to do it all. We I’m not at all advocating for the return of the stay-athave put Darwin’s theory of evolution to the test and, home wife or mother. I totally support and commend evolved we have. We’ve gone from waiting for the man the woman that is able bring home the bacon, fry it to bring home the bacon to going out and catching the up and serve it for dinner. However, is it the societal pig ourselves. It is commendable how far we’ve come, norms that have dictated to and are responsible for the despite the challenges and opposition and being called way women are today or are we being driven by the feminists. fear of being discarded, disregarded and left stranded? The only problem this presents is that it conflicts with a man’s innate, instinctual desire to provide and protect. Men don’t find value in this kind of woman nor do they see us as complimenting them; they see us as competing with them. For the most part, it’s true. There is a time in a woman’s life where she has learned, will learn or absolutely must learn to do things on her own and truly, the only difficulty lies in starting. Once we’ve become acquainted with the idea of having to do, the actual doing becomes comfortable and often times second nature. The problem develops as this sense

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Gaet ane Va lembr un

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or

Who what greatest

is your inspiration? My greatest inspiration is to be a Filmwriter. I want to inspire others with my stories. I believe everyone has the ability to change the world through their talents and individualities. Turn on’s: Happy + Positive People who inspires others. S TAT S Horoscope: Libra Age: 26 Citizenship: US Measurements:  34-26-37 Current Location: NewYork, NY Stars that you are most compared to: Kelly Rowland

Turn off ’s: Dishonest and callous individuals What are you listening to right now? Erykah Badu “Back in the Day.” If we were to raid your room right now what would we find?   A lot of Artsy stuff. From monologues books, Tap Shoes, screenplays and tons of romance books.

What is your biggest fear? My biggest fear is trusting. I have a huge heart and times people do take advantage of kind individuals. I’m slowly learning to not let that affect the Inner beauty God has given me.  Finish this sentence…what really makes me smile is…God. Any time i’m having a bad day or dealing with Life challenges, God always pulls me through it. I learned to trust in him. 

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H E R

A N D

I

Male Model: Ryan Barrett (@ry_barrett) Female Model: Sarah O’Leary (@_sar_oleary) MUA: Mary Kiely (@marykiely) Hair Stylist: Rachel Flanagan (@rachpm_redkenartist) Photographer: Oliver Schneider (@lensedbyoliver) Location: Ash Hill, Limerick. male clothing: “Esquire Menswear”, Limerick. female clothing: “Be Fabulous”, Limerick .

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the misadventures

of Twitter? G A I L

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L I N D S E Y


Gail Lindsey @_glmh

Follow

Hey there. I’m taking a break from my usual deep semiphilosophical writing (that ya’ll don’t read anyway) to discuss recent, disturbing developments in one of my loves - Twitter.    Yes, Twitter. I love Twitter. Or loved. Poor past tense. I used to adore and be obsessed and tweet my almost every thought. I’ve subtweeted and been subtweeted or outright insulted (@ or dap still), watched beef that got way too personal, saw people develop friendships, met new people that I would have otherwise not been able to interact with, and found out about events happening around me and globally. We had hashtags that directly insulted people, spoke about real life and past events, and watched people’s business unfold on the TL for the better part of a half a decade. On Twitter OTSS – Only The Strong Survive and many have fallen by the wayside as the Twitter train charged ahead.   I love the speed of Twitter,  that everyone is essentially reading your thoughts and that information is readily available to you as it happens. I truly loved everything Twitter… until now.   The problem I think is while I’m still on it, the people that were active circa 2010 are no longer there. The whole vibe of #BahamianTwitter has evolved into younger users, who are going through what us older twam went through 6 years ago – that is, learning that Twitter is in fact real and can mess up real life while you’re behind a screen. Some of them think Twitter is a world set apart from the real until you wibe online and someone calls you out on the road about it, or when you learn that potential employers are watching what you tweet, or when #bae asks you what that tweet mean, or failing to grasp that you need to watch what you post online, because these people are not your friends… lessons we learned the hard way at times.    I left Twitter for about a month a couple months ago as my obsession left me addicted to it in my boredom, and I needed a break. I deleted my profile and about 5 years of almost daily thoughts and some nice favorites from back in the day. After I re-joined and had to find people to follow, s**t is just not the same mang. These Twitter streets are littered with the seemingly former kiddies at my school that don’t get spanked for swearing anymore. 

1. A** Eating – for some reason the TL ends up on this at least once per week 2. $200 dates or just food in general – cyber bullying is never cool 3. Latest Music release or Lyrics and lyrics that aren’t subtweets but really are. “It’s just a song, boo” 4. Whatever show is on (Scandal, Walking Dead, HTGAWM, etc.) 5. Cheating, Relationships and Sex (apparently totally different from Number 1) 6. Hoes & FBoys  

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These new savages have no law. Speaking of which, where in the world did Twitter jail go?! Back in the day you had to watch how many tweets you sent per minute. You know nothing of having to DM someone to ask them to mention you to get out of Twitter jail. Smt. These biddies know nothing about that, as they let 4 and 5 tweets fly in the space of ten seconds littering your TL with triple eye roll content you gotta scroll past. Cussing is rampant not an  asterisk  in sight,  and there really seems to be no respect for your fellow twam. *puts on spectacles* I remember back in the day when I was a youth, you used to say morning and perhaps an inspirational tweet or two. Nowadays before they even brush their teeth they’ve already started some beef with a random #onhere.   Further cementing my grammy status, I’m wondering if we were that bad back in the day… (were we? we were probably worse) but it’s a whole other experience to see these young ones coming up and cringe about mistakes we’ve already made, that they apparently have not learned from. (As an aside, I wish there was a veteran support group for #NewTwitter to guide these twam on these twitter streets. The older tweeters don’t even bother to scroll much less tweet anymore).    Alas, you can’t save them all.  Feels like I’m losing an old friend and  I don’t want to give her up, but it may be time to get my old hip off Twitter. Follow me though - @_glmh I tweet some gems every now and again. Tweet to _glmh

Even the Twitter topics are recycled on an almost daily basis… Don’t believe me? Here’s a list of the Top Bahamian Twitter Topics (in no real order and debate ya grammy):

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Stor y: Travis Edgecombe Photography: Scharad Lightbourne Styling: Scharad Lightbourne Custom Suit: Gustavus Augusta Accessories: The PICO Brand

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Myles Munroe Jr. also known as “Chairo” is a very quiet and soft spoken kind of guy who doesn’t like large crowds, hates being the center of attention, very content with keeping to himself, loves to travel, easy going and doesn’t require too much to be happy. But for the past few years he has become more assertive and proactive on a lot of different platforms. “I’d like to think that my parents were training my sister and I from we were kids to be comfortable in a room full of 10 or a room full of 10,000.” Being the youngest of two, Chairo and his sister Charisa grew up in a very close knit family. “The relationship my sister and I have is like any other sibling relationship. She and I are 11months and two weeks apart. Family was all I knew growing up. I grew up very close to my cousins and extended family, especially my mother’s side. It was almost as if I had other brothers and sisters how close we all were; and still are.” Growing up as a kid, the expectations of being a pastor’s son was very high which had caused Myles to feel resentment, but as he matured he later realized that he couldn’t live up to anyone’s expectations of himself but once his parents were fine with the man that he was, that was all that mattered. “The man that I am today has a lot to do with what my parents and I have experienced over the many years. Life is about your responses to certain things, and in each situation the way my parents carried themselves and reacted taught me a whole lot and helped me to better cope when I’m faced with different life situations.”

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“I’d like to think that my parents were training my sister and I from we were kids to be comfortable in a room full of 10 or a room full of 10,000.”

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I have been at my lowest point in the past 15 months not really knowing what to think or how to even move forward.

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Myles Jr. and sister recently started The Myles and Ruth Munroe Foundation in keeping the names of his parents alive. “Throughout our travels, we have met a lot of people that wanted to stay connected to their names, their life and to everything that we were doing and wanted to do.” The Munroe Legacy Gala was simply the platform that both Myles and his sister wanted to use to launch the foundation and to also create a brand that hopefully allows them to highlight the foundation and their yearly efforts. “There is a lot of rebranding and reorganizing going on in our organizations, so I am absolutely focused on ensuring all of that is done correctly.” Myles Jr. is also working towards establishing The Munroe Institute which both he and his sister envisioned to be one of the major training grounds for the next generation of leaders. After the tragic loss of losing his parents, Chairo has learned to lean on Proverbs 3:5-6 for strength, grace and hope. “The verses has taught me that we can’t put our trust in human beings or even in ourselves; but only in God. I have been at my lowest point in the past 15 months not really knowing what to think or how to even move forward. But those verses, the simplicity but yet the complexity of it has kept me focused and has allowed me to mature in all areas of my life. I can’t even explain how I’ve been able to even make it to this point other than God’s grace, a lot of prayers and from the example my parents set for us. There is only a greater sense of responsibility in moving forward; growing and expanding everything that we have now been gifted with.” Myles Munroe Jr has certainly seen his days of highs and lows but the quote he lives by the most is “The only constant in life is change”. “This keeps me humble and focused knowing that any day at any time everything can change. I say “I love you” a lot more and I try not to put things off that I want to do; instead I do them the first opportunity I get because tomorrow is not promised.” On an off day when life is not too hectic, he appreciates the opportunity to do absolutely nothing. He loves to sit on the couch to watch a good game or 34

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good movie and just relax. He also loves to read business related, biographies or self-help books that offers many different perspectives on life. Chairo also considers himself quite the chef. “I love to show my cooking skills off and I tend to boast about it because I know I’m really good at it. I have a lot of people that can vouch for me on my cooking skills…lol!” In the next 20 years, Chairo envisions for The Bahamas that a new breed of young, bright, influential men and women will lead the country. “I know we are capable of establishing, developing and expanding new industries that can allow us to thrive as a nation. It all starts with opportunity. We are creative, smart and talented individuals born and raised right here that are simply asking for an opportunity to show what we are capable of.” He also wants to be one of those individuals that leads those efforts by using the influence and creativity that can create new avenues of success that can pave the way for others to follow. Myles Jr. tries his best to be a positive example to everyone around him. “I’m not perfect at all. As much of a mentor, role model, and father my dad was to me, it’s the example of a man that he was that stands out to me the most. He didn’t only say what to do but he showed how it should be done. I hope to continue that trend with all I do.”

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Here’s what we think are the next hot gadgets on the market. This will satisfy any tech’s tastes buds and keep you “in” on what’s hip.

MOVI LIVE EVENT CAMERA

WATCH THE VIDEO

We all love capturing life’s moments and video has become a huge part of everyday life. Snartphones have made capturing great videos easier for everyone and so the makers of this cool gadget devided to take it a step further. This little device packa a powerful punch. Recording 4k video that you can control from your smartphone is very cool. It can even be set to follow the motions of faces. The beauty of this is that once you set it, you dont have to worry about what’s recording. Of course, the more the merrier. Packed with functionality and amazing features the MOVI Live Event Camera is sure to be a great investment for the hobbyist, photographer or anyone that wants more creativity from their videos. Visit www.getmovi.com to see more.

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the rise of Marcus Laing

Sherron Young

Scharad Lightbourne

Some individuals were born into corporate success; others injected at a midpoint and continue in an upward climb but what happens to the balance? The few who aren’t handed their victory, just a few blocks some sand and water to build their future? Marcus Laing stepped out of the shoes he was handed and walked fearlessly into his own destiny, but not before chiseling away at the barriers that prohibited his ascent. Marcus refused to buy into the convictions that are often handed to underprivileged kids. He bore an inner fight and a scarce discipline that ushered him into many of the achievements he has seen today. It was his rigid upbringing that set him apart from like successors, he recalls. Sure, he wears the suit, the tie and the smile he too wears, but Marcus had a rough childhood, much like the childhood of those who beat the blocks and toss casually the words “I Can’t.”

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Marcus was raised in very unorthodox circumstances...He was initially introduced to his parents and a number of his siblings post a short lived upbringing in Freeport under the wings of his grandparents. The latter of his early adolescent years were spent with his Aunt who groomed him and instilled many of the disciplines he still today employs. He began to work at an early age to assist his parents and younger siblings and to afford luxuries others may consider norms. A chore made for adults, parents and guardians not a young boy. Despite challenges at home, Marcus was a high achiever in school and always remained top of his class. He stuck to his guns and pulled himself past his circumstances by every means available to him. While in school he enrolled in the police cadets program; a recruiting mechanism for the best high school students, which at the time, offered Math and English study sessions and exposure to law and the enforcement thereof. The program offered a small stipend. There were disciplinary schedules and physical training routines embedded in the program but the cherry on this cake was that the program offered Bahamians the opportunity to attend The College of The Bahamas on full scholarship. It was here that Marcus first began to see his way out of his prevailing conditions. He knew his heart was in Architecture and this was his golden ticket. To be a Professional Licensed Architect however required a 5year professional degree. With no other financial options, Marcus joined the Royal Bahamas Police Force and served as a detective constable to secure the funds required all in pursuit of becoming The Architect he’d always dreamed of becoming. 4 years along and after saving all he could, Marcus gained unexpected training in firearms, hand to hand combat, photography and crime scene investigation. He also worked with The Ministry of Foreign Affairs as a security and protocol attaché with the charge of both armed protector and country host to dignitaries. He saw his own way to college and with his determination and focus completed the five-year professional degree program at Louisiana Tech University in just three years while tossing jobs and unconventional means of earning his tuition. Today, Marcus is an equity partner at TDG Architects, the premier choice and leader in large scale Architectural design in the Bahamas. There, he provides in addition to Architectural design, some Human Resource attributes such as Sourcing and Recruitment, Employee Reviews, training coordination and development for all new designers both professionally and academically. He molds the company’s standards of practice and overall firm development, forecasting, photography, and man’s their Public Relations Arm with his acute and in-depth business acumen. Marcus is noted as an integral part of the executive architect team for Bahamar, a leading design architect for the recently constructed 88,000 square foot Princess Margaret Hospital Critical Care Block and Entry addition, the 40,000 sq ft American Screen Works Theatre renovation in Decatur, GA, 44

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the Rebranding of the Bamboo Shack brand Nassau, Bahamas and The Vincent D’Agulair Gallery renovation in the heart of Old Nassau; The Bahamas. With scores of tasteful residential and interior design productions under his wing and his intellect in Architecture enhanced by his training in green building, sustainability, and construction technologies Marcus birthed the famous Pediatric Associates Bahamas Ltd., Home of Dr. Carlos Thomas with its Yellow brick road and state of the art Play Corner. He has worked alongside International Giants like; Aecom and Bahamian Architect Fred Perpall who along with renowned Architect Carlos Hepburn have been his mentors through his professional development. Laing is the 124th licensed Architect within the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and the 1st of his age to possess such a vibrant and accomplished pallet of succession within


his field. In commemoration of The Bahamas’ 40th year of Independence, he was honored as one of the top 40 professionals under 40 in the country. His eminent advocacy for a renewed Bahamas combined with his passion for Architecture stemmed the birth if his Caribbean Architectural Publication InSitu Arch launched in 2008. He served as Vice President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. Graduate Chapter in New Providence and sat as a council member for his Alma Matter, The College of the Bahamas in its road to University. He still maintains his international affiliations in the American Institute of Architects, the Urban Land Institute, U.S. Green Building Council and the National

Council of Architectural Registration Boards. In lieu of his firm yet swift rise and his passion for the Reshaping of the Bahamian Economic Structure, Laing has become a highly sought Business Consultant with a concentrated interest in corporate frame works that promote best business practices. Many have found him instrumental in starting new businesses, they have found his advice a critical component in avoiding closure and defeat in the hard economic times our country has seen. STYLEZINE: Is there a challenge that you overcame that you would eliminate for the person coming up after you?

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ML: I think I was able to overcome access to little to no educational opportunities. There were few scholarship opportunities available but I don’t regret my path nor the way things happened. If I could, I would change the number of opportunities available to Bahamian students by way of scholarships and grants as an incentive to achieving excellent grades. Despite, The experience was valuable. If I had gone straight off to college and finished 4 years earlier I would have lost 4 years of earning that exponentially increased my resourcefulness and provided access to more money, resources and opportunities. STYLEZINE: Do you think appreciation for success changes 46

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based on how it is achieved? ML: With access to resources up front, quality of life is altered. When I was in high school, I went to school by day and worked by night therefore eliminating the luxuries of recreation, homework assistance; it was definitely harder and it therefore shaped me. You lose appreciation when you eliminate the struggle. STYLEZINE: Is climbing the corporate ladder hard? ML: It still boils down to your ability, skillsets and determination; it is the same level of skill and drive that is going to take you to where you need to be. STYLEZINE: The level of succession engrained in your portfolio is heavy bearing accolades that place you toe to toe with Architects twice


then you are immediately called back to the reality that if you didn’t have to struggle and were given success you lose the value of that journey and the real value of the success. I’m not angry but aware and humbled by my circumstances. STYLEZINE: What are some of the highlights of your career or being in the field that you work in? ML: My biggest achievement I think has been The InSitu Arch Magazine as there is no other magazine in entire region that exposes the built environment in the way that mine does. It’s not just Bahamian either but a Caribbean Digest infusing major cross Caribbean networking. By way of InSitu Arch and in our most prized issue, we were able to shed light on Jackson Burnside, a true achievement. We had prepared the story before he died and when he died it seemed more than due him to release it in grand style celebrating his life. With the help of avid readers, advertisers and supporters like Architect Michael Diggiss, we launched the issue at his studio, an event hosted by Pam Burnside, his widow. STYLEZINE: Your truest and most sincere passion for country is? ML: The implementation and devotion to a National Development Plan. Consistency is lacking in our country but if we had a plan that was stuck to, no matter which government was in power the plan would continue. We could achieve so much as a young country with so much human capital that is exposed and talented. The inconsistency comes from the people who control the resources and that have no faith in the people of this country. STYLEZINE: What would you say to young men coming up today in such a rough economic time who desire to aspire? ML: Create do not emulate. Gone are the days of getting an education to secure a good job. The world is so small the focus should now be to become a citizen of the World and fill the plethora of needs the entire world has. Create your own jobs and successes.

your age. It calls for wonder why when given the same circumstances so many of young men opt to beat the blocks, smoke and fail at life. Do you think it’s easy to lose hope? ML: Honestly it’s very easy to lose hope especially in today’s society where they is very little encouragement to do anything significant. Some of us are lucky enough to push pass that but for the ones that end up down a different path they just need to see that that very same effort can be redirected to something more fulfilling and respectable. Inspire others to do the same. Begin a movement. STYLEZINE: Do you think a rough climb can make you envious of others who have been handed success on a silver platter? ML: It definitely makes you wonder sometimes what if it were easier. But

STYLEZINE: Marcus is the poster child for defeating a rough lifestyle and fighting the odds, today he enjoys nature with a preference for boating. He loves clear, cool days. In his words, “Nothing beats being on a boat out on the ocean on a fresh, crisp day.” We celebrate Marcus and other innovative minds that have added and continue to enrich the Bahamians with their creative and forward thinking. It is minds of determination and fight that will move us past our circumstance and into the Bahama land we all aspire to be.

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>ARTISTWATCH T R A V I S

B O W E

It’s All-Star Weekend and the city of Toronto is abuzz, the who’s-who of sports, music and entertainment are currently making their rounds through the hottest events in the city. One would presume that any artist that resides here and is on the come up, would be trying their best to maneuver and finesse through the various festivities in hopes of running into an important industry influencer. This chance encounter then would possibly manifest itself into the big break that this artist was searching for, but not Travis Bowe. The 25-year old rapper is in bed in his Long Branch apartment and has made no plans to leave. You would think it’s the Bahamian in him that doesn’t want to face the subzero temperatures that awaits him outside, but according to Travis there is nothing out there for him. Spending an exorbitant amount of money on champagne bottles is at the bottom of his list of priorities, but at the top is his music.

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AK : So Travis you’ve definitely come along way from me schooling you on COB courts, tell us about your early beginnings in rap music and when you ultimately decided that you wanted to be a rapper.

AK : About 2 summers ago you burst on to the scene in terms of national consciousness with your hit single “Oh Lord” could you tell us what that period was like and the persons that were around you helping you get adjusted to this new found fame?

TB : Ok, yeah you had a good game. That one good game and we played other games when we were on teams and we won too and I was out of shape at that time but that’s all excuses and I aint tryna make excuse, you had a good game, so boom end of story.

TB: It was a great experience and it taught me a lot as far as timing. I think I took too long to drop a next song after Oh Lord and that was on me. I was focusing on dropping a complete body of work. It taught me not to take anything for granted because as fast the song comes, is as fast as it would go.

When it comes to early life, my early childhood, music was always played all throughout the house. My mom was a big fan of Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson, Celine Dion and people like that. I always had music in the house, when we would clean the house on Saturdays and Sundays when my mom would wake me up, she would always say turn on some music and let’s have some music while we’re cleaning. From a young age I always had a lot of R&B and pop in my life and my first love is actually R&B but I can’t sing, but I really do love R&B more than I love rap music.

As far as people being behind me, I really didn’t have anyone else in my corner at that time I was managing myself. It was a great experience nonetheless. It was a joy going out and seeing people and having them know me and want to take a picture. I even signed an autograph for a girl and she was on a different island (Freeport) too so that was pretty dope. Yeah, but it really taught me timing and just to be a stronger artist and that stage performance is everything and that’s something I realize I have to get stronger in and I’m working on that. I did a lot of performances and they taught me a lot of things and everything I learned I try to put back into myself to make me a better artist in terms of performance and songs that I make.

Rap came along later in my life when my sister brought home this rap CD by a Bahamian rapper by the name of D-Bo and I listened to it and I thought it was so amazing and Zoltan who I know now, mixed and mastered it and did the work for it. I heard Deebo on that mixtape and said if he could do this I could do this and that’s when I started to rap. Some guys in our grade were already doing it but I wasn’t confident in it but when I heard him do it and I thought wow, he really sounded like he could go international and really blow. The thing is he was signed at the time and I had no idea he was signed to Slip N Slide, but I guess it didn’t work out, but he is the reason I really started rapping. At this time I also started listening to rap and had favorite rappers like Lloyd Banks and people of that sort but it wasn’t until I heard him (D-Bo)rapping that I wanted to start rapping. AK: How would you describe your style as a rapper, what lane would you say that you’re in or do you not box yourself in? TB : Honestly as an artist, I’m going through that phase where it’s difficult for me to decide what my lane is, I love music so I don’t ever hear one beat and say this is what I should go for. I just love music…so I hear different beats and approach them differently. I don’t ever try to make the same type of song over and over. Honestly i don’t know if that’s a strength or a weakness, maybe people wanna hear a certain sound for me and want me to stick to that but that’s just something that I’m fighting with now. I don’t have a sound per say but I tend to like to rap in my songs, I don’t try to swag verses out and I play with a lot of melodies. If it sounds like something Timbaland made or 40 made or Guru made or those different sounds I would hop on it. I don’t know if me not having a sound is a strength or weakness but like you said I don’t want to put myself in a box but that’s just me.

AK: For those that follow you closely they would realize you’ve made the move to Toronto, Canada which is one the epicenters of the hip hop scene right now. Was the move strictly from a music standpoint or a life standpoint? TB: I would say both. What a lot of people don’t know is that I actually came here for school. I went to a recording arts school and got a diploma in sound and vocal engineering, so I could make my own music better. Just being able to work on my own stuff before I send it to someone else to mix and master it. Also I think Toronto has become a great place for hip hop, but I feel as of right now Atlanta is the place for hip hop and Atlanta is really running everything and I say that because I’ve been there this past year and it’s a really great place to be as an artist because they’re just so accepting of any type of music and any type of rap that you make. When it comes to bettering my life, I feel like Nassau was sort of a restriction when it came to me expanding my sound and what I wanted to do. I feel like just moving to a city and just being part of a city life and seeing and taking in everything has just given me more things to rap about. I’ve seen more things than I ever could just being home and because of that I feel that I have more substance to put inside my music now and I want people to understand as somebody coming from an island who makes music and is transitioning to a city, it’s a huge a difference. You become such a better artist and travelling in general too, just going different places, it will help you so much. I ultimately just came here to better my way of life and increase the chance of me becoming successful because we really don’t have a chance as rappers in The Bahamas.

STYLEZINE MAGAZINE


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AK: Expounding a bit more on the Nassau scene, how do you feel about the current state of hip-hop in The Bahamas and who are some of your favorite artists and what do you feel we can do to propel Bahamian rap into the national spotlight? TB: I feel like there are a lot of talented artists in The Bahamas, notice I said The Bahamas, because I’ve spent some time in Freeport and there are a lot of talented artists in Freeport as well. I feel when it comes to saying what the hip-hop scene is like, I can say for sure it’s not a family, because everybody is going hard to try and be king, but to me it’s futile, because… king of what? There is nothing there to be king of, in terms of being a rapper or top rapper. You could have that title, then what? What does it really mean? There is no industry there, yeah you’ll drop a hot song like I did and do shows but that’s it. It’s no opportunities, it’s not like certain companies would reach out to you because they like singers, they don’t do rappers. In the states or even here in Toronto, rappers are like rockstars, rappers are the new rockstars. In the Bahamas if you say you’re a rapper, it’s just like ok…ok, a next young guy who’s falling by the wasteside. In terms of who are my favorite rappers, I would say Paperboi, The Twins of course, Duckie, we have some dope females as well, Chase Fernander she is a very talented female, she can sing and rap. From Freeport I like Dolly Boy just because he is very out of the box in terms of the way he approaches songs. Killa Fang is also crazy, there are a few others but they aren’t crossing my mind right now. In Nassau, one of the guys that helped me coming up was Soulja Shaddy, crazy engineer and rapper, i’ll put him up as one of the top rappers. Flash, I don’t know if he still goes by that name but Madio Munnings. A lot of people don’t know about Madio but he is definitely one of the best in The Bahamas. My dog Shalon, my clique B.A.S.S that’s Jay Complex, Skully, Teiko, SB and Chase. These are all the people I mess with, and Foots, can’t forget about Foots. The whole HD-Boyz movement, it’s a lot of talented people. I can’t forget the other little crew that’s coming up too but I can’t remember their name…“Ararap” I mess with them. I like listening out for their stuff and then there is this young guy Ashton Kelly I like his approach to music. My advice to the young talent we have is to get out the city, because they won’t appreciate you until you go off and do what you have to do and then you can come back and dominate. AK: For those that follow you on social media, more so Snapchat a lot of people think that you’re a funny guy, how do you feel about connecting with your fans through your personality because a lot of rappers tend to be standoffish when it comes to being jovial, so how do you feel about that aspect in connecting with your fans? TB: The thing about it is I can’t be fake and I say that as truthful as possible. You know people always like to say “I’m the realest”, I can’t be on Snapchat and not be who I am, I

wouldn’t be on it if that was the case. Anybody that knows me, knows I like to crack jokes, I like to talk stupidness, I love to watch comedies that’s just my thing, I like to laugh. I feel like laughing really makes me feel better but when it comes to being a serious rapper…rap has many different elements to it. I wouldn’t say that I’m a comedic rapper because I’m not but I like to have fun when i make music. Whether the song is serious or on the softer side, i just like to have fun as a person. If anybody was to ever feel like…and that’s probably why I do my snapchat like that because i don’t want people to feel like they can’t come and approach me. I’m the guy you can approach, if you’re a fan of my music i want you to come tell me or if you’re a fan of the way that I make you laugh then I want you to come tell me. I just want you to feel like Travis is such a relatable guy, because I am. I’m going through the same things you’re going through everyday and i want you to see that I see the same things you see. I don’t think it pays off to be standoffish as an entertainer or as an artist because it’s pointless. Ironically a lot of rappers do have that vibe and people adore them more but I guess it is what it is. I probably just can’t be that guy, I can’t be that guy, I want people to feel like this dude is human. I go through every emotion that you go through, I’m in the same place you are and that’s this world. AK: So rounding things out, what can we expect from Travis Bowe in 2016 and moving forward in terms of new projects whether it be music or film? I checked your snapchat this morning and saw you have your hair plait, so you might just be chilling but what can we expect? TB: You’re a funny guy but yeah i just plait my hair because it was growing and I just felt like doing it so I did it, but I’m working on a new project, I’m not saying when I’m going to drop it or going to put a release date on it just yet. Just know I’m working on a new project, it’s already recorded but it has to be mixed and mastered, but that’s the most I’m going to say about that right now, I don’t have a name for it just know it’s a project and it’s coming. After this mixtape there will be an album and a lot of people don’t know but I have management now and that has become a real big help. I’m really going to work hard on just being successful within this music, whether that’s inking a deal or staying independent and just growing as an artist, I guess i’ll make that decision one day, but people can expect a lot of visuals, they’re coming. Also expect me to start working with some familiar names, i won’t say who just as yet but it will be some names that you know on an international level. Within film I have some things that are on my mind that i’m working on…Let’s just say Ice Cube ain’t the only rapper writing movies…I’ll just leave it at that. The self proclaimed monniker “Light skin nigga with a whole lot to say” seems fitting after this brief conversation.

STYLEZINE MAGAZINE


>ARTISTWATCH TRAVIS BOWE

The Video Resume Oh Lord Directed By @Jmavsinc

If It’s Cool/The B from “$tandout Guy$” Directed by : Gary Wong

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MAN OF THE YEAR


STYLEZINE MAGAZINE


EAT, DR INK & PARTY HER E Kashan Poitier

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MAN OF THE YEAR


“Bahamians like new t’ings” and Lukka Kairi is no exception, although one sip, one taste proves that it is completely justified. Plating tapas (Spanish for small portions or appetizers) Bahamian and Caribbean-inspired cuisine, this restaurant is serving a vibrant dining experience in the heart of downtown Nassau. With its kaleidoscope of earth tones, tangerines and cyan blues, the sultry musical notes drizzling over the restaurant’s balcony is enough to lure tourists and locals walking along Nassau’s harbor. At the foot of the stairs (which is how you access the restuarant) the Creole seasonings appear as vibrant as the décor, including a wall-to-wall mural of Bahamian history, including 1600’s piracy era, Arawak civilization and

the evolution of Junkanoo. This grand Allan Wallace piece sits behind the bar that serves as a stage for live entertainment. So far, songstress Richa Sands, Wendy Lewis, Julien Believe and reggae cover band, Willis and the Illest have christened the stage.

nor had I ever thought of pairing the two. Early this summer, Lukka Kairi added the Drunken Grilled Flank Steak to it’s menu and, like most patrons, I can not get enough. Served over sweet potato hash and topped with a fried egg, the steak in marinated in Lukka Kairi’s own Gun Cay Rum. With the yolk bursting at your first stab, you’ll be tempted to lick the fork. I know what you’re thinking: how can a bite be that good. That’s what I thought when I saw guava duff stuffed in a tiny jar (I also thought: where’d they get these miniature jars from). Nevertheless, I flipped the jaw upside down, watched as the sugary goodness slipped out and drizzled the guava sauce on top, as instructed by my waitress… heaven! The guava duff was so moist. Pure heaven. My only complaint: I wished it came in a bigger jar, obviously. Although tapas-style dining is a fairly new concept for most Bahamians, the Lukka Kairi restaurant is quickly

becoming a staple to the Woodes Rogers boardwalk and downtown dining experience. As long as the music never stops, and the food continues to pop… it will light up the harbor for a long time.

Tucked along Prince George Wharf, Lukka Kairi is the perfect addition to spice up Nassau’s nightlife. So, let’s dig in… The menu features a few bite-size versions of Bahamian favorites—tropical conch salad, guava duff and conch fritters, but Lukka Kairi also offers their Caribbean twist on classic international cuisine, including the shrimp and grits. Fiery red in color, this Creoleinspired dish will leave a Mardi Gras trail of spices on your taste buds. When it comes to cooking with alcohol, I’ve tasted just about anything—from BBQ chicken and pulled pork drenched in beer to penne pasta in wine sauce, but my taste buds had never met steak marinated in rum… STYLEZINE MAGAZINE


Profile for STYLEZINE Online Magazine

Man of the Year 2015  

Myles Munroe Jr. also known as “Chairo” is a very quiet and soft spoken kind of guy who doesn’t like large crowds, hates being the center of...

Man of the Year 2015  

Myles Munroe Jr. also known as “Chairo” is a very quiet and soft spoken kind of guy who doesn’t like large crowds, hates being the center of...

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