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Man’s Best Friend Clinical psychologist Dr John Barletta explains the therapeutic benefits of having a pet Growing up on a farm, a dog was for security and the cat was for vermin. Oh, how things have changed. Pets, or companion animals, now provide a range of health and psychological benefits to people and families, both young and old. Interacting with pets boosts our internal ‘feel-good’ chemicals, which in turn enhances our social skills and relationships. Additionally, pets can potentially decrease our blood pressure and heart rate, boost our immune system, and raise our tolerance for pain. Pets can also help to lower our stress and anger levels, and improve your mood. Our pets easily become a part of our everyday lives, and can also be particularly helpful to children, those with special needs, people who have been traumatised, older folks, and those living by themselves. Adding to this, our success in taking responsibility in caring for our pets can contribute to our

own self-esteem and positive, emotional wellbeing. When considering a pet for companionship, wellbeing, or therapy, you must consider your physical living situation, your lifestyle, and the inevitable costs associated with pet-food, toys, equipment and health and veterinary expenses. Asking your friends who already have pets about their experiences is a great way to start, as well as talking with a veterinarian or reputable breeder to learn about the particular characteristics of different animals or breeds. Whether the goal is to improve the social, emotional, physical, or cognitive functioning of yourself or those you love, a well-considered, appropriately-chosen companion animal can bring a vast array of benefits for many years to come.

DR JOHN BARLETTA, CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST LEVEL 1, SUITE 2, 3 DAYS RD, GRANGE P 3356 4400 JOHNBARLETTA.COM

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Born beautiful Experienced dentist Dr Anne-Maree Cole explains how it’s not just our genetics that affect our facial outcome. We are all born with the genetic capability of developing a beautiful face. While symmetry, balance and proportion help to increase facial attractiveness, we usually only focus on the outside areas of our face like the skin and lips, and forget about the underlying bony structure and muscles. How our face develops can often rely on a balance between our genes and our environment. To develop our face to its genetic potential, we need to ensure that we are maintaining four key steps. The first is to ensure we’re keeping our lips together and our tongue up in the roof of our mouths when we are not talking or eating. The second and third are to breathe through the nose and aim to swallow correctly, and the fourth is to STYLEMAGAZINES.COM.AU

chew well, and eat a semi-hard diet. These crucial functions help to create correct jaw development, and with that comes optimum facial development. When you’re breathing and functioning physiologically, the upper jaw grows broad and forward. The lower jaw responds similarly, growing plenty of room for all of your teeth. Mouth breathing is the most important factor to consider during facial development, as when the messages genes receive change from what is expected, so does the outcome, so when you’re not breathing right, your jaw will not grow correctly.

If our faces have developed well, not only do all of our 32 adult teeth fit in a straight line, but our faces are more likely to be symmetrical, proportioned, more attractive and most importantly, healthier! AESTHETIC EXCELLENCE 151 ROBERTSON ST, FORTITUDE VALLEY P 3257 1577 JAMESSTREETDENTSITS.COM.AU

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Profile for Style Media

STYLE | May 2019  

Style Magazines. Style is a vibrant, monthly magazine capturing the essence of the metropolitan lifestyle in Brisbane.

STYLE | May 2019  

Style Magazines. Style is a vibrant, monthly magazine capturing the essence of the metropolitan lifestyle in Brisbane.