Page 1

PRACTICAL TRAINING REPORT 1JULY’10 - 7 JANUARY’11 ahmedabad


acknowledgment

with profound sense of gratitude i extend my heartfelt thanks to ar. yatin pandya (footprints e.a.r.t.h, ahmedabad), who gave me an oppurtunity for a detailed study of various aspects of their esteemed projects, giving me an insight into the real world of architecture and inspiring me for my future prospects. also to let me attend his fascinating and thought provoking lectures at cept university and seminars around the city. i am gratfull to my esteemed colleagues , who helped me throughout the learning process; rectified my mistakes and appreciated my success. i am deeply indebted to ; 1. ar. kirti makhija 2. ar ranjini agamudiya 3. ar. ridhish gajjar 4. ar. arpit bhatt i am also grateful to prof.qamar sheikh and his colleagues to invite me for regular seminars and group discussions with trainees of their esteemed firm HCPDPM, AHMEDABAD and for allowing me to experience their office environment and work ethics for a short period of one month ( 13dec’10 - 7jan’11) . also i feel oblidged towards the hospitality provided by the people of ahmedabad with whom i enjoyed my training tenure and got to appreciate their rich culture, lifestyle and language. i feel nourished to have friends all across india with whom i would strive to stay in contact in the future. i thank my parents and family for their constant support and motivation. i would cherish this experience throughout my life. stuti sareen


CONTENTS I ARCHITECT AND THE FIRM II MANAV SADHNA ACTIVITY CENTRE III ENVIRONMENT SANITATION INSTITUTE IV AHMEDABAD REALIZED


AR.YATIN PANDYA FOOTPRINTS E. A. R. T. H

Environment Architecture Research Technology Housing

Yatin Pandya is an author, activist, academician, researcher as well as the practising architect, with his firm FOOTPRINTS E.A.R.T.H. Graduate of CEPT university, Ahmedabad he has availed Master of Architecture degree from McGill University, Montreal. Yatin has been involved with city planning, urban design, Mass housing, and architecture, interior design as well as conservation projects. He has written over two hundred articles in National and International Journals. Several books authored by him on architecture, especially “Concepts of space in traditional Indian architecture”, and “Elements of space making” have been published internationally. He has also been involved in preparing over 30 video documentaries on Architecture. He has been visiting faculty at National Institute of design and CEPT University and guest lecturer/ critic to various universities in India and abroad. He has served as thesis guide to nearly 150 Graduate, Masters and PhD students and has lectured in over fifteen countries and in about hundred fora. Yatin has won nearly twenty five National and International awards for design, research as well as dissemination. MILAN BANGLOW, SARGAM FLAT LANE ISHWAR BHUVAN TO STADIUM ROAD NAVJIVAN POST AHMEDABAD 380014, INDIA


MANAV SADHNA ACTIVITY CENTRE AND CRECHE Mahatma Gandhi’s Talisman

“I will give you a talisman. Whenever you are in doubt or when the self becomes too much with you, apply the following test: Recall the face of the poorest and the weakest man whom you may have seen and ask yourself, if the step you contemplate is going to be of any use to him. Will he gain anything by it? Will it restore him to a control over his own life and destiny? In other words, will it lead to Swaraj for the hungry and spiritually starving millions? Then you will find your doubts and your self melting away. ”


C

o

n

t

e

x

t

Nearly 27.4 million tonnes of waste is produced daily in the urban centers of India. Cities like Ahmedabad alone produce 2750 metric tonnes. Unfortunately nothing really gets processed of the same. This waste is simply dumped openly in the landfill sites, which uses enormous volumes of fossil fuel, creating an altered, polluted, unsafe and unealthy landscape. Thankfully India has a well-established tradition of waste recycling which is clearly demonstrated in daily practices and lifestyle. By giving waste or surplus food to beggars and animals, the leftover food waste goes beyond its primary life cycle. Food along with many other objects, are given added value for their multiple uses and diverse applications. Can the building industry not learn from these applications? An activity centre at Rama Pir Tekra, Wadaj in Ahmedabad has been one small attempt in the direction of recycling municipal/domestic waste into building materials.


The activity centre is located amidst the largest squatter settlement of Ahmedabad, and was created under the initiative of the social NGO, Manav Sadhna. The multi-purpose activity centre serves as an informal school for young children, provides evening education for adults and serves as a training centre and activity workshop for the manufacturing craft based products by women and elderly. The campus also includes a dormitory, an administrative unit and an all-religion meditation unit. Addressing the issue of Young children in slum areas that have problem of being looked after through the day when both parents are out at work for earning livelihood, a creche as an extention to the activity center was created. The locally employed women serve as ‘nanny’ through the day to couple of dozen slum kids. The place functions as a cradle house, play area, nursery school as well as community facility centre for bathing and personal hygiene of young children.


C

o

n

c

e

r

n

s

• Non-polluting environment • Economic empowerment • Affordable built forms are the three key dimensions of this initiative. The project is an outcome of over three years of empirical research in Environmental Design, with the goal of converting municipal waste from the domestic sector into building components. First hand experiments and on site explorations have led to the development of innovative building components that use waste, simple hand- operated tools and local resources and know-how. The project also demonstrates that building can become an economic activity, empowering the poor.ate economic opportunities without needing capital intensive, mechanised or centralised production setup. It shows potential of becoming a cottage industry for economic self-reliance and possibilities to improve the quality of their homes using the affordable alternative building components. This also meant reduction in waste thrown thereby reduction in environmental pollution. it models as a value addition processes, of converting waste into building components.


thought+research+empower+self reliance+atten tion+symbiotic+life+energy+solution+sustainable +sadhna+potential+capital+generation+humanity +recycle+cottage+wellbeing+society+assosiation


manav sadhna activity centre


Creche at -2.8m with the extention plan


manav sadhna Creche


COURTYARD TOWARDS ENTERTAINMENT ROOM DENTIST CLINIC

CLASSROOM

CHAUPAL - COURTYARD

LIBRARY

CRECHE

ACTIVITY ROOM


Recycled Building Components

Waste Materials

C o n s t r uc t i o n The campus built as a live demonstration for the application of recycled waste as affordable, aesthetically pleasing and efficient building components. The products developed for this project, which incorporate municipal/domestic waste and were prepared with simple hand operated tools, are demonstrated in the walls, roofs/slabs, doors and windows. There are six types of materials and techniques used in the making of the walls. These include: cement bonded flyash bricks, mould-compressed bricks made from landfill site waste residue, stabilized soil blocks, recycled glass bottles, recycled plastic bottles filled with ash and waste residue, and vegetable crate wood paneling in the inner partition walls. Similarly the floor and roof slabs as applied in the activity centre include: filler slab with glass bottles, plastic bottles and bricks, stone slab, cement bonded particle board with clay tile cover, as well as light conduit pipe truss with G.I. sheet with clay tile roof. The door paneling used shredded packaging wrapper and coated paper waste as reinforcement sustitute for fiber reinforced plastic (FRP). Vegetable crate wood as a frame and oil tin container as blades make the ventilation louvers in the toilets. A paneled door using vegetable crate wood and oil tin containers for the frame and cladding respectively is also provided in the administrative block office toilet. Flyash and waste residue moulded tiles with inlaid ceramic industry waste as china mosaic (applied during tile moulding itself) is also applied in patches for their demonstration. All of these products were developed and produced first hand. The products thus produced have been lab tested for their engineered performance and they prove to be economical, environmentally friendly, participatory and aesthetically pleasing solutions and express alternatives to contemporary practices.


Wall Type one - Fly Ash Wall Materials: Fly ash, Cement Quantity of materials used in gms. Fly ash 2375 95% Cement 125 5% Total weight 2500 Properties Dimensions 230 x 110 x 75 mm Compressive strength 18.84 kg/sq cm Water absorption 18.04 % All the required ingredients are measured by weight and are mixed properly either manually or mechanical process. Proper water content needs to be maintained in the mix through out during the process. The properly mixed slurry is poured in to the mould. The slurry filled mould is placed in the brick making machine and is subjected to vibration. The mould is then provided the requisite pressure mechanically for achieving proper shape and size of the brick. Brick are laid on edge in rat trap bond. It saves around 25% of brick consumption than Flemish bonded masonry.


Wall Type Two - Waste Residue Brick Materials: Fly ash, Waste residue, cement, Gypsum, Lime, River sand Quantity of materials used in gms.: Fly ash 650 26% Waste residue 1250 50% Cement 25 1% Gypsum 50 2% Lime 175 7% River sand 375 15% Total weight 2525 Properties: Dimensions 230 x 110 x 75 mm Compressive strength 10.16 kg/sq cm Water absorption 12.99 % All the required ingredients are measured by weight and are mixed properly either manually or mechanical process. Proper water content needs to be maintained in the mix through out during the process. The properly mixed slurry is poured in to the mould. The slurry filled mould is placed in the brick making machine and is subjected to vibration. The mould is then provided the requisite pressure mechanically for achieving proper shape and size of the brick.


Wall Type Three - Plastic Bottle Wall Materials: Plastic bottle, Flyash, Cement mortar Skill/ Machine: Masonry Dimensions: In proportion of bottle size. Composition: 1:3 Cement Sand Cost Component: Plastic bottle -1Rs./bottle Empty plastic bottles are cleaned of labels. Bottles are fi lled full of fl yash or waste residue. Then the bottles are laid in horizontal courses over a cement mortar bed. Deep groove pointing is done simultaeously and bottles are cleaned off extra mortar.


Wall Type Four - Glass Bottle Wall Materials: Glass bottle, Flyash, Cement mortar Skill/ Machine: Masonry Dimensions: In proportion of bottle size. Composition: 1:3 Cement Sand Cost Component: Glass bottle -2Rs./bottle + labour charges Empty glass bottles are cleaned of labels. A mockup of bottle arrangement is done in desired pattern on ground without cement mortar. Then the bottles are laid in horizontal courses over a cement mortar bed. Deep groove pointing is done simultaneously and bottles are cleaned off extra mortar.


Wall Type Five - Wooden Crate Wall Materials: Vegetable/ Fruit crate, Flyash, Cement mortar. Skill/ Machine: Carpentry, Fabricating Dimensions: 300 mm X 300 mm slat height Cost Component: Vegetable/ Fruit crate -10/- Rs... per crate + MS ‘L’ section frame fabricating charges + Carpentry labour charges. Wooden slats are obtained by dis-mantling the used vegetable crates. MS ‘T’ sections are used to make framework to receive wooden slats. They are cut and shaved in needed size. Thus prepared slats are screwed to the frame and slats are nailed with each other.


Door Type One - Fibre Reinforced Wall Materials: Resin, Cobalt Octte, Catalyst, Glass fibre matt Proportion of mix: 96.5% Resin, 1.5% Cobalt octet, 2% Catalyst Dimensions: 300 mm X 300mm Cost of FRP panel per sqft = Rs... 30.00 - 40.00* Plastic wrappers are cleaned with scissors cut into fine shreds. On a clean sheet of plastic a glass fibre matt is laid. Shreds are laid over it and then covered by another matt. Mixture of polymer resin catalyst and stabilizer is applied over the matt. The plastic sheet is covered over it. In half an hour the polymer is set and plastic sheet is removed and FRP sheet is ready to use.


Door Type Two - Wooden Crate and Oil Tin Door Materials: Oil tin boxes, Wooden/ Fruit crate Skill/ Machine: Carpentry Dimensions: 750mm X 1800mm Cost components: Oil tin box - 5 pieces 100.00 Rs. Vegetable crate - 4 nos. 40.00 Rs. Total cost of the material used 150.00 Rs.+ 300.00 Rs. labour charges + 50.00 Rs. Hardware charges = 500.00 Rs. (material + labour)+ other charges Cost of tin and crate door= Rs. 500.00 - 550.00 Wooden slats are obtained by dis-mantling the used vegetable crates. Oil tin containers are opened up into sheets. Wooden slats can be joined by dove tail joint as shown or by simply nailing. Thin sheets are fl attened properly. The corners pieces are cut at 45째 angles. After placing two layers of wooden frame tin sheets are arranged behind with two short side ends wrapping the frame. The third layer of wooden frame is overlaid on top, securing the edges of tin sheets. Tin sheets are overlapped so as to avoid water ingression. The same wooden frame structure can be used with different panelling materials like jute, tarpaulin, card board etc.


Window Type One - Wooden Crate and Reinforced Bar Materials: Discarded reinforcement bars, Wooden/ Fruit crate Skill/ Machine: Fabricating Dimensions: 500 mm X 500mm Cost components : Reinforcement bars - 2.0 kg 40.00 Rs. Vegetable crate - 1 nos. 5.00 Rs. Total cost 45.00 Rs.+15.00 Rs. labour charges = 60.00 Rs. (material + labour)+ other charges Cost of one crate and rebar window = Rs. 60.00 - 65.00* Wooden slats are obtained by dis-mantling the used vegetable crates. They are cut and shaved i needed size. Reinforcement bar are straightened and cut and bent as per the design. They are welded into required pattern. And then inserted into the wooden frame prepared from the wooden crate slates.


Roof Type one - Cement Bonded Particle Board Materials: MS box section Cement bonded particle board Country tile Truss is made-up of welded MS box section. On top of it cement bonded particle board is screwed. The joints between panels are fi lled with sealant for water proofi ng. On top of it country tile would be laid to provide heat insulation.


Roof Type Two - Glass bottle, Plastic Bottle, Fly Ash Brick Roof Materials: Glass bottle Plastic bottle Fly ash brick Mild steel reinforcement bar 1:2:4 Cement Concrete

Shuttering is erected with a coat of cement mortar. Then dry sand is laid over it to be able detach shuttering easily from the bottoms of filler materials. Glass bottles, flyash brick and waste filled plastic bottles are laid in the reinforcement grid on the shuttering. Bottles are secured with ties and grid reinforcement. Starting from the centre of the grid cement concrete is poured into. The concrete is compacted. A coat of IPS is laid over.


Roof Type Three - Corrugated Galvanized Iron Sheet Materials: Glass bottle Plastic bottle Fly ash brick Mild steel reinforcement bar 1:2:4 Cement Concrete Truss is made of welding steel tubes. Tin sheet is laid on the truss. It would be than covered with mud mortar and country tile would be laid over it.


Floor Type one - Fly Ash and Galvanized Ceramic Mosaic Tile Materials: Fly ash, Waste residue, Cement, Aggregate, River sand Skill / machine : Compressor machine Dimension : 250mm X 250mm Composition Fly ash - 234 gm 0.04 Re. - 6.83% Cement - 167 gm 0.50 Re. - 4.86% Aggregate - 1167 gm 0.33Re.- 33.97% River sand - 1667 gm 0.14Re.- 48.52% Dolomite - 200 gm 2.50 Rs. - 5.82% Broken tiles - 0.75 Re. Total weight - 3435 gm 4.26Rs.+ 0.25 Re. (labour) = 4.51 Rs. (material + labour) + transportation, energy, machinery and water charges. Cost of single tile is in the range of = Rs. 5.00 6.00* All the materials in given proportion are mixed into a homogenous mixture. Water is added to this mixture and before 30 minutes the mixture is poured into the mould to make tiles. Before pouring almost dry mixture in the mould pieced of glazed ceramic tiles are placed in desired pattern invertedly in the mould. The mould is placed in a press and the pressed tile is then cured for 28 days in the water basin.


Door Type Three - Interactive Door With Cycle Wheel Mechanics using wheel Junk

Doors have been one of the most interactive and dynamic element of the space. Made up of steel frame and recomposed metal parts as infill. The diverse parts of broken bicycles and used rotary blades of stone cutter etc have been creatively composed which not only is like a grill to door’s shutters but creates dynamic backdrop to the space with silhouette profiles and multiple sub patterns within the component assembly. The dynamism is further enhanced by actually moving wheels as well as sound chimes withinthe door. This also alerts other faculties of the child in addition to sight.


Roof Type Three - Filler Slab With Clay Bowls and Computer Keyboards Roof and ceiling has been experimented with number of materials. As filler slab it has an infill of sporadic glass bottle cluster to also bring in the glow of light. The other filler material chosen has been sundried clay bowls which are being produced by the neighbouring potters as business proposition. One more such filler has been the computer key boards which not only provide texture to ceiling but also makes it visually engaging as well as educative w ith alphabets on them for a child watching the ceiling lying on floor. Ceiling is further animated by the help of local women who skilfully rendered it with filigree in bright colours.


CONSTRUCTION DETAILS


Fibre Reinforced Plastic Door Detail


Wooden Crate Window


Wooden Crate Window

Louvered Window Steel Truss


Meditation Room

Filler Slab


Design Detail

Window with Twisted Metal Bar


Manav sadhna Activity Centre Rama Pir Tekra, Wadaj, Ahmedabad. Promoter: Manav Sadhna Trust (Jayesh Patel, Anar Patel, Viren Joshi) Project Cost: Rs. 38 Lakh Site area: 1245 sq.mts Total Built -up Area: 607 sq.mts.+ 488 sq.mts Plinth Area Design: Yatin Pandya (Footprints E.A.R.T.H.) Nirmit Jhaveri, Rajesh Moothan Architectural Assistance: Ulrike, Suchita Vyas, Riddhish Gajjar, Ruchita, Kunal, Iti, Harshita, Kanika, Naagraj, Tejal Construction: Dewang Safi, Nayan Patel, Keyr Modi Steel fabrication: Vipul Gajjar Landscaping: Mukund Padshala (Green Gold)


Aatmann ka parichaye Sujivan ka darpan Athva, Tere or mere vesh ka parivesh Vastu shilp se vastavta ka safar, Khub vastu tune or mane dekhi Janana chaha unke baare mein Lekin, Isne to svayam hi apna bayan diya! Kaha.. Jo maine suna, Koshish hai jo safal hai Naye jivan ki aur… Rang dala hai jivan, Samilit kiya hai sabko, Apna bana kar ashre diya Jisko mane apna ghar samajha….

Introduction to the insight Mirror to an ideal life Or, u may say Other costume to my body it seems. It’s a journey of architecture turning into realty We have seen many, though Wanted to understand it also, but It Recited its story itself Said.. What, I’ve listened An attempt already success Towards a new era…. Fills color into life assimilates and Shelters all as his own I thought it my home….


AHMEDABAD AND AROUND


JULY 2010

AUGUST 2010


SEPTEMBER 2010

OCTOBER 2010


NOVEMBER 2010

DECEMBER 2010


ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION INSTITUTE TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE SYMBIOSIS OF MAN, NATURE AND ARCHITECTURE


ABOUT ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION INSTITUTE CONTEXT AND ISSUES - Almost half of the world’s population (2.4 billion) lack access to basic sanitation. One sixth of the world (1.1 billion) have no access to safe and affordable water. - 80% of all disease in the developing world is due to a lack of access to safe drinking water, inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene. - In India, only 36% of the population has latrines. I - India annually loses 73 million working days due to sickness caused by unsafe water and lack of sanitation. - Only 15% of Indian primary schools have toilets, resulting in a high female drop-out rate VISION - The Environmental Sanitation Institute (ESI) envisions an India free from the practice of open defecation and the inhumane task of scavenging human waste by hand; ESI works towards a country where all inhabitants have their basic sanitary needs met, thus improving the quality of life for all. Mission To provide the rural and urban poor with access to basic sanitary facilities. - To improve rural and urban health through education, motivation and participation. - To uplift downtrodden people, especially sweepers and scavengers. - To create awareness and respect for the environment based on Gandhi an values.


IDEOLOGY AND STRATEGY - ESI is founded on ideologies that encompass the spiritual, mental and physical well-being of people and their environment. Based on Gandhian values, ESI focuses on environment and eradication of untouchability. Based in the Sabarmati Gandhi Ashram, ESI spawned from Harijan Sevak Sangh, an NGO inspired by Gandhiji’s life and work. Inspired by Gandhian values, the institute creates awareness about the environment and sanitation while advocating the eradication of scavenging (manual removal of human waste by order of caste). The institute encourages community participation and takes a demand-driven approach to providing sanitary facilities in order to ensure their appropriate use. The technologies designed and promoted by ESI are based on ecological sanitation, thus maintaining the environment while meeting basic human needs. APPROACH AND ACTIVITIES - ESI tackles the problems of sanitation with a holistic vision; sanitation awareness will lead to better health, improved education and a stronger economy of the whole country. 1) Orienting and training government and NGO officials on India’s Total Sanitation Campaign. 2) Providing orientation and training to students, teachers, masons, health workers, etc on sanitation issues. 3) Functioning as a nodal agency between the government and other NGOs in the construction of individual, household and school sanitation facilities, smokeless ovens and soakage pits. 4) Developing cost-effective and environmentally sustainable sanitation technologies and appropriate implementation strategies. 5) Creating Information, Education and Communication material on sanitation.


DESIGN PHILOSOPHY AND CONSIDERATIONS: The design results from addressing four primary considerations - the program, the physical context of the site, the ideology of design and the demonstration of environmental sustainability and ecological balance. Physical Context: The smaller triangular plot on the southeast is the only accessible area from the road and thus becomes the entry plaza, initializing the movement sequence into the institute. The existence of three trees in this plot is exploited by using them as visual guides in this process. The constriction caused by the junction of the rectangular and triangular plots of land demarcates the main movement route to the institute from the one, which leads to the residential and service areas. The garden on the north orders development along the institutional corridor, which forms the edge between the built and the un-built along the diagonal of the site from the entrance. Residential and service areas are accommodated in the southern half of the development with clear demarcation from the institutional areas. Higher massing at the south west of the site exploits view to the garden as well as shades the lower masses on the north. They also become the main visible feature from the bridge across the canal. KINESTHETICS: The design emphasizes the narrative aspect of spatial experience in which the resolution of the spaces in the institute actively engages the visitor in his explorations. This experiential dimension to architecture, of movement through a sequence of spaces in an episodic manner and the sense of discovery of gradually unfolding spaces, vistas and interconnected elements is epitomized. In this method of space making, the dialogue set up between the visitor and the built environment in the process of understanding the space through the decoding of visual, tactile and sensorial clues personalizes the experience by involving him in it. Thus, the choices presented in the process of moving through the ensemble become the main determinant of the way the space reveals itself to the visitor. GANDHIAN VALUES: The Gandhian philosophy of austerity, denouncement of ostentation and truth translate into the built environment as the expression of inherent aesthetic of the material and construction without applied decoration, simplicity of form and free flowing, transparent spaces. The solution, thus is a series of overlapping spaces with a diverse range of connectivity and relation to other adjacent spaces offering a choice to the student of his degree of participation. Gathering spaces for formal congregation as well as chance meeting and interaction spaces of different scales are carefully ordered where the built and unbuilt spaces diffuse into each other flexibly to adapt to various kinds of usage patterns. Courts, balconies, overlooking terraces, shaded verandas, covered corridors, colonnaded loggias, open decks, plinths and amphitheatres all enrich the space in terms of contrasting light and shade as well as animate the area with activity


ACTIVITIES ZONING

ACCESS AND CIRCULATION LAND

BUILT RESPONSE TO SITE OPTIMIZATION

CLIMATE

SITE CONTEXT


01. ENTRANCE PLAZA 02. DISPLAY PLATFORM 03. OPEN AIR STAGE 04. FOYER 05. ADMINISTRATION 06. AMPHITHEATER 07. CLASSROOMS 08. LIBRARY 09. DECK 10. MULTIPURPOSE HALL 11. KITCHEN 12. VIP GUEST HOUSE 13. DIRECTOR’S RESIDENCE 14. TOILETS

15. BUILDER’S YARD 16. SERVICE ROAD 17. SERVICE COURT 18. KITCHEN GARDEN 19. WATER HARVESTING POND 20. LAWNS 21. ROOT ZONE TREATMENT TROUGH 22. SOAK PIT 23. RAIN WATER HARVESTING TANK 24. BIO-GAS PLANT 25. ENTRANCE AND SECURITY


1. DORMITORY 2. TOILETS 3. DIRECTOR’S RESIDENCE 4. ADMINISTRATION MEZZANINE 5. LIBRARY MEZZANINE

5

1 2 4 2 1 3

N

FIRST FLOOR PLAN


DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS: ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABLITY

SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH BUILT FORM: The built form, epitomizing and demonstrating the understandings of environmental sustainability is a veritable showcase of an effort in maintaining the ecological balance and harmonizing with nature in the hot, dry climate of Gandhinagar. Orientation to regulate breeze and reduce solar gain are responses to the macro-climatic conditions of the site. Increased massing towards the south west exploits shaded areas to the north east by accommodating the activity areas, courts and streets along them. North facing terraces in the upper floors, decks and open to sky plinths provide multiple use probabilities. Fenestrations regulated to control convective heat loss and optimize day lighting are features integrated with the design. Design decisions are made with the priority of regulating the microclimate for comfort conditions. Brick cavity walls insulate the interiors from the high ambient atmospheric temperatures and incoming solar radiation. Subterranean built form along with shared adjacent walls prevents excessive heat gain from exposure to the sun. Massing is selectively controlled to provide mutual shade and maximize shadow, breaking up continuous surfaces and thereby reducing reflected glare. Overhangs determined by shadow-throw studies and sun angle analysis over the year control solar penetration and also help in reducing atmospheric glare in the interiors.


SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH LAND RESOURCE: In terms of managing available resources of land, the landscape design facilitates and fosters microclimate control. Local shading by trees are used to an advantage in situations with south facing walls. Wind turbulences and eddy spaces formed by both built form and vegetation assist dust control and are positively used as open air activity areas. Ground cover vegetation helps in the prevention of soil erosion and also aids surface glare control. Land management and landscape treatment in terms of cut and fill on the flat site for solar passive design like berming, evaporative cooling and sunk levels also create spatial and visual interest. Orchards and kitchen gardens are active and productive means of optimizing available resources like land in the setback margin, treated sullage for irrigation, mulched organic waste from the kitchen as manure etc. These features not only absorb ese effluents which would otherwise go waste and need management but also yield produce as a by-product of the landscape effort for no extra cost, participating in the sustainability of the system and actually adding value.


LAND MANAGEMENT SOIL MANAGEMENT THROUGH CUT AND FILL The soil excavated from the site for the subterranean area was piled to raise the ground level in the other areas.


LAND AS CULTIVABLE RESOURCE (HORTICULTURE) Reproductive resource exploited through creation of kitchen gardens and herbal / fruit plantation through seasonal organic farming. Plantation with resource value i.e. fruit bearing, herbal value and shade giving trees.


CLUSTERING TO INTEGRATE BUILT & UNBUILT

OPTIMIZATION THROUGH PLACEMENT

TERRACES USED AS ALTERNATE GROUND

Usable spaces arranged around courtyards generate activity pockets.

Diagonal placement of builtmass within site ensures sizable open spaces in all directions of the site.

Tiled terraces with inlaid games, built in seating, serving tables, planters, etc. render them active outdoor spaces substituting ground.

Open space as garden

Open space as chowk

Open space as courtyard


OPEN SPACES

Open space as terrace on upper floor

Open space as sheltered pavilion

Open space as amphitheatre

Open space as veranda


WATER MANAGEMENT: HARVESTING AND RECYCLING

Sustainable Water Management The combined water requirement of the institute, for drinking, sanitation and gardening purposes have been met by rain water harvesting, both from the roofs as well as from the open ground and garden. The clearer and unsullied water collected from the roof is stored in an underground tank and supplements the flushing water requirements of the toilets. A controlled amount of the surface runoff from the ground is stored in an open air tank which becomes a major feature in the landscape of the garden and also satisfies the gardening water requirement of the entire year. Ground water recharging from percolating wells are combined with sullage treatment by root-zone tanks to return water to the ecosystem in a naturalized and harmless way. Organic solid waste is used to make bio-gas which fuels the kitchen and is also managed through soak pits. Lavatories designed with minimized water-borne carriage system enhance performance of these techniques at the same time maintain high standards of sanitation. Water Management: Harvesting and Recycling Roof water Harvesting Closed Tanks Capacity – 1, 80,000 Litres Site water Harvesting Percolation Wells Capacity – 70,000 Litres x 4 Garden water harvesting in Open Pond Capacity – 7, 00,000 Litres


WATER HARVESTING

Surface Water Catchment (Open Pond) Water from all the garden areas flow into an open pond. This water is used for all the gardening requirements. It also aids in micro climate modulation and is a pleasing site element

Percolating Wells Open Pond Underground tanks

Rain water harvesting from rooftop (Closed Underground Cistern) An underground water cistern, designed integrally with the structure, ensures a cost effective solution to harvesting up to 5 lac litres a season and storing filtered rain water runoff from the rooftops.

Ground Water Recharging (Percolating Wells) Water as site run-off is channelized into four percolation wells 3 mts diametrically and 10 mts deep.


WASTE WATER RECYCLING Root Zone Treatment (Plant Bed) The plant Australis-Phragmatis is grown in a specially designed bed through which grey water is passed. After a cycle of 40 days totally clean water is discharged to be reused for toilet flushing, washing etc. (Capacity 5000 litres /day for 50 persons)


ENERGY MANAGEMENT: SOLAR PASSIVE RESPONSES


COOLING THROUGH MUTUAL SHADING Cascading built form favourably shades subsequent built-mass creating cooler interstitial zones.

VEGETATION/ WATER ELEMENTS Interspersed vegetative zones and water elements provide evaporative cooling.


SOLAR PASSIVE DESIGN RESPONSES

Subterranean Spaces / Volumes Passive earth cooling achieved through berming and creating subterranean usable spaces.

Form Facilitating Convective Cooling Vaulted spaces create optimal volumes for convective air currents and dissipation of heat.


ORIENTATION AND OVERHANGS Orientation and building profile based on prevailing wind directions and Sun Path.


SOLAR PASSIVE DESIGN RESPONSES: DOOR WINDOW

PERFORATED METAL SHEET (VENTILATION)

OPENABLE LOUVERS (AIR & SUN CONTROL)

FIXED GLASS (VIEW)


SOLAR PASSIVE CONSTRUCTION RESPONSES


INSULATED ROOF Thin Ferro-Cement shell roof insulated by layers of China Mosaic and Vermiculite.


ENERGY MANAGEMENT: SOLAR ACTIVE RESPONSES Sun Solar photovoltaic and heating panels along with humidifiers and fans are envisaged as low-energy, active means of controlling the microclimate to supplement the solar passive design.


PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS FOR ELECTRICITY

Photo voltaic Solar Panel for Electricity Photo voltaic Cells produce electricity to run 2 Horse Power solar water pump.

Solar Water Heater Solar power used to heat water for ablutionary requirements in winter.

Solar Cooker Nine mt dia. two set of horizontal and vertical solar parabolic panels are mounted to be able to produce energy to cook for hundred persons. Smaller dishes are also mounted for lesser quantity cooking and domestic gadgets.


ACCESSORIES & ALTERNATIVE SANITATION Toilets pan and accessories have been researched and specially developed to ensure minimum consumption of water for maximum efficiency of flushing. For example the ceramic toilet pans used at the environmental sanitation institute consumes only a tumbler full of water to flush. Thus, conserving water as well as making sanitation treatment simpler and economical in absence of high quantity water.


CRAFT & COMMUNICATION


CONSTITUENT SPACES


ADMINISTRATION

CLASSROOMS


LIBRARY

MULTI-PURPOSE HALL


DORMITORIES

GUEST HOUSE


KITCHEN

VIP RESIDENCE


DISPLAY PLATFORMS True scale installations of alternative technologies and sanitation options for rural areas are mounted near the entrance as permanent exhibition and in-situ reference.


PROMOTER: ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION INSTITUTE (Ishwarbhai Patel, Jayeshbhai Patel) PROJECT COST: RS. 2 crore with landscape and interiors SITE AREA: 7418 sq.mts TOTAL BUILT -UP AREA: 2400 sq.mts (ground floor- 1400 sq.mts, first floor-1000 sq.mt )

DESIGN TEAM PRINCIPAL ARCHITECT: Yatin Pandya ASSISTANCE: Dilip Karpoor, Raajesh Moothan, Young Soon Ko, Joseph, Verughese (administration) STRUCTURAL DESIGN: V.S.Shah SERVICES DESIGN: Pradeep Sheth (Sheth techno consultants) ROOT ZONE TREATMENT: Alka Dangash LANDSCAPING: Mukund Padshala (green gold) CONTRACTOR: Rohit Shah (R.K. Construction)


THE BALANCE OF PRIORITIES, FROM ENERGY TO ECOLOGICAL SUSTAINABILITY, ADMINISTRATIVE IDEOLOGY TO DESIGN PHILOSOPHY, ALL COME TOGETHER HARMONIOUSLY IN CREATING A HIGH QUALITY, LOW ENERGY, SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT WHICH REFLECTS THE IDEALS IT STANDS FOR WITHOUT COMPROMISING ON ITS INTERNATIONAL, CONTEMPORARY OUTLOOK AS A PREMIER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE.

Profile for Stuti Sareen

PRACTICAL TRAINING REPORT - FOOTPRINTS E.A.R.T.H  

PRACTICAL TRAINING REPORT - FOOTPRINTS E.A.R.T.H  

Advertisement