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steven P R A T A M A arch 103 | f i n a l portfolio spring 2013


icebreaker- Photo Montage

| 1/22

Objectives: Create a three-dimensional construction mainly consisting of photographic images laminated onto a structural surface that is also designed for a wall-mounted installation. The work may not exceed six square feet in area and may not project into space more than six inches. All edges that contain the prescribed 6sf shall be either vertical or horizontal and in multiples of three inches. The work should represents the most compelling relationships between the designer and the city of San Francisco.

Context: As a response to the main objective of this icebreaker project, representing the most compelling relationship between me and San Francisco, I picked the Mission district as my study area. This decision was influenced by my experience taking a guitar lesson in that area a year ago. When I first coming to this district, I was spontaneously attached to it because of the atmosphere that surrounded the whole area. I just felt like I was at home. The feeling of being at home is the most compelling relationship between me and the city of San Francisco, and this relationship can be shown through my attachment to the Mission district. After doing some on the field researches, I picked the 7 most compelling things that attracted me the most. The lists were: local stores, coffee, street arts: murals, cultures, housing type, restaurant, and public transportations. All of these elements shaped the attachment that I had with the area.

Learning Outcomes: • A vital area is an area that can create an attachment with the visitors. • Environment supports, enhances, or undermines human activities. • Space by itself doesn’t promote activity and attachment. • The interaction between different elements that exist in the mission district evokes the image of a district. • It is always okay to break the constraints and the limitations set by the instructor as long as we have a compelling reason behind it. • People and the interaction between them shape a district.

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five city elements- MISSION district | 1/24

Objectives: Analyze the area that was selected from the previous icebreaker according to the five elements of the city from Kevin Lynch’s The Image of the City. The elements are: paths, districts, nodes, edges, and landmarks.

Context: Responding to the five elements according to Kevin Lynch, I looked back at the previous study that I did for my icebreaker project and started to categorize it according to the five elements.

Learning outcomes: This project made me starting to view a city in a different sense. Though I was not really critical at that time, it still gave a valuable insight of how an urban planner viewed the city.

MISSION D I S T R I C T path Different pathway exist on the district; starting from the little alley, the less crowded road around the residential area, to the main road with the connection to the public transportation and to the bart stairways. Each one of them evokes a different sensation and experience to the one who travel across them.

edges The Street signs are the best elements that represent edges. On every corner, there is always something that makes people wonder “what’s going on in this intersection?” Sometims, it makes me feel that I need to document all the intersection, so I can visit the site in the future.

nodes There is always a hidden surprise that lies behind the alley or behind the main street. Behind those small little alleys, street arts and murals are sometimes depicted as they are something hidden from the society. Though some of the murals are right on the main street, the ones that lies behind the alleys are make us wonder and stop from our pathway. On every intersection, there exist a hidden gems. For instance, this Buddhist temple in a building that was used as a Cathedral. It came out of nowhere on the 22nd St. where the concentration on this street is more for the residential.

district The mission district lies along the relatively flat valley on the estern side of San Francisco. It is sheltered between the San Miguel Hills to the west and the Potrero Hills to east and Bernal Heights to the south. However, the focus for this project is the Southern part of the mission district which lies from 24th St. and S. Van Ness to 21St. and Valencia St.

landmark Even though I was concentrating my project on the Souther side of the Mission District, I couldn’t find any better landmark rather than the San Francisco de Assis that lied across the Mission-Dolores. This landmark represents the historical values of the district, the city of San Francisco, and even the history of the United States.

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five city elements- MISSION district | 1/29

Objectives: Following the previous assignment about the five elements of city images, create a SketchUp model for the massing studies that approximate the district, nodes, edges, paths, and landmarks.

Context: Since it was my first time doing a digital massing model of a city, I spent lots of time on the 3D model and didn’t really develop my previous research on Kevin Lynch’s 5 city images.

Learning Outcomes: Though I was able to categorize the area into the five city elements, my attempt was still too general. Quantitative aspects that lead to specificity are what an in-depth research should consist of. Each street has its own concentration. From my studies in the Mission district, I noticed that some streets were concentrated in commercial and retail stores while others were concentrated in housing. The commercial streets are predominantly the major street. For instance, the Mission Street. However, a residential street can also become a major street. For instance, South Van Ness Street has lots of traffic circulation and a wider street compare to other residential streets in the Mission district.

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the

MISSION

DISTRICT:

area distribution

an urban-made d i s t r i c t

residential

40%

capp st.

mission st.

bartlett st.

valencia st.

21st

commercial

district Lies along the relatively flat valley on the eastern side of San Francisco, the mission district is sheltered by the San Miguel Hills to the west and the Potrero Hills to the east and the Bernal Heights to the South. The primary focus on this research is the southern part of the mission district.

50%

24th

10%

infrastructure

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path Different pathway exist on the district; starting from the little alley, the less crowded road around the residential area, to the main road with the connection to the public transportation and to the bart stairways. Each one of them evokes a different sensation and experience to the one who travel across them.

edges The street signs are the best elements that represent edges. On every corner, there is always something that makes people wonder “what’s going on in this intersection?� The edges defined by the street corners whispers to me to document all the intersection that I am passing by because there is always a surprise in every intersection.

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nodes There is always a hidden surprise that lies behind the alley or behind the main street. Behind those small little alleys, street arts and murals are sometimes depicted as they are something hidden from the society. Though some of the murals are right on the main street, the ones that lies behind the alleys are make us wonder and stop from our pathway. On every intersection, there exist a hidden gems. For instance, this Buddhist temple in a building that was used as a Cathedral. It came out of nowhere on the 22nd St. where the concentration on this street is more for the residential.

landmark The New Mission Theater which is located at 2550 Mission St, San Francisco. Though the building is in a state of deterioration, it has the kind of beauty through its historic and cultural values that embodied within itself. Currently, the building is getting ready for a conversion into a five auditorium cinema, with some new additions, but still preserving the essential part of the landmark.

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five city elements- MISSION District | 2/5

Objectives: Create a more in-depth research based on the past two projects of Kevin Lynch’s 5 city images. In-depth research means creating a more specific research. One way of doing it is by researching and providing quantitative aspects in order to get a quality work. Moreover, the project should satisfy Edward Tufte’s “Six Principles for the Analysis and Presentation of Data”. Approach: In order to avoid generality, I picked at most two examples for each city element. For instance, for path I picked the difference between the Mission St. and the 24th St. My decision to compare the two streets was driven by the first point of Tufte’s Six Principles for the Analysis and Presentation of Data: to “show comparisons, contrasts, and differences”. In my observation, I measured the width of the streets and the pedestrian walkways, and the vegetation patterns of both streets not only to show comparisons, contrasts, and differences; but also to provide a multivariate data which was responding to Tufte’s third principle: “Show multivariate data; that is, show more than 1 or 2 variables”.

Learning Outcomes: By showing the quantitative aspects, I could see that my research was getting more specific. The five city elements are in close relationship with each other. Sometimes the relationship gets blurred. For instance, the BART station at the intersection of 24th St. & Mission St. It acts as a node and a landmark simultaneously. The other example is the Bernal Heights which bounds the Mission district on the south. However, due to its monumentality and visibility, it also acts as a landmark for people who are walking down the Mission St. toward the South. I became more aware of the 5 city elements, and I started to relate my daily experience walking down a street with Kevin Lynch’s 5 city elements. A 3D model not only helped me studying the district, but it also helped me communicating my point to the audience through the visual 3D graphic.

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MISSION

DISTRICT:

an urban-made d i s t r i c t

23rd st.

550’

Lies along the relatively flat valley on the eastern side of San Francisco, the mission district is sheltered by the Bernal Heights to the South. The majority of the district are organizedd based on a grid pattern with an interplay between a bigger/major street and a smaller/minor street.

capp st.

mission st.

district

24th st.

25th st.

26th st.

st

.

cesar chavez st .

ss

io

n

270’ mi

the

Bernal Heights

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path on the mission district, the paths; the channels along which the observer customarily, ocassionally, or potentially moves; are primary divided into a major path and a minor path.

The major and minor paths on the mission district interact within each other, not only through the grid patterned intersection, but also in a sort of curviliniear pattern and distorted pattern.

case study: THE INTERSECTION between Mission

case study: Mission St. & 24th St.

St, Capp St, and Cesar Chavez St.

24th St.//minor street - Street width : 40’ - Pedestrian walkway width : 12’ - Vegetation pattern : predominantly trees with dense leaves, app. 6’ apart. These dense leaves create a series of nature canopies along the street which are blocking the sun light.These series of natural canopies create a more enclosed space; thus, making the pathwaymore private and mysterious.

capp st. - Street width : 40’ - This curvilinear path which is an extension of the capp st. represents the minor pathway that intersects with the other major pathways. The view along this road is blocked by the building on both sides of the road. Thus, it is not an effective or a well designed pathway since it does not enhance the experience of a traveler; instead, it can give a dangerous impact to the traveler. For instance, accident.

cesar chavez st. Mission St.//major street - Street width - Pedestrian walkway width

: 60’ : 12’,18’ (variation depends on the parking spots) - Vegetation pattern : a combination of palm trees and small trees. bigger distance between each tree. Compared to the trees on the 24th St, the trees on the mission st. have less density in terms of leaves and branches. Thus, they don’t protect againt the sun light. However, they create a more open feeling to the pathway along the mission street.

mission st. - Street width : 60’ - The extension of the mission st. shows an interesting alignment with the nature. The mission which predominantly lies on a straight line is shifting its orientation once it’s facing the hill of the Bernal Heights (South of mission).

- Street width : 90’ - The cesar chavez st. with its humongous street width evokes the idea of how the proportion of width can also show a more important pathway over the other.

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nodes landmarks

The major nodes (points, the strategic spots in a city into which ovserver can enter, and which are the intensive foci to and from which he is traveling) on the mission district is the mission and 24th bart station.

Landmarks are external points of reference which can be a defined physical object. It can also be a distant object or a local object. The practical purpose of landmarks is as a physical compass for one who travels around the district. It provides direction and a sense of being.

case study: Mission & 24th St. Bart Station

case study: Mission & 24th St. Bart Station

These two structures are the same bart station that are connected through the underground. Compared to the area around the neighborhood, these two areas provide a huge open space; where the usual width of pedestrian walkway is around 12’, these two structures are located 32’ from the street which create a place for people to gather, to sell goods, to promote ads, or even to preach. Interestingly, the muni stations are located near the bart stations; making it as a central point or central foci for those who travel using the public transportation system.

The five elements exist within each other, and it can exist within a single structure. In this case, the 24th and Mission Bart Station embodies the two elements, node and landmark. As a center of human activities, this bart station often time stands as a point of reference for people who are travelling on the mission district. This bart station often is the arrival terminal as well as the derparture terminal for some people. Moreover, the existence of the muni stations increases the importance of this building as a point of reference, especiall for those who travel with the public transportation system. In addition to that, the huge open space compared to the surrounding creates a visual distinction as we are walking towards it.

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edges Edges are the linear elements not used or considered as paths by the observer. They are the boundaries between two phases, linear breaks in continuity. Edges are important in organizing spaces. For instance, creating a boundary between water and land. In a way, it organizes the amount of space that a man can possess. case study: Bernal Heights

The Bernal Heights which lies on the Southern side of the Mission district becomes a nature landmark that is often use as a point of reference when walking through the Mission Street, towards the south direction. It can also be a point of reference of North-South direction.

This hill that runs on the South of the Mission district, in addition of being a landmark, it also acts as a fragmented edge. When we walk on the mission street, it activates the use of it as both the landmark and the edge that defined the area. However, we can’t see it from every street. It is only visible from certain streets that are parallel to the Mission St. Even though we can only see a fragment of it, the truth is this edge is a continuous edge that bounds the southern region of the mission district. Being only visually visible at discrete points make this landmark as a fragmented edge.

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WRITTEN REFLECTION- week 4 • The projects that were done during week 4 provided a valuable insight to me. The first project which was due on Tuesday focused on the five city images according to Kevin Lynch. However, we were specifically asked to provide more quantitative data; such as, dimension, ratio, proportion, and scale. This guidance really helped me to get more specific. Instead of saying that there were different pathways on the mission district and each pathway evoked different sensation, I started to prove the difference between the pathway (by showing the dimension of the street, the pedestrian walkway) and show why it evoked a different sensation. It could be due to the bigger pedestrian walk that provided an open feeling, or it could be due to the tree formation that provided shades; thus, created a more preferable pathway during a hot sunny day. Beside of following the suggestions from the classroom, I started reading Kevin Lynch’s book. I understood the five elements even more. More importantly, since Lynch showed some examples of his own analysis, I started to see the way this project was headed toward. • Moving to Thursday’s project, we started to focus on a specific area from our chosen district. The strength that I found in my project was the usage of multivariate data (from Tufte’s six principles). I started to provide not only a sketchUp model, but also a real life image, and also a sectional view of the street in order to support my hypothesis. • The major weakness: the message that I wanted to tell was not communicated clear enough to the audience. I needed to actually tell them what my points were in order for them to understand it. • Other weakness: the small texts are the predominant elements of my presentation (after picture and diagram). I should have pointed out/ highlighted the main point, so it would be easier to communicate the message. • Question about architecture: I’ve been taking several history classes, and from the past, I learned that people built their architectures based on their will/purposes. For instance, the Egyptian Pharaohs built the pyramids as a place of burial, predominantly for ritual purposes. So, my question is if people build and shape architecture, then how does architecture shape the human being?

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the INTERSECTION

| 2/7

Objectives: Create an in-depth research of the strongest part from the previous project. The project should also follow “Six Principles for the Analysis and Presentation of Data”.

Approach: I picked the intersection of Cesar Chavez, Mission, and Capp St. from my observation in previous study. I actually discovered my interest to this area when I was doing my 3D site model. The intersection, unlike other intersections in the Mission district which followed the grid pattern, had a unique shape. It connected the two major streets, the Cesar Chavez St. and the Mission St. However with a minor street, the Capp St. Thus, I was interested in studying how the city planner designed this intersection. Generally, I was interested in studying an intersection because I viewed an intersection as a vital city element since it acted as a point of decision for the people who passed through it.

Learning Outcomes: While my project did show some quantitative aspects of the intersection, it lacked the message behind it. I showed lots of evidences, but I didn’t really put my message on the visual presentation. I didn’t really answer the main question: Why is this area vital? And what makes it vital? I somehow answered the first question that an intersection was vital because it acted as a decision point, but it didn’t really address why the intersection that I picked was vital; aside of it being an intersection between two major streets and one minor street.

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the

INTERSECTION : CESAR CHAVEZ ST /MISSION ST /CAPP ST

an intersection between paths is a vital element as it acts as a decision making point. On the mission disctrict, the majority of the paths intersect on a simple perpendicular relationship; mainly due to the rectilinear pattern that constructs the district. BUT, as the district moves to the South, the simple perpendicular relationship starts to shift. Among those shifted paths, one that really stands out is an intersection at the south of the mission district between Cesar Chavez St, Mission St, and Capp St.

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mission st. - Street width : 56’ - as one walks south ward through the mission street, one is constantly aware of the intersection. The existence of the Bernal Heights at the south of the intersection is the strongest factor for this awareness. Bernal Heights is one of the landmarks on the mission district. It is often used as a reference point for people to travel toward the south direction. As people refer their journeys to the Bernal Heights, they will become aware of the discontinuity of the path at the end of street.

capp st. - Street width : 40’ (gets narrower as it progresses toward the intersection) - this curvilinear extension of the capp street is a point of confusion, especially for those who travel across it. There is no clear direction when one enters the street. The street sign states that it is a one-way street, and once the path gets narrower, the path can only fits one car. However, the existence of a stop sign signifies a different meaning. It is the sign that produces a point of confusion since people will start thinking that it is a two way street. N

cesar chavez st. mission st.

- Street width : 86’ - This major path is a perfect example of how a width of a street can show the importance of a street over other. Compare to the mission and the capp streets, cesar chavez has a much wider street. Not only that, the vegetations also help creating an open feeling into this street. The type of trees on this street is predominantly a tall tree with a less dense leaves. Moreover, this street also has a bigger pedestrian walkway. The actual street width, combined with the vegetations and pedestrian walkway width evokes the idea of the importance of this cesar chavez street.

12’

8’

10’

10’

10’

10’

8’

12’

cesar chavez st. 14’

8’

10’

11’

11’

6’

11’

11’

10’

8’

14’

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capp st. \\cesar chavez st. On the intersection between capp st. and cesar chavez st. there is a little abandoned space that forms a triangular shape. This space serves a purpose as a node where people can gather around. Moreover with nothing on this little empty plaza, it actually helps the traveler who comes from the capp st. to see the intersection. If there was a big tree on this plaza, it would block the view of the traveler from the capp st. Sometimes an empty space has its purpose and function.

mission st. \\cesar chavez st. the intersection between cesar chavez and mission street shows a good use of vegetation as a city element. The mission street that lies across the mission district is known for its collection of vegetations, for example: the palm trees. However, starting from the 25th, two blocks away from cesar chavez, there is no existence of any kind of vegetation. not until it approaches this intersection. This series of trees could encourage slower traffic for the pedestrian. This feature is really necessary considering that it is an intersection with a big major pathway: the cesar chavez st.

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24th St. & Mission St. Intersection| 2/12

Objectives: Create a more in-depth version of the previous project.

Approach: As I looked back to my previous study on the intersection of Cesar Chavez St, Mission St, and Capp St; I realized that this area was not vital. I accidentally picked the area that interested me the most, not the area that was the strongest point of my project from February 5. So, I decided to look at my previous project, and I decided to study the intersection of 24th and Mission St. since this area was really vital. It acted as both the node and the landmark of the mission district. Learning from the mistake that I did earlier, I started out by answering the question: Why is this area vital? I came up with two answers. First, this intersection was vital because it had a clear sense of direction, provided by the landmarks and the edges along the pathway. Second, this was a vital intersection because it was an active intersection. An active intersection that promoted a broad range of interaction of human activities. In terms of the visual organization of the project, I actually put the two main points in different color in order to show the contrast between them. From what I understood, contrast in a visual presentation could also mean a different way of representing it.

Learning Outcomes: While my work was starting to had a message behind it, it still needed more evidences to back up the hypothesizes that I made.

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DISTINCTIVE PATHWAYS - EDGES along the pathway Mission St.

- LANDMARKS

- Street width : 60’ - Pedestrian walkway width : 12’ - Vegetation pattern : a combination of palm trees and small trees. bigger distance between each tree. Compared to the trees on the 24th St, the trees on the mission st. have less density in terms of leaves and branches. Thus, they don’t protect againt the sun light. However, they create a more open feeling to the pathway along the mission street.

Bernal Heights The Bernal Heights which lies on the Southern side of the Mission district becomes a nature landmark that is often use as a point of reference when walking through the Mission Street, towards the south direction. It can also be a point of reference of North-South direction.

mission 12’

- Street width : 40’ - Pedestrian walkway width : 12’ - Vegetation pattern : predominantlytrees with dense leaves, app. 6’ apart.These dense leaves create a series of nature canopies along the street which are blocking the sun light.These series of natural canopies create a more enclosed space; thus, making the pathwaymore private and mysterious.

10’

10’

10’

8’

8’

12’

12’

24th 12’

These two stations, connected through an underground channel become the landmarks of this district. The provide the direction of West and East. The circle station points toward the West, and the rectangular station points toward the East.

8’

10’

10’

\\ a CLEAR SENSE of

ACTIVE INTERSECTION

the

HUMAN ACTIVITIES-INTERACTION An active intersection is promoted by the human activities and interaction. From a mapping by sf-planning.org, the intersection of 24th st. and mission st. is an intersection between two commercial throughways. Within a distance of one block, there exist small residential/alley and neighborhood residential. Besides of the interaction between the residential and commercial spaces, node can enhance the human activities that will eventually lead to an active intersection. The little plazas near the bart stations provide a public space to gather around with an approximation of 32’ space from the street. Interestingly, the muni stations are located near the bart stations; making it as a central point or central foci for those who travel using the public transportation system.

10’

24th St.

24th St & Mission Bart Station

\\ an

8’

st.

DIRECTION

I N :TME R S E C T I O N ISSION ST /24th ST

an intersection between paths is a vital element of a city as it acts as a decision making point. The intersection of Mission St. and 24th St. increases the vitality of the mission district because of two factors: 1) It has a clear sense of direction 2) It is an active intersection

small residential/alley neighborhood residential residential throughway neighborhood commercial commercial throughway mixed-use

data source: google map

BROAD RANGE OF INTERACTION data source: sf-planning.org

An active intersection like the intersection of 24th St and Mission St provides a broad range of interaction; starting from human interaction to an interaction between a variety of vehicles. The pathways on Mission St and 24th St are accessible for cars, buses, barts, pedestrians, and bicycles.

40%

SF Commute Mission Commute

29%

drove alone

11%

11%

carpool

31%

40%

public transportation

2%

9%

6%

bicycle

5%

8%

4%

walk

home

2% 2%

other

data source: sf-planning.org

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UTOPIAN DISTRICT

| 2/26

Objectives: Create a utopian district based on minimal six urban design concepts, principles, and strategies. This hypothetical urban district comprised of a four-block segment along a major street. The blocks are 600’ x 300’, major streets are 75’ wide, two lanes each way, with curbside parking; cross streets are 50’ wide. The dimensions can be altered to support the vision of a vital utopian district.

Concepts: This project is a really rare opportunity in a design studio since we are asked to create a community that is totally up to our own ideas. Instead of creating a random utopian community, I decided to look for a vision for my utopian district first. And my vision was to create a creative community that not only provides a venue for the community to showcase their talents, but also provide a venue for them to pass those talents to other people. This idea was a response to a condition of the street artists in San Francisco had to deal with. In order to be a legal street artist in San Francisco, artists must have a membership with an annual fee of $ 664.08 (http://www.create-legal.com). The San Francisco Street Artists Program had thirty three areas spreading around San Francisco Downtown, and the street performers had a monthly schedule selection on a rotation-basis (http://www.sfartscommission.org). These situations concerned me because surely, there must be artists that were not able to make that much money to become a legal artist. Thus, I envisioned a creative community that would provide a venue for San Francisco Local Artists to dwell, to showcase their creativities, and to pass the skills that they have to others. In designing my utopian district, I was influenced by both Kevin Lynch’s The Image of the City and Oscar Newman’s Defensible Space. Newman’s ideas can be clearly seen on my urban design concepts, principles, and strategies (For instance, my second point: Physical boundaries such as gates, walls, and distinctive pathways are necessary in order to create a spatial organization within a district’s program or to establish design parameters. Third point: Assigning public grounds under individual families’ or small group of families to create a sense of responsibility of the district among the community). Moreover, the use of wall to cover the entire district ensures the security of the people who live inside the community.

The ideas behind the circular plan - to create a distinctive community since the surrounding area follow the grid pattern - to focus the center of attention to the cultural center/exhibit at the center of the plan which will be the landmark/node for this district

Learning outcomes: Incorporation and integration of different ideas (Kevin Lynch’s ideas and Oscar Newman’s ideas) could enhance the outcome of the project. A specific vision helps focusing on the main idea of the project. A vital district has to be defensible in order to promote the feeling of secure within the ones who live inside the district, and those who are coming to the district.

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SIX URBAN DESIGN CONCEPTS, PRINCIPLES, AND STRATEGIES: 1. A vital district has a specific program and a clear organization based on the program.

Second sphere

2. Physical boundaries such as gates, walls, and distinctive pathways are necessary in order to create a spatial organization within a district’s program or to establish design parameters.

- commercial area consist of local stores, cafe, restaurants, and other shops that support the needs of both the community and the visitors. Street width: 50’. only accessible by walking.

3. Assigning public grounds under individual families’ or small group of families to create a sense of responsibility of the district among the community.

Physical boundaries: a slightly wider gates to send a signal to travelers that this area is only accessible by walking. A retaining wall is also used as a boundary between the residential area and commmercial. This area is also marked by its distinctive brick pattern for the ground and the fountains that act as nodes and landmarks for this district.

4. A close proximity between residents, retail stores/commercials, nodes, and landmark promotes the vitality of a district as it creates an easy access within the district. 5. A vital district has a variety of nodes with at least one node that acts as a major node/landmark

Sunrays’ response: In order to ensure that the district, especially the area inside the second sphere where the main attraction happens to have a maximum sunlit during the day, the commercial buildings on the South West region must be limited to 10’ maximum height.

6. Maximum sunlit streets are important during the day. Additional light posts are added for security purposes and to expand the hours of activity on the major streets and/or the minor streets.

PROGRAM: a creative community that not only promote and showcase the creativities of the community but also ensure that those creativities are passed down to others.

4’

75’

14’

36’

35’

ORGANIZATION: First sphere

N

residential area for the local artists. Artists are required to give lessons during weekdays in order to fulfil the goal of this community which is to pass the creativities to the next generations. Physical Boundaries: The first sphere also marks the entrance to this utopian district. The whole district is surrounded by a 4’8” retaining wall- allowing a peek to the interior of the district while still keeping the security of the residences. There are four entrances, each is marked with a pair of 14’ height gates. The use of gates and retaining wall is meant not only to create a spatial organization, but also to establish the design parameter.

Center a cultural center. Open every day, displaying the arts created by the local artists who live in the district. On every weekend or special occasions, there will be a cultural night at this cultural center. During the cultural night, the minor roads (the roads that exist on the first sphere) are closed, providing only four major pathways as the walk able pathways.

In order to ensure that there is no confusion, street signs are used to mark the complex. For instance, the complex for musicians, the complex for painters, etc. Type of Houses: Town houses, 2 story height: 24’, width: 40’, length: 60’. Each house is given both front and back yards. By assigning these public grounds to individuals, it will create a sense of resposibility among the community. Street width: 46’. accessible by car. Every street has a 6’ curb at the center, equipped with the light posts in order to ensure the security during the night. Each side of the street has one curb parking line and one line.

a

UTOPIAN

V I S I O N : a creative community

“APPLYING SUCCESSFUL URBAN DESIGN CONCEPTS, PRINCIPLES, & STRATEGIES TO CREATE A VITAL CITY IMAGE”

40’

60’

22’

8’

12’

6’

12’

8’

22’

ARCH 103 \\SPRING 2013 \\STEVEN

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MISSION BAY PROPOSALS

| 3/12

Objectives: Create proposals as potential design responses to the Mission Bay Project Site.

Context: Since we were not given a specific program for our project yet, I decided to work on the idea on how to respond to the constraints on the site. I came up with two proposals that might increase the vitality of the project and the Mission Bay.

Learning outcomes: Working with the constraints is a good way to start since constraints on the field could influence the vitality of the whole project. Things to consider for future designs: • Go underground • The edges respond to the edge conditions of its surrounding • Try to avoid symmetrical objects!! • Circulation or the flow of the people. • Possibly reaching out to the bay? • Incorporating the bridge to the second proposal • The spesific use of space on the right and left sides of the elevated pathways

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1st P R O P O S A L CONSTRAINT ON THE FIELD: THIRD STREET. An obstacle for the continuity of the mission bay development as the Third Street which acts as amajor atery that holds the street car rail and most of the traffics, lies in between the built and unbuilt areas in the mission bay.

IDEAS:

project

Instead of seeing this inevitable traffic route as an obstacle, we can turn this obstacle into an interesting promenade that will lead the people to and from our project. This promenade is designed as a connector between the already built area around the UCSF campus to our project’s site through a bridge and to the purblic transportation system- the street car station on Third Street. This bridge will act as a connective tissue that will weave individual buildings into a collective. Responding to the already built pedestrian pavement on Gene Friend Way, this bridge will act as the extension of the Gene Friend Way.

excerpted from: missionlocal.org

Within this bridge, we will try to capture the AT&T Park, a major landmark of the city of San Francisco, that is visible when we are looking North. However, we will design the bridge so people will focus their attentions to the project as they are walking toward the project, and we will provide the view of AT&T Park only on their way back.

street car station the bridge

2nd P R O P O S A L CONSTRAINT ON THE FIELD: WHERE IS THE BAY IN MISSION BAY? While a fairly amount of investments are focussing on the development of the biotech companies, UCSF campus, and UCSF housing on the western side of our project; none of them really captures the BAY which is an important edge, landmark, and node.

IDEAS: Creating a connection between the land and the bay. Instead of building a linear facade building, the project will be placed somewhat centered. It will have pathways that are directing the pedestrian to the project. At the back of the project/ the one that is facing the bay, the project will have a balcony that is facing the bay and another pathways that lead people to the pier/ bay.

PROPOSALS

FOR the

MISSION

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midterm reflection

This semester has been a tremendous learning experience. Being exposed to different urban design concepts and principles for the first time, I now have a better understanding of the relationship between urban design and architecture. In 102, I learned how to deal with the given site plan, and starts to build a relationship between my design and the site plan. Now, given the new knowledge that I have gained, I am starting to look at the project in a broader sense; I am starting to look at it in terms of its relationship with the site and the vitality of the city. The urban design concepts and principles also help me understand the city more. When I was first introduced to Kevin Lynch’s The Image of The City, I was blown away. I never really thought about his five city elements before (except for the landmarks); although, I might have thought about it unconsciously. By exploring the city through Kevin Lynch’s lenses, I can now see the city differently. When I walk through a city, it is no longer about places of attraction; my mind is now filled with the five city elements: edges, nodes, paths, landmarks, and districts. Moreover, Oscar Newman’s Defensible Space also gives me a really valuable insight in designing defensible space. His concepts are somewhat logical, yet unheard of. Through half of this semester, the major issue that I have been dealing with is specificity. I am still working with that issue. Hopefully, by the end of this semester, the level of specificity of my thinking will surpass the level of generality.

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END of MIDTERM . . .

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SITE ANALYSIS

| 3/19

Objectives: Create a site analysis of the location of the project

Learning outcomes:

Traffic Flows

North Parking garage entrance Bridge Point Way leads to high rise residential view Align w/ Gene Friend Way Financial District View from Bridge Point Way

Views/ Landmarks

Sun Path Wind Topology

Use/ Activities

Edge Conditions District see Use/Activities

Urban Actors' Agendas Noise Pollution Crime

Ambient sunlight

East Terry A.Francois Blvd leads to port AT & T Park Repair facility Aqua Vista Park Bay View Mt. Diablo East Bay Hill Bay Bridge Morning sun, lateral

Bay/ East Bay Hills Parking Recreation Office Port Residential Public Fishing Spot Boat Ramp Mission Rock No sidewalk on North boundary Bay Coastline South St: Entrance of the parking garage & Office Building

South Quiet, but street leads to UCSF Hospital + Campus

Overhead sun Bay View Hill Biotech Offices

West Third Street Muni Line Freeway Access Station @ UCSF and 16th Twin Peaks Sutro Tower 280 Freeway UCSF Rutter Hall Tower Sunset, lateral Wind from West Potrero Hill UCSF Campus MUNI Stations

ISOLATED ENCLAVE Residential Gateway to central SF Developers- Residential + Offices + Labs

Educational/Health Research Port Dept.

SW: UCSF Hospital for women, children, and cancer

UCSF MUNI Freeway Caltrain

TEMPORARY NONE

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neighborhood CONTEXT

S

B

E

R

R

circulation

sun PATH The site area (shown in magenta color) is bounded by Third St. on the west which is the major artery on Mission Bay. Major artery should promote high traffic. However, based on my on the field research, there is a low vehicular traffic on Third St. Thus, there is a possibility to reinforce or promote this major artery so that it can fully function as what it is created to be. Moreover, if we are facing north on this street, we can clearly see the AT&T Park.

The proposed site is located at block number 29 and 30 with the actual dimension of 780’ x 307’ (on the north) and 970’ x 307’. The actual site has a curve edge on the east. This site has an east-west orientation which gives much of the sun exposures on the southern edge of the site.

T

Y

The neighborhood buildings that are bounding this site are as follow: • 27 on the north => An empty land on the left for future Salesforce campus , South St. Garage. • 28 on the north => An empty lot for future GAP Inc. Commercial Office. • P22 on the east => Public open space, framing the bay. It also has a route for joggers. • 31 and 32 on the south => empty lot for future Salesforce campus. • 23 on the west => Third Street Garage.

On the north, the site is bounded by South St. which is classified as a collector street according to sfredevelopment.org. This street has a low to almost zero traffic since this street is an extension of Gene Friend Way on the west which is a pedestrian only street. Thus, we can only expect the traffic coming from Terry Francois Blvd on the east and from Third St. Most of the traffic is from the garage located at 450 South St. The entrance and the exit of the garage are facing the site project. On the east, Terry Francois Blvd acts as the boundary for the site. A minor artery is what it is. This route need to be promoted and reinforced as the route that has a magnificent view of the bay, the east bay, and bay bridge. The route that lies on the south of the site does not exist at the moment.

The residential buildings (shown on yellow color) are built on the North side of the project whereas the area surrounding the site is concentrated for UCSF campus on the west and commercial on the South and part of the North.

excerpted from: sunearthtools.com

The sun path exists from the south side of the project. Since there is an empty lot on the south, there is no shadow from the outside surrounding that is affecting the site. However, the design of our site should correspond to the amount of shade and shadow that it will generate as we have the parking garage on the south with a linear facade that will cast all the shade that the building generate.

excerpted from: sfredevelopment.org

MISSION BAY LAND USE PLAN SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA | November 2005

N 0

300

600

WIND pattern accessibility

This graph shows the distribution of wind through out the year on our specific given site. The average wind speed is 6.3 mph with the majority of the wind coming from the west. The maximum wind speed recorded is 27 mph, and the most frequent wind speed recorded is 4 mph. Since the site has a East-West orientation, wind pattern will have an important role in the design process as it might affect the amount of covering, public spaces, landscape, etc. required for the project.

AT&T PARK - major landmark within this area - 15 mins of walking to the site - 6 mins of bicycling - 4 mins, using bus 91 and street car T

caltrain station - located at 4th and King St. - 15 mins walking to the site - 6 mins bicycling - 4 mins of using other alternatives: bus 91 and street car T that go along the third street

street car stations - there are two stations that are located right at the intersection on the north west side of the project. - less than 1 min walking, bicycling, driving.

excerpted from: sfenergymap.org

SITE excerpted from: maps.google.com

A N A L Y S I S - M I S S ION

BAY

PROJECT `

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PROGRAM ANALYSIS

| 3/21

Objectives: Create a program analysis using the bubble diagram and the matrix of adjacencies.

Learning outcomes: This program analysis really helped me analyzing the relationship between each program. Instead of thinking of the program as a separated element, I now started to think about it as one single thing. This program really helped me organizing my thoughts regarding the organization of the programmatic elements. Even by looking at the bubble diagram, I could start see the organization of my project.

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MMG Main Museum Gallery Indoor Exhibit 1 for ecol Indoor Exhibit 2 for sfmoma Café and Shop- organic

E2

Restrooms

Exploratorium Complex

E1

Mechanical Spaces Circulation- lobbies, corridors Outdoor dining area Outdoor gallery

U.O.GARDEN

IE 1

IE2

C&S

R

HVAC

CIR

O-DIN

O-GAL

AMPT

BACK

S&S

UOG

PR

PG

BAY

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Ampitheater- outdoor, open stage Backstage Leasable shops and stalls

Marketplace

Urban Organic Garden Public Restrooms

Public Gardens

MAIN GALLERY

PUBLIC GARDEN

OUTDOOR GALLERY

Public Gardens

AMPHITHEATER

BACKSTAGE

RESTROOMS HVAC

OUTDOOR DINING

PUBLIC RESTROOMS

CAFE & SHOP

DIRECT CONNECTION DESIRABLE CONNECTION SHOPS & STALLS

PROGRAM

A N A L Y S I S - M I S SION

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MASSING STUDY + INSPIRATIONS

| 4/4

Objectives: Massing study, Precedence, Inspirations, and Research.

Context: With my first attempt of massing study, several problems came to mind. One of them was the placement of urban organic garden and outdoor gallery. Since I envisioned both to be near the water edge, there was not enough space to incorporate the two programmatic elements. Then, after doing some researches, I came out with an idea of using a multi layer approach to accomodate both programs at the same location. By learning from the built projects by various architects, I gained some insights in dealing with the constraints of this project. It also inspired my design; thus, giving me an opportunity to incorporate some of the elements of the design to my project. (For instance, the rooftop seating area that will be incorporated in my final model,)

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

MASSING STUDIES

RESEARCH

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

As ones approach the uchronian gardens from be greeted with an amphitheater that stands the main gallery. This amphitheater will be well as a part of the circulation along the

ABU DHABI PERFORMNG ARTS CENTER / ZAHA HADID

the Third St, they will between the street an acting as an enclave as uchronian gardens.

The visible circulation could be used in designing a desirable connection between programmatic elements.

Once they reach the main gallery space, they will be greeted with a cafe. The placement of the cafe near the amphitheater is a way of promoting a slow life lifestyle. With the close proximity, I am expecting people to come to the cafe and enjoy their foods or drinks either at the amphitheater or at the cafe itself while enjoying the performance at the amphitheater or simply enjoying the view of people circulating along the unchronian gardens.

http://www.zaha-hadid.com/architecture/abu-dhabi-performing-arts-centre/

excerpted from:

MAIN GALLERY N

OUTDOOR GALLERY SHOPS & STALLS

KING ABDULLAH II HOUSE OF CULTURE & ART / ZAHA HADID

AMPHITHEATER PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

OTHER PROGRAMMATIC ELEMENTS EXCEPT, PUBLIC GARDEN

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PUBLIC RESTROOM

EXHIBIT 1

URBAN ORGANIC GARDEN

A multi layer approach is used in designing the urban organic garden, outdoor dining, and the outdoor gallery. Since the U.O.G is visually accessible for public, it will be located at the first floor where as the circulation will be created on top of the U.O.G. Moreover, the outdoor dining area and the outdoor gallery share the same interest of having the view of the waterfront; therefore, the multi layer approach is used. the outdoor gallery will be hovering above the U.O.G. and the outdoor dining area while there will be a skylight that will provide sunlight and heat for the U.O.G.

I was inspired by the way the amphitheater is blending to the path and the whole notion of the building. Instead of designing an amphitheater apart from the circulation, it becomes part of the circulation of the building. The elevated path provides the seating areas for the amphitheater. http://www.zaha-hadid.com/architecture/king-abdullah-ii-house-of-culture-art/

excerpted from:

TOKYO NATIONAL STADIUM / ZAHA HADID

The concentration of the shop is mainly happening on the South St. (the North side of the uchronian gardens). This series of shops is meant to increase the traffic flow and the circulation across this quiet and deserted street.

OUTDOOR DINING

CAFE & SHOP

EXHIBIT 2

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

http://www.zaha-hadid.com/architecture/new-national-stadium/

excerpted from:

MMG Main Museum Gallery Indoor Exhibit 1 for ecol

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Indoor Exhibit 2 for sfmoma Café and Shop- organic Restrooms

Exploratorium Complex

Mechanical Spaces Circulation- lobbies, corridors Outdoor dining area Outdoor gallery Ampitheater- outdoor, open stage Backstage

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

This idea of visibility could also be used for designing the urban organic garden that is only visually accessible to the public. For instance, placing the garden at the center of a building (an indoor garden) while providing view and sunlight trough skylight and glass windows.

Leasable shops and stalls

Marketplace

Urban Organic Garden Public Restrooms

Public Gardens

Public Gardens

IE 1

IE2

C&S

R

HVAC

CIR

O-DIN

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O-GAL AMPT

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BACK

S&S

UOG

PR

PG

BAY

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The use of overhanging space could be used for the design of the public gallery and other programs that have a desirable connection with the view of the bay. In this project, Zaha Hadid uses a multilayer of space. At the upper part of the stadium, she creates an open outdoor space while at the lower level, she has an indoor space. This might solve the constraints that I was facing while trying to place the outdoor gallery and the outdoor dining area since both have a desirable connection to the bay.

KENGO KUMA DESIGN FOR SUPSI The use of sloping roof as a seating area might be incorporated to the design of the amphitheater. Moreover, the use of glass on the vertical part of the sloping roof, allowing the visitors to view the activities below the sloping roof. It also provides the sunlight to penetrate through the sloping roof. http://www.designboom.com/architecture/kengo-kuma-design-for-supsi-mendrisio-switzerland/

excerpted from:

CONCEPTUAL

DESIGN - MISSION

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VISIONS

| 4/9

Objectives: As an attempt to refining my massing study, I realized that I needed to have a vision because if there is no clear vision for this project, it will be hard to focus and narrow down the possibilities of the design thinking. A set of objectives is needed in order to keep track of the project.

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VISIONS • A project that will create a paradigm-shifting experience of science-especially biotech- from an exclusive field that is only understandable for scientists to a more welcoming and inviting field through the spatial journeys that promote curiosity and discovery. • Acting as a connective tissue between the rigorous research activites with the slow lifestyle that is promoted by the Agua Vista park- bicycle and jogging route, public fishing spot. • Creating an interactive environment that will engage and immerse the visitors to the awareness of science, nature, art, and the history of Mission Bay. • Creating an immersive experience of nature to the city by promoting an integrated public garden to the entrance from the western side (close to UCSF campus & a major atery- 3rd St.) and locating the amphitheater on the eastern side of the site which is close to the water front- this amphitheater depicts a beautiful view of the bay. When there is no performance, this amphitheater will provide a seating area and a place for people to fully immersed with the nature and the surrounding area. • Stimulating curiosity through its distinctive design that would enhance the UCSF’s prominence and add a distinctive identity to the Mission Bay as the center of biotechnology. • Revealing some parts of the indoor activities to the external area as a way of immersing the experience to the surrounding and promoting curiosity and the joy of discovery to the uchronian garden.

VISIONS

-

M I S S I O N BAY

PROJECT

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GESTURAL DRAWINGS

| 4/16

Objectives: After looking at my previous massing study, I was having a hard time to come up with the design of the whole project. As a result, I decided to do some gestural drawings to explore my architectonic language based on my visions that I already set.

Context: This series of gestural drawings explore the idea of a connective tissue that is bridging the rigorous research at UCSF to a slow life style at the water edge. As it progressed, the left side of the drawings (representing the West side of the project) started to have this strict and rigid language as a response to the rigorous research at UCSF. On the other hand, the right side of the drawings (representing the East side of the project) started to form a more natural form as a response to the slow life style and the natural state of the bay.

Learning outcomes: By doing these gestural drawings, I started to have some visual images of what the whole project would look. These drawings reall helped me develop my architectonic language for this project.

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MASSING STUDY

| 4/23

Objectives: Create a 3D conceptual model of my Uchronian Garden.

Context: Working with the west edge of the project. I started by designing a huge platform acting as a main entrance for this uchronian garden as a way to incorporate and accomodating the pedestrian flow that is coming from the Thrid Street and the Gene Friend Way. As the visitors walk through the huge main entrance, there will be a depressed Urban Organic Garden. This sort of mysterious garden is meant to promote the curiousity of the visitors to become more engage in exploring the uchronian garden. On the North side near the main entrance, I designed a series of leasable shops and stalls as a response to the major artery: Third St, the UCSF residence tower at the North West side of the project. This series of leasable shops and stalls will also have a huge plaza in front of them in order to create an open feeling due to the edge of the building at the South St which is the parking garage that has no setback. These shops are also meant to activate the currently dead South St. and to attract the pedestrian flow to the Bay. The rooftops of these shops will be used as a seating terrace. This seating terrace is inspired by Kengo Kuma design for SUPSI. Moreover, by placing the Cafe and Shop near the seating rooftop, it will promote the idea of slow life style as soon as the visitors get into the project.

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urban organic garden

cafe & shop

rooftops/ seating area

urban organic garden

the view above is overlooking the urban organic garden and the rooftops from the shops below that are used as a seating area.

UCHRONIAN GARDEN arch 103| steven PRATAMA leasable shops

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MASSING STUDY

| 4/25

Objectives: a 3D conceptual model of my Uchronian Garden with plan and sectional views.

Context: In this 3D model, I incorporated the second U.O.Garden facing the South St. This U.O.Garden is a two story building covered with glass. Besides the U.O.Garden, stands another entrance as a response to the Bridge Point Way on the South St and the incoming pedestrian flow from the parking garage. Within this model, I also incorporated my exploratorium and second exhibit space at the ground level as an attempt to create a more secluded space. Thus, visitors will become more focussed and engaged to the events that are going to happen. In comparison, the first exhibit space is placed at the second level and was made visible since this exhibit space needs a connection with the bay environment (it will exhibit the historic elements of the bay area). Though my attempt to map the amphitheater and the other leasable shops are lacking of the integration, I actually gained a significant outcome in terms of the placement of the two programmatic elements that I will further explored on my next iteration.

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U.O.GARDEN

EXHIBIT 1 SHOPS EXHIBIT 2 U.O. GARDEN AMPT.

EXPLRT.

CAFE & SHOP SHOPS EXHIBIT 2

U.O.GARDEN

EXHIBIT 1 CAFE & SHOP U.O.GARDEN

U.O.GARDEN

EXPLORATORIUM

U.O.GARDEN

UCHRONIAN GARDEN- PERSPECTIVE, PLAN, & SECTION arch 103| STEVEN P R A T A M A arch 103

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MASSING STUDY

| 4/30

Objectives: a 3D conceptual model of my Uchronian Garden with plan and sectional views.

Context: In this 3D model, I tried to integrate the amphitheater and the second row of leasable shops with the design language that I had developed. The amphitheater was designed near the bay; so, if it was not in used, the seating area could provide a nice public space with the atmosphere and the view of the bay. I also envisioned the second row of leasable shops to be placed near the bay in order to attract the people from the Terry A. Francois Blvd. and to create a major node, so visitors would dwell within the uchronian garden. This row of leasable shops is designed to be a set of one story buildings in order to keep the natural light available for the ampthitheater and the pathway that is coming from the second exhibit space. Moreover, I also incorporate Newman’s Defensible Space principle by keeping all the public-accessible space visible. Thus, there is no hidden pathway or space such as, underground pathway in this uchronian garden. All the public accessible spaces are within the nice exposure of sunlight.

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shops

E 2

SHOPS u.o.g

amphitheater

E 1 shops

CAFE & SHOP

u.o.g

u.o.g

u.o.g

amphitheater

shops

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FINAL DESIGN

| 5/7

Objectives: a 3D refined model of my Uchronian Garden with persepctive vignettes, plan and sectional views.

Context: In this final model, I added an interior-exterior pathway inside the Urban Organic Garden #2. This pathway also serves as an outdoor gallery to showcase and to investigate the Bay area. With a view of the Urban Organic Garden, this Outdoor gallery will be a desirable place for people to walk through. Moreover, the pathway has a dead end. This uncontinuous pathway is used as a metaphor that sometimes during the research, we can clearly see where we want to head, but we just can’t get there. We just need to go back and re do the expriment. Moreover, in this final model, I also incorporated the rooftop of the shops near the bay as a sculpture garden. This sculpture garden will have a nice view overlooking the bay, the amphitheater, and the Urban Organic Garden #2. Furthermore, I also added glass walls on both side of the entrance from South St. These glass walls will reveal the activity of the exploratorium underneath. This idea of hidden and revealing is meant to evoke the curiousity of the visitors, just like the concept behind the depressed U.O.G #1 near the main entrance from Third St.

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site U T I L I Z A T I O N D

CAFE & SHOP

A

URBAN ORGANIC GARDEN

SCULPTURE GARDEN

C EXHIBITION 2

ROW OF SHOPS B OVERLOOKING THE URBAN ORGANIC GARDEN 1, THE ROOFTOP SEATING AREA, AND THE EXHIBIT SPACE #1

E2 SHOPS

UOG 2

UOG 1

LONGITUDINAL SECTION CUT A-B NEAR THE NORTH SIDE

VIEW FROM THE SOUTH ST. CAFE & SHOP

AMPHT

UOG 2

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URBAN ORGANIC GARDEN 2

EXPLORATORIUM

EXHIBITION 2 INTERIOR OF URBAN ORGANIC GARDEN 2

AMPHITHEATER & BACKSTAGE

SCULPTURE GARDEN

SHOPS & STALLS

PATHWAY NEAR URBAN ORGANIC GARDEN 2

OVERLOOKING THE WESTERN EDGE OF THE UCHRONIAN GARDEN

VIEW FROM EXHIBITION 2 PATHWAY

VIEW FROM TERRY A. FRANCOIS BLVD OVERLOOKING THE URBAN ORGANIC GARDEN 2

VIEW FROM THE PATHWAY AT SOUTHERN SIDE OF THE AMPHITHEATER

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SCULPTURE GARDEN

SHOPS EXHIBITION 1 AMPHT

EXPLORATORIUM

UOG 1

ENTRANCE #3 MAIN ENTRANCE SHOPS UOG 2 SCULPTURE GARDEN ENTRANCE #2

SCULPTURE GARDEN

outdoor DINING CAFE AND SHOP

EXHIBITION 2

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FINAL MODEL

1. AERIAL VIEW FROM NORTH WEST

4. VIEW OVERLOOKING THE MAIN ENTRANCE FROM THIRD ST.

1’:16”

| 5/16

2. AERIAL VIEW FROM NORTH WEST/ THIRD ST. (UCSF RESIDENCE TOWER ON THE RIGHT)

3. AERIAL VIEW FROM SOUTH WEST SIDE OF THIRD ST.

5. VIEW FROM THE CAFE & SHOP

6. DETAIL VIEW OF THE ROOFTOP SEATING AND U.O.G 1

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7. AERIAL VIEW FROM SOUTH EASTERN SIDE- TERRY A. FRANCOIS BLVD

8. VIEW OVERLOOKING THE AMPHITHEATER, SCULPTURE GARDEN, & U.O.G.#2

9. VIEW OVERLOOKING THE AMPHITHEATER & THE UNCONTINOUS PATHWAY INSIDE THE U.O.G.#2

10. VIEW OVERLOOKING THE PATHWAYS FROM THE WEST

11. DETAIL VIEW OF THE PATHWAYS FROM EXHIBIT #2 AND EXPLORATORIUM

11. DETAIL VIEW OF THE PATHWAYS FROM EXHIBIT #2 AND EXPLORATORIUM arch 103

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ENTRANCE TO U.O.G. #2

GLASS WALL OVERLOOKING THE EXPLORATORIUM UNDERNEATH

12. AERIAL VIEW LOOKING AT THE EXHIBIT 1 AND PATHWAY LEADS TO THE AMPHTHEATER AND UOG

14. DETAIL VIEW OF THE ENTRANCE FROM THE SOUTH ST. AND THE ENTRANCE TO THE U.O.G #2

15. DETAIL VIEW OF THE ENTRANCE FROM THE SOUTH ST. AND THE ENTRANCE TO THE U.O.G #2

arch 103

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arch 103

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FINAL LEARNING ASSESSMENT

| 5/22

This semester has been a tremendous learning experience. Being exposed to different urban design concepts and principles for the first time, I now have a better understanding of the relationship between urban design and architecture. The strength of my final project lies on the response to the site and urban conditions of the project and the cohesiveness of the architectonic language of the whole project. The first half of the semester really taught me all the urban design principles that helped me dealing with the urban conditions of the site whereas the gestural drawings and the design thinking that I have developed since 101 helped me deal with the cohesiveness of my architectonic language. However, I do think that I need to improve the interior circulation both the vertical and the horizontal circulations. Throughout the semester, there has been ups and downs. One of the major obstacles that I finally overcame was the issue of generating conceptual model in a 3D software. There was a time when I felt frustated because I just couldn’t make the 3D computer model. Fortunately, I was able to overcome it through several trials and errors. Compare to where I was on January 2013, I now have a much better understanding of generating a conceptual model in 3D softwares, spesifically Google SketchUP. I can’t believe how helpful it was to generate the conceptual model in a 3D software first before making the actual model, especially if when working with a big project like this uchronian garden. Another main issue that I overcame was the issue of productivity. I was productive up until the point where I got stuck with designing the 3D computer model. I learned that it takes courage and passion to overcome the barriers. In conclusion, this Arch 103 has added new views, new perspectives, new principles, and new techniques in my architecture skills. I now have another set of tools added to my architecture toolbox. I’m sure that this set of tools will help me succeed in my future education and my future career as an architect. Thank you for this wonderful learning experience, Jerry! GO BEARS!

TIPS for future ARCH 103 student: always do the work!!! don’t let ANYTHING stop you from doing your work!

arch 103

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arch 103

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ARCH 103 Final Portfolio| steven PRATAMA